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October 14, 2014

Revealing "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" by James Thurber


Image Source:http://www.ssninsider.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/walter-mitty-poster.jpg


Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 14, 2014 10:44 PM

Readers' Comments:

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
October 17, 2014

QUESTION #8:
Where does Walter Mitty go after getting the puppy biscuits? Why?


ANSWER:
Walter Mitty goes back to get his wife and pick her up after her hair appointment after getting the puppy biscuits. He gets them because it came from a daydream of him being a lawyer and defending someone that was being accused of shooting and killing another man. He argues that “[He] could have killed Gregory Fitzhurst at three hundred feet away with [his] left hand” (Thurber 4). It was during this daydream that he said the words puppy biscuit and was laughed at in front of the whole room. He went back to get his wife because “his wife would be through at the hairdresser’s in fifteen minutes” (Thurber 4). He knew where he needed to be to get her, yet he had to big up the dog treats on his way because it was caught in his thoughts.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at October 17, 2014 12:50 AM

Alyssa Davis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
17 October 2014

Question #11:
In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” what is Walter Mitty’s final daydream? Describe who he is and what he does in the daydream. Also, what might it symbolize? Explain your response.

Answer:
In Mitty’s final dream, he is in a war where he believes he would not make out. Although he thinks, he may not make it out he still tries to make a way. He tells the Sergeant that he should go on and the sergeant does not want to leave Mitty on his own. Mitty’s last dream symbolizes his bravery. After taking a couple shots of Brandy, Mitty was now determined to make it out. “‘We only live once, Sergeant,’ said Mitty, with his faint, fleeting smile. ‘ Or do we?’” (Thurber Page 4).

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at October 17, 2014 11:01 AM

Justine Gonzalez
Dr.Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
16 October 2014

Question #2:
Looking closely at the text of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” how do you, as a reader, know that Walter Mitty is switching between his daydream and reality? Explain your response.

Answer:
Looking closely at the text while reading it, I noticed that before the daydream the writer puts, “…” to indicate that the scene is changing from reality to daydream. The writer puts it in the end or the beginning of the paragraph to show the daydream. In the beginning if the story he starts with a daydream and in the end he puts, “…” to show the daydream ends and reality starts. “ “The Old Man ain’t afraid of Hell!” …”(Thurber 1) shows the end of the daydream, and now reality starts.

Posted by: Justine Gonzalez at October 17, 2014 12:10 PM

Elizabeth Brown
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
17 October 2014

Question #10:
.In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” why might the moment when Walter Mitty tells his wife, “Does it occur to you that I am sometimes thinking?” be the climax of the story? Explain your response.
Answer:
In this story, Walter is envisioning multiple scenes from various places in time. When he says that sometimes he is thinking, he is referring to the daydreams that he sees while he goes through his everyday tasks. This is the climax of the story because you have no idea what is really going on with him, you have no idea why he is seeing these different times and then when he tells his wife that he is thinking, the whole story comes together and you can understand why he was seeing what he sees. “He took one last drag on his cigarette and snapped it away. Then with a faint fleeting smile playing about his lips, he faced the firing squad; erect and motionless, proud and disdainful, Walter Mitty the Undefeated, inscrutable to the last.” ( Thurber, page 5 )

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at October 17, 2014 01:33 PM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing 2
17 October 2014

Question #14:
What might be the central theme of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”? Explain how that theme is revealed through the character of Mitty? Explain your response.
Answer:
The central theme is everyone has their own perfect place. They all have their own mental reality. In their mind, they are daydreaming on what is basically perfect. (Thurber 3) The theme is revealed through mitty by how he is smug about it. How he was motionless, proud and disdainful. (Thurber 5)

Posted by: Zachary Gary at October 17, 2014 01:44 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 March 2015

Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” compare and contrast the
way Mitty is treated by people in his dreams with the way he is actually treated in
his real life. Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part
of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Mitty is treated with respect and honor in his dreams, the people in his dreams believe and trust in him for anything. “The Old Man’ll get us through, they said to one another. The Old Man ain’t afraid of Hell!” (Thurber 1) he feels he is undefeatable. “Then, with that faint, fleeting smile playing about his lips, he faced the firing squad; erect and motionless, proud and disdainful, Walter Mitty the Undefeated, inscrutable to the last.” (Thurber 5) In reality, he is constantly being pestered by his wife and told there is something wrong with him. She wants to take him to the doctor to be looked over. “It’s one of your days. I wish you’d let Dr. Renshaw look you over.” (Thurber 2)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at March 4, 2015 11:52 AM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 March 2015

Question 5: In James Thurber's "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," what is the "pocketa-pocketa-pocketa" in real life? Explain in your response.

Answer: Pocketa-pocketa-pocketa in real life is the accomplishments or dreams of accomplishments wish to be done. In the beginning, Walter sees himself reliving "through the worst storm in twenty years of Navy flying." (Thurber 2) When walking past the hospital he imagines himself saving a patient from a broken machine by "pulling a faulty piston out of the machine and inserted the pen in its place." (Thurber 2) Each time he hears the same pocketa-pocketa-pocketa, even though it may have a little variation in it, it is the same mantra encouraging him on.

Posted by: Mallory Delay at March 4, 2015 01:50 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
4 March 15

“The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” Discussion Question

Question 12: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” compare and contrast the way Mitty is treated by people in his dreams with the way he is actually treated in his life. Explain your response.

Answer: In “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” Mitty’s fantasy daydream roles were a Navy captain, a genius surgeon, a master criminal, a pilot on a suicide mission, and a hero facing a firing squad. In these fantasies, all of the people treat Mitty with extreme admiration. For example, during his dream about being a navy captain, his crew looks up to him during his incredible control of the ship while in a life-threatening storm. During his dream about being a surgeon, his colleagues look up to him while he is performing the surgery as well as fixing the broken equipment. An intern says, “There is no one in the East who knows how to fix it!” (Thurber 2). However, with his skills, Mitty can repair it and save the day. On the other hand, in real life, Mitty is treated as just an object by his wife. She scolds him regularly, and has him run errands for her. “I’ve been looking all over this hotel for you,” states Mrs. Mitty (Thurber 5). She is not the most pleasant women, and his dreams are an alternate universe for him to get away from his life. In all his dreams, he is praised and treated as a brave hero, which is quite the opposite of what his life is like usually.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at March 4, 2015 05:26 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 March 2015

Question 13B: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” Mitty drives past a hospital and imagines that he is a surgeon. What other situations lead Mitty into other dreams? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: At the open to this story, we see Walter Mitty as a revered Navy commander. He is brought out of his reverie by his wife nagging him about the speed at which he is driving (Thurber 1). Other occurrences, where he slips into an imaginative world, is when a newsboy is shouting about the Waterbury trial (Thurber 3) and when he read the headline “Can Germany Conquer the World Through the Air?” (Thurber 4).

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at March 5, 2015 03:32 PM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 March 2015

Question: Looking closely at the text of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” how do you, as the reader, know that Walter Mitty is switching between his daydream and reality?

Answer: I, as the reader, know that Walter Mitty is switching between his daydream and reality in the short story “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” because when his daydreaming interrupts his reality the author, Jame Thurber, introduces his daydreaming by beginning the paragraph off with “…”. Also as you read, you can tell where Walter is daydreaming because the story switches from him being in the Navy, flying a plane and then reality sets in and it’s actually him driving him and his wife around. “The crew, bending to their various tasks in the huge, hurtling eight-engined Navy hydroplane, looked at each other and grinned” (Thurber 1). Here we think he is in a plane at the beginning of the story but later on we find out he is not, he’s just daydreaming. “Not so fast! You’re driving too fast!...What are you driving so fast for?” (Thurber 1). Right after we think Walter is in a plane, flying, we figure out he is driving him and his wife around.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at March 5, 2015 06:55 PM

Amber Dunlap
Dr.Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
5 March 2015

Question:
What is Walter Mitty’s final daydream? Describe who he was and what he does in the daydream. In addition, what is symbolizes

Answer:
Mitty’s final daydream was is of being a condemned man facing a firing squad. In the final daydream, Mitty was a World War I pilot. It symbolizes the death of him towards the end. “Walter Mitty the undefeated, inscrutable to the last”. (Thurber 5).

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at March 5, 2015 09:58 PM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 March 2015

Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” where does Walter Mitty go after getting the puppy biscuits? Why? Explain your response.
Answer: Walter Mitty goes to the hotel to meet his wife after her hair appointment. He goes because his wife likes him to be there so that when she is done she can find him because she notices his memory and going away. “She didn’t like to get to the hotel first; she would want him to be there waiting for her as usual.” (Pg.4)

Posted by: Rachel Addington at March 5, 2015 11:38 PM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 March 2015

Question: Who is Walter Mitty, in his daydream, at the beginning of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”? Describe (a.) who he is and (b.) what he does in the daydream. Explain your response.

Answer: Mitty is a poor driver, a passive husband, and a forgetful man. “He looked at his wife in the seat beside him with shocked astonishment. She seemed grossly unfamiliar, like a woman who had yelled at him in a crowd.” (Mitty 1) In his daydream, however, he is skilled, decisive, bold, brave, and perhaps most importantly, respected by those around him. Walter Mitty first imagines himself flying a Navy airplane through a terrible storm. Then he imagines his self as a millionaire banker who has just wrote a book. Afterwards he is a suspect be questioned in trial for murder. In his last imagination, he is a Captain in war.

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at March 6, 2015 01:13 AM

Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
March 6 2015

Question: 8. In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” where does Walter Mitty go after getting the puppy biscuits? Why? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: He is going to lobby and waiting for his wife. :He found a big leather chair in the lobby, facing a window, and he put the overshoes and the puppy biscuit on the floor beside it.”

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak at March 6, 2015 09:46 AM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 March 2015

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
Question #7: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” who is Walter Mitty in his third daydream? Describe who he is and what he does in the daydream. What triggers his third daydream? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: In Mitty’s third daydream, he is a defendant in a trial. In his daydream, he examined a gun given to him by the District Attorney (Thurber 3). He announced the gun belonged to his causing some talk in the courtroom. When the room returned to silent, Mitty said, “With any make of gun, I could have killed Gregory Fitzhurst at three hundred feet with my left hand (Thurber 4)”. His comment caused an uproar. A passing “newsboy shouting something about the Waterbury trial” (Thurber 3) triggered Mitty’s third daydream.

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at March 6, 2015 09:54 AM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
12 October 2015

Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” who is Walter Mitty in his fourth daydream? Describe who he is and what he does in the daydream. What triggers his fourth daydream? Explain your response.

Answer: In in the fourth daydream of Walter Mitty of James Thurber's "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," he pretends to be a Captain during the Second World War. After sitting on a chair in the lobby of a hotel, Walter Mitty picked a Liberty magazine that quoted, "Can Germany Conquer the World Though the Air?" (Thurber 4). All of the sudden, Captain Mitty appears to save the day, as he had done previously in his other daydreams. The sergeant tries to bring him to reason, but as any hero would have done, Mitty decides to fly alone to prevent the enemies from acquiring ammunition. Before he leaves the room in his dream, he hums, "Après de ma blonde" or "next to my girlfriend" in French to beautiful nurse who was attending one of the soldiers (Thurber 4); she smiled at his words. Walter Mitty is not only the hero but the one to get the girl at the end, too. During the story Walter Mitty plays different roles during his daydreams; however, all resemble the idea of heroism. The character's dreams act as getaways from his boring reality.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at October 12, 2015 03:39 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
12 October 2015

Question: In James Thurber’s “the secret life of Walter Mitty,” what is the “pocketa-pocketa-pocketa” in real life?

Answer: his first day dream took place on a ship while it was sinking and the “pounding of the cylinders,” were making the loud noise. In his second day dream he was playing as a doctor in the operating room and the machine was malfunctioning and was causing the loud noise once again. His last day dream involved him being in war and the noise seem to have come from “…the new flame-throwers.” The noise must be coming from the old chair that he is sitting In because he recalls the noise as being recognizable and his wife mentioned when she found him that he tends to hide in that chair.

Posted by: lady hernandez at October 12, 2015 04:05 PM

Tannor Berry
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 “The Secret life of Walter Mitty” CA03
12th October 2015


Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” what is Walter Mitty’s final daydream? Describe who he is and what he does in the daydream. Also, what might it symbolize? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: In the story “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” Walter has a final daydream. In his last daydream, Walter lights up a cigarette and leans back on the wall and snaps out of it. In his mind he is picturing himself on the wall of a firing squad. To me, in his mind I believe he will never be able to escape his ordinary life. In each of his dreams he was a hero and always the center of attention. I believe this symbolizes heroic efforts; in his regular life he is just a normal person. “Walter Mitty the Undefeated, inscrutable to the last.”(Thurber 5)

Posted by: Tannor Berry at October 12, 2015 05:37 PM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
13 October 2015

Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” why might the moment when Walter Mitty tells his wife, “Does it ever occur to you that I am sometimes thinking?” be the climax of the story?
Answer: Walter’s wife was very controlling the whole story. She was like a drill sergeant the whole time always telling him every little thing to do and he never said anything to her about it. That moment is the climax of the story because he showed his bravery by speaking to her about it. You know Walter was proud of himself because Thurber wrote, “Then, with that faint, fleeting smile playing about his lips, he faced the firing squad; erect and motionless, proud and disdainful, Walter Mitty the Undefeated, inscrutable to the last” (Thurber, 5).

Posted by: Emma Duncan at October 13, 2015 06:33 PM

Zeida Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
12 October 2015
Question: What is Walter Mitty’s second daydream in James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”? Describe who he is and what he does in the daydream. Also, what triggers his second daydream? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In Walter Mitty’s second daydream in James Thurber’s, “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”, he is a world-renowned surgeon who tries to save a millionaire banker. “It’s the millionaire banker, Wellington McMillan,” said the pretty nurse. “Yes?” said Walter Mitty, removing his gloves slowly” (Thurber, 2). Two triggers cause Walter to have his second day dream, His wife making him put on is driving gloves, “He put them on, but after she turned and gone into the building and he had driven on to a red light, he took them off again” (Thurber, 2). The second trigger is Walter driving by a hospital after dropping his wife off at the hairdressers, “[…] and then he drove past the hospital on his way to the parking lot” (Thurber, 2).

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at October 13, 2015 06:51 PM

Alexis Clayton
Doctor Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA03
October 13, 2015

Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” where does Walter Mitty go after getting the puppy biscuits? Why? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Walter Mitty goes after getting the puppy biscuits is he wants to get back to the hotel before his wife who did not like to be back at the hotel before him. This is proved when Mitty says, “she would want him waiting for her as usual.”He had only fifteen minutes to get back to the hotel before she was done at the hair salon.

Posted by: alexis Clayton at October 13, 2015 09:45 PM

Luis Bautista
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 – English Composition
13 October 2015
Question: Looking closely at the text of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” how do you, as the reader, know that Walter Mitty is switching between his daydream and reality? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
“Walter Mitty drove on toward Waterbury in silence, the roaring of the SN202 through the worst storm in twenty years of Navy flying fading into the remote, intimate airways of his mind” (Thurber, 2).
Answer: Throughout the short story “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” by James Thurber it’s visible how Walter Mitty jumps from daydreaming to reality several times while he and his wife Mrs. Mitty go out to do some errands. At the beginning of the story, Mr. Mitty is driving while daydreaming to be a commander piloting a hydroplane. However, while driving Mrs. Mitty interrupts Mitty’s daydreaming by asking him to slow down. “Not so fast! You’re driving to fast!” said Mrs. Mitty. “What are you driving so fast for?”(Thurber 1). After dropping off Mrs. Mitty to have a haircut, Walter drives away and starts daydreaming to be a doctor and to be in an operating table. “Someone handed him a fountain pen. He pulled a faulty piston out of the machine and inserted the pen in its place. “ That will hold for ten minutes, “he said,” Get on with the operation. (Thurber 2). Once after a newsboy shouts out something about trial he imagines being crack shot interrogated by the courtroom regarding a murder. “We have shown that the defendant couldn’t have fire the shot. We have shown that he wore his right arm on a sling on the night of the fourteenth of July. (Thurber 3). Finally, while waiting for his wife to get his hair done, Mitty picks up a magazine and starts picturing and imagining to be a British pilot willing to sacrifice his life for his country. “It takes two men to handle that bomber, and the Archies are pounding hell out of the air. Von Richman’s circus is between here and Saulier. Somebody’s got to get that ammunition dump, said Mitty?”(Thurber 4).

Posted by: luis Bautista at October 13, 2015 11:11 PM

Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09
13 October 2015

Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” who is Walter Mitty in his third daydream? Describe who he is and what he does in the daydream. What triggers his third daydream? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In his third daydream, Walter Mitty imagines himself on trial for murder. Even though he has an alibi, he is one of the best shooters with a pistol and could have killed him with either end. In the text, the courtroom goes into commotion with the lines: “suddenly a lovely, dark-haired girl was in Walter Mitty's arms. The District Attorney struck at her savagely. Without rising from his chair, Mitty let the man have it on the point of the chin. "You miserable cur!"

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at October 13, 2015 11:24 PM

Sabrina McIntyre
Mr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II 03
14 October 2015

Question: Describe Walter Mitty’s exchange with the garage attendant in James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.” What is he going to do in order to make them not make fun of him for needing help? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: Mitty’s exchange with the garage attendant was a pretty simple transaction. Both men talked to each other about fixing the car. The garage man was called the “grinning garageman” and the garageman thought to himself that if he changed his appearance to something sad that Mr. and Mrs. Mitty wouldn’t grin at him anymore. The text states, “I’ll have my right arm in a sling and they’ll see I couldn’t possibly take the chains off myself” (Thurber 3).

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at October 14, 2015 12:38 AM

Yaribilisa Colon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
10/14/2015

QUESTION:

In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” Mitty drives past a hospital and imagines that he is a surgeon. What other situations lead Mitty into other dreams? Explain your response.

ANSWER:

In the story there were many situations where Mitty day dreamed of being something else. When he was trying to remember what his wife asked him to buy, he them day dreams about being a cocky defendant in a murder case. Another situation is when he sit in a chair in a convenient hotel lobby and imagines himself a bomber pilot under fierce attack. In life Mitty doesn’t really do anything well. The technique used by Thurber is to show Mitty as someone who fails even as a dreamer, and in reality he is a man trying to deal with the fears and difficulties of a drab and disappointing life.

Posted by: yaribilisa Colon at October 14, 2015 09:25 AM

Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing CA03
13 October 2015

Question 1: Who is Walter Mitty, in his daydream, at the beginning of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”? Describe (a.) who he is and (b.) what he does in the daydream.

Answer: In Walter Mittys first daydream he is the commander of a navy hydroplane. Currently he is directing his lieutenant in steering the hydroplane as they are trying to go through a hurricane.

Posted by: Jaclyn Taylor at October 14, 2015 02:36 PM

Group 2
Brittany, Daniel, Anayah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 October 2015

Question: Looking closely at the text of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” how do you, as the reader, know that Walter Mitty is switching between his daydream and reality? Explain your response.

Answer: As the reader, we know Walter Mitty is switching between his daydream and reality when an ellipsis is inserted. For example, "...'it's the millionaire banker...'" the first set of ellipsis tells us that Walter is now going into a daydream (Thurber 2). Also, when he enters into a daydream, he is treated with much more respect than he is in reality.

Posted by: Brittany, Daniel, Anayah at October 14, 2015 04:02 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk
Brayden McAvoy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG II Academic Writing CA-09
10/14/15

Q #6
The experience between the garage man and Walter Mitty was embarrassing for Walter. Walter Mitty believes that he is more important than poor people so when he is unable to do something he feels embarrassed because he believes he should know. His wife asks him to go on various shopping errands to get groceries “toothpaste, toothbrush, carbonate” (Thurber 3) Walter Mitty hates going on errands but he especially hates it when he has to ask for help from poor people. The workmen in the garage always makes fun of Walter Mitty for his lack of labor work. So, next time when he comes the garage to take the chains off the car he would put his arm in a sling to seem like he can’t physically take the chains off himself and therefore people would not make fun of him. “I’ll wear my right arm in a sling; they won’t grin at me then.” (Thurber 3) Let me add, he is stubborn character because he doesn’t learn from this experience. He does things to dance around the main issue instead of going headstrong towards the conflict. So he is flat until he becomes dynamic.
Scribe: Brayden McAvoy Spokesperson: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk

Posted by: Brad McAvoy at October 14, 2015 04:07 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 October 2015

Question #12: .In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” compare and contrast the way Mitty is treated by people in his dreams with the way he is actually treated in his real life.

Answer: Everyone looks down on him and treated him as a loser in real life, even his wife treated him in the same manner. On the other hand, everyone treated him so well in his dreams and was known to be the best, he was captain, etc.

Posted by: Hana Lee at October 14, 2015 04:13 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 October 2015

Question 9

Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” who is Walter Mitty in his fourth daydream? Describe who he is and what he does in the daydream. What triggers his fourth daydream? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In his fourth daydream Walter Mitty envisioned himself as a Captain (Thurber 4). He flew some sort of model of aircraft bomber and was drinking with his sergeant in the midst of a war (Thurber 4). Walter decides to drop the bomb by himself even though it’s a two man job (Thurber 4). Walter Mitty’s fourth daydream was triggered when he “picked up an old copy of Liberty and sank down into the chair” (Thurber 4). On it, Mitty saw illustrations of the ravages of war (Thurber 4). Walter Mitty tends to take things he hears or sees around him and then inserts himself into a similar situation. He sees images of war, he’s then he’s a captain of some fighter plane (Thurber 4). A boys shouts about a trail, then he’s on the witness stand for a murder charge (Thurber 3). Anything has the potential to trigger an episode. One thing seems to be common trend: he is vital to the story. Walter Mitty makes himself the most important person. This is probably due to the fact that in his own life, he feels unimportant and completely ordinary.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at October 14, 2015 04:20 PM

Peyton Farrier, Sidnee Yaeger
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
14 October 2015

Question 8: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” where does Walter Mitty go after getting the puppy biscuits? Why? Explain your response.

Answer: He goes back to the hotel after getting the puppy biscuits because “His wife didn’t like to get to the hotel first” (Thurber 4). The puppy represents a child to them.

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at October 14, 2015 04:21 PM

Lawrence Watt Necdet Gurkan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 October 2015

Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” why might the moment when Walter Mitty tells his wife, “Does it occur to you that I am sometimes thinking?” be the climax of the story? Explain your response.

Answer: In “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” the quote by Walter “Does it occur to you that I am sometimes thinking,” could be the climax of the story. This could be the climax of the story because everything up to this is the rising action. All the other fantasies he imagines himself in build up to his wife interrupting him for the final time before he snaps back at her. She constantly references throughout the story every time she would interrupt a fantasy of his that she was wondering if he was alright. Every time she would interrupt him he would immediately see something else and dive back into another fantasy relating to what he saw. This time though his wife interrupts him and he snaps back at her only to hear her reply for the final time that she truly thinks something is wrong with him as she says “Im going to take your temperature when I get home” (Thurber 5). After this time he does not immediately dive back into another fantasy. He began to walk out with his wife and then smoked his cigarette as he leaned back against the wall and for the last time imagines his final fantasy of him preparing to die honorably before a firing squad.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at October 14, 2015 04:25 PM

Conner Knaresboro & Freddie Williams
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 October 2015

Question: In James Thurber's "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," Mitty drives past a hospital and imagines that he is a surgeon. What other situations lead Mitty into other dreams? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your words.
Answer: When he is driving to do errands with his wife leads him to dream that he is piloting a hydroplane and him going fast when he is just driving. "…hurtling eight engine Navy hydroplane, looked at each other and grinned" (Thurber 1). "Not so fast! You're driving too fast! Said Mrs. Mitty" (Thurber 1). Also when he ask himself to remember what his wife told him to get at the store, he becomes a defendant as he is on trial answering the prosecutions answers. "Perhaps this will refresh your memory. The district attorney suddenly thrust a heavy automatic at the quiet figure on the witness stand" (Thurber 3).

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at October 15, 2015 07:27 PM

Shania Bienaime, shyiem
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
13 October 2015

Question: .What might be the central theme of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”? Explain how that theme is revealed through the character of Mitty? Explain your response.
Answer: The theme portrayed throughout the story was reality vs fantasy. Walter often versioned himself as being in unrealistic situations that would involve him being some type of hero or romantic when in reality he was just an old man who could barely keep up with the world let alone his wife. The story started off with the quote “We’re going through” (Thurber 1) where Mitty vison himself in the navy driving a plane but he actually was just driving with his wife in the car on the way to the hairdresser. He also fantasizes about him being a surgeon and a British pilot and a romantic about to die for his love all while being out with his wife. The theme is revealed through Mitty because he is the main character who fantasizes himself with his huge imagination but he knows that he is just an old man who can’t seem to comprehend his wife’s small tasks.

Posted by: Shania Bienaime, Shyiem - Akiem at October 15, 2015 09:25 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA 06
26 January 2016

Question: Who is Walter Mitty, in his daydream, at the beginning of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”? Describe (a.) who he is and (b.) what he does in the daydream. Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”, by Thurber, the titular character of Walter Mitty daydreams while he runs errands with his wife. At the beginning of the story, the reader witnesses Walter Mitty as a commander screaming “We’re going through (Thurber 1)!”. He is dressed in a full-dress uniform, with the heavily braided white cap pulled down (1).” The uniform and title of commander of Walter Mitty suggests that Walter Mitty is in some organization with ranks, such as the marine corps, army, or military. In this case, Walter Mitty is a commander in the Navy, when it is mentioned that the crew is on “a eight-engined Navy hydroplane (1).” In the dream, Walter Mitty is commanding his crew how to operate the hydro-plane while going through a storm.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 27, 2016 10:50 AM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
27 February 2016

Walter Mitty

Question #3: Describe Mrs. Mitty in James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.” How does she bring him out of his daydream? Explain your response.

Answer: Based on the story itself, Mrs. Mitty is nothing but a loving wife that cares about the wellbeing of her husband. She once says, “’I’m going to take your temperature when I get you home’” (Thurber 5) when Walter Mitty begins to not make much sense. She’s obviously concerned about him and wants to find the source of the issue. Walter Mitty tends to daydream quite a bit throughout the story and his wife is probably used to it by now. She is seen waking him twice. The first time she wakes him, she yells at him (1). The second time she taps him (5). The narrator gives us no reason to think illy of Mrs. Mitty except for what Walter Mitty thinks of her. He always seems a bit upset whenever anyone wakes him from his fantasies so his anger might not necessarily be aimed at her but just people in general. He once thinks “she seemed grossly unfamiliar, like a strange woman who had yelled at him in a crowd” (1). He is obviously not including his marriage in his daydreams which might elude to his being unhappy in the marriage. However, this might not have any fault on Mrs. Mitty. We can’t really conclude that she is a bad person so I believe that Mrs. Mitty is a good person based on her two appearances in the story where she worries about his wellbeing both times.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 28, 2016 02:17 AM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
26 February 2016

Question: What is Walter Mitty’s second daydream in James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”? Describe who he is and what he does in the daydream. Also, what triggers his second daydream? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In the short story, “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” Walters’s second daydream is built on the notion that he is a famous surgeon. As Walter drives pass a hospital while on his way to the parking lot, his second daydream is triggered and that’s where is duty as a surgeon steps in (2). Walter is a surgeon, who is conducting an operation on Pritchard-Mitford in the operation rooms because Pritchard-Mitford has Obstreosis of ductal tract (Thurber 2). It is obvious that Walter is famous since he wrote a book on streptothriosis and his dear friend Pritchard-Mitford commends him on his work (2).

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 28, 2016 09:36 AM

Phillip Moss
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing CA06
29 February 2016

Question: What is Walter Mitty’s second day dream in James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”? Describe who he is and what he does in the daydream. Also, what triggers his second daydream? Explain your response.
Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: in James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”, Mitty has multiple daydreams throughout the story. The second daydream Mitty imagined himself as a lead surgeon about to operate on “the millionaire banker Wellington McMillan”(Thurber 2). In his day dream, Mitty is receiving famous doctors and specialist who complement him on his contributions to medicine. Mitty reaches daydreams to the point where he is about to operate but then he is snapped back to reality where he is currently doing a poor job driving. “They slipped a white gown on him; he adjusted his mask and drew on thin gloves; nurses handed him shining… back it up Mac! look out for that Buick. Walter Mitty jammed on the brakes.”(3)

Posted by: Phillip Moss at February 29, 2016 10:05 AM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
28 February 2016

“The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”

Q: #12 In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” compare and contrast the way Mitty is treated in his dreams and how he is treated in his real life.

A: In Walter Mitty’s dreams, he is an honored and respected man. People look to him to help them preform surgeries, or lead them into battle saying “‘The Old Man’ll get us through…The Old Man ain’t afraid of hell” (Thurber 1)! However, in his real life, Mitty is looked at as though he is a child. His wife tells him everything he needs to do and even tells him she is going to take his temperature when they return home (5). It seems that Mitty does not feel like a real man, unless he is dreaming because in his dreams, he is “Walter Mitty the Undefeated, inscrutable to the last” (5).

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at February 29, 2016 10:56 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
29 February 2016

Question: Looking closely at the text of James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” how do you, as the reader, know that Walter Mitty is switching between his daydream and reality? Explain your response.

Answer: Walter Mitty is switching between his daydream and reality, is when someone yells at him. The first time we see Mitty switch between is his wife yelling at him. His wife tells him, “Not so fast! You’re driving too fast!’ said Mrs. Mitty, ‘What are you driving so fast for” (Thurber 1). Mitty was dreaming he was driving a Navy hydroplane, and his wife got scared that he was driving over 40 miles per hour. Just from the one time of his wife yelling at him, you can figure out from the rest of the story that this is how he switches.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 29, 2016 11:20 AM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic writing 2 CA06
29 February 2016

Question 6) Describe Walter Mitty's exchange with the garage attendant in James Thurber's "The secret life of walter mitty". What is he going to do in order to make them not make fun of him for needing help? Explain your response.

Answer 6) When Walter's fantasy is interrupted by the garage attendant, he realizes he had entered a parking garage. The garage attendant tells him to just leave the car where it is and he'll park it which makes Walter angry because he thinks the attendant is being arrogant. Next time he goes to get his chains taken off his tires he is going to wear a sling on his arm so that they don't make fun of him for needing help.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 29, 2016 08:31 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
1 March 2016

Question: In James Thurber’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” where does Walter Mitty go after getting the puppy biscuits? Why? Explain your response.

Answer: After getting the puppy biscuits, Walter Mitty sees a leather chair that was facing a window in the hotel lobby, and he decided to sit there with an old copy of the Liberty. Once seated Walter Mitty started reading the newspaper which read, “Can Germany Conquer the World Through the Air?” In this newspaper, “Walter Mitty looked at the pictures of the bombing planes and of ruined streets” (Thurber 4).

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at March 2, 2016 12:30 PM

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