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January 13, 2015

Learning to Fly with Sun-Mi Hwang's Wishful Hen

Image Source: http://orig08.deviantart.net/0c4f/f/2013/281/d/5/belle___the_flying_hen_by_bcphotome-d6poref.png

The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly (2000). Penguin, 2003. ISBN-10: 0143123203 ISBN-13: 978-0143123200. South Korean. Novella.

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 13, 2015 02:02 PM

Readers' Comments:

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
15 April 2015


“The most wonderful day since she was shut in in the coop had dawned. The scent of the acacias filled the air” (The Hen Who Dreamt She Could Fly, Chapter 2: Flying the Coop, page 16, par. 3, Sun-Mi Hwang).
Question: How is Sprout’s freedom bittersweet, and what could it symbolize for her as a character?


Answer:
In Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamt She Could Fly the main character, Sprout is only able to obtain freedom from the coop because she is past her “egg-laying” prime and getting weaker and “sickly” by the day (15). The farmer and his wife see this change in Sprout and decide to dispose of her. The farmer rounds up all of the old, sick, and weak hens and throws them into the “death pit” where they slowly fade and die (Hwang 18-19). However, Sprout survives. Much like her name, Sport had risen from death in life in order to start her new beginning outside the coop: she is finally free.

Posted by: Emily Finck at April 13, 2015 08:51 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet
15 April 2015

“She had no desire to lay another egg. Her heart emptied of feeling every time the farmer’s wife took her eggs.” (Chapter 1: I Refuse to Lay another Egg, page 6, par. 6, Chi-Young Kim translation)

Question: Why does Sprout dislike laying eggs? What could this signify about her and the world that she finds herself in?
Answer: Sprout dislikes laying eggs because they are taken away each time. The eggs that she lays may be hers in a literal sense, but they are not hers to raise or to take care of. Sitting in her coop, Sprout notes, “The coop was tilted forward so the eggs would roll to the other side of the barrier, separating them from their mothers,” (Hwang 6). This shows that Sprout has no control over what happens to her eggs from the time they leave her body. Sprout’s attitude toward the act of the farmer and his wife taking her eggs show that she is a caring animal who dreams of being a good mother, but is unable to because the world around her – the farm – does not allow this type of life for her.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at April 14, 2015 07:09 PM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
15 April 2015

Question: Why is the hen so enamored with her name in Chapter 1?

Answer: The hen calls herself Sprout because “it was the best name in the world” (7) and it symbolizes new life; she sees sprouts turning into leaves and watches their life cycle – from hanging on trees and embracing the wind and sun to falling on the ground, rotting and becoming mulch that helps new flowers bloom. She doesn’t see herself as an actual Sprout – although it could be seen as a bit of foreshadowing – but it makes her feel good about herself and gives her hope that she’ll make something of her life.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at April 14, 2015 08:40 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
15 April 2015

Question (chapter 4 "The Egg in the Briar Patch"): Does Sprout find what she was looking for in the briar patch?

Answer: When Sprout goes into the briar patch, she is looking for a place that she can hatch an egg: "It was a lovely spot for a nest, surrounded by a thick tumble of ferns. But something was there" (Hwang 42). Sprout not only finds a nest already made, but an egg as well. She cannot believe her luck, so seeing as there is no mother tending to the egg, Sprout takes responsibility for it.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at April 15, 2015 12:24 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
15 April 2015

“Sobs filled her throat; her entire body stiffened” (Hwang 10).

Question:
Why was Sprout so upset in this scene?

Answer:
She was upset because the egg that she produced was ugly and came out without a shell. When the farmer picked up the egg it broke open, and he threw it on the ground in front of Sprout, “Sprout squeezed her eyes shut. The egg broke without a sound. The old dog lumbered over to lick it up. Tears flowed freely from Sprout’s eyes for the first time in her life” (Hwang 10).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at April 15, 2015 08:18 AM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
14 April 2015

Question: Why does Straggler make some much fuss at nighttime and what is his advice to Sprout? Why do you Straggler is giving Sprout this advice?
Answer: Straggler wants to help Sprout and her chick survive the weasel, so late at night he makes multiple noises and dances in order to scare away the weasel. Often he did not sleep so he could make noise to keep the weasel away from Sprout. Straggler puts an emphasis on his advice, “”When the egg hatches, leave this place. And go to the reservoir, not the yard, okay” (Hwang 54). Straggler does not explain himself much, but he repeats his instructions several times—making the advice seem vital. Potentially, there might be a danger waiting in the yard, a danger that possibly killed the white duck who was his mate.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at April 15, 2015 08:56 AM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
15 April 2015

Chapter 4: “The Egg in the Briar Patch”

What does Sprout value the most in her life? How does this value drive her throughout the novel?

Throughout the first chapters of the novel, Sprout wanted to leave the coop for a variety of reasons: she wanted to experience the outside world, she wanted to be able to flap her wings, and she wanted to be able to give birth to a chick, just has she saw the field hen doing. When Sprout finally was able to leave the coop, reality was not has fantastic as it seemed, though it was in a way better than confinement. The other animals on the farm were discriminative, and wanted nothing to with the hen that did not abide to the rules. When the hen asked the dog, “What if I don’t like the rules?” the dog responded back that she was ridiculous and “Nobody wants you” (39). This response back put Sprout into a state of depression when she thought of the fact, her life was insignificant to everyone around her; not being able to have eggs. The only ally left and found a mate, leaving her to wonder why, “If I can’t lay an egg, what’s the point of my life" (40). Her values change when she is finally able to experience the life around her. Rather than valuing the outside and freedom for herself, Sprout wishes to have a baby to fulfill her life.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at April 15, 2015 09:24 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
15 April 2015

“This hen escaped from the Hole of Death! No other hen has come out of there alive. The weasel had his eye on her, but she escaped. She’s brave!” (Hwang 26-27)

Question for pages 23-28, chapter 3
What did Straggler mean when he said Sprout was brave? What does that show about both of their characters?

Answer:
What Straggler says Sprout is brave, he means that she is unlike any of the other animals because she dares to dream of getting a better life than the one she had. Sprout has a sense of her self-worth, thus why she named herself. Sprout is also brave to want to live in the yard instead of being cooped up on the chicken coop as an egg-laying slave. This interaction shows how Straggler values the heroism of other outcasts. Both he and Sprout are unwanted by the other animals, but he feels as though he and Sprout deserve better than the other animals. As Straggler says, “She stood up to the weasel! Could any of you do that? You would have met your end as you tried to waddle away (Hwang 27).” What he means here is that no other hen or duck could stand up to the weasel and was weaker than the weasel and Sprout. During this argument with the other animals, Sprout internally expresses her awe at Straggler’s confidence, which itself is a form of bravery. Based on this both Sprout and Straggler value the other’s bravery to speak up and will to live.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 15, 2015 09:31 AM

Dalton Hart, Marcus Chisholm, and Jahiedy Vinas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet
15 April 2015

Chapter 1 Summary: I Refuse to Lay another Egg

In chapter 1 of The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, three characters are introduced into the novel: Sprout, the Farmer, and his wife. Sprout is the novel’s protagonist while the Farmer is presented as the villain in the novel and his wife can be considered an ally to the Farmer. The first chapter is told from a third person limited omniscient perspective as the inner feelings and thoughts of only Sprout are relayed to the reader. The first chapter takes place on the farm where Sprout is located, and more particularly in the henhouse where Sprout is unable to leave, although she is able to see the outside because of a crack in the door. The main conflict in chapter 1 comes in the form of Sprout versus the Farmer. Sprout wishes to take control of her own possession, her egg, as opposed to simply letting the Farmer take it out of her control. Sprout has little hope that she will be able to do such a thing because she cannot control when she lays an egg. The major theme presented in the first chapter is the idea that Sprout is unable to achieve what she truly wants which is to keep her egg as opposed to the Farmer taking it from her. Sprout, having an epiphany at the end of the chapter, ultimately decides that she will take control by trying not to lay another egg, “Tears flowed freely from Sprout’s eyes for the first time in her life. I refuse to lay another egg! Ever!” (Hwang 10).

Posted by: Dalton Hart (group Summary) at April 15, 2015 10:06 AM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet
17 April 2015

“She was no longer frightened by the weasel’s stare. As the weasel was about to turn away, sprout sprinted toward him like a moth darting toward a flame.” (Chapter 8: Joining the Brace, page 92, par. 2, Chi-Young Kim translation)

Question: At the beginning of the novel, Sprout seemed to be a hen lacking confidence, but by the time she fights with the weasel, this is not the case. What has caused the changed in Sprout’s confidence?

Answer: Sprout begins to grow confidence within herself because she has realized that the first step in her plan in completed and it is up to her now to fulfill her dream of seeing an egg that she laid become a real Hen. The first problem Sprout came across was how to actually lay an egg and not have it stolen, but after getting through this problem, Sprout has realized that her dream is coming true, giving her confidence to thwart off the weasel. After defeating the weasel, Sprout notices that Greentop has begun to fly, giving her a great sense of elation. Hwang writes, “Greentop spread his wings and embraced her. Sprout’s throat closed up in gratitude. She set her beak firmly to hold back tears, but that day it was impossible,” (Hwang 93). The scene with the weasel shows that Sprout has become fully confident in herself and her child because her dream is finally coming to fruition and she feels that anything can be achieved from this point on.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at April 15, 2015 11:30 AM

Lorie Jewell, Shaina McSweeney, Dierdre Rowan
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
15 April 2015

Question: Summarize Chapter 2 “Flying the Coop,” to include character descriptions, point of view, setting, conflicts, theme, symbolism, tone and any epiphanies.

Answer: Chapter 2 of The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly is told in third person narrative; protagonist Sprout, a round character, and the flat characters of the farmer and his wife are joined here by the mallard, a round character who serves as a mentor/friend/fairy godmother, and the weasel, a flat (for now) character who serves as the story’s antagonist/villain. There are several conflicts at play in this chapter, beginning with freedom versus enslavement and dreams versus reality – Sprout fantasizes about getting out of the coop and wandering free in the yard, where she will be able to hatch an egg and raise her chick. When she is freed from the coop, it doesn’t play out the way she hoped; it only happens because she is so sickly and skinny, the farmer’s wife does not want her. This introduces a hegemonic dichotomy in which being fat is valued over thinness. There is also a life and death conflict when Sprout is tossed into the hole of death, where she is covered in dead hens; at the urging of the mallard, she regains consciousness and makes her way out of the hole before the weasel can get her. The predominant theme in this chapter is survival; the weasel symbolizes death; and the tone is rather ironic in that Sprout gets the freedom she longed for but lands in the hole of death. Her epiphany could be that freedom isn’t all it’s cracked up to be; it’s fraught with danger and requires a lot of work.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell, Shaina McSweeney, Deirdre Rowan at April 15, 2015 08:23 PM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
17 April 2015

“She wanted to slow down in her old age. She knew the weasel was around, but she didn’t have the energy to flee. Sprout started to empathize with the weasel” (Chapter 11: Aloft Like a Feather, page 131, par. 2, Hwang-Chi-Young Kim translation).

Question: Why is Sprout open to empathy for the weasel and what is the significance of her attitude change?

Answer: Sprout begins to soften her fear and loathing of the weasel in the previous chapter when she realizes that her enemy is a mother with four babies. Now, she realizes she is getting old and she doesn’t have the strength to stay one step ahead of the weasel – “She knew how difficult it was to go through winter with someone to care for” (131). The significance of Sprout making a conscious decision to drop her guard with the weasel is that it introduces a sense of foreboding and foreshadowing to the story. Is Sprout giving up now that her baby is grown and leaving the nest for good?

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at April 15, 2015 08:39 PM

Emily Finck and Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
17 April 2015


Question on Chapter 5: A farewell and a Greeting. Summarize the chapter, by answering the following questions (handout). Answers to the questions should go on the appropriate English-Blog entry connected to this work. When writing up the summary, the answers should appear as a short narrative, not as a bullet list.


Answer: In Sun-Mi Hwang’s novel The Hen Who Dreamt She Could Fly, the main protagonists introduced are “Sprout” (hen) and “Straggler” (mallard) the new character introduced is the egg. Though it has not hatched, yet it will be central to the life of Sprout (49). Both Sprout and Straggler are dynamic characters because they grow throughout the novel and continue to grow, Sprout more so than Straggler. Sprout finds the willpower and drive to escape the farm. Straggler helps her but does not coddle her, even though he knows the egg she is incubating is his (Hwang 19-49). The weasel is also present as in previous chapters but makes more of an appearance towards the end of the chapter.


In terms of characters and archetypes, Straggler fits into the category of ally and guardian, and the weasel fits into the category of shadow/villain. For example, Straggler “dances and makes noise” every night to keep the weasel away from Sprout and the egg, he brings her “food,” and he gives her advice for when the egg hatches; “It should be okay. But I am telling you just in case. Don’t go to the yard, go to the reservoir” (Hwang 49, 50, 54). In order for this passage to make sense to the reader, it is told from the perspective of third person limited, with some accounts of first person between the animals. Along with the perspective, the setting is present tense. To explain the setting further, each place on the farm can be classified as either public or private or both. For example, the farm on a large scale is a public, and each niche is either or such as the coop (private), briar patch (private), and the reservoir (both).


The plot is defined by the conflicts found within the chapter, in this chapter, A Farewell and A Greeting the conflicts are nature vs. nature and sprout vs. farm community. For example, the conflict of nature vs. nature is just that survival of the fittest. Those who are strongest ward off being culled and other threats. The conflict Sprout vs. the farm community is defined; by the way, the farm animals treat her at the beginning of the novel and in this chapter, which is not good. They do not appreciate that she is different, and therefore they gang up on her thus, she makes a permanent home in the “reservoir” (Hwang 71). Aside from the plot some major themes that recur are survival, and nurture. For example, Sprout had this drive to not only survive on the “farm” and “away” from it but she has a “strong maternal” instinct as well (Hwang 17, 37). Symbolism exists in the egg and the Sprouts name. The egg is a symbol of life and Sprouts maternal instinct, as well as an opportunity for her to experience the birth of a chick. Her name is also a symbol of life, death, and regrowth and throughout the novel she grows, wans, and survives.


The novel itself is an allegory; the tone is light but with a much deeper meaning, that meaning being a journey of the life and all of its miracles and misfortunes. One of these misfortunes leads to an epiphany; Sprout suddenly realizes that Straggler was warding off the weasel because the egg she was sitting on belonged to him and his late mate.

Posted by: Emily Finck at April 16, 2015 02:46 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
17 April 2015


“‘You should leave. Don’t you think you should be with your own kind and see other worlds? If I could fly I would never stay here. I don’t know how I could live without you. But you should leave. Go become the lookout. Nobody had better hearing than you’” (The Hen Who Dreamt She Could Fly, Chapter 10: The Bone-Weary, One-Eyed Hunter, page 120, par. 4, Sun-Mi Hwang).


Question:
How might the quote mentioned above embody the strength a mother has when preparing herself and her child for the next step in life: leaving the nest?


Answer:
In Sun- Mi Hwang’s novel The Hen Who Dreamt She Could Fly, the quote above embodies the strength of a mother by having Sprout focus on Greentop’s wellbeing rather than her own. She internalizes her feelings in order to show Greentop that it is okay to move on and branch out “‘I’ll be fine. I have good memories to keep me company’” (Hwang 120). Sprout may be sad that Greentop will eventually leave her, but she has come to terms with his need to fly and be with his kind, after all, he is a duck. Even though she is sad and scared for him she understands that is important for him to leave, he needs to continue to grow, which is what every mother wants for her baby.

Posted by: Emily Finck at April 16, 2015 03:35 PM

Ashtan Richey, Shawn Dejesus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
15 April 2015

Summary Chapter Three "Into the Barn"

After Straggler helps Sprout survive the Hole of Death she asks him to take her to the barn with him so that she has somewhere to stay. The farmer culled Sprout and by doing that took away her identity.
The characters in this chapter aren't exactly new to Sprout. She had watched them from her coop and dreamed of being like them, free in the yard. These characters reject Sprout because she belongs "in the coop" and should stay there (29). Two important characters introduced are the rooster and the hen; the rooster signifies authority and the hen exemplify the life Sprout dreams of having. The other characters introduced, he dog and the ducks, intimidate and harass Sprout. These characters explain to Sprout that she is a different kind of outsider compared to Straggler because she is simply not wanted, as he is an outsider because he is a wild duck and they are domestic: "'We let the mallard stay because he really doesn't have a place to go. But you have your own place. The coop' (Hwang, 29)."

Posted by: Ashtan Richey, Shawn DeJesus at April 16, 2015 04:32 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
16 April 2015

Question (Ch. 10, pg. 125-8): What surprising action does Sprout consider taking when she deals with the one-eyed weasel?

Answer: When Sprout finds out that the one-eyed weasel is a mother, she threatens the kill the weasel's pups in order to protect Greentop: "...Now I'll hurt your precious babies! That's only fair" (Hwang 126). Sprout knows that what she is proposing is wrong and she does not really want to do it, but she feels that it is the only way to let the weasel know that she has had enough.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at April 16, 2015 11:44 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
17 April 2015
Question: What, if any, significance is there in the fact that Sprout let Greentop go?
Answer: It is clear from the beginning of this story in chapter one that Sprout has a strong maternal instinct though she has no real children of her own. When she was with Straggler she even protected an egg that wasn’t hers. When Sprout and Greentop find each other once again in “The Bone-weary, One-Eyed Hunter” Greentop still has the cord around his foot. Sprout worked so hard to free him from that cord. “By the time morning came around she was dizzy, and her beak was so sore she couldn’t even open it” (Hwang 119). However, she was able to free him and, now that he could fly, she knew that his place was elsewhere, despite the fact that she loved him. It is then very like a mother to let a child go for his own good sometimes. I believe the significance in Sprout letting Greentop go is that the story has come full circle. In the beginning she had to let her babies go without even getting to see them or touch them. With Greentop, it’s as if she’s “raised” her child and they are now old enough to go out into the world. Even still, she is sad both of these times. “Sprout stood on the slope, watching him return to his kind. She felt like a mere shell of herself” (Hwang 121).

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at April 17, 2015 08:20 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
17 April 2015

“It was difficult to have to watch Greentop sitting apart from the flock or swimming alone, but there was nothing Sprout could do to help him” (Hwang 116).

Question:
Why was Greentop alienated by the flock?

Answer:
The flock did not want to be associated with Greentop because of the cord that had become stuck on his foot, which “gave the impression that he had run away from a human, so the wild ducks were wary of him”(Hwang 115). Although the flock of wild mallards did not truly accept Greentop, he made it a point to follow them closely and sleep at the edge of the group to show how eager he was to be accepted by the group.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at April 17, 2015 08:46 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
16 April 2015

“No longer could she run away. She no longer had reason to, nor did she have the energy. ‘Go on, eat me,’ she urged. ‘Fill your babies’ bellies.’ She closed her eyes.” (Hwang 134)

Question for Chapter 11, pages 132-134
What happens to Sprout after Greentop leaves with the rest of the mallard flock? Why is this significant?

Answer:
Throughout the book, Sprout has been living in fear of the weasel because she had to live to raise her child. They never stayed long in the same place and were always on alert, ready to flee at a moment’s notice. During this time, Greentop learned how to swim and fly because he was a duck while Sprout was always grounded as a hen. Though she wished to be able to fly and to always be with her child, she knew she would never be able to. Once Greentop has left with the other mallards, Sprout’s reason to keep running from the weasel also left. She was old, but she was happy; having lived a hard life did not deter her. In the end, the weasel returns to Sprout and since she has nothing else to live or fight for, she “urges (Hwang 134)” the weasel to eat her to feed the weasel’s babies. Then, almost slowly and gently, Sprout wakes up and is flying high above the land and sees the weasel dragging a scrawny hen in her mouth. This scene is significant because Sprout had “imagined [dying] would hurt, but all she felt was bone-deep relief (Hwang 134).” What this shows is that Sprout had nothing to fear about dying because it didn’t hurt. Also, Sprout realized that she was flying after she had died, meaning that all of her dreams had come true.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 17, 2015 09:16 AM

Ashtan Richey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
16 April 2015

Chapter Two, "Flying the Coop", Pg. 19-21

Why is it significant for Sprout that it is not the rooster who is saving her from the Hole of Death?

"Sprout didn't know who was ordering her around from outside the open grave but decided he was more trustworthy than the glinting eyes. 'You must be the Rooster!' she cried. Only he would have the courage to shout out in the dark like this" (The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, Chapter 2: "Flying the Coop", page 19, Sun-Mi Hwang).

Straggler is an outsider mallard duck who is allowed to live in the barn with the rest of the yard animals. He is the one who saves Sprout from the Hole of Death. This is significant because up to this point Sprout's view of life concerned only the Rooster and the Hen, signifying the life that she wants to live. Sprout assumes that the Rooster is the protector of all and expects it to be him who saves her.
Straggler saving Sprout is not only the beginning of an important friendship, but also shows that Sprout's small view on life is beginning to fall apart, and a new life and new truth opening up before her. Straggler represents an outsider who maintains identity even though he doesn't "belong".

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at April 17, 2015 09:30 AM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
17 April 2015

Chapter 9: “Travelers from Another World”

What does the flock of wild ducks allude to with the relationship between Sprout and Greentop as a family unit?

The flock signifies the coming end of the relationship between Sprout and Greentop, even though they are still a family of mother and son: “Mom, it’s strange. I’ve never felt this before. Something is about to happen” (108). Greentop has grown older and is at the point where he is an adult who will soon be “leaving the nest.” With the coming flock, Sprout knows her time will soon be ending and the only thing left that she has is her memories, the past, present, and the looming future. She has an epiphany in that moment: “Ah, old friend! Now I understand everything” (109). Straggler went through of the struggles of life and death, and told the hen to make sure his child would not go to the farm, wanting Greentop to live the free life, something Straggler could not attain after a fight with the weasel. Even though Sprout knows that her child would have to leave her and she would no purpose and be alone, Sprout understands what will be better for him in the end.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at April 17, 2015 09:57 AM

Ashtan Richey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
16 April 2015

Chapter Nine, "Travelers From Another World", Pg. 99-103

"No matter how hard he flapped his wings, he couldn't free himself free himself from the cord. Sprout should have told him why they'd left the yard in the first place. Then he wouldn't have gone back" (The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, Chapter 9: "Travelers From Another World", page 102, Sun-Mi Hwang).

How does this point in the novel show the maternal constructs between Sprout and Greentop?

When reading this section of the novel the characters of Sprout and Greentop become so relatable that it is possible to forget that they are animals. The feeling of wanting to protect your child from something that the child will probably need to discover for himself is so human that it begs empathy from the reader.
Sprout is left feeling guilty that she did not do enough to save Greentop from the farmers wife, even though the reader knows that Greentop needed to go to the barn so that he could find out for himself why his mother chose to move them from there. At first Sprout wanted for Greentop to be "chased away" by the ducks so that he would come back to her and they could go back to their life together (101). This also shows the maternal instincts present in Sprout, in a selfish, human, way.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at April 17, 2015 10:01 AM

Dalton Hart and DJ Menezes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet
17 April 2015

Question #8: Does it matter to Sprout that Greentop is a duckling? Why does it matter to the other animals? How is the issue of adoption portrayed in the novel?

Answer: No it does not matter to Sprout because of her motherly instincts, she loves Greentop because he is her child. This matters to the other animals because they notice that he is duck and Sprout thinks she hatched it. The issue of adoption is addressed with society looking down upon it because Sprout and Greentop are a different species. The mother loves the child just as if she hatched it because it should not matter how the child came to be hers.

Posted by: DJ and Dalton at April 17, 2015 10:15 AM

Ashtan Richey, Marcus Chrisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
17 April 2015

4. Sun-mi Hwang’s novel has been described as a modern fable. But
what is a fable and how does this story conform to your understanding
of the genre?

Fable: a short story, typically with animals as characters, conveying a moral. (Google Definitions)

The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly molds our understanding of a fable because we read it not thinking about that genre classification. Looking at the story line after reading the definition of a fable confirms that The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly is a fable. The use of animals allows for more harsh conditions and themes, in the sense that if these characters were human the ideas presented would be more objected and less understood. The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly is full of moral questions that apply to modern day society; rejection of differences in others, adoption, maternal instincts, and the need to fit in.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey, Marcus Chisholm at April 17, 2015 10:20 AM

Lorie Jewell, Shaina McSweeney, Deirdre Rowan
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
17 April 2015

Question: Sprout dares to question her station in life by venturing beyond the restrictive confines of the farmyard. What are these confines, and to what extent could Sprout be considered an antihero?

Answer: The confines of the farmyard are both literal and figurative. Sprout is initially confined to a coop, the only redeeming quality of which is that she is near the door and can see outside. Once she is out of the coop and returns to the farmyard alive, she is first confined to the extreme outer edge of the barn and then banished altogether from the barn, with the guard dog making sure she does not get back in. Sprout is also confined in a literal sense by the class structure of the farm and the prejudices of the other animals. She is a lowly hen whose sole purpose in life is to produce eggs in a coop; when she gets out, the free-range hen and mate of the rooster feels threatened and makes it clear she does not belong in the farmyard. The other animals defer to the queen-bee hen and rooster, refusing to help her with food, shelter, or even a friendly shoulder to cry on.

As for her being considered an antihero, Sprout demonstrates both good and bad qualities as she struggles to survive and protect her baby duck/chick. For example, when she discovers that the weasel is a mother with four newborn babies, she threatens to kill them as revenge for all of the killings the weasel has done or attempted to do. She also has moments of self-doubt and self-centeredness; when Greentop finds a place with his fellow mallards and Sprout knows her baby is going to leave for good, for instance, she feels sorry for herself rather than celebrating Greentop’s freedom.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell, Shaina McSweeney, Deirdre Rowan at April 17, 2015 11:11 AM

Ashley Gross and Hannah McCafferty
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
17 April 2015

Chapter Summary: A Disgrace to the Comb
In this chapter, we see Sprout engage in a conflict with other animals on the farm, including the rooster and the hens after she introduces the duckling as her own chick. The rooster relentlessly scolds Sprout, repeatedly exclaiming "It's a disgrace to the comb! A ridiculous hen has made our kind the laughing stock of the barn" (Hwang 66). As Sprout and the duckling continue to live on the farm, a fight over the baby soon ensues between the ducks and the hens. The hens want the baby to be taken away from the farm, while the head duck explains that the duckling does not even know that he is a duckling, so they can not get rid of him, or he would surely die in the wild.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at April 17, 2015 04:14 PM

Ashley Gross and Hannah McCafferty
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
17 April 2015

Question:
How do names affect who we are? And how others see us? Consider some of the other characters' names in the novel, such as straggler.

Answer:
Our names give us a sense of identity, whether it be a name given to us by someone else or something that we decide for ourselves. Names can also be a point of judgment for others. For example, we are unclear whether Straggler was named Straggler by his parents or whether he received the name from his peers. If he was named that by his parents, then it could be that he started to straggle, or people thought that he would straggle because of the name. If he was given the name by his peers, then it was because of a judgment of his qualities or habits. Either way, the name reflects a certain characteristic of Straggler that either was influenced by his name or judged by another animal and reflected in the name.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at April 17, 2015 04:41 PM

Hannah McCafferty, Ashley Gross
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
16 April 2015

Question: Do you think that Sprout’s hesitance to return to the barn with Greentop is selfish or selfless? Why?
Answer: Sprout has spent most of her life protecting and nurturing Greentop, so the idea of potentially separating from him terrifies her. “She was afraid he would insist on joining the brace of the ducks” (Hwang 96). Subconsciously, Sprout understands that returning to the barn would be the best thing for Greentop’s development—he needs to be with his own kind. However, once Greentop leaves Sprout, she will have nothing. Furthermore, if Sprout returns to the barn, she faces the potential of being killed by the farmer. If the two return, Greentop will blossom, and Sprout will wither away, and that is why Sprout refuses to return.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at April 17, 2015 08:32 PM

Kristen Collins and Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
19 April 2015

Question 7, Group Work
Consider the relevance of the novel’s title. Perhaps start by considering both the literal and metaphorical meanings of the word ‘flight’.

Answer:
The word “flight” can mean different things in different settings. For some, it means the ability to sustain oneself in the air. For others, it means escaping or fleeing from a current situation. In both cases, the word is related to be free from the limitations of the ground or the rules placed on someone by someone else. The use of this word is interesting for the title of this book because Sprout experienced the desire to fly twice in the story. In the first chapter, Sprout wanted to get out of the chicken coop and not lay another egg for the farmer, but rather to live her own free life. In the second chapter, Sprout successfully flew the coop and escaped her life as an egg-laying slave. Then towards the end of the book Sprout started wishing she could fly to be with Greentop and leave the weasel behind on the ground. While she was not fully alive to fly, she did find herself aloft in the air once she had died and given herself to the weasel.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 19, 2015 12:13 AM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
22 April 2015


Test #5 Question 4g:
Conflict: What are some major conflicts that are present throughout Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, and how do they compare to some of the major conflicts present in Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis?


Answer:
The major conflicts present in The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly and Persepolis that are similar are as follows: Man vs. Man, Nature vs. Nature (parallel to Persepolis), and hierarchy/class structure. This conflict breaks down further into each main character vs. society, others, and self.


For example, Sprout had an internal conflict with her existence on the farm. She wants nothing more than to “fly the coop” and finally become a “mother,” however this is not possible because she is a laying hen past her prime (Hwang 15). Later on, due an unfortunate accident Sprout can become a mother once she finds herself outside of the coop. The next conflict to arise is Sprout vs. nature and the various subcategories of farm animals, barn, briar patch, and reservoir. Once Sprout is finally free of the coop, she finds herself an outsider to all the other farm animals except Straggler the duck, who is also an outsider. The hen and the rooster who “rule” the barn feel like Sprout should go back to the “coop” because she has no place outside her class structure (Hwang 27-28). Thus, Sprout is only able to stay settled for a short amount of time in the barn until she goes off into the briar patch and discovers her sense of motherhood. However, she still must be on her guard because the “weasel” is yet another conflict and very real threat (Hwang 58). Finally, there is the conflict of Sprout and the reservoir, where she and Greentop reside for the remainder of the novel. Sprout learns the true meaning of motherhood, sacrifice, and life once Greentop finds “himself home” among the migratory ducks and leaves. She is also able to call up “happy memories” as she becomes food for the “weasel and her babies” (120, 134).


In comparison, Marjan Satrapi’s Persepolis also has similar conflicts, however instead of animals the characters are actual people. For example, Marji has an internal conflict with her identity she is “Persian” living in “Iran” and has to cope with the religious extremists who implement the “veil” (3-5). Both Sprout and Marji have trouble with who are and where they have to live. For Marji, another conflict arises just like with Sprout, that conflict is the class structure and the hierarchy or Man vs. Man. The religious extremists who follow the “Shah” are not in favor of women and require them to “cover” and since Iran was previously not oppressed, there are those who are “traditionalist” and back the Shah, and those who fight for “freedom” as “modernists” (Satrapi 5). Another conflict of Marji vs. society and others takes effect after the initial conflict once she is sent out of the country. In order to protect her parents send her to “Austria” which can be compared to Sprout’s journey outside the farm (Satrapi 151-53). Once outside her native country Marji also experiences conflicts with those around her in the chapters “The Soup,” “Pasta,” and “Hide and Seek” (Satrapi 158, 178, 207). Much like Sprout these conflict with others made Marji stronger and wise, for she embraced her past and fate. Both Marji and Sprout achieved flight.

Posted by: Emily Finck at April 21, 2015 11:47 AM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
22 April 2015

Irony in Persepolis and The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly

On the surface, Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis and Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly could not be more different; one is a graphic novel depicting the aftermath of Iran’s revolution in the late 1970s, the other is a modern-day fable about a hen who wants to hatch an egg and raise a chick. One thing the two works have in common is a heavy dose of situational irony – characters expecting one thing to happen, but the opposite occurs.
Persepolis begins with “The Veil” (3) in which Satrapi describes her introduction at age 10 to wearing a veil. This happened a year after the 1979 Islamic Revolution that forced the Shah out of power – he was seen as too materialistic and chummy with Western powers – and put a new fundamentalist regime into place. Soon, strict standards of dress were decreed – hence, the veil – as well as drastic changes in education and living standards. Iranians who fought to free themselves from the Shah – “The day he left, the country had the biggest celebration of its entire history” (42) – now found themselves oppressed once again. Satrapi describes Iranian women protesting against the veil (5) were girls and women being required by the new fundamentalist government to wear veils to cover their hair. Prior to the revolution, Iranians could wear what they wanted, listen to music they liked, drink and party, and benefit from a good educational system. Now, they were not only told what they should wear in public, but those who disobeyed – primarily women – were subjected to harassment, ridicule, and jail. Satrapi describes a terrifying run-in her mother had with two fundamentalist men who “ . . . said that women like me should be pushed up against a wall and fucked, and then thrown in the garbage” (74) – all because she was not wearing a veil. This, undoubtedly, was not the freedom Marji’s mom anticipated when she took part in the revolution.

Likewise, Sprout does not anticipate being tossed into the hole of death when the farmer’s wife unwittingly fulfills Sprout’s dream to be free of the coop. Sprout, sickly and unproductive, is being culled; she thinks she’s “flying the coop! . . . Their conversation didn’t register with Sprout, whose heart pounded at the thought that she would finally live in the yard” (16). When she regains consciousness in the hole, surrounded by the carcasses of dead chickens, Sprout gets an immediate education on what freedom is really like – the weasel has her in sight and she must escape before she becomes a meal. For the rest of the story, Sprout continues to learn that freedom demands hard work and responsibility – she must find food and shelter for herself and her baby – and it can sometimes be dangerous; Sprout is always on guard for the weasel and other hazards that threaten her little family. Sprout no doubt was not expecting freedom to be so exhausting, but in the end, she sees her life away from the coop as a happy one.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at April 21, 2015 04:34 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet
22 April 2015

Symbols of Rebellion (Test 5)

In Sun-Mi Hwang’s short novel, The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, the main character Sprout rebels from the conventional norms of what is expected of her. As Sprout is an egg-laying hen, the main goal expected from her is to stay within the confines of the henhouse and lay eggs, but Spout does not agree with this. At the beginning of the novel, Sprout rebels from this expectation and leaves the henhouse to pursue her dream. The concept of Sprout’s rebellion in the earlier parts of the novel are characterized by her loss of feathers. Hwang writes, “Sprout got up and shoved her head through the wires of her cage. Her bare, featherless neck was rubbed raw,” showing that for Sprout to view the world in which she wishes to live in – a world of rebellion – she has to endure the pain of losing her feathers (Hwang 7). Later Hwang writes, “[Sprout] couldn’t get to the yard where the ducks and the old dog and the rooster and the hen lived together no matter how far she stretched her neck through the wires; they just plucked her feathers,” again showing that the loss of Sprout’s feathers is symbolic of her desire to rebel from the expectations for her and pursue what she wants (Hwang 9). The outside world in which Sprout wishes to rebel and be in are symbolized in the earlier parts of the novel with the action of Sprout losing her feathers.

Much like in Hwang’s novel, Kundera uses a specific symbol to show a longing for rebellion. Sabina’s bowler hat is the symbol that Kundera uses to show her rebellion against society. Kundera writes of this, stating, “The fact that Tomas stood beside her fully dressed meant that the essence of what they both saw was far from good clean fun (if it had been fun he was after, he, too, would have had to strip and don a bowler hat,” going on to state that Tomas placing the hat on Sabina while she was nude “was humiliation” (Kundera 87). In a normal situation, this humiliating act would have immediately been turned down by Sabina, but she rebels from this notion. Kundera writes, “But instead of spurning it, she proudly, provocatively played it for all it was worth, as if submitting to her own public rape,” showing that Sabina is rebelling from the societal view of being humiliated as is beginning to accept her role (Kundera 87). Sabina’s acceptance of this erotic symbol ultimately shows her rebellion against society’s idea that eroticism is negative. Therefore, the symbol of the bowler hat is used to show a sense of rebellion from societal wishes, much like the plucked feathers symbolize a rebellion from societal wishes in Hwang’s novel.

Posted by: Dalton Hart - Test 5 at April 21, 2015 05:41 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
21 April 2015

Test #5

Conflict- The Last Temptation of Christ and The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly

The strongest link in terms of conflict between Nikos Kazantzakis’s The Last Temptation of Christ and Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly is the dichotomy of freedom and slavery. Each novel offers its own take on the classic struggle for independence versus a figure of oppression. Nikos Kazantzakis depicts the struggle of Christ and the Hebrews, who are oppressed not only by the Roman Empire, but themselves as well. The Hebrews are subjected to the rule of the Romans but are unwilling to fight for their personal freedoms and homeland, which have been acquired by the Roman Empire. Jesus repeatedly attempts to free the Jewish community and rouse them, in order for both he and the population to be truly liberated, however he is continually condemned by the very people that he is struggling emancipate, “He leaned out and saw that his yard had filled with Jewry. He could also see the maniacal multitude which filled the porches and tiers of the temple to overflowing. Armed with staffs and slings, the crowd shoved, kicked and hooted Jesus, whom the Roman soldiers were guarding and pushing toward the immense tower door” (Kazantzakis 436). It is this misinterpretation of Jesus’s intentions that allows for the Hebrews to become their own oppressors and seals the fate of Jesus, who can now only achieve his freedom through sacrifice.
Sun-Mi Hwang also explores the idea of a search for freedom against oppression from both a higher power and the general population. The Christ-like figure of Sprout, seeks to attain both personal freedom and freedom for her fellow animals, however, comes to realize that the other inhabitants on the farm relish in the security that the farmer provides and have become accustomed to the hierarchy that has been established among the animals, thus keeping them bound to rule of the farm and alienating Sprout. Her relentless attempts to achieve freedom, lead to an almost constant persecution from the other farm animals and almost gets her killed several times. Much like Jesus, Sprout soon realizes that her only way to true freedom is through her sacrifice to the weasel, “gliding through the air with her large, beautiful wings, Sprout looked down at everything below – the reservoir and the fields in the snowstorm, and the weasel limping away, a scrawny hen dangling from her jaws” (Hwang 134).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at April 21, 2015 08:43 PM

Ashtan Richey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
20 April 2015

Test Five, Conflict
Sun-Mi Hwang's The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly and Pierre Boule's The Monkey Planet

Conflict found in The Monkey Planet through the hierarchy and its similarities to conflict found in the hierarchy present in The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly.
In The Monkey Planet, there is a hierarchy found in the roles portrayed: the orangutans, who are the smartest, most powerful, and most influential, the chimpanzees, who are the "middle class", the workers, the gorillas, a step up with some brain and more brawn, and the humans, representative of mindless game-like animals.
In The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, there is a hierarchy present between the different species of animals as well: the farmers, the only humans and the characters who exhibit a large amount of control, the Weasel, who is widely feared and gains her status as such, the Rooster and the Hen, the leaders of the barn and the yard, the Dog, seen as a peacekeeper but not decision maker, the yard animals, creating the largest group or "working class", and the others, such as Straggler and the white duck.

“The orangutans, as I’ve said before, make no distinction between one man and another (The Monkey Planet, chapter 37, page 250, par. 3)."
“It was difficult to have to watch Greentop sitting apart from the flock or swimming alone, but there was nothing Sprout could do to help him (The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, "The Bone-Weary, One Eyed Hunter", pg. 116)."

In both novels, the main characters do not fit into one solid part of the hierarchy, therefore creating a conflict.
In The Monkey Planet, Ulysse is a constant outsider. He travels from being a human of comparable status to the orangutans, to the lowest level with the mindless humans, and then back and forth.
Similarly, Sprout, from The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, begins at one point of the social status, as one of the bottom members of the working class, as an unsuccessful egg-laying hen, to an accepted member and then later rejected.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at April 22, 2015 12:02 AM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
21 April 2015

Question # 3D: Irony in Milan Kundera's "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" and Sun-Mi Hwang's "The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly"

Response:
Irony in these two novels play a key element, specifically in the plot and characters actions. In the beginning of the novel "The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly" none of the characters have names. We quickly discover that the main character does not have a name, but she actually named herself, "That was why she'd named herself herself after them" (Hwang 7). It is important to note that none of the characters have names in this novel other then the main character and her son. These names are only used between these two characters. This is ironic because characters, fictional or real, usually never name themselves. This is probably meant to make the readers feel more empathy towards the main character and further distinguish her from the rest of the animals on the farm. From the very beginning of the novel it is made clear that Sprout wants nothing more then to leave the coop and be free to "dig through the pile of compost with the rooster, walk side by side with him, and sit on her eggs" (Hwang 8). Along with this dream she also wanted more than anything to hatch an egg, but the reader is quickly informed that "an egg she laid on her own would never hatch" (Hwang 9). This introduces the irony in this novel because Sprout does indeed hatch an egg later in the novel, but it is not hers. This novel does a great job with not giving away major plot lines like the main character raising a child because the readers are told she would basically never have a child. The second part of irony in this novel comes when Sprout survives the pile of death and finally escapes the coop. The irony here is that once Sprout leaves the coop and becomes "free", it is not the life she imagined and she is not satisfied at all. She idolized the animals in the yard and they ended up being the cruelest animals she had encountered.
In Kundera's "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" the contrast between the character's lightness and weight lead to ironic endings. With Kundera presenting the reader two separate couples with each couple having one light and one heavy partner, he gives the characters what they complain that they lack; the ability to choose two different paths. Of course the readers are the ones to realize this and not the characters themselves. Take for example Franz and the course of action he takes with his wife and Sabina. Franz is a man who makes every decision with immense amount of thought and "weight". When he decides to be lighter, things quickly spiral toward the end for him. "'Love is a battle.' Said Mari-Claude, still smiling. 'And I plan to go on fighting. To the end''Love is a battle?'Said Franz. 'Well I don't feel at all like fighting' And he left" (Kundera 121). Despite Franz leaving his wife and never getting divorced, he decides to pursue Sabina and when she learns he has left his wife, she is disinterested and leaves him the next morning for good. What is so ironic and also pathetic about Franz, is that he continues to live his life with this idea of loving Sabina following him. He stands up to the muggers at the end of novel because he felt that it would have made Sabina proud, yet Sabina despised marches and this is what caused Franz his death. Not only did he die in vain, but also the irony is overwhelming with his wife when she has "A return after long wanderings" inscribed on his tombstone.
Both of these authors effectively use irony to reinforce the themes of these novels and make the characters travels seem tragic in one way or another. Whether it be the choices they make or the choices others make which influence them, readers are taken for a ride and are not left with predictable plots or characters.

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at April 22, 2015 01:30 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
22 April 2015

Test #5-Hwang (Hen) and Satarpi (Persepolis) Symbolism

The symbolism between The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly by Sun-mi Hwang and The Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi is similar when it is focused on an object that affects the main protagonist. The Complete Persepolis starts with the first chapter titled “The Veil,” the piece of fabric that Satrapi uses to represent the repression of the Islamic Revolution. On the first page, there are five panals; the first two show Satrapi at ten years old sitting in a row with her classmates, all wearing the veil. Panal three shows a group of women with their fists raised in protest. The last two panals return to the children: the first one has them entering the schoolyard with a teacher hand each one a veil saying, “Wear this” (Satrapi 3)! The last one acts as a banner on the bottom of the page, topped with the text, “We didn’t really like to wear the veil, especially since we didn’t understand why we had to” (Satrapi 3).
Exposing the schoolyard, the panal has the children playing with the veil. One girl just has it covering her face as she pretends to be “the monster of darkness” while another has tied several together to make a functional jump rope. Satrapi herself is seen casting the veil aside saying, “It’s too hot out” (Satrapi 3)! The two girls who are wearing the veil properly are dominating their classmates: one is riding a girl like a pony, using the veil as reins. The other has her hands on a classmate’s neck declaring, “Execution in the name of freedom” (Satrapi 3)! (A subtle comment on the subjugation of the new regime).
In The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, the hen who calls herself Sprout wants to hatch an egg because every egg she has laid is carted off by the farmer. The first chapter is titled “I Refuse to Lay Another Egg” and the first paragraph has the word egg in every sentence: “The egg rolled to a stop upon reaching the wire mesh of the coop. Sprout looked at it-a chalky egg flecked with blood…-one small, sad egg” (Hwang 5). The egg represents Sprout’s hope for a better life: she never lays another egg, but after she is released from the coop, Sprout finds an egg in a briar patch and after hatching it, raises the duckling as her own. Caring for an egg gives Sprout a purpose in life instead of just being trapped in a cage, doing nothing but eat and lay eggs that immediately leave her side.


Works Cited
Hwang, Sun-mi. The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly: A Novel. Trans. Chi-Young Kim. New York: Penguin, 2013. Print.

Satrapi, Marjane. The Complete Persepolis. Trans. L’Assocation. New York: Pantheon, 2007.
Print.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at April 22, 2015 03:20 AM

Shawn DeJesus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading The Planet CA01
22 April 2015
Test # 5 Response

Throughout the duration of this course, we have studied a multitude of texts ranging from a plethora of different cultural backgrounds. However diverse these texts may be in cultural origin, there are recurring characteristics indicative of storytelling that transcend the culture barrier. Character archetypes are one example of a trait ubiquitous in successful storytelling, and clear links can be found between Pierre Boulle’s The Planet of The Apes and Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly. Both authors employ the savior/sidekick character archetype in their works. In Planet of The Apes, the character is Zira, the kind hearted female chimpanzee, and in The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, this character archetype is embodied in the mallard duck dubbed Straggler.
As the name suggests, the savior character archetype is one who possesses a distinctive form of compassion for the protagonist, aiding the hero of the story through their quest of fulfillment and self-discovery and helping them overcome trials and tribulations, normally putting their own welfare and standing in society at risk in the process. In Planet of The Apes, Zira, a female chimpanzee scientist, takes a keen interest in the human captive Ulysse Merou and aids him in his quest for freedom. Intrigued by Ulysse’s mental acuity, Zira’s perspective on the human race (“other”) universally acknowledged as savage and inferior, is changed drastically when she realizes that he is a being capable of both emotion and intelligence. Like all characters indicative of this archetype, she does this at her own risk, putting her life and standing in society in jeopardy to assist this savage creature. The mallard duck Straggler in Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly employs this same sense of compassion, assisting in Sprout’s escape from the Hole of Death and attempting to convince his fellow barn mates to accept this social outcast into the ranks of normal society. What these character archetypes possess that seems to be lacking in the entirety of each story is sense of compassion and pity for the “other,” and the courage to follow through with their convictions in the equality of all. In stories devoid of hope and brimming with despair, these characters provide the light in the darkness, a beacon of hope that invigorates the protagonist with the strength to continue their hero’s journey.

Posted by: Shawn DeJesus at April 22, 2015 05:42 AM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
22 April 2015

The Archetype: Hwang and Satrapi

At the start of both novels, Sprout and Marji are in the state of the archetypal Plato’s Cave where reality is seen through a lens without experience. Sprout is living in the confines of the coop, and she can only see bits and pieces of what is going on outside the coop. She can see nature and the other farm animals, but she is unable to experience these things because she is “chained” down in the cage of her existence and the farmer’s expectations. Marji, while a lot more liberal in her thoughts and experiences, starts off in the cave because she does not have a full understanding of what is truly going on around her to the full capacity. She has more opportunity to better understand what is outside the cave through others around her who are already outside. Through leaving the figurative cave, both characters are able to experience the world around them and begin their own individual archetypal journeys, seeing the harsh realities and the innocence of the world. With Plato’s Cave being the beginning archetype for both of these characters, it allows the ability for the protagonists to go through a plethora of other archetypes. The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly goes through the hero’s journey, and Persepolis can be both a hero’s journey and a coming of age story.
Spout begins her heroic journey after leaving the coop but finds that reality is not all what she thought it would be. She leaves the “comfort” of the coop, though it also can be perceived as the Underworld, and starts on her journey. At the start, Sprout goes even further into the Underworld of the hero’s journey, “Dead hens were piled all around her. She was stepping on them. She was stuck in a large open grave” (18). With how the journey begins, it alludes to how the archetype will shape the story; Sprout being close to the line between life and death. Like any hero, Sprout has many obstacles in her way but she is able to overcome each one in a unique way. She leaves the coop through the cusp of death, she is able to accomplish her goal of having a child and bringing life through Greentop, she defeats the weasel (the ultimate enemy), and she is able to finish her journey with the acceptance of death, transcending the limitations of her body and “Gliding through the air with her large, beautiful wings” (134). Her journey may not be the conventional one of the classics, but she is able to hit every important aspect to the hero’s journey.
Coming of age can almost be seen as a subgenre of the archetypal hero’s journey because it is a journey through childhood to adulthood, having trials and tribulations to be able to possess self-realization and understand. At the very beginning, Marji is actually at the opposite spectrum of the journey. While Spout began hers in the underworld, Marji began hers in the heavens having ties with spirituality and God, “I’ll be a prophet” (8). As time goes on, her trials begin to become a lot more apparent with the world around her and her own inner conflicts happening. She does not see the horror for what is actually is while she is a young child, with the instance between her and Uncle Anoosh. Then Marji goes through a phase of rebellion against all of the traditionalist ideals of the value and no self-expression and individuality. For a coming of age journey, these are important aspects of her development as a person to become something greater as she grows and develops through childhood, teenage years, and finally to adulthood. She explores everything in her reality, seeing both the good and the bad in people. The moment where she is at her lowest point, and incidentally the turning point of her perspective of the world, is when she becomes homeless in Austria where she “spent more than two months on the street in the middle of winter” (240). Self-actualization happens here, and she sees and understands the harsh realities of the world. And in the final pages of Persepolis, Marji finally becomes an adult and all of her realizations and understanding come into being: “wandering in the mountains of Tehran,” taking a trip with her grandmother, visiting the tomb of her grandfather, going to Evine prison to see the unmarked grave of Uncle Anoosh, having happy times and memories with her family, and finally leaving once and for all, but with the realization that “freedom had a price” (340, 341).

Posted by: Kristen Collins at April 22, 2015 06:06 AM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-410-CA01
22 April 2015
Irony: Pierre Boulle’s Monkey Planet
We are shown various types of Irony in both Pierre Boulle’s Monkey Planet and Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly. In both works, we are shown very ironic positions. For example, in Monkey Planet we are shown that in the planet Soror we are introduced to a different hierarchy. At the top of the hierarchy lies Gorillas, Orangutans, Chimpanzees and at the bottom humans. Humans were considered animalistic savages. The great apes were both intelligent and civilized. In Sun-Mi Hwang’s, The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, we are introduced to a hen named Spout, who refuses to lay eggs on command. She comes across an egg and decides to incubate it. Once the egg hatches, ironically it’s a duck. Spout is not only able to “hatch a duck” but she also is able to raise it correctly, even though it’s an entirely different animal.
Ironically, when the apes encounter the main human character Ulysse, they try to hunt them and eventually capture them. Even when Ulysse tries to show the apes that he is a different human, they are unfazed, for many days. One of the main characters in, The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, is a weasel who is described as a monster who is known for killing many animals on the farm. The weasel is deeply feared by the entire farm.

She felt pity for a fellow mother. A mother who ran through the dark fields; a
Mother who had to return quickly to her still-blind babies, who couldn’t survive
if she wasn’t as swift as the wind; a mother who was a bone weary, one-eyed
hunter (Hwang 70).
Towards the end, we are shown that she ironically is not a monster, but is only a mother who comes out to kill whenever her children are hungry. Towards the end of Monkey Planet, we are shown that the once underdog, “animalistic” human is able to win the trust of the apes and eventually is allowed to live amongst them. However, one the members of his very intelligent crewmembers were not able to win the trust of the apes.
Professor Antelle followed their example. He came up as close as possible to the
Director and begged for a tidbit. This humiliating behavior gave me a sickening
Feeling that soon became unbearable anguish (Boulle 177).
During Professor Antelle’s captivity, he was mentally broken down to become the animalistic savage that humans were said to have been. Even though he was very intelligent and spoke English, he ironically lost his human mentality during his captivity.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at April 22, 2015 07:38 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
21 April 2015

Take Home Test:
Discuss conflict in Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly as it relates to the conflict of Milan Kundera’s The Unbearable Lightness of Being.

Answer:
In Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly and Milan Kundera’s The Unbearable Lightness of Being, some of the main conflicts circle around fleeing from some enemy that could tear one’s life apart without a moment’s notice. For Sprout in The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, this adversary is the weasel of whom many of the other animals are afraid. Similarly for Tomas and Tereza in The Unbearable Lightness of Being, the shadowy figure that haunted them is the Russian occupation in Czechoslovakia. While kitsch is the enemy of Sabina, it does not mirror the same kind of conflict that Sprout and the weasel share because kitsch is not directly deadly. The Communists were “the ones responsible for Czechoslovakia’s misfortunes (Kundera 176)” just as the weasel was an oppressor to the barnyard, “hunting the living to show how powerful [she] is (Hwang 20).” In the sense that those powerful prey on the weak, the Communists and the weasel would be about the same kind of conflict.
Other conflicts exists like the hegemonic dichotomies of the wild versus the barnyard versus the cage Sprout had lived in and the overall comparisons in The Unbearable Lightness of Being of lightness/weight, soul/body, and the sections of misunderstood words. For Sprout, the cage was dreadfully cramped, but the yard was wide open and free. Her only problem here was that she was unwanted and considered a nuisance. While in the wild, she found that she could go anywhere and not really worry about what the other animals thought, but yet she still had to provide for herself and Greentop while the food would have been given to her while on the farm, for the most part. For Franz and Sabina in the sections for misunderstood words, their ideas of what something is are opposites and do not mesh well together. For instance in the section about cemeteries (Kundera 104), Sabina sees them as joyful parties of dead people with bright lights while Franz sees ugly grey stones.
The only other main conflict between these two books is honesty and love. Sprout loves Greentop and Straggler in different ways, but none of them are fully honest with each other. Most notably is Straggler who neglects to tell Sprout that the egg she was sitting one was his for fear she would abandon it (Hwang 77). Sabina, Franz, Tereza, and Tomas each share a love-based relationship with another person in the awkward square but none of them seem fully content. Tereza is the most finicky about it because she moves herself and Tomas to the country in the secret hopes he would stop having affairs with other women (Kundera 293). In the end though for both Sprout and the group in Kundera’s text, they managed to find true happiness despite all of their shortcomings and problems.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 22, 2015 08:58 AM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
21 April 2015
Test 5
Question 4f: What themes present in both Persepolis and The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly.
Answer: At a glance, it’s a wonder what these two books could have in common: one is an autobiography while the other is a children’s book. However, both share one very strong particular theme and that is that fact that they are both coming of age stories. This is easily seen in Sartrapi’s Persepolis. The book traces Marji’s life all the way from childhood up until the end of her education in college. Throughout the story Marji faced many difficulties. Some might even akin this to a sort of hero’s journey. There was Marji’s struggle with the veil (Sartrapi 3), the conflict she faced with the authorities (Sartrapi 133, 143, 177), romantic difficulties and familial strains as well.
However, Sprout’s story is a coming of age story as well. Although we don’t get a story from Sprout from birth to death we do get a coming of age story where she gets to learn the ways of the world around her. Sprout’s been kept in a coup all her life, popping out eggs without being allowed any emotional connection to them. Fed up and about to be taken to her death, Sprout manages to escape the coop. Through her journey in the outside world, she learns about companionship, how to survive by evading the weasel, as well as a different kind of loss. She is able to raise Greentop even though they are an unlikely pair. The kind of loss she experiences with Greentop is the same loss a mother must cope with when their child goes off to college or goes off to live on their own. They are releasing their children into the world. Sprout’s story really comes full circle by the end. She even learns to assert her power against the weasel who actually turns out to be a mother as well. Sprout’s coming of age story just happened to take place later on in her life when she was finally free to explore the world and it’s wonderfully cruel ways.

Posted by: rebecca maldonado at April 22, 2015 09:21 AM

Jahiedy Viñas
ENG 410-Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
21 April 2015
Test #5
Pierre Boulle’s Monkey Planet and Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly Theme

Pierre Boulle’s “Monkey Planet” and Sun-Mi Hwang’s “The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly” have the common theme of “Fish out of water,” or the main characters develop throughout the story in an unknown environment where they are out of place and don’t fit in, however both protagonists manage to adapt to their surroundings and gain a means of survival with instinct and educating themselves about how to best face their obstacles.
In “Monkey Planet,” Ulysses became captive of the primitives in the foreign planet, Soror, where Ulysses eventually gains the help of Zira, a Chimpanzee, about the language, history and a means to gain freedom through Ulysses’ speech at Congress. Soror is a planet three hundred light years from Earth, similar to Earth’s but its primary habitants are intelligent species of monkey (Chapter 2). Ulysses is stuck in the hierarchy of man being primitive before the apes as they are “two separate branches that have evolved from a point in common but in different directions” (Chapter 19). Man is thought to have the intelligence of animals on Earth and nothing more. Ulysses eventually manages to leave Soror to return to Earth with Nova and his son to find Earth in the same place as Soror.
In “The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly,” Sprout had lived all of her life in a cage. Until her unexpected escape from the Weasel in the Hole of Death, Sprout had no experience in survival. She had aspired to live in the yard and among the barn animals, but she is not welcomed. As the rooster commands, she is to “Leave at once” when he announces dawn (Into The Barn). Sprout eventually manages to survive with the help of Straggler and eventually, her duckling, Greentop. Sprout is a hen who is unable to lay eggs and takes the opportunity to hatch and care for Scraggler and the white duck’s egg. Sprout and the duckling, Greentop, are both rejected being an unusual pair without a home. Both Sprout and Greentop continuously move to survive and stay safe from the Weasel. Sprout evades death multiple times from the grasps of the Weasel until she finally meets her end after Greentop leaves with his flock.

Posted by: Jahiedy Vinas at April 22, 2015 09:43 AM

Although it is a children’s book, The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly deals with various adult themes. The book uses the animals and their actions as an allegory for real life society. For example, when Sprout questions why she cannot live in the yard just like the other hen, the dog responds:
“‘Ha! Silly chicken. What makes you think that? Yes, you’re both hens, but you’re different. How do you not know that? Just like I’m the gatekeeper and the rooster announces the morning, you’re supposed to lay eggs in a cage. Not in the yard! Those are the rules.’
‘But what if I don’t like the rules? What happens then?’
‘Don’t be ridiculous!’” (Hwang 38-39)
This dialogue between Sprout and the guard dog captures the simple essence of prejudice within a society. The “not one of us” language that Hwang employs can reflect all forms of prejudices, from racism, homophobia, ageism, etc.
Similar to The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly, Monkey Planet also uses animals as symbols for prejudice within human society, specifically, as an allegory for racism, particularly the experiences African-Americans have felt in the United States. Ulysse is a white man surrounded by a “superior” majority. Therefore, the white man becomes the minority, and is used as an allegory to show the majority the concept of being imprisoned and discriminated against. For example, while Zira is fully aware of Ulysse’s intelligence, she often forgets, and still uses stereotypes regarding humans. When insulting Zaius, she exclaims, “He’s as stubborn as a mule and as stupid as a man!” (Boulle 141). Zira has living proof in the form of Ulysse that human beings are capable of “ape” intelligence, but she still resorts back to what society has taught her about human beings.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at April 22, 2015 09:58 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 February 2016

“Sprout was the best name in the world. A sprout grew into a leaf and embraced the wind and the sun before falling and rotting and turning into mulch for bringing fragrant flowers into bloom… Nobody called her Sprout, and she knew her life wasn’t like a sprout’s, but still the name made her feel good.” (Chapter 1: I Refuse to Lay another Egg, page 7, par. 2, Sun-mi Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to a moment when Sprout was declaring her purpose for naming herself and why she admired it. Why did she give herself the name Sprout and what changed after she gave herself that name?

Answer: Sprout wanted to be like the Acadia tree sprouts because they grew and served a purpose. “Sprout wanted to do something with her life, just like the sprouts on the acacia tree.” (Hwang 7) She goes on to explain a change in her after she gave herself the name. “Ever since she’d named herself, she’d gotten into the habit of noting the events occurring outside the coop.” (Hwang 7)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 16, 2016 01:11 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 February 2016

“Sprout was the best name in the world. A sprout grew into a leaf and embraced the wind and the sun before falling and rotting and turning into mulch for bringing fragrant flowers into bloom. Sprout wanted to do something with her life, just like the sprouts on the acacia tree.” (Chapter 1: I Refuse to Lay another Egg, page 7, par. 2)

Question: This passage refers to the meaning behind her name. How is this related to what she wants to do with her life?

Answer: Sprout wants to “dig through the pile of compost with the rooster, walk side by side with him, and sit on her eggs.” (Hwang 8) She wants to escape her wire cage, be free, be able to sit on her eggs and watch them hatch and blossom just like the flowers on the acacia tree.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 16, 2016 08:47 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
15 February 2016
“The acacia tree on the edge of the yard was blooming with white flowers. Their sweet scent caught the breeze and wafted into the coop, filling Sprout’s heart.” (Chapter 1: I refuse to lay another egg!, Page 7, Par. 10, Chi-Young Kim translation)
Question: What roll do you think that the tree plays/will play in this story?
Answer: This tree was the one of the first things she saw when she arrived at the farm. During her fantasies in the first and second chapter, she dreams of walking under the acacia tree with the rooster. I think that the tree, while representing the changing of the seasons, also holds a sense of freedom that Sprout always dreamed of.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 16, 2016 10:42 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
16 February 2016

“Sprout felt her heart tearing into two. Her sorrow each time her eggs were taken away was nothing compared to how she felt now. Sobs filled her throat; her entire body stiffened. Poor thing came out without a shell. The farmer tossed the soft egg into the yard; bracing herself, Sprout squeezed her eyes shut. The egg broke without a sound. The old dog lumbered over to lick it up. Tears flowed freely from Sprout’s eyes for the first time in her life. I refuse to lay another egg! Ever!”

Question: In the above quotation, it states how Sprout felt after she realized what had happened with the egg she had just laid. Why do you think that she decided to no longer lay anymore eggs after that?

Answer: She probably felt like she no longer wanted to lay anymore eggs, because of the fact that it wasn’t only heartbreaking when the farmers took her eggs from her, but just as heartbreaking when she knew none of them would ever get picked. She didn’t want to continue going through something that would ultimately give her the results that she never wanted.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 16, 2016 11:54 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journey in Narrative
17 February 2016

2. Student #1: “Flying the Coop” (Pages 15-16 of this chapter) Original, Student-designed discussion question focused on the Identification of and a Short Close Reading of Key Passage for the selected pages of this chapter.

Question: Why was Sprout removed from the coop?
Answer: In the Chapter, “Flying the Coop,” It was Sprouts desire to lay an egg, but no matter what she tried she was in capable of lay an egg. Each day she persisted despite his barren-hood. One evening the Farmer and his wife left the house and entered the coop to check on the chickens to but to their surprise Sprout still laid no eggs. Frustrated by her failed attempts the Farmer’s wife stated, ““We need to cull it. Take it out of the coop.”(Hwang 15) Overhearing such frightening words Sprout persisted to lay an egg, but eventually gave up because “she sensed her body could lay no more eggs.”(Hwang 15) Eventually the Farmer and his wife returned and they saw that she could no longer bear eggs and therefore removed her from the coop.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at February 17, 2016 10:25 AM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17 February 2016

“Sorrow bubbled up from the bottom of her heart. She couldn’t die like this, not before getting to the yard. She had to escape from the wheelbarrow. But the hens stacked on top of her were crushing her bones.” (Chapter 2: Flying The Coop, pg. 17, par. 1, Sun-Wi Hwang)

Question: What keeps Sprout alive after she realizes she is at the bottom of the wheelbarrow? What is Sprout wish she hopes she can achieve?

Answer: As Sprout was laying at the bottom of the wheelbarrow she knows she has to get out before the hens laying on top of her suffocate and kill her. Although she is weak “Sprout focused on the image of the acacia tree blooming with flowers, the green leaves, the wonderful scent, and the happy animals in the yard.” (Hwang 17) Her vision of the beautiful field motivated her to stay alive so she can experience it herself. Sprout also had a wish, “She had only one wish, to hatch an egg and watch the birth of a chick.” (Hwang 17)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at February 17, 2016 10:37 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
18 February 2016

“‘Don’t you make a fuss…The hen can stay in the barn. But only tonight... She can sleep on the outer edge. As soon as I announce the dawn, she must leave at once!’” (Chapter 3: Into the Barn, page 27, par. 6, Sun-mi Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to the moment when the barnyard animals are arguing about allowing the hen, Sprout, enter in the barn for the night to be safe. Most of the animals do not think logically about the situation, and decide she should not be allowed inside, but one of the animals allows her in. (a) Which animal of the barnyard has the most authority and allows her to come inside for the night? (b) Why did he allow her inside?

Answer: The rooster decides to allow Sprout to come inside the barn. The rooster says “It’s late, so the weasel might come by… The coop is closed anyway.” He logically decides that it is too dangerous for her to stay outside, he allows her to stay for one night thinking he is generous.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 18, 2016 01:22 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
18 February 2016

“‘Don’t you make a fuss…The hen can stay in the barn. But only tonight... She can sleep on the outer edge. As soon as I announce the dawn, she must leave at once!’” (Chapter 3: Into the Barn, page 27, par. 6, Sun-mi Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to the moment when the barnyard animals are arguing about allowing the hen, Sprout, enter in the barn for the night to be safe. Most of the animals do not think logically about the situation, and decide she should not be allowed inside, but one of the animals allows her in. (a) Which animal of the barnyard has the most authority and allows her to come inside for the night? (b) Why did he allow her inside?

Answer: The rooster decides to allow Sprout to come inside the barn. He said “‘I am the head of the barn! Stragler has no right to say this or that. I make every decision’ Everyone deferred to the rooster’” (Hwang 27) The rooster says “It’s late, so the weasel might come by… The coop is closed anyway.” (Hwang 27) He logically decides that it is too dangerous for her to stay outside, he allows her to stay for one night thinking he is generous.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 18, 2016 01:25 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
18 February 2016

“Something was slinking in the grass opposite from where the voice was coming. Two eyes were glaring at her. A chill shot down her spine. ‘If you stay there you’re going to get into trouble!’ Sprout didn’t know who was ordering her around from outside the open grave but decided he was more trustworthy than the glinting eyes.” (Chapter 2: Flying the Coop, page 19, par. 3, Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to Sprout’s first experience outside of the cage. Has her situation improved? If so, what has changed?

Answer: Initially, her situation has not improved. She was thrown into the Hole of Death, a graveyard like area for the chickens, because she could no longer lay any eggs. The unknown voice who turned out to be the mallard helped her escape but then told her “Go back, now that you survived.” (Hwang 20) The mallard had no intentions of bringing her with him. All he wanted to do was help Sprout because he doesn’t like the weasel preying on creatures that are alive. Sprout had no idea where to go, so the mallard reluctantly brought Sprout to the barn.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 18, 2016 05:37 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
18 February 2016

“’My goodness, what is that?’ Sprout pulled her head out of the patch in confusion and blinked. She shoved her head back in. ‘How pretty!’” (Chapter 4: “The Egg in the Briar Patch, page 42, par. 2, Hwang)

Question: Sprout found two things in the briar patch. One physically and one mentally. What were they and how did they change Sprout?

Answer: Sprout found “in the middle of the patch was a white egg with a slight bluish cast to it.” (Hwang 42) She also found a reason to continue living because earlier in the chapter she said: “If I can’t lay an egg, what’s the point of my life?” (Hwang 40) Her attitude has completely changed for the better because of this discovery.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 18, 2016 05:39 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
18 February 2016


“Sprout glanced back at the weasel and hurried after the mallard. ‘How did you know I was in the grave?’ ‘On my way back from the reservoir I saw the weasel hanging around, which meant there was still a hen alive in the Hole of Death.” (Chapter 2: The hen who dreamed she could fly, page 20, par. 6)

Question: Why was Sprout afraid of the weasel, and why did the Mallard want to help Sprout?

Answer: In the novel, “The hen who dreamed she could fly,” Sprout knew that the weasel would have made a meal out of her, and the author wrote, “Sprout trembled, too. The weasel stood proudly on the other side of the open grave. He was glaring at them, angry that his meal had escaped,” which explained her fear. In chapter two, the Mallard wanted to help Sprout because he got angry when the weasel ate a live prey, and the Mallard explained,
“No need to thank me. I couldn’t let him get you. When he gets someone alive, I get so unbelievably angry.” It is clear that the Mallards help was based solely on his emotions.

Posted by: CH2_20-21_Andre Gilbert at February 19, 2016 01:28 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
19 February 2016
A Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly

3 #3: “Into the Barn” (Pages 29-31 of this chapter)
Original, Student-designed discussion question focused on the Identification of and a Short Close Reading of Key Passage for the selected pages of this chapter.

Question: What happened to Sprout when she finally felt settled in another farmer's coop?

Answer: As soon as Sprout felt safe and settled in the coop, she enjoyed sleep she never hoped to possess in a long time but sooner than anticipated she was being kicked out by the rooster. Her dreams of enjoying a place to stay was destroyed. Due to the roosters fear of "being the laughing stock of the barn," he demanded her to leave. (Hwang 29) As a result of his response humiliated her, but she built a resolve to lay an egg to ensure her stay at the new coop

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at February 19, 2016 10:26 AM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 February 2016

“From the moment Sprout had left the coop, the weasel’s eyes had always followed her. Straggler had shielded her from the realization that the briar patch wasn’t safe. He had stayed awake every night to guard her and her egg from the weasel.” (Chapter 5: A Farewell and a Greeting, page 58, par. 1, Hwang)

Question: Why was Straggler continuously willing to help Sprout and the egg? What happened to him because of this?

Answer: Straggler had an attachment to the egg. He told Sprout, “When the egg hatches, leave this place. And go to the reservoir, not the yard, okay?” (Hwang 54) The reservoir is where all the ducks go. This clue and all the other clues throughout the chapter suggest that the egg is actually his. Because of his concern for the safety of the egg he spent entire nights “dancing” around fending off the weasel. After doing this many times, he became exhausted. He told Sprout, “I hope the egg hatches tomorrow, before it’s too late. I’m too tired.” (Hwang 57) It was too late because on the night the egg hatched the weasel had caught Straggler by surprise and killed him.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 20, 2016 04:36 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 February 2016

“‘Your wings look different from the other duck’s. Although your right wing is a little strange.” (Chapter 5: A Farewell and a Greeting, page 52, par. 2, Sun-mi Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to the moment when Sprout admits to Straggler that she notices how his wings are different from the barnyard ducks’. What makes Straggler different than the other farm animals? Why do you think Straggler’s wings are different than the other barnyard ducks?

Answer: I think Straggler is different than the other farm animals because he is not a farm animal, he is a wild duck. Due to the fact that Straggler is from the wild, it is possible that his wings look different because they are not clipped. To keep the farm ducks from flying away they may have clipped their wings, this would explain why Sprout would have thought his wings looked strange.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 20, 2016 08:21 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative
19 February 2016

“Sprout was petrified. But the farmer shook his head. “It’s sick anyway. It’ll die eventually. Or a weasel will get to it.” (Chapter 3: Into the Barn pg. 31, par. 5, Sun-Mi Hwang)

Question: Why didn’t the farmer care about Sprout’s life anymore? What did the farmer’s wife say that stunned Sprout?

Answer: The farmer did not care about the Sprout because he believed Sprout was sick since she couldn’t lay any eggs. (Hwang 31) The farmer’s wife said “Should I put it back in the coop? Oh, right, this one can’t lay eggs. Should we eat it?” (Hwang 31) When the farmer’s wife said this, Sprout was afraid she was going to be their next meal.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at February 21, 2016 09:16 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative
21 February 2016

Chapter 5
“Morning dawned. The sun began to rise from behind the reservoir, dampened by fog as usual, illuminating the spot where Straggler usually sat. He would watch the sun and shake out his feathers was no longer. Sprout vowed never to forget him. Oh! The egg had begun alone for the long time by now, Sprout rushed into the briar patch. She couldn’t believe her eyes.”
Question: Why was Sprout as surprised as she seemed to be when she realized what the egg was doing?
Answer: Sprout was as surprised as she was, because none of her eggs prior to this had ever gotten as far as this one had, and none of them really ever seemed to hatch properly. So it was a wonderful feeling that she got knowing that one of her eggs was actually beginning to hatch properly and they had a chance to actually live.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 21, 2016 11:41 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
A Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly
22 February 2016

6 #4 Chapter 6: “A Disgrace to the Comb” (Pages 70-72 of this chapter)
Original, Student-designed discussion question focused on the Identification of and a Short Close Reading of Key Passage for the selected pages of this chapter

Question: Who did Sprout leave the Yard with and why?

Answer: Once again hoping for a place to call home Sprout returned to her original home and it was the same a she left it. Sad to say, her stay was brief as the last. She overheard a discussion that the Farmer and his wife was holding which disturbed her deeply though it was not directly targeting her. It was directed to a duck who to the Farmer appeared to be wild. The Farmer and his wife were discussing what they were going to do to him, whether to “put him in a cage or clip his wings.” (Hwang 70) Overhearing everything the ducks and the hens went into disarray trying to decide the fate of the stray duck. Finally, Sprout waited until everyone was sound asleep and escorted the duck to safety away from the farmer and his wife’s clutches.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at February 22, 2016 10:20 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
18 February 2016


“As she headed back toward the briar patch with some blades of grass in her beak, she heard something behind her. Straggler! She was so stunned that she almost dropped everything. He looked exhausted and sad. She was glad to see him, but she stopped in her tracks so he wouldn’t catch her with her egg” (Chapter 4: The hen who dreamed she could fly, page 44, par. 1).

Question: Why do you think Sprout was stunned to see Stragler? What was Sprout doing, that she always wanted to do?

Answer: In chapter four, “The egg in the briar patch,” Sprout worried about Stragler, especially because he was sad. In fact, Sprout was very concerned and “she wondered what had happened to her friend. He didn’t tell her anything, but from time to time he moved his head out from under his wing and looked at her with sad eyes” (Hwang 44). Sprout had always wanted to hatch an egg of her own, “eventually Sprout went back into the briar patch and settled over the egg” (Hwang 44). Sprout said to herself,
“This is my egg. My baby that I can tell my stories to!” (Hwang 43). It is clear that Sprout had finally found a way to do what she had longed to do for so long, and hatch her egg.

Posted by: CH4_44_Andre Gilbert at February 22, 2016 10:27 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 February 2016

“The next day Sprout and Baby returned to the reed fields. Baby jumped into the water, and Sprout went to take a look at their nest. But then she saw something awful. The reed warblers had been attacked.” (Chapter 7: Certainly a Duck, page 85, par. 3, Sun-mi Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to a moment before Sprout makes a decision about her future along with her baby. She vows something so that she could be safe from the weasel. What is the vow that Sprout makes?

Answer: After Sprout sees what the weasel did the reed warbler’s nest, Sprout vows to never make a permanent home anywhere to avoid discovery by the weasel. She vowed, “…not to make a permanent home anywhere. She would spot the hunter’s shadow before the hunter spotted them.” (Hwang 85)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 23, 2016 04:55 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 February 2016

“Sprout looked closely- Baby wasn’t drowning; he was definitely swimming, albeit clumsily. Dripping wet, Sprout laughed loudly. Her baby was doing things he hadn’t been taught. ‘Yes, you’re certainly a duck!’” (Chapter 7: Certainly a Duck, page 79, par. 6, Hwang)

Question: If the duckling was never taught how to swim before how was he able to do it?

Answer: He was able to do it because of his collective unconscious which Carl Jung said was the part of the brain that housed all the information that is passed on from generation to generation. It is something we acquire at birth. This is how the baby duck was able to swim after he fell off the lily pad.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 23, 2016 08:31 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
21 February 2016

“Sprout was scared, but she remained where she was. She didn’t want to do what the rooster demanded. “Let me see that duckling, I said!” Thundered the rooster, his neck feathers standing on end.” (Chap. 6 pg. 65 par. 1 Sun-Mi Hwang)

Question: What was Sprout’s response to the rooster? What did Sprout realize after the rooster’s statement?

Answer: Sprout’s response to the rooster was “Duckling?” (Hwang 65) Sprout hadn’t realized that the egg she was incubating was a duck’s egg. Sprout started analyzing her baby, and she noticed “All her baby’s toes were welded together. His beak was round, and he waddled, but she had chalked it all up to his youth.” (Hwang 65) Everything started making sense to Sprout; she finally realized why the egg was just sitting there all alone that night she heard a scream. Sprout began to piece everything together. Sprout thought to herself “I was incubating the white’s duck’s egg. Straggler knew everything—when the egg would hatch and that he had to die so it could live.” (Hwang 65)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at February 23, 2016 09:02 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
21 February 2016

“Sprout was scared, but she remained where she was. She didn’t want to do what the rooster demanded. “Let me see that duckling, I said!” Thundered the rooster, his neck feathers standing on end.” (Chap. 6 pg. 65 par. 1 Sun-Mi Hwang)

Question: What was Sprout’s response to the rooster? What did Sprout realize after the rooster’s statement?

Answer: Sprout’s response to the rooster was “Duckling?” (Hwang 65) Sprout hadn’t realized that the egg she was incubating was a duck’s egg. Sprout started analyzing her baby, and she noticed “All her baby’s toes were welded together. His beak was round, and he waddled, but she had chalked it all up to his youth.” (Hwang 65) Everything started making sense to Sprout; she finally realized why the egg was just sitting there all alone that night she heard a scream. Sprout began to piece everything together. Sprout thought to herself “I was incubating the white’s duck’s egg. Straggler knew everything—when the egg would hatch and that he had to die so it could live.” (Hwang 65)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at February 23, 2016 09:02 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 February 2016

“The reed warblers had been attacked. Their nest was torn to shreds and broken shells were everywhere.”

Question: Who was watching over the reed fields to notice something was wrong? Who had attacked the reed warblers and not Sprout and the Baby?

Answer: Sprout was watching over the reed fields the night of the attack. (Hwang 85) The weasel had attacked the reed warblers. Sprout decided to leave the reed fields because she knew it was only safe to do so to stay alive. (Hwang 84) While Sprout night watched “Sprout caught sight of something moving. She flattened herself on the ground. A dark shadow swiftly approached the reed fields. The weasel.” (Hwang 85) The weasel was unable to attack or capture Sprout and her Baby because they weren’t there; they had left just in time before the night of the attack.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at February 23, 2016 11:20 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journey in Narrative
A Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly
24 February 2016

Student #7:
Chapter 7: “Certainly a Duck” (Pages 84-85 of this chapter)
Original, Student-designed discussion question focused on the Identification of and a Short Close Reading of Key Passage for the selected pages of this chapter____________________

Question: What was the purpose in Sprouts tragedies?

Answer: Sprout’s tragedies were directly linked to her purpose in her journey. Spout throughout her life thus far found success from learning from the tragedies that were directed towards her, and the lives that were linked to her as well. From tragedies that happened to her friend, Straggler, who had to battle weasels, to being kicked out of her home, all granted her passage to commence her journey. These tragedies illuminated her purpose to help others and gave her knowledge that being trapped within a sheltered environment which would not have given her enlightenment. Now that she found direction, “she vowed not to make a permanent home anywhere” because she knew that there would be someone to aid due to her ability to “spot the hunter’s shadow before their hunters spotted her.” (Hwang 85) All in all, her tragedies gave her the necessary tool to face the world with wisdom and also granted to her the courage to battle when needed.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at February 24, 2016 10:07 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative
25 February 2016

Chapter4
“Straggler didn’t leave until dawn. She felt for him, but she was grateful he didn’t ask her any questions about the egg. As the mist-shrounded sun came up, Straggler headed to the reservoir with the other ducks. A while later he returned, a fish hangig from his bill. He placed it in fron t of the patch and left again.”
Question: Why was Sprout glad that Straggler didn’t ask questions about her egg?
Answer: Sprout was glad she wasn’t asked any questions about how her egg laying was going because she didn’t want to start having the conversation on why she couldn’t lay any eggs, and then get another lecture about why she can’t lay any eggs and never hear the end of it.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 25, 2016 11:38 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative
25 February 2016

Student #5: Chapter 7:
“Sprout thought it was laughable that he was bad mouthing chickens behind the rooster’s back; he woudn’t say a word of this to the rooster’s face. “So if our behinds get larger, why was it the ducks that ended up waddling?” Sprout asked gently, “And you have wings too. What do you use them for?’
Question: Why did Sprout feel as though she needed to ask all these questions?
Answer: Sprout felt like she needed to ask all of these different questions, because she wanted a better understanding of why Straggler was talking about the duckling behind the rooster’s back. She wanted a better understanding of what was going to become the end result of everything that was being said

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 25, 2016 11:59 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220 CL Jourenys into Narrative
25 February 2016

Chapter 8:
“ But Greentop, shook his head. “ I don’t know, Mom. What if the ducks never accept me? I want to be one of them.” He started to weep.”
Question: Why did Greentop feel as awfu as he did about everyting?
Answer: Greentop felt as awful as he did because of the fact that not a single duck would accept him into their patch. He felt like he was being outcasted by so many different and he didn’t know what else there was to do because all he wanted to do is to be accepted by those who he wanted to associate with the most.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 25, 2016 12:08 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
25 February 2016

“The weasel laughed derisively. Sprout felt her heart pound and her entire body inflame with rage. She was no longer frightened by the weasel’s stare. As the weasel was about to turn away, Sprout sprinted toward him like a moth darting toward a flame.” (Chapter 8: Joining the Brace, page 92, par. 2, Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to an important moment is Sprouts journey. She is no longer afraid of the weasel and attacks him. Where did Sprout find the courage to attack the weasel and what happened to her after she attacked him?

Answer: She most likely got the courage from wanting to protect her baby because “Until now they had managed to avoid the weasel, but he was one step ahead of them. Greentop wasn’t paying attention. Sprout had to take charge of the situation.” (Hwang 91) This situation had happened before when the weasel snuck up on Straggler and sprout just before the baby was born. She could have gotten the courage from not wanting that memory to happen again. She was knocked around after attacking him and was barely conscious. She could not find Greentop and then noticed two things. The first was she had part of the weasel’s flesh in her beak and secondly her baby was flying.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 25, 2016 04:47 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
25 February 2016

“‘Mom, I’ve been thinking,’ he said with difficulty. He was quiet for a while. Sprout grew nervous.” (Chapter 8: Joining the Brace, page 94 & 95, par. 6, Sun-mi Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to a moment just before Baby makes a suggestion to his mother, Sprout. What did Baby say to Sprout? What was Sprout’s reaction?

Answer: Baby said, “How about we go back to the barn? I don’t like being by myself all the time.” (Hwang 95) He wanted to go back to the barnyard so he could be with his own kind. Sprout was disappointed. “Her heart sank… ‘Even though we look different, we cherish each other. I love you so much.’” (Hwang 95 Sprout was sad her son felt like he needed to go live with the other ducks to be happy.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 25, 2016 11:15 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
A Hen Who Dreamed She could Fly
26 February 2016


Student #4:
Chapter 8: “Joining the Brace” (Pages 93-94 of this chapter)
Original, Student-designed discussion question focused on the Identification of and a Short Close Reading of Key Passage for the selected pages of this chapter

Question: What feeling did Sprout feel towards her son Green top?

Answer: Spout loved Greentop though he was not her biological offspring. She raised him after their time leaving the barn and therefore, developed a soft spot for him. Also, Sprout felt envy within her heart towards her son due to his ability to fly. Since “Greentop spent days at the reservoir,” she often felt alone which appeared to be the root of her envy.(Hwang 93) When Greentop was young and unable to fly Spout, and Greentop did everything together, therefore, when he found his new ability she exhibited loneliness since she could not experience it with him nor was she able to do it.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at February 26, 2016 10:16 AM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 February 2016

“One early morning the wind blew mightily, shaking the reed fields. Something was in the air. Sprout trembled as the wind cut into her feathers. She became worried about Greentop, who was within shouting distance.” (Chapter 9: Travelers from Another World, page 107, par. 2, Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to something being in the air. Was it something physical, a feeling, or both?

Answer: There was something actually in the air as well as a feeling Sprout had. She sensed danger and discovered the weasel had returned with three others. There was something different about him this time. He was missing an eye which Sprout realized she had plucked out when they last fought. She was right about her feeling because they weasels were there to hunt Greentop. The one-eyed weasel said, "You're not what we're looking for unless there's nothing else to eat in the fields," (Vogler 108) After that encounter the four weasels left. The physical part of something being in the air was a flock of ducks who were headed towards the lake. "The birds circled the reservoir and started landing on the water. Sprout and Greentop gaped at the travelers from another world. (Vogler 109) This was Straggler's long lost family and Sprout now knew why he wanted her to take the baby to the reservoir. To be able to be with his real family.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 27, 2016 05:22 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative
28 February 2016

Chapter 9
Question 8: “Travelers from Another World” (Pages 111-112 of this chapter) Original, Student-designed discussion question focused on the Identification of and a Short Close Reading of Key Passage for the selected pages of this
“Straggler! Your family is here!’’ Sprout whispered. They had to be his knd, the family he’d missed every time he struggled to climp the hill to look far off in the distance. He’d been separated from such a big flock—how loneyly he must have been without them!”
Question: why was straggler so reluctant to go over to the flock when he first saw them?
Answer: Straggler was so reluctant at the time because he never knew how long they were going to stick around and actually be there long enough for him to get a better understanding as to who he really is, and how much he is loved all throughout. But he had to get comfortable around them again to get a better feel as to what they were like.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 28, 2016 10:16 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 February 2016

“The farmer and his wife hadn’t tied up Straggler. So why Baby?” (Chapter 9: Travelers From Another World, page 103 & 104, par. 2, Sun-mi Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to a moment when Sprout is confused. Her wild duck friend Straggler had not been tied up like they were tying up Baby. As she is pondering another character approaches her, and gives her the answer. Who was the other character and what was the reason for tying Baby up?

Answer: The weasel is the other character that gives her the truth. He says to her, “‘Soon I’ll get him before long!...Even though he’s tied to that stilt? Soon he’ll be so fat he won’t be able to fly. That’s how they get tame.’ Again the weasel laughed. Sprout suddenly understood.” (Hwang 103) The weasel told her that they tied him up so that he would get fat, and therefore not be able to fly away.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 29, 2016 08:29 AM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
29 February 2016

"Greentop started to snore, but Sprout couldn't sleep. Tonight she had to rid him of the cord. All night she pecked at it. By the time morning came around she was dizzy, and her beak was so sore she couldn't even open it. But the cord was now ragged; it could easily snap off.” (Chapter 10: The Bone-Wear, One-Eyed Hunter, page 119, par. 3, Hwang)

Question: Greentop is finally free from the cord. What does this symbolize in his journey? What does it symbolize in Sprout's journey?

Answer: Greentop is aided by his mother, Sprout. She tells him, "You should leave. Don't you think you should follow your kind and see other worlds? If I could fly I would never stay here." (Hwang 120) Sprout is acting as a mentor by giving him advice and aided him in removing the cord. In Sprouts journey, it could symbolize that her adventure is nearing its end. She was able to hatch an egg, raise a baby, and now he is all grown up and ready for his own adventure.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 29, 2016 04:53 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
29 February 2016


A Hen Who Dream She Could Fly

Chapter 9

Student #2:
Chapter 9: “Travelers from Another World” (Pages 101-102 of this chapter)
Original, Student-designed discussion question focused on the Identification of and a Short Close Reading of Key Passage for the selected pages of this chapter


Question: How does the dog prove to be more than just a guardian?

Answer: In the Text the dog depicts the guardian role but in others can prove to be a shadow playing the role of enemy. Based on Voglers’ definition on the role of villain and enemy, he states, “they are usually dedicated to the death, destruction, or defeat of the hero” (Vogler 65). In chapter 11, the dog though exhibiting the role of the guardian also shows his eagerness to take the hero, Sprout, out when given the chance. This is alluded in the dog's statement, “I am a strict gatekeeper, so I have a habit of bitting first.” (Hwang 102) Through such a bold and aggressive notion given by dog to Sprout, he wasn't afraid of taking her out, therefore expressing not to give him the reason to.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at February 29, 2016 05:45 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 February 2016

“Long ago, when Greentop fearlessly skipped across the lily pads and swam, Spout realized he wasn’t her kind.” (Chapter 8: Joining the Brace, pg. 96 par. 1 Sun Mi-Hwang)

Question: Now that Greentop is older, what would Greentop like to do? What happens the next day after Greentop and Sprout’s conversation?

Answer: Since Greentop is older, he realizes that he has become lonely and that Sprout isn’t able to do the same activities he can do because she is a hen. Before Greentop and Sprout were about to go to bed, Greentop expressed to Sprout “How about we go back to the barn? I don’t like being by myself all the time.” (Sun Mi-Hwang 95) He also said “What if the ducks never accept me? I want to be one of them.” (Sun Mi-Hwang 95) The next day after Greentop told Sprout what he wanted to do he went out to the reservoir. As Sprout “watched him sidling up to them. They were cold to him. But Greentop kept hanging around. As the sun set, the ducks returned to the yard. Greentop trailed them.” (Sun Mi-Hwang 96/97)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at March 1, 2016 11:07 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 February 2016

“The weasel came because you tied up that duck” snapped the farmer. “It’s like inviting him to a dinner party. Go tie up in the barn.” (Chapter 9: Travelers from Another World pg. 105 par. 3 sun Mi-Hwang)

Question: Who was the farmer talking to, what were they doing? And what did the person suggest so the weasel wouldn’t come into the yard?

Answer: The farmer was speaking to his wife, “who was trying to herd the ducks back into the barn.” (Sun Mi-Hwang 105) The farmer’s wife suggested “We need a bulldog--that dog’s too old. Otherwise, the native chicken seed will dry up.” (Sun Mi-Hwang 105)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at March 1, 2016 11:37 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 March 2016

“By the time autumn turned to winter, the weasels had eaten all the young and weak mallards.” (Chapter 10: The Bone-Weary, One Eyed Hunter pg. 116 par. 2 Sun Mi-Hwang)

Question: When winter came around how successful were the weasels hunting for food?

Answer: The weasels hunting, begin to become unsuccessful. (Sun Mi-Hwang 116) “Healthy mallards were formidable opponents. The hungry weasels were swift on their tails, but they were lucky to get one every other day.” (Sun Mi-Hwang 116) They became so unsuccessful with not eating or catching any mallards, two of the weasels decided to split up and hunt elsewhere.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at March 2, 2016 12:02 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
2 March 2016

“She’d had a single wish, to sit on an egg and see the birth of a baby. Her wish had come true. She’d had a hard life, but she’d been happy. That is what sustained her… She’d never realized that she’d harbored another wish; it was something she physically longed for.” (Chapter 11: Aloft Like a Feather, page 133, par. 2, Sun-mi Hwang)

Question: This passage refers to a moment when Sprout looks back on her life. While her baby leaves her she realizes she had another wish other than raising a baby. What was Sprouts other wish? Did it come true? If so, then how?

Answer: Sprout’s other wish was to fly, she wanted to fly away from where she was. “Now I want to fly away! I want to go far away like Greentop” (Hwang 133) Sprouts final wish did come true. The weasel found Sprout and she let the weasel take her. “‘Go on, eat me,’ she urged. ‘Fill your babies’ bellies… You got me, finally.” (Hwang 134) Sprout’s story ends with her final wish coming true, she is flying way from her life. “Gliding through the air with her large, beautiful wings, Sprout looked down at everything below—the reservoir and the fields in a snowstorm, and the weasel limping away, a scrawny hen dangling from her jaws.” (Hwang 134)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at March 2, 2016 09:53 AM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
13 April 2016

“In the middle of the patch was a white egg with a slight bluish cast to it. An egg that hadn’t yet been wrapped by feathers. It was large and handsome, but there was no sign of its mother or that it was being incubated” (42).

Question: All her life Sprout has wanted to lay an egg and hatch a chick. She is given that opportunity when she comes across an egg in the briar patch. What context clues help the reader figure out who the mother of the egg is? Does this pose any future problems that might come about after the egg hatches?

Answer: Sprout finds the egg in the briar patch after hearing a “piercing scream” (41). The sound stunned her and left her feeling dizzy. “Everything turned red” after she heard the scream (41). Red can be associated with danger. She immediately thought of Straggler and “was convinced it was Straggler who’d screamed” (42). It may have been Straggler. Readers know that Straggler had a mate, a white duck. She could have been with Straggler. Sprout looks for signs of a struggle and finds the egg instead. After sitting on the egg all night without the mother returning, Sprout makes it her responsibility to see the egg hatch (43). That morning she finds Straggler, who “looked exhausted and sad” (44). He becomes her guard and brings her a fish from the reservoir (44). Sprout wonders why “his expression was so dark” and “where the white duck was” (44). Straggler is motivated to protect the egg because the egg belongs to him and the white duck. The context clues lead readers to believe the white duck is the mother, and she was killed right before Sprout found the egg. If this is true, the egg will hatch a duck, not a chicken. Because Scout plans to raise the baby as her own, raising a duck might be problematic. She cannot teach a duck how to be a duck like she would be able to teach a chicken how to be a chicken.

Posted by: nicole klukowski at April 13, 2016 03:26 PM

Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
13 April 2016

“Watchful and alert, Sprout looked into the darkness. She was like Straggler now.” (Page 84, “Certainly a Duck,” Chi-Young Kim translation)

Question: What does the author mean by stating that Sprout was like Straggler now? What was Sprout on the lookout for? Was she tough enough to face what was looming in the darkness?

Answer: Sprout was on the lookout for the weasel. She realizes that she is strong enough to face the weasel when she realizes “the weasel hadn’t been able to get her in the Hole of Death because she was too feisty” (84). She knows she must stay alert to protect Baby, and this is how she is like Straggler. “Straggler had stayed awake to keep the weasel away, flapping his wings and hollering” (84). Sprout know she must be vigilant to save Baby, even if it means sacrificing her own life like Straggler did.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at April 13, 2016 07:06 PM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
14 April 2016

Question: Straggler clearly knew that the egg was not Sprouts. Why didn’t Straggler tell Sprout that it was his and the white ducks egg?

Answer: Straggler never told Sprout that the egg was his, because he did not want to make Sprout uncomfortable, or hurt her feelings. Straggler knew that life would be hard for Sprout and his child since they would look different. Before dying, Straggler tells Sprout, “that’s all there is to it. We look different, so we don’t understand each other’s inner thoughts, but we cherish each other in our own way. I respect you” (Hwang 56). Straggler did not want Sprout to feel uncomfortable about having a child that does not look like her, therefore Straggler did not bring this topic up.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at April 14, 2016 01:59 PM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
15 April 2016

“You think I’ve survived out of luck? I’ve experienced it all. You better not bother me” (Page 106, Travelers from another World (Ch. 9), Chi-Young Kim translation).

Question: The major conflict of this particular scene (pgs. 103-107 of Chapter 9) revolves around Sprout’s attempt to save her duckling son, Greentop, from being eaten by the weasel. In what ways do Sprout’s interactions with the weasel reflect her development as a character since the beginning of the story?

Answer: Sprout has come a long way since the beginning of the story, and her interaction with the weasel in this scene exemplifies this greatly. The weasel, who is described as being “insidious” and intimidating as he “had a dying chicken between his jaws,” is shown almost no fear from Sprout, who “puff[s] her chest out and glare[s] at him” as a way to intimidate him instead (103). This is a contrast from pervious encounters with the weasel, in which Sprout did not appear as confident.

The weasel notices this as well, as he points out clearly that Sprout is “so confident,” enough of an unusual trait for him to notice and call out (102). In addition, Sprout yells confidently about the weasel’s inability to succeed, telling him that “[he] will never get [Greentop]” and that “[she’d] rather drown in the reservoir than let [the weasel] devour [her]” (104). This, too, is a contrast to how Sprout was towards the beginning of the story, in which she found difficulty in having a reason to live, which lead to her eating less and laying smaller eggs.

It is interesting to note, however, that Sprout did still feel some fear towards the weasel, although it is clear that the fear is not for the sake of Sprout, but rather of her duckling, Greentop. Sprout is described as feeling “frozen” when she realizes what the weasel’s most possible plan of attack is (which is to allow Greentop to be fattened so that he cannot fly away); when she “started after [the weasel],” she is told to have “had goose bumps” and to be “trembling” (104). Because of this, it is evident that Sprout has grown to know she can take care of herself, but still must also care for Greentop, whose survival is not always in her hands.

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at April 14, 2016 08:46 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
14 April 2016

“He had become moody from time to time after the leader had visited them in the reeds. These episodes recurred more frequently after his feathers changed color.”
(Page 90, “Joining the Brace”, Chi-Young Kim Translation)

Question: Why was Greentop becoming moody as he was getting older?

Answer: Greentop was getting moody because the more he grew, the more he realized he was not the same species of bird as his mother, and this bothered him. Later in the chapter, he says, “I know you love me. But we’re still not the same kind.” (95). He wanted to be able to spend some time with his own kind, but he would have to leave his mother to do that.

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at April 14, 2016 09:25 PM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
15 April 2016
Chapter 10 pages 117 – 120:
Question: In these first few pages of chapter ten, Greentop comes back expressing that he wants to stay with Sprout. Sprout, on the other hand, takes notice of the cord Greentop is still dragging behind him. Later, Sprout spends all the entire night pecking at the cord until it is frayed enough to be snapped. What sort of meaning could the snapping of the cord hold? What does it mean for Sprout and Greentop?

Answer: The cord snapping and Sprout’s part in its breaking is symbolic of the connection between Sprout and Greentop also breaking. Greentop has yet to be accepted by the flock of wild ducks. One of the reasons for this is because of the strange cord around his foot and his relationship with Sprout, a hen. Sprout understands this and snaps to cord because she believes Greentop “should leave” (120). Greentop has also been reluctant about being fully accepted into the brace because that would mean leaving behind Sprout, who cannot fly. Thus, serving the cord is symbolic of serving their relationship so that Greentop can become the new lookout and freely join the flock in time for when they fly away for the winter. Sprout understands this and forces Greentop to think hard about this when she asks him, “Don’t you think you should follow you kind and see other worlds” (120). Sprout also tells Greentop to do what he “want[s] to do. Ask yourself what that is” (120). All of Sprout’s actions point towards this final separation and severing of their connection to each other.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at April 14, 2016 11:00 PM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
15 April 2016

"She would never return. Looking straight ahead stiffening her claws, setting her break firmly, and with fierce eyes, she walked resolutely into the twilight." (Hwang 71)

Question: Do you think that Sprout is in just as much, or more, danger than when she was stuck in the chicken coop? Why or why not?

Answer: From the beginning of the story, all Sprout wanted in life was to be free of the coop and raise her own chick. Now that she has experienced the hardships of life outside the barn, she realizes that it was not going to be the easy and free life as she thought. However, now that she has Baby, which is all she ever wanted, she will do anything to keep her duckling safe. Even though she is a hen and she is raising a duckling, she will treat and love it like her own. Now that she has fulfilled what she desired most, she will go through any obstacle to keep her freedom and Baby safe.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at April 15, 2016 01:18 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
15 April 2016

“The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly” Chi-Young Kim translation.

“From the slope she watched him sidling up to them. They were cold to him. They yelled at him. The leader even attacked him. But Greentop kept hanging around” (Hwang 96).

Question: Why does Greentop want to fit in with the ducks? Why do the ducks reject him? What does this novel say about acceptance in society?

Answer: Greentop wants to be part of the ducks because he knows that he is a duck, not a chicken like his mother (Hwang 95). However, the ducks dislike him because he looks like a wild duck and he can fly. Sprout never let Greentop join the ducks because she was afraid his wings would be clipped and he would lose his individuality (70). This scared Sprout as much “as seeing the weasel’s eyes” (70). This novel shows that fitting in with the crowd will make people unhappy in the end. While Greentop would have been given protection in the barn by joining the other ducks, he would have his wings clipped, and he would not be able to fly away from the weasel (93). Sprout would have been killed or sent back to coop if she had stayed in the yard (96). Though individuality makes life hard for Sprout and Greentop, it is what keeps them alive.

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 15, 2016 09:39 AM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures
17 April 2016

The Egg in the Briar Patch

Question: Why does Sprout suddenly want to lay an egg after being determined never to do so again in the chapters prior? What changed?

Answer: This desire comes from the want of something you don’t have and a power struggle. Sprout doesn’t want to be told what to do as seen from chapter 1 where she says “I refuse to lay another egg. Ever!” (10). The reason she didn’t like laying eggs was because she was forced to do it. She saw the other animals having fun on the outside and assumed it was a better life than the one she was living so she wanted it. In the third chapter, Sprout is free with the other animals but finds the life not as exciting as she thought it would be. However, now she wants to lay an egg. Laying eggs was all she has known and now that she is not being forced to do it, it’s more appealing to her. “If I can’t lay an egg, what’s the point of my life?” (40).Also, the familiarity plays a part in it. Since she feels displaced and alone, something familiar would comfort her. She’s going back to what she knows.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at April 17, 2016 02:12 AM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
17 April 2016

Question: What is the significance of chapter five’s title, “A Farewell and a Greeting?”

Answer: The title of chapter five, “A Farewell and a Greeting,” refers to the death of Straggler and the birth of Baby. In the days before the egg hatches, Straggler acts erratically. He runs through the briar patch flapping his wings in the middle of the night, brings Sprout fish, and speaks cryptically. Finally, Sprout hears Straggler scream as the weasel snaps his neck and drags him away. Sprout cries at the death of her friend, thinking, “Although a precious life was snuffed out in an instant, the world was serene. The trees, stars, moon, ad grass were hushed as though they’d witnessed nothing” (Hwang 58). Even though Sprout is grieving her friend’s death, she soon has cause to celebrate. The very next morning, the egg hatches. Sprout is full of joy. She dotes on the young baby and reflects, “Someone died, and someone was born. Sometimes a farewell and a greeting happened at the same time” (Hwang 59). Straggler is gone, but Baby has arrived.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at April 17, 2016 03:41 PM

Lauren Kilton

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation

15 April 2016

Pages 113-116 Question: How is Greentop considered an outcast like Sprout?

Answer: Sprout is considered an outcast by the barn animals because she is a culled chicken who hatches and raises a duck. Greentop eventually learns that he is also an outcast, but the community that rejects him is a brace of ducks at the reservoir. Even though Greentop grows up in the fields like the wild ducks, "the cord around his food g[ives] the impression that he had run away from a human, so [they are] wary of him" (115). The cord also prevents Greentop from flying as well as the other ducks, so he has a difficult time blending in with the group.


Posted by: Lauren Kilton at April 17, 2016 11:06 PM

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