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The Roadmap / Blueprint of Reasons: A Required Component for Your Thesis / Claim / Position Statement

August 15, 2013

Here are some videos and links about a proper essay thesis and the roadmap/blueprint plan of reasons, sometimes called a summation of points or arguments in favor of the thesis. Please . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 03:09 PM and is filed under Composition.

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Beyond Acceptable: Writing Effective Academic Essay Titles

April 01, 2013


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Students,

One of the weakest things I frequently discover in your academic papers are the titles themselves. We should spend a little more time revising titles before we print the final drafts and submit them to our professors.

Some things you should never do include . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 05:40 PM and is filed under Composition.
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The Struggle with MLA-Formatting in MS-Word--Especially in Versions since 2003

October 09, 2012


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22 October 2012

Classes,

I am dedicating this entry to known in-class and out-of-class issues with MS Word 2007, the version of Word most of you . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 08:16 PM and is filed under Composition.

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Taking Your Chances in Shirley Jackson's "Lottery"

January 30, 2012


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Class,

In the comment box below,

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 11:59 PM and is filed under Literature.
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Proposals for ENG 122 Research-Informed Critical/Analytical Essays


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This entry posted by lhobbs at 11:15 AM and is filed under Composition.
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Writing the Interview Essay

October 15, 2009


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15 October 2009

Dear ENG 121 Students (Fall 2009),

Please consult the handouts and advice given to you in class about conducting an interview (and then writing an interview essay).

However, if some of you still . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 08:14 AM and is filed under Composition.
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ENG 121 - Midterm Exam

October 08, 2009


Caption: For our course, substitute "Law" with "Academic Writing"
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Fall 2009

8 October 2009

ENG 121 Students,

Today in class, I gave you a handout with strategies for preparing for the final exam. In addition....

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 09:39 AM and is filed under Composition.

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The Most Common Writing Issues in Your Essays

September 09, 2009


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9 September 2009

ENG 121 students,

I was a little taken aback today at the apparent disregard/misunderstanding of logic in today’s class meeting. For those of you who were absent from the peer-review, take . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 07:39 AM and is filed under Composition.
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Course Feedback: Your Thoughts about What You'll Take Away

April 22, 2009


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Dear Students,

I sincerely hope that you all got something positive or, at least, one useful piece of knowledge or skill that you can . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 10:59 AM and is filed under English Teaching.
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Defining 'Society' - A College Freshman's Understanding

November 06, 2008


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6 November 2008

ENG 121.14 Students,

Per the directions you were given in our class meeting today . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 11:56 PM and is filed under Etymology.
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Defining 'Justice' - A College Student's Perspective


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6 November 2008

ENG 121.16 Students,

Per the instructions you were given in today's class meeting . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 08:03 AM and is filed under Etymology.
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Defining Paul and Sandra Fierlinger's Film _A Room Nearby_

November 04, 2008


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4 November 2008

ENG 121 Students,

If you missed today's meeting, I hope it was because you were voting!

If you attended class, you know we screened (and discussed) Paul and Sandra Fierlinger's film A Room Nearby in light of the upcoming definition essay. Per the instructions given to you in class today . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 12:12 PM and is filed under Literature.
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Classifying The Classification Essay

October 21, 2008


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7 October 2008

ENG 121 Students:

Using the information given to you in your . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 09:09 PM and is filed under Composition.
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ENG 122 - Critical Essay Assignment Details for *Academic Writing II*

October 07, 2008


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7 October 2008

ENG 122 Students,

Sadly, about HALF of you felt it was unnecessary to actually do the assignment on Ibsen's A Doll's House as instructed. If you stil think that not completing the homework assignments are NOT affecting your participation score (See our syllabus), you are sorely mistaken.

If you missed today’s class, we began screening the film Everything is Illuminated. So that you won’t be lost in the next two screenings and class discussion, please be responsible and find the film in a video rental of your choice and watch it. After the in-class screening is done, I will put the film on reserve in the library.

In the comment box below . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 07:29 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Explaining the Expository Essay

October 06, 2008


Video Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNVoMGcQZ9Y

ENG 121 Students:

Using the information given to you in . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 10:12 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Essay Outlines and Proposals for ENG 121: *Academic Writing I*

September 30, 2008


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7 October 2008

ENG 121 Students,

See . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 10:34 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Why are ‘Examples’ Important as a Writing Strategy?

September 29, 2008


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“Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach” ~ Albert Einstein

Students and Friends,

Opinions are great but provided examples make a stronger case. Many learned men and women have had much to say on the subject of examples as a method of teaching. But, do they serve a useful purpose anywhere else?

This is the question I put to my writing students when trying to get them to see the fundamentals of a good argument or position paper. With or without research data, the example is the cornerstone of good reasoning . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 01:38 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Scholarly Articles: What Are They & How Are They Found?

September 09, 2008


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Students,

Even after our lengthy in-class discussions, a few of you have indicated a confusion on what scholarly articles are.

You are in luck. The SLU library has online imbedded videos that discuss . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 07:23 AM and is filed under Composition.

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Synthesis Essays: What Are They and How Are They Written?

September 08, 2008





Source of Images: http://www.dlsweb.rmit.edu.au/lsu/content/4_WritingSkills/writing_tuts/synthesising_LL/model.html

8 September 2008

Students,

Per your upcoming assignment options, some of you are still asking, "What is a Synthesis Paper?"

According to Washington State's Evergreen State College,

Synthesis means putting ideas from many sources together in one essay or presentation. After reading several books, watching movies and participating in a variety of class activities, your task is to . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 12:06 PM and is filed under Composition.

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Student Guidelines for Formal, In-Class, Oral Presentations

August 29, 2008


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29 August 2008

Dear ENG 121 Students,

Confused on what to do for the upcoming "Formal Oral Presentation" that each of you will need to do for ENG 121? My guidelines, borrowed freely from the University of Hawai’I at Manoa's Dr. Leon James's “Instructions for Oral Presentations," are below. Use my modified guidelines however (thanks Dr. James!) for our course. The first . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 09:56 PM and is filed under DIY Articles - "How to...".

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Composition - Bizarre English Metaphors AND Similes

June 13, 2008

Hi Readers,

Earlier, I did a review on a lesson I did this Spring semester with writing students on similes and metaphors HERE. I thought my students did fairly well.

What I’ve reprinted below (including the intro paragraph) came into my mail today: these are NOT from my students (can also be found HERE--thanks, Femmebot). Note that some of these are really analogies. (NOTE: Before you leave a comment saying that some of these are similes...of course!...please read the title of the post...I can't help it that some places on the Web have shortened their reference to this page as a "metaphors-only" page).

I found some of these similes and metaphors hilarious though and, as some commenters have pointed out, covertly ingenious is some cases. Anyway, I thought some of you might enjoy seeing examples of--what I assume to be--unintentionally silly / mixed metaphors. My colleague suggested that it would be nice if writing students would at least indulge in this much creativity from time to time!

*Every year, English teachers from across the USA can submit their
collections of actual analogies, similies, and metaphors found in high school
essays. These excerpts are published each year to the amusement of
teachers across the country. Here are last year's winners . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 11:29 AM and is filed under Composition.
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New to Teaching Writing? Eleven Things You Should Know

January 18, 2008


Image Source: http://www.soe.umich.edu/es/images/chalkboard.jpg

Hi Readers,

Allyson of Learning to Teach Tech-Comm, a freelance writer and graduate student teacher, posted a list of eleven things that took me many semesters to learn by trial and error. For me, the advice is quite useful. What tips for composition teachers would you add to this list?

Eleven Things You Could Start Doing Today for the Benefit of Your Students' Writing

A few days ago, someone forwarded and email called "Eleven Things You Could Start Doing Today for the Benefit of Your Students' Writing" to the WPA listserv. I wanted to comment on it, but this is the first time I've had the chance because of the conference, as well as just keeping up in general. I'm not going to reproduce the e-mail comments under each item, but instead reproduce the items with my own thoughts.

1. Give writing assignments in written form, not just word of mouth

This one really is important. I pretty much figured that out within a week of class. Sometimes, though, telling them in . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 09:40 AM and is filed under Composition.

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Rumors of *Two-Spaces-After-a-Period*'s Death Are Highly Exaggerated

November 05, 2007


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Students and Friends,

There is a famous quotation (I forget the source, so I paraphrase) that suggests if someone hypothetically put a chimpanzee in front of a typewriter and allowed it to type randomly for an unspecified amount of time, eventually the chimp's efforts would produce a recognizable word. My question is--if you let a chimp type long enough, would it put two spaces after a full-stop period?

Folks, I learned to type on an actual manual typewriter in the 1980s! I can show you a dozen style guides that maintain the two-space after a full-stop rule. Some newer guides, such as MLA's sixth edition, claim it is now acceptable to use one OR two spaces, as long as the typist is consistent.

To me, this newfangled, one-space-only-after-full-stops thingy just looks way too "Internety," if I may use that word, on unpublished, yet printed, hardcopies of typed manuscripts. It's the same with the extra space between paragraphs and no paragraph indentions (what we used to call the business letter format). Should we or shouldn't we make distinctions between the two types of writing--unpublished, typed and printed hardcopy manuscripts and "published" online text seen on a monitor's screen?

Although many out there have come up with good reasons to try and extinguish the old and established two-space rule from the days of typewriting, I've found that . . .


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This entry posted by lhobbs at 08:42 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Using the Articles 'A' or 'An' Before the Words 'Historic' or 'Historical'

November 03, 2007

The rule seems simple enough doesn't it? Except for words such as "heir," "hour," "honor," or "herb" the article "a," (not "an") precedes a word beginning with the letter "h." That's how I was taught, yet the either archaic or exceptional "an" article still crops up here and there, even in more "respectable" venues such as NPR, one of the supposed final bastions of clear, crisp, and articulately spoken Standard American English. Is public media's incorporation of the, for example, commonly-heard British and Canadian usage of "an" before "historic" mere pretentiousness on their part or some refusal to use Standard American English "rules" on the air? To many, this bold grammatical choice is unoffensive, but how are we to--as teachers--properly explain this inconsistency to EL learners and even native-speakers in grammar and writing bridge courses? Below is an excerpt from James Dvorkin's reply to a recent letter by Charles Everest about NPR's on-air grammatical faux-pas. (Please note Everest's own reply to this post below). Dvorkin replies . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 12:55 PM and is filed under Etymology.
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The "SUPER" Final Draft - Writing is a Process!

April 02, 2007


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2 April 2007

Students,

Today, in class . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 02:03 PM and is filed under Composition.

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Composition - Lead Ins that Hook Your Audience

October 17, 2006


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Students,

Before you begin to post your homework assignments (see instructions below) it might behoove you to get some advice from writers other than Ballenger. For example, read the excerpt here on lead-ins by Judy Hilliard from her text, "Completing the Essay."
[NOTE: the entire article can be found on the San Jose State University website HERE]

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 09:08 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Research Proposals

September 26, 2006


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Research Writing Students,

Your Research Proposals will be due on September 28th. Please see the previous PowerPoint lectures and class e-mails (both on the P:drive) for the detailed instructions . . .


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This entry posted by lhobbs at 10:39 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Narrowing Things Down & Your First Four Sources

September 14, 2006


Image Source: http://www.saskschools.ca/curr_content/teachlib/images/smokeweb.jpg

Students,

Enter your information about your most recently narrowed topic and MLA cited sources as indicated by these instructions in the comment box. Later, we'll use this posted information to peer-review and provide feedback for one another. Remember, this is a public space, so do your best and be mindful of your language mechanics. Who knows, maybe someone out there in cyberspace will give you some feedback to your topics as well (it's happened before).

Part 1: REVISE

Sometime this weekend, look at your topic and how it was refined by your classmates. Decide if you like it or not. If not, use the same exercise and narrow it down (according to the rules of Ballenger, page 54) to some way that you DO like. Write it down.

Part 2: RESEARCH

Continue the process of exploratory research. Go to the library or work from home, but sometime before our next meeting, and find . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 01:41 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Research Writing - Asking Questions About Potential Topics

September 07, 2006


Image Source: http://www.eprri.org/images/master/research_questions.gif


Today, in research writing, we tried an exercise that practiced our abilities to generate ideas about potential research topics by asking questions.

First, the students arranged their desks into a large circle. Each student was assigned one of the following topics. (They were completely random) . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 04:59 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Is Knowing How to Learn Enough? Debating Life's Necessities

April 19, 2006

Der Danse Macabre IV - © 2006 Lee Hobbs
Photograph: 'Der Danzig Danse Macabre IV' © 2006 Lee Hobbs

“They know enough who know how to learn.” ~ Henry Adams (1838-1918)

Adams seems to have it all sorted out. How about you? Can you concur with this bit of pragmatic philosophy or is there more to know than this?

I originally gave my students a choice between . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 12:25 PM and is filed under Critical Theory.
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Rediscovering the Comparison Paper: Intolerance in Two Very Different Films

April 18, 2006


Source: http://www.sonoma.edu/users/s/steiner/img/marinij_3.jpg

The film Process B-7185 by Bernard Offen and the academy award winning Hollywood production Crash elicited so many responses (see HERE for Process and HERE for Crash) that I felt it deserved another devoted blog entry. This difference about this entry, however, is how similar thematic developments in both (one was a historical auto-biography, the other a work of fiction) diverged and brought understanding to sensitive issues such as racism, intolerance, hate and hate-crimes (as opposed to war-crimes, for example). Some of my students did a wonderful job comparison writing exercises involving subject matter from both films . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 10:10 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Quotations as Writing Prompts that State a Position: Agreeing with Gandhi

April 17, 2006

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948)

No, it's not a recently discovered verse from the Gospel of Judas, it's a 20th century adage. But, insightful nonetheless. It reminds me of another quotation by Maya Angelou which reads, "If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude. Don't complain." In many ways, this is a philosophy not of victimization but one of personal responsibility. That is, responsibility not only for yourself but for your species, your planet, your world.

What does this have to do with writing and the learning institution? That's excactly what I want you to figure out . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 12:36 AM and is filed under Composition.
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Making Choices: The Road Theme Revisited

April 16, 2006

If you follow current events in pop-culture, you can see choices all around us. Katie Couric has made her choice to leave one successful job--her morning show--to try on another as chief anchor for CBS. In the same regard, Meredith Vieira chose to leave her successful television job--The View--to replace Katie's post on the morning show. Some choices our parents or guardians made for us, like whether we would celebrate Passover (if your family is of one religious tradition) or Palm Sunday (if your family is of another). Other choices are cost dependent and, once you begin to earn your own money, you have the financial freedom to buy, say, a vintage Kenny Rogers LP or a collector's edition Red Hot Chilli Peppers CD. Choices are all around us and they determine our every move. Recently, with the newly released translation of the Gospel of Judas, people have begun to revisit a very old agument that wonders whether the infamous "Judas"--the betraying character of the Christian religious tradition--actually had a choice, perhaps even asked, in doing what he did (the free will theory) or whether or not he was predestined--like a robot--to do what he did (the divine will theory) . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 07:39 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Katrina and Popular Film: New Ways to Read Into the Horrific Aftermath

April 11, 2006

The independent film about Hurricane Katrina, by filmmaker Creighton Hobbs, got such an overwhelming amout of remarks (read them at THIS ENTRY) I came to the conclusion that some of the more lengthy (and thought out) ones deserved a blog entry of their own. What makes this approach different is how some of my students compared not only the film but the event itself to ideas expressed in the film Crash, Process B-7185, and others. . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 10:05 AM and is filed under Composition.
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When Students Revolt: Reacting to Anarchy & _Generation '89_

March 22, 2006

Today I screened the first part of a documentary film called Pokołenie '89 by director Maria Zmarz-Koczanowicz. This comprehensive exposé provided a series of concise vignettes about the Independent Student Union [in Polish, "NZS"] participants who, in the late '80s, actively opposed the Communist government in Warszawa, Poland. Says the Visegrad Documentary Library:

The portrait of the first generation of Poles who reached adulthood after 1989, the turning point for the political transformation in Poland. The protagonists are middle-class people from Warsaw.

I will show the conclusion in the following class meeting. Granted, this material is hardcore and radically different from anything I've shown thus far. For example, the production is subtitled. So, for several at least, this is the first opportunity some of the students have had to literally "read" a film as a text. My decision to immerse them . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 07:31 PM and is filed under Film.
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Collisions over Social Issues in the Film "Crash"

March 20, 2006

Dear Convention-Defying Instructors,

When hurtful stereotypes and ignorant prejudices collide, a major accident is bound to ensue. Mao once said, "without destruction there can be no construction." I interpret this to mean that in order to construct (or re-construct), a positive deconstruction is sometimes necessary first . Crash is layered enough to do that and much more. If you have a class of top-level English students that seem open to receiving pop-cultural topics for writing and discussion subject-matter, you might have some success with this piece.

The film itself is a full two hours long and it took two complete class periods to show this film in its entirety to my class. Should you decide to screen this film, your students should be forewarned: It's certainly violent, graphic and has something to offend almost everyone. But, at the same time, some really important social issues are first toyed with and then brought to the surface. The narrative results in an amazing chain-reaction of hatred, prejudice and bigotry. Does hate fuel the uninformed and misguided opinions or do uninformed and misguided opinions inform the hate? In the third class period, I conducted a . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 08:11 PM and is filed under Critical Theory.
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Writing Students and the Holocaust: Reviewing "Process B-7815"

March 02, 2006


Source: http://www.zchor.org/auschwitz/picskomski/KOMSKI20.JPG

Scholars,

As several of you might know, I lived as an expatriate for many years overseas, primarily in post-Communist Europe, teaching, doing research and operating new businesses after the Berlin Wall came down in East Germany.

I made many good friends there including Mr. Bernard Offen - a survivor of the Holocaust - who has dedicated much of his life to giving, sharing, educating and promoting peace. I had the opportunity to learn a lot from Bernard and . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 01:10 AM and is filed under Film.
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Defining Our Own Terms: Teaching is a Metaphor, Learning is Like a Simile

February 27, 2006

English Students,

We’ve discussed previously the concepts of metaphor and simile. Both compare different ideas and draw connections, thus offering a new perspective or interpretive definition. But, what’s the difference between them?

Here's some help:

Simile - A figure of speech in which two essentially unlike things are compared, often in a phrase introduced by like or as, as in “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get" - Forrest Gump (or) "My love is like a red, red rose" — Robert Burns
Metaphor – The metaphor is similar to the simile, but doesn't say that one thing is like another thing. A metaphor says one thing IS another thing! For example, “Life is a process of becoming . . ." - Anaïs Nin (or) "No man is an island" —John Donne

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 01:27 PM and is filed under Literature.
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Searching for Process in the Midst of Catastrophe: Case-in-Point - Hurricane Katrina

February 24, 2006

Katrina. A name many will likely never forget, no matter how much they'd like to.

The damage she caused was absolutely devastating, her aftereffects heartbreaking and the embarrassing bureaucratic response to her a national tragedy. These points are not the subject for this post. Instead, I ask you to consider the subject of "process" on the subject of this catastrophe.

On the surface, process is only a word, like procedure, that we use everyday in a rather benign way. In theoretical terms, it is nothing more than a signifier that signifies "an action, or a series of actions or events, progress [or] course" (OED). The process of getting from here to there, from this state of affairs to that. As a verb, we "process" our feelings about things and even process our food. As writers, can we . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 12:13 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Which Process? Understanding the Purpose of Procedure

February 22, 2006

“Life is a process of becoming, a combination of states we have to go through. Where people fail is that they wish to elect a state and remain in it. This is a kind of death.” ~ Anaïs Nin

Comrades,

Lots of people have lots of different opinions on what process is and means. For some, this notion is a philosophical key to life and for others a big wasted of time. Nin's notion seems to contrast another famous persona's concept of life and the game of process. Television's Oprah Winfrey once said . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 12:03 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Organizational Procedures: How Do You Prepare for a Writing Class?

February 20, 2006

"The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure , the process is its own reward." ~ Amelia Earhart

Prepping for courses and class assignments can be daunting for even the most experienced teacher or student. Besides the matter of preparedness, the other issue is time! How much of it are you willing to contribute so that you'll get everything you want and expect from the content? This juggling act of time spent in preparing and maintaining one's own sanity is one that many of us deal with on a daily basis.

So, what is your organizational procedure for class preparation? Do you have a failsafe M.O. (method of operation) or would you say there is a method to your madness? University websites, such as the St. Louis University of Law, often have . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 10:59 AM and is filed under Composition.
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The Standard Deviants: Sesame Street for College Students?

February 13, 2006

"The Stone Age was marked by man's clever use of crude tools; the information age, to date, has been marked by man's crude use of clever tools." ~ Source Unknown

I've been using the instructional videos from this production company, the Standard Deviants, for some time now. They also have a series on grammar and punctuation in a similar format but it's the one on writing for college that I generally try to incorporate somewhere in my writing courses near the beginning of the semester. The overall success of this series has . . .

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Using Strange Depictions as both a Discussion and Writing Prompt

February 07, 2006

 'Der Danzig Danse Macabre I' © 2006 Lee Hobbs
Photograph: 'Der Danzig Danse Macabre I' © 2006 Lee Hobbs

"Cast a cold eye / On life, on death. / Horseman; pass by!" ~ W. B. Yeats Under Ben Bulben

Caption: A grim church ornament gives a grisly grin over onlookers in a Danzig cathedral (2002) . . .


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This entry posted by lhobbs at 10:22 PM and is filed under Photography.
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Utilizing The Power of Photography in Writing-Intensive English Courses

February 01, 2006

Devil's Head Chimney Rock, North Carolina
Photograph: 'Rock Devil's Head' © 2006 Lee Hobbs

"I like being near the top of a mountain. One can't get lost here." ~ Wislawa Szymborska

Caption: A side of the Chimney Rock mountain - which resembles a face - looks gleefully over the valleys of North Carolina . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 11:50 PM and is filed under Photography.
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Suggested Instructional Video for Teaching English Essay Writing

January 30, 2006

For Monday's English composition class, I used this educational video as part of my daily lesson plan:

English Composition: Writing for an Audience. Program 2. "Finding Something To Say." Nar. Peter Berkow. Prod. Peter Berkow and Anita Berkow. Annenberg/CPB, Annenberg Foundation-Corporation for Public Broadcasting. PBS. 30 minutes. 2000.

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 02:29 AM and is filed under Film.
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Online Teaching Resources For: Learning to Write!

January 29, 2006

Are You Teaching Academic Writing To English Students?

I'm always open for new ideas in this area. Recently, I've come across some really great resources to recommend to students who have online access. The topic for these resources are learning to write effectively and all are in the English language . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 03:32 PM and is filed under Electronic & Online Materials.
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Using Poetry as an In-Class Writing Prompt: Frost Part II

January 27, 2006

Contemplating Robert Frost's "Road Not Taken"

I like to use poetry in my English language writing courses as both writing-prompts, discussion topics and lead-ins to other assignments. In my experience with Western students, it seems that today the majority of them enjoy and have full access to all forms of popular music, much of which - hip-hop for example - is lyric intensive . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 11:25 AM and is filed under Literature.
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Recommended Resource for Teaching English Language Composition

January 23, 2006

For Friday's English composition class, I used the following production as part of the lesson:

English Composition: Writing for an Audience. Program 1. "School Writing / Real World." Nar. Peter Berkow. Prod. Peter Berkow and Anita Berkow. Annenberg/CPB, Annenberg Foundation-Corporation for Public Broadcasting. PBS. 30 minutes. 2000.

I found that . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 04:01 PM and is filed under Film.
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Poems In The English Writing Classroom: Take Frost, For Example

January 17, 2006

Playing With Robert Frost's "Fire & Ice"


What are your experiences using poetry in the writing classroom? Do you prefer the easier-to-comprehend-type model for poems so that more time can be spent on the actual craft of response-writing, for instance, or do you like the headier examples that will probably take an entire class period of discussion before students "get it" enough to even have an academic reaction?

Recently, I asked the students in my English language class . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 01:28 PM and is filed under Literature.
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Censorship in the English Classroom

January 15, 2006

"Every burned book enlightens the world." ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Bonfires,” according to Ruth McClain of OCTELA, “were a very efficient form of censorship in an age when books were handwritten and existed in few copies . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 03:20 PM and is filed under Industry Issues.
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Ways to use Quotations in your English Classes: Cather, et al.

January 14, 2006

Gulf Shores after Hurricane Ivan 2004
Photograph: 'Gulf Shores after Hurricane Ivan' © 2006 Lee Hobbs

"There are some things you learn best in calm, and some in storm." ~ Willa Silbert Cather

Caption: After the mighty winds of Hurricane Ivan, the once happy resort at Gulf State Park sits gutted and utterly defeated on the coastal shores of southern Alabama (2004) . . .


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This entry posted by lhobbs at 06:45 PM and is filed under Composition.
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Teaching English Grammar? Some Reader Recommendations

December 20, 2005

"Grammar, which knows how to control even kings." ~Moliere

Looking for really USEFUL grammar textbook for your ESL lessons?

Dear English Language Teacher-Resource Shoppers, look no further . . .

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 08:10 PM and is filed under Textbooks.
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A Dystopian Future for The English Language?

November 29, 2005

Alien ESL Teacher3.jpg

"He who controls the present, controls the past. He who controls the past, controls the future." ~ George Orwell

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 03:49 AM and is filed under ESL.
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When Students Evaluate their English Instructor

November 16, 2005

ESL Student Evaluating ESL Teacher.jpg

"There are four ways, and only four ways, in which we have contact with the world. We are evaluated and classified by these four contacts: what we do, how we look, what we say, and how we say it." ~ Dale Carnegie

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 01:13 AM and is filed under Literature.
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Encouraging English Course Students to Talk

November 14, 2005

ESL Student writing name.gif

"Forgive your enemies, but never forget their names" ~ John F. Kennedy

Ever wonder what to do on the first day of class? Nervous about remembering new students' names? Well, the first day of class is the perfect opportunity to satisfy both of these apprehensions.

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 04:20 AM and is filed under Literature.

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English Teaching Classroom Observations

November 09, 2005

ESL Class Observation.jpg

"This inescapable duty to observe oneself: if someone else is observing me, naturally I have to observe myself too; if none observe me, I have to observe myself all the closer." ~ Franz Kafka

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 03:33 PM and is filed under Industry Issues.
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Plagiarism and English Teaching Part II

November 08, 2005

Plagiarized ESL Paper.jpg

"To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism, to steal ideas from many is research." ~ Anonymous (of course)

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 06:02 PM and is filed under Literature.
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Evaluating Student Work in English Courses

November 07, 2005

Graded Paper.jpg

"True genius resides in the capacity for evaluation of uncertain, hazardous, and conflicting information." ~ Sir Winston Churchill

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 03:34 PM and is filed under Literature.
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PowerPoint Presentations in English Courses

November 06, 2005

PowerPoint in the ESL Classroom.jpg

"Professors known as outstanding lecturers do two things; they use a simple plan and many examples." ~ W. McKeachie

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 02:39 AM and is filed under Industry Issues.
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Plagiarism and English Teaching Part I

November 05, 2005

Anti Plagiarism Sign.jpg

"The more laws & order are made prominent, the more thieves & robbers there will be." - Lao Tzu

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This entry posted by lhobbs at 01:38 AM and is filed under Industry Issues.
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Who is Lee Hobbs?

September 01, 2005

Lee Hobbs, a North American native-speaker (and partial descendant of Native-Americans and wily Welshmen), renowned global citizen (and infamous universal denizen) spends much of his existence "searching for sanity beyond the self-dynamic" After earning his bachelor of arts (in fine art) in 1993, he spent six of his thinner years trekking across the planet, experimenting with entrepreneurial endeavors, and working in the emerging ESL field of Post-Communist Europe. During that time . . .

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This entry posted by msimmons at 04:22 PM and is filed under Tutoring.
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