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October 22, 2014

The Departure Phase (Act I) of the Hero's Journey


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 22, 2014 10:55 AM

Readers' Comments:

(Yellow Kosinski Group)
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
22 October 2014


Discussion #1: Identify the HERO archetype you are chatting.

Answer: The boy.

Discussion #2: Identify the ordinary World of this HERO.

Answer: Large city in eastern Europe with his parents.

Discussion #3: Identify the Special World of this HERO.

Answer: Without his parents in more towards eastern Europe.

Discussion #4: Identify the exact location of the First Threshold between the two worlds.

Answer: When the Orphan Gypsy child separated from his parents, he was entrusted to foster parents for protection.

Question #1: Ordinary World of this journey

Answer: Large city in eastern Europe with his parents.

Question #2: Call to Adventure of this Journey

Answer: The war started, and because “his father had prewar anti-Nazi activities, they had to leave to avoid forced labor in Germany or imprisonment in a concentration camp (Kosinski 3)”.

Question #3: Refusal of the Call for this journey (if applicable)?

Answer: There is none, but he did not refuse the call.

Question #4: Meeting with the Mentor for this Journey

Answer: The parents were initially the first mentors because they tell the boy that they will be reunited again. They also give him that source of hope as well. There was an educated guess from the reader that the parents tell him that they will be reunited again with the boy.

Question #5:

Answer: The Crossing of the Threshold is the hand off from the parents to the transport system that sent the boy to Marta’s house.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 22, 2014 01:56 PM

Bronwen Burke, Erin Gaylord, Aaron Virelli, Joshua Natonlo, Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
22 October 2014

The Departure Stages of the Monomyth Act/ Phase 1 for Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Questions and Answers:

• Identify the HERO archetype you are charting: Siddhartha

• Identify the Ordinary World of this HERO: The initial Ordinary World is his religious life with his family and friend Govinda. “…in the shade of the sallow wood and the fig tree, Siddhartha, the handsome Brahmin’s son, grew up with his friend Govinda” (Hesse 3).

• Identify the Special World of this HERO: The initial Special World is his life with the Samanas. “On the evening of that day they overtook the Samanas and requested their company and allegiance. They were accepted” (Hesse 13).

• Identify the exact location of the First Threshold between the two worlds: In the woods with the Samanas /the moment, the Samanas accepted him. “On the evening of that day they overtook the Samanas and requested their company and allegiance. They were accepted” (Hesse 13).

1. Ordinary World of this Journey (see above):

Siddhartha’s life with his father and mother in his religious community was Siddhartha’s Ordinary World. “…in the shade of the sallow wood and the fig tree, Siddhartha, the handsome Brahmin’s son, grew up with his friend Govinda” (Hesse 3).

2. Call to Adventure of this Journey:

The meditation at the banyan tree – “They went to the banyan tree and sat down…he sat down ready to pronounce the Om…” (Hesse 8)

3. Refusal of the Call for this Journey (if applicable):

N/A

4. Meeting with the Mentor for this Journey:

The conversation with his father about his proposed journey. “’With your permission, Father, I have come to tell you that I wish to leave your home tomorrow and join the ascetics’." “Then his father said: ‘It is not seemly for Brahmins to utter forceful and angry words, but there is displeasure in my heart’” (Hesse 10).

5. Crossing of the [First] Threshold for this Journey:

His journey to the woods where he joins the Samanas “On the evening of that day they overtook the Samanas and requested their company and allegiance. They were accepted” (Hesse 13).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 22, 2014 08:45 PM

James Sierra,
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
22 October 2014

Question 2:
2. We have already learned that a monomythic hero has two worlds: An Ordinary one, and a Special one. According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, are we, as readers and human beings, limited to only ONE Special World in our lives. Explain what Vogler means about heroes traversing a “succession of Special Worlds” and what happens to each of them as the journey progresses. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
What I can tell Vogler means is that a Heroes journey may take him to many different places. As the Hero progresses through his journey, the worlds will “evolve from strange, foreign territory to familiar bases from which to launch a drive into the next Special World. (Vogler pg.87).” For example, when Luke in Star Wars boards the Millennium Falcon for the first time, it is unknown to him, and he describes it as just a piece of junk. As his journey progresses, the ship becomes like their home as they travel through galaxies.

Posted by: James Sierra at October 26, 2014 01:59 PM

James Sierra, Ashlee English, Mat Basin, Joanna Ozog, Jonah Robertson, Jake Gates
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
17 October 2014

In Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha, the Hero of the story we felt is Siddhartha. His ordinary was when he was living at home with his father and Brahman Caste. The special world for the Hero is outside his home. His first threshold to cross was asking his father for permission to leave the Brahman.
As stated above the Siddhartha’s ordinary world is when he lives at home with his father and the Brahman. His call to adventure is when he decides for himself that he is not satisfied at home, and feels that in order to find the knowledge he seeks he needs to venture out on his own. We did not feel there was a time when Siddhartha refused the call. As Vogler states, “You stand at the threshold of fear, and an understandable reaction would be to hesitate or even refuse the Call, at least temporarily (Vogler 107.” Siddhartha does not seem to have any hesitation to start his journey. During his journeys, Siddhartha met with many mentors. The threshold Siddhartha has to cross is receiving permission to leave from his father.

Posted by: James Sierra at October 26, 2014 03:58 PM

Ashley Gross, Tashanna Harris, Nathanael Jones, Zachary Sabo, Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
24 October 2014

The Departure Stages of the Monomyth’s Act/ Phase 1 for A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

Identify the Hero: Scrooge
Identify the Ordinary World of this Hero: The ordinary world for Scrooge consisted of the regular day London town, physically, and a cold-hearted/ cynical personality, mentally.
Identify the Special world of this hero: The special world for Scrooge consisted of the dream world where he was taken on his journeys by the 3 spirits and got visited by Marley’s ghost.
Identify the exact location of the First Threshold between the two worlds: When Scrooge crosses the threshold of his home after seeing Marley’s face on the knocker; he no longer presides in his normal world.

1. Ordinary World of this Journey: The ordinary world for Scrooge consisted of the regular day London town, physically, and a cold-hearted/ cynical personality, mentally.
2. Call to Adventure of this Journey: The call to adventure occurs when Marley enters the plot and warns Scrooge about his visitation of the three spirits.
3. Refusal of the Call for this Journey: The Refusal of the Call consists of Scrooge wanting proof that Marley’s ghost was actually Marley, and attempting to get out of the journey or making the as convenient as possible.
4. Meeting with the Mentor for this Journey: Marley serves as a mentor showing the result of Scrooge’s actions if he does not change his ways.
5. Crossing the [first] Threshold: When Scrooge crosses the threshold of his home after seeing Marley’s face on the knocker; he no longer presides in his normal world.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 27, 2014 07:45 AM

Peter Bellini, Rebeccah Braun, Matt Basin, Thomas Meseroll
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 10 2014


5. Crossing the [First] Threshold for this Journey: Group Work


In Watership Down we, begin the story with the main character Hazel and his small companion Fiver living peacefully in their burrow at the Sandleford Warren. This peace does not last long as Fiver begins to have violent visions and decides to warn the warren that there is a great danger approaching. Hazel and his prophetic friend are denied and seen as a sham by the chief rabbit and decides against moving out of the warren. The pair remains undeterred as they go about convincing others to join them; this upsets the Owsla captain Holly, who confronts the growing group. Holly and his guards attempt to prevent the rebellious group from leaving the warren, but they are defeated by Bigwig. Now the path is cleared for the rabbits and allows them to leave their Ordinary World and enter the Special World of adventure.

Posted by: Peter Bellini, Rebeccah Braun, Matt Basin, Thomas Meseroll at October 29, 2014 12:42 PM

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