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October 05, 2014

Outlasting Brian Aldiss's "Super Toys"


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

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Posted by lhobbs at October 5, 2014 08:45 PM

Readers' Comments:

Shelby Rexroth
October 7th, 2014
ENG210 CA02

7. Comment briefly on the characterization of Monica Swinton in Brian Aldiss’s short story, “ Super-Toys Last All Summer Long.” Then, answer these two questions: “Is Monica capable of loving David?” and “Is Monica capable of love?” Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Monica Swinton is a lonely person. Reading the story, you find out that her “son”, David isn’t actually real and is one of the “super-toys” her husband Henry created for her to keep it from being lonely. Monica wanted nothing more than her own son. Since the government tried to have control of the population, they had to wait for a letter that granted them permission to conceive, which they finally received. I think Monica is capable of loving David. “She had tried to love him.” (Aldiss 1) Just because she was capable, didn’t mean she was. I don’t think she loved David just because she knew he wasn’t real. She loved the idea of someone else around to ease her loneliness, but she wanted her own son. When Henry brought home the letter from the government giving them permission, they were both ecstatic and couldn’t wait to create their own family. She was going to finally be able to give the love she’s always wanted to go give to her real son. ““Yes, my darling, yes, we’ve won this week’s parenthood lottery! We can go ahead and conceive a child at once!” He let out a yell of joy. They danced round the room. Pressure of population was such that reproduction had to be strict, controlled. Childbirth required government permission. For this moment, they had waited four years. Incoherently they cried their delight.” (Aldiss 7)

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at October 7, 2014 03:49 PM

Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 8, 2014

Question #4
In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” David is programmed to love Mrs. Swinton as if she were his real mother. Do you think that there is any significant difference between David’s love for Mrs. Swinton and the love of a “real” child for a “real” mother? Why do you think that Mrs. Swinton cannot love David?

Answer
There is a significant difference between David’s love for Mrs. Swinton and the love of a “real” child for a “real” mother. For example, David has a hard time expressing love for Mrs. Swinton. He tries to write a letter to her, but he got frustrated and told his friend Teddy, “I can’t think what to say!”(Aldiss 2). Mrs. Swinton cannot love David because he is just a machine; he may have the programming to love and show emotion, but it is not the same as the love and emotion of a real child. When Mrs. Swinton read the letters that David wrote, she, “dropped the pieces of paper and burst out crying.”(Aldiss 6). At the end of the story, her husband comes home, and she tells him that they can, “conceive a child at once!”(Aldiss 7) It shows that she craves and needs the love and emotions of a real child.

Posted by: Allison Ward at October 8, 2014 07:12 AM

Sharonda S Byrd
B. LEE HOBBS
ENG 210CL
8 October 2014
Super – Toys Last All Summer Long

Question: 2. Science fiction stories often explore possible transformations in social relations resulting in science and technology. What are some of the ways in which social relations are shaped by technology in Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super – Toys Last All Summer Long”?

Answer: In the story “Super –Toys Last all Summer Long”, social relations are shaped by technology because the toys that Henry Swinston creates are super futuristic toys that talk and act like a human but are not. David’s teddy bear, Teddy, talks to David and Monica all the time. David communicates too, but he does not have emotions; he wants to love his mom but he does not know how, “Slowly, he shook his head. “If she loved me, then why can’t I talk to her?” he can’t communicate or feel any emotion to her because he is just a machine. Henry Swinston in the story makes a serving – man and unlike David the serving man can handle situations that go on in the house. David can’t deal with the fact that he does not know what is real or the fact that he does not know how to show love and affection to his mom.

Posted by: sharonda byrd at October 8, 2014 11:59 AM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 October 2014


Question #10:
In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” is David truly malfunctioning? Is his “verbal communication center… still giving him trouble?” Does he deserve to be resent to the factory from which he came? Why, or why not? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.


Answer:
In the short story “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” by Brian Aldiss, Davis is not malfunctioning. He works just fine; he is just struggling to identify himself as “real” (3). David being conflicted with his identity versus the identity of his mother is what makes it hard for him to communicate how he truly feels for her. He tries to write her letters conveying how he feels for her, but because he struggles with his identity, he struggles with how he feels (Aldiss 6). David deserves to stay with the Swinton’s and not get sent back to the factory. He is trying to communicate with the family; he just finds it hard to grasp the concept of whether or not he is real.

Posted by: Emily Finck at October 8, 2014 12:26 PM

Gabriela Navarro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
8 Oct 2014

QUESTION #4:
Do you think that there is any significant difference between David's love for Mrs. winton and the love of a "real" child for a "real" mother? why do you think that Mrs. Swinton cannot love David?

ANSWER:
There is no significant difference because David's love for Mrs. Swinton was "real" to him. David wrote a letter to Mrs. Swinton saying, " 'Dear Mummy, I hope you're well just know. I love you….' (England, 2)," which expresses an emotion David has towards Ms. Swinton. To David, his care was real, and there is no difference if he of his mom were "real" or not, because the feeling of love it still the same.

I believe that Mrs. Swinton cannot love David because she does not share the same desire to love another like David. From her realistic perspective, she cannot see past that David is not real; although she "she had tried to love him" (England, 2), she simply cannot.

Posted by: Gabriela Navarro at October 8, 2014 01:33 PM

Elizabeth Brown, Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
8 October 2014

Question #7:
Comment briefly on the characterization of Monica Swinton in Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long.” Then, answer these two questions: “Is Monica capable of loving David?” and “Is Monica capable of love?” Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer:
Monica is capable of loving David, but not the imagination that he possesses. She is bland and a grown up so she cannot understand his imagination. The fact that she did try proves that she is capable of loving as a mother does.

Posted by: Elizabeth brown, Stephanie Vera at October 8, 2014 01:53 PM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 October 2014

QUESTION #9:
In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” why can’t the character David fully express himself? What is wrong with him? What might the author be trying to say about what it means to be human?

ANSWER:
It seems that the problem with David not being able to express himself lies with him being a machine. The day that Henry revealed his new Synthetic man, he revealed a couple of things that can depict why David can’t fully express himself. Clearly they’ve had David for a while before this new intelligence but Henry states, “It is now almost ten years since we put our first synthetic life-forms on the world market. You all know what a success they have been, particularly the miniature dinosaurs. But none of them had intelligence”(Aldiss 2). To add Henry also states, “Not only does he have intelligence, he has a controlled amount of intelligence. We believe people would be afraid of a being with a human brain. Our serving-man has a small computer in his cranium”(Aldiss 2). Which tells you David came before Henry's new invention, and that David is incapable of expressing himself fully regardless of new technology.



What could be wrong with him is the fact that he has analyzed how his mother has been acting. He’s coming to the realization that he’s incapable to feel and questions what is real and what’s not. Here’s a dialogue of David and Teddy, ““Teddy - I suppose Mummy and Daddy are real, aren’t they?” Teddy said, “You ask such silly questions, David. Nobody knows what ‘real’ really means. Let’s go indoors.””(Aldiss 7).



The author might be saying that being human is quite difficult. Not everyone/everything can do it, when you obviously look at David, Teddy, and the synthetic man. Humans have an infinite number of emotions that flow through them that not everyone/everything can understand.

Posted by: Thomas Watson at October 8, 2014 01:56 PM

Danielle Kluender, Gianna Anderson, Rashard Knowles
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
8 October 2014

Question #8:
In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” why is David experiencing difficulties communicating with his Mummy? Why is his mother, Monica, incapable of communicating with her son? What is Teddy’s role in this particular situation?

Answer:
David is experiencing difficulties communicating with his Mummy because he is not a “real” boy. He feels lonely because all he has is Teddy. Teddy told him to go the psychiatrist but he does not want to go because he makes him feel like he is not real. Teddy communicates with Monica for David. Teddy tells Mummy what David says. Monica cannot really love David because it is not the same feeling or connection as if it was her own. It also does not help that David’s verbal communication- center is having trouble.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at October 8, 2014 02:10 PM

Roslyn, Alyssa, Trejon
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II
8 October 2014

Question #2
Science fiction stories often explore possible transformations in social relations resulting from developments in science and technology. What are some of the ways in which social relations are shaped by technology in Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
To what extent can a machine replace the interaction of a person? As in the machine can’t take the place of an actual person. you start to question yourself like in the story she ask the teddy bear why can’t they have the same relationship and she starts to wonder why.

Posted by: Roslyn at October 8, 2014 02:15 PM

Mickael Dodard & John Crane
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
8 September 2014

Question #4
The future world of Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long” is marked by a desperate reliance on illusion and artificiality. How does the first sentence introduce this thematic element? What other details in the story contribute to this atmosphere of illusion? How might we read the concluding sentence of the story in this context? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
The author wrote, ”In Mrs. Swinton’s garden, it was always summer.” This thematic element is represented as happiness and unreality. The author also provides another detail when he said, “At once, Henry was sur-rounded by the friendly illusion of gardens set in eternal summer. It was amazing what Whologram could do to create huge mirages in small spaces. “ This quote shows the unreality of the garden and how everything is set to make you feel happiness. “Its beauty and softness reminded him of Mummy.” This quote means that the perfection makes him recognize unreality.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at October 8, 2014 02:18 PM

Martin Terrasi
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
8 October 8, 2014
Question: The future world of Brian Aldiss’s short story, “super-toys last all summer long” is marked by a desperate reliance on illusion and artificiality. How does the first sentence introduce this thematic element? What other details in the story contribute to this atmosphere of illusion? How might we read the concluding sentence of the story in this context?

Answer: We are told that Monica Swinston’s yard is always in summer alerting us that this is not a normal place. We find that we are in a futuristic world were almost everything is controlled. As the story continues we relies that the child she is watching is too human but a robot designed with artificial intelligence. “It seems like a paradox that in this day and age we can create life but not intelligence.” (Aldiss P.2) By the end, we see that the child is starting to understand that he is not the same as his parents and starts’ questioning what is real.

Posted by: Martin Terrasi at October 8, 2014 03:44 PM

Zachary Gary, Sam Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
9 October, 2014

Question #10:
In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” is David truly malfunctioning? Is his “verbal communication center . . . still giving him trouble?” Does he deserve to be resent to the factory from which he came? Why, or why not?
Answer:
He is not malfunctioning. He is just experiencing normal feelings of neglect and loneliness. In Davids world all the people are detached from reality and “Nobody knows what ‘real’ really means.” (Aldiss 7) He does deserve to be resent to the factory because it give him current action to act. He wants to be different and show love.

Posted by: Zachary Gary, Sam White at October 9, 2014 07:47 PM

Zailet Martinez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL- Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2014

Question #11:
TONE/MOOD: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” what is the author’s general tone throughout the piece? Is it positive, negative, or both? If it’s both, in that there’s an ironic sense throughout, explain. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
There seems to be an informal tone in this story. When reading the story there were times when I have to go back and reread because the author changed subjects unexpectedly. He was talking about Henry’s speech at one point and then jump to David and Teddy talking about the letter he wants to write for Monica. This shift can be seen below. The tone is informal because it is not centered in one idea or person. It goes from person to person, and keeps changing constantly. The tone is both positive and negative, from some individuals you get sadness and from others you get happiness. We can see a negative tone when David talks bad about himself, as if he had low self-esteem and at the end the mother says that he should go be fixed again. But we can also see a positive tone at the end when Monica shares the news that they had “won this week’s parenthood lottery! They can go ahead and conceive a child at once!” (Aldiss, 7). There is an ironic sense because David wants to profess his love to his mother just in time when she finds out that she is going to be able to conceive her own children. It is ironic because David represents that child in their life, but then again they are just gaining the opportunity to bear a true child.
“There have been mechanicals on the market with mini-computers for brains - plastic things without life, super-toys - but we have at last found a way to link computer circuitry with synthetic flesh.”
David sat by the long window of his nursery, wrestling with paper and pencil. Finally, he stopped writing and began to roll the pencil up and down the slope of the desk-lid. “Teddy!” he said. (Aldiss, 2)

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at October 10, 2014 12:23 AM

Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
30 September 2014

Question #1:
In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” the background details of the future depicted in this story suggests that, in spite of its many technological advances, this world is more dystopian than utopian. If you don’t know these words, fill in the gaps of your knowledge, and look them up first. What are some of the negative features of the world depicted in “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: One of the negative features depicted in the story would be how society controls the population. “Though three-quarters of the overcrowded world are starving, we are lucky here to have more than enough, thanks to population control […]” Based on the evidence from the story Monica is not truly happy with the fact that she has a “robotic” like child and is unable to conceive when she wants, “She had tried to love him.” It is clear that she is very lonely even with David. Henry is also working hard towards eliminating some of the common issues that we as humans face every day, like obesity. “Obesity’s our problem, not malnutrition. I guess there’s nobody round this table who doesn’t have a Crosswell working for him in the small intestine, a perfectly safe parasite tape-worm enables its host to eat up to fifty percent more food and still keep his or her figure. Right?”” What makes it okay to stick a chip inside someone’s body and have them control their weight to help “keep their figure?” It comes off as the government really having control of everything, and relying of technological devise.

Posted by: irma sera at October 10, 2014 01:40 AM

Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 October 2014

Question #3:
In spite of its brevity, Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” gains resonance and depth through its indirect evocation of the well-known story of Pinocchio, the wooden puppet who desperately desires to be a real boy. If you aren’t familiar with that story, fill in the gaps of your knowledge and look up a summary on site, such as Wikipedia. How is David like a science-fictional version of Pinocchio?

Answer:
David is like a science-fictional Pinocchio because he too is curious what the difference is between “real” and “not real.” In the story of Pinocchio, the puppet is confused with his livelihood and why he exists. The same concept happens in this short story as well. David is a toy that is intellectual and can think. He is confused about if he is “real” or “not real,” and it gives him troubling thoughts. “David was staring out of the window. ‘Teddy, you know what I was thinking? How do you tell what are real things from what aren’t real things?’” (Aldiss 3). David does not believe that he is truly a real boy and thinks that his Mummy does not love him because of it. In the story of Pinocchio, he has the same thoughts and ends up running away. In this short story, David starts to debate if he should run away because he does not feel like he is getting all the love that he deserves.

Posted by: Matthew Weller at October 10, 2014 11:37 AM

Anthony Colello
Dr. Hobbs
ENG CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
15 October 2014

Question: 
Brian Aldiss's short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long" is a classic example of science-fiction in that it is set in the future. Being that there are various technological and scientific advancements in the setting of this piece, how does the setting affect the general tone (positive or negative) of this piece? What advantages are these advancements supposed to provide society? What problems exist in this society?

Answer:
In this story, the main characters are a female and male, the females names Monica, and the males name is Henery. Together they make Mr. and Mrs. Swinton. They live in a futuristic world where society suffers from over populating. Their government has dictated that in order to have a child one must win a raffle, "yes, we’ve won this week’s parenthood lottery!" (Aldiss, 7). The theory of a raffle is to control birth rate. In order to combat the inability to have children at will and the loneliness that is attributed with over population. Society, including Mr. Swinton has created A.I. versions to replace the role of the missing and desired person in their life. 

It is odd that a society faced with overpopulation suffers from loneliness, and it speaks on the society as a whole. The negative tone that is portrayed throughout the story, "An overcrowded world is the ideal place in which to be lonely" (1). An over controlling government causes this. The people's primal need to procreate has been taken. The government must give them permission to have a child, so it is clear that they would prohibit a child from being born without permission.It is evident that recreational sex would be looked down upon as being too risky. Such risk would leave little incentive for singles to mingle. Thus reducing the level of social activity leading to intimate In counters. The derivative to such a society would be one of strictly business, social encounters that lead to a platonic society. 

The artificially intelligent beings are supposed to comfort those who suffer from loneliness. However, it only teases the senses. The technology is not ready to bridge the gap from programmed responses to human thought responses, "Inside the bear, a small computer worked through its program of possibilities" (3). The A.I. have preprogrammed responses that they must choose from and cannot truly form their opinion.

Posted by: Anthony Colello at October 15, 2014 10:22 AM

Aderias Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
23 February 2015
Question 7: Comment briefly on the characterization of Monica Swintonin Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long.” Then, answer these two questions: “Is Monica capable of loving David?” and “Is Monica capable of love?” Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Yes, even though leads a lonely, isolated lifestyle; she shows much love for her son David. She was thinking about what a mother should do when her child is upset or hiding. (Why not simply go upstairs and scoop David into her arms and talk to him, as a loving mother should to a loving son? ) She has emotions of feelings with love towards her son (Monica dropped the pieces of paper and burst out crying. In their gay inaccurate colors, the letters fanned out and settled on the floor.) And (She came out of the sitting-room immediately and flung her arms round him, kissing him ardently on cheek and lips. Henry was amazed.)

Posted by: aderias ewing at February 23, 2015 11:30 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23 February 2015

Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” why can’t the character David fully express himself? What is wrong with him? What might the author be trying to say about what it means to be human? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer .

Answer: David has trouble communicating with his ‘mother,’ (“His verbal communication-center is still giving trouble. I think he’ll have to go back to the factory again.”) and his ‘mother’ has trouble loving him. “He went with her without protest into the house, his dark head bobbing at the level of her waist. At the age of three, he showed no fear of the ultrasonic dryer in the kitchen. But before his mother could reach for a pair of slippers, he wriggled away and was gone into the silence of the house. She had tried to love him.” Human communication cannot be substituted by a machine; humans can only fully communicate with humans and machines can only fully communicate with machines.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 23, 2015 01:20 PM


Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
23 February 2015

“Super Toys Last All Summer Long”

Question #5: The future world of Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super Toys All Summer Long” is marked by a desperate reliance on illusion and artificiality. How does the first sentence introduce this thematic element? What other details in the story contribute to the atmosphere of illusion? How might we read the concluding sentence of the story in this context?

The first sentence introduces the thematic event because in the first sentence in states that, “In Mrs. Swinton’s garden, it was always summer.” When in the real world it is not always sunny and bright. This theme expresses how they vision the world to really be outside of what it really is. Some parts of the story also portray this illusion, for example, “It seems like a paradox that in this day and age we can create life but not intelligence.” (Aldiss page 2) This line represents how we have the ability to create anything, but we can’t always create things how we want it to be. Later, they were able to make anything they desired to their liking like a full-size serving-man. The concluding sentence can be read the opposite of the first sentence because a mummy is not portrayed as bright and beautiful like Mrs. Swinton’s garden.

Posted by: Selena Hammie at February 23, 2015 06:22 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
23 February 15

“Super-toys Last All Summer Long” Discussion Question

Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-toys Last All Summer Long,” the background details of the future depicted in this story suggest that, in spite of its many technological advances, this world is more dystopian than utopian. What are some of the negative features the world depicted in “Super-toys Last All Summer Long”?

Answer: In Aldiss’s short story, “Super-toys Last All Summer Long,” the world is dystopian. Some negative features this world is described as is, “through three-quarters of the overcrowded world are starving” (Aldiss 2). A character in the short story states, “our miniature dinosaurs are almost equally stupid” (Aldiss 2). The characters in this story portray that this society is overcrowded and is not intelligent. However, they “launch an intelligent synthetic life-form – a full-size serving-man” in hopes to help their world (Aldiss 2).

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 23, 2015 07:17 PM

Jorge Braham

Dr. Hobbs

Academic Writing II CA12

23 February 2015

Super-Toys Last All Summer Long

Question:

TONE: Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long is classic example of science-fiction in that it is set in the future. Being that there are various technological and scientific advancements in the setting of this piece, how does the setting affect the general tone (positive or negative) of this piece? What advantages are these advancements supposed to provide society? What problems exist in this society? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:

The tone of this piece is very off and on because in the beginning the kid was all for the bear “Teddy” because he comforted him because he was not getting the attention that he wanted from his mother. The mother was in a negative way because she thought it was pointless that he should just have to talk to his child to get information from him. The circuits of the bear’s brain were too simple for artifice. “So you lied to me. Yes, Mummy. Stop calling me Mummy! Why is David avoiding me? He’s not afraid of me, is he?” (Aldiss 4)

Posted by: jorge braham at February 23, 2015 11:36 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
24 February 2015

Question 5a: The future world of Brian Aldiss's short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long" is marked by a desperate reliance on illusion and artificiality. How does the first sentence introduce this thematic element? What other details in the story contribute to this atmosphere of illusion? How might we read the concluding sentence of the story in this context?

Answer: The first sentence introduces the thematic element of illusion and artificiality by saying "it was always summer" (Aldiss 1) in Mrs. Swinton's garden. There are also other details in the story that contribute the illusion of it all. When David is in the nursery, he writes with a crayon and acts like an ordinary child even "looking for Teddy." (Aldiss 1) When Aldiss mentions, "Teddy lay on the bed… the speech-pattern of his master's voice activated him" (Aldiss 2) he gives another illusion of a "real" boy playing with his "super-toys…plastic things without life." (Aldiss 2) The concluding sentence tells the readers that David is not going to become back, and he knows, so he plucks "a bright pink flower,… [where] it could lie on the pillow as went to sleep. Its beauty and softness reminded him of Mummy." (Aldiss 8)

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 24, 2015 07:33 PM

Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
23 February 2015

Question 11: TONE/MOOD: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” what is the author’s general tone throughout the piece? Is it positive, negative, or both? If it’s both, in that there’s an ironic sense throughout, explain.

Answer: The story is split between two scenes. One is at the Swinton house, where the couple is having problems communicating with their son. The other takes place at a luncheon where Henry Swinton gives a speech to company directors to celebrate the launch of their new intelligent robot. The story begins showing how Monica feels “She had tried to love him” (Aldiss 1). This indicates that there is a somber tone to the start and it will continue throughout the story. She cannot love David in the way she thinks a mother should, and in return, David finds it hard to talk to her and attempts to express his feelings for her through writing. He finds it impossible and feels that she will not be able to understand even if she did read it. At the end of the story, the couple has been granted permission to have another child and questions begin to surface involving David and Teddy. Henry questions Monica about what they will do about David and Teddy, she responds when asked about David: “his verbal communication-center is still giving trouble” and that he might have to “go back to the factory again” (Aldiss 7). This implies that they are both super-toys. In the end, David picks a flower and “its beauty and softness reminded him of Mummy” (Aldiss 8). The rose symbolizes that Monica might also be an artificial being, carrying on the bittersweet somberness tone on to the end of the story; it is ironic that they are both artificial and unable to communicate proper emotion.

Posted by: Victoria Markou at February 24, 2015 07:54 PM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
25 February 2015

Super Toys Last All Summer Long
Question #7: Comment briefly on the characterization of Monica Swinton in Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long.” Then, answer these two questions: “Is Monica capable of loving David?” and “Is Monica capable of love?” Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer: Monica is not capable of loving David. She does not love him as if he was a biological child, but she does show concern towards him. Monica worries that David is malfunctioning, “His verbal communication-center is still giving trouble, I think he’ll have to go back to the factory again” (Aldiss 7). On the other hand, Monica is capable of love. She informs Henry about the privilege to conceive a child and “flung her arms around him, kissing him ardently” (Aldiss 7). Monica and Henry “incoherently cried their delight” (Aldiss 7).

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at February 24, 2015 09:39 PM

Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
25 February 2015

Question: 11. TONE/MOOD: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” what is the author’s general tone throughout the piece? Is it positive, negative, or both? If it’s both, in that there’s an ironic sense throughout, explain. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer
Answer: Tone is rather negative through the all story, author shows that a lot of things are not on the way they should be. ” “Teddy, did David tell you to tell me he had gone into the garden?” The circuits of the bear’s brain were too simple for artifice. “Yes, Mummy.” “So you lied to me.” “Yes, Mummy.””. Also there are some positive points but their point is more to balance negatives’ than to put positive point of view to the story. ““For the future, we plan more models, male and female - some of them without the limitations of one, I promise you! - of more advanced design, true bio-electronic beings.”

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak at February 25, 2015 10:08 AM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
24 February 2015

Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” David is programmed to love Mrs. Swinton as if she were his real mother. Do you think that there is any significant difference between David’s love for Mrs. Swinton and the love of a “real” child for a “real” mother? Why do you think that Mrs. Swinton cannot love David?
Answer: I think that there is a difference between David’s love for Mrs. Swinton and the love of a “real” child for a “real” mother because David isn’t able to talk to his mother because he is afraid of her. “On the upper landing, something was moving very silently - David, trying to hide away from her....” (Pg. 4) Mrs. Swinton can not love David because she wants a baby more than anything and David is just a machine who isn’t able to talk to her.

Posted by: Rachel Addington at February 25, 2015 10:50 AM

Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing CA 12
25 February 2015

Question 8:
Why is his mother incapable of communicating with her son? What is teddy’s role in this particular situation?
Answer:
Monica, David’s “mom” is incapable of communicating with her son, because he is not a real flesh human. David, just as Teddy is known to be a super toy. 'Is David malfunctioning?” said Monica. Giving the hint that David is not a real person. Monica is unable of conceiving a child and David is supposed to be the replacement of the human child but he is a toy and cannot communicate as a human. Teddy’s role in this situation is a super toy also.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 25, 2015 11:15 AM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing II CA12
24 February 2015

Question: TONE/MOOD: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” what is the author’s general tone throughout the piece? Is it positive, negative, or both? If it’s both, in that there’s an ironic sense throughout, explain. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: The general tone throughout the short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” the authors’ general tone is expressed as being a both positive and negative. Aldiss uses a questionable/curious tone for David and when Mrs. Swinton begins to appear the tone starts to become more authoritative. “Stand there, Teddy. I want to talk to you” (Aldiss 4). This quote represents that authoritative tone that was set for Mrs. Swinton. “You and I are real, Teddy, aren’t we?” (Aldiss 3). Here David is questioning if Teddy and himself are real and this gives us the feeling of a questionable tone.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at February 25, 2015 12:37 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 February 2015

Question 1: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” the background details of the future depicted in this story suggest that, in spite of its many technological advances, this world is more dystopian than utopian. If you don’t know these words, fill in the gaps of your knowledge, and look them up first. What are some of the negative features of the world depicted in “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer: This story shows what can happen to our society if we continue to advance our technology. This leads us into further isolation to the point where we are not even having true human interaction. Monica Swinton says “an overcrowded world is the ideal place in which to be lonely (Aldiss 1).” The line between what is real and what is not becomes so blurred that some robots become the only escape that we have from our loneliness.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 26, 2015 02:13 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
4 October 2015

Question: What is the author’s general tone throughout the piece? Is it positive, negative, or both?

Answer: Brian Aldiss takes super toys and purveys it as a modern Pinocchio story. David is the super toy trying to become a real boy to please Monica and Henry who have given up on David since they are having a baby on the way. Monica’s feelings were negative toward David and Brian, the author, describes it as, “she had tried hard to love him.” David feels positive that he will become what his parents always wanted, a baby.

Posted by: lady hernandez at October 4, 2015 12:57 PM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
4 October 2015

Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” David is programmed to love Mrs. Swinton as if she were his real mother. Do you think that there is any significant difference between David’s love for Mrs. Swinton and the love of a “real” child for a “real” mother? Why do you think that Mrs. Swinton cannot love David?

Answer: "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long" by Brian Aldiss takes places in a futuristic stage where reality and artificial life have become indistinguishable. In this utopian future, the population is controlled by the government to keep a habitable place for every citizen in the country; therefore, any couple who wishes to bear a child needs to ask permission from the government—advantage benefits the inventor Henry Swinton who has created artificial companions to prevent loneliness. Ironically, the robotic son of Monica and Henry Swinton, David, shows more than artificial intelligence; he loves his mother and worries as a real child would. However, David's mother sees him as just a machine, incapable of real loving. In the story, David worries about his mother's time preoccupation, "I don't think mummy likes time very much" (Aldiss 3). By the time that Mrs. Swinton received the government's parental approval, the couple had waited four years to bear a real child. As a consequence, David feels that his mother does not love him because she is been waiting to be a real mother. This feeling is what makes David a real kid; however, Monica fails to interpret his son's behavior correctly and mistakes it by malfunctioning. Also, Monica is not capable of loving David because she knows that he is a computerized machine programmed to love regardless of treatment and that he will not grow like a normal kid would neither.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at October 4, 2015 02:12 PM

Cannelle Samson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
4 October 2015

Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” why can’t the character David fully express himself? What is wrong with him? What might the author be trying to say about what it means to be human? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.


Answer: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”, David is not able to fully express himself because he is afraid that his Mummy will not understand what he is writing down. David is a child robot, who is having difficulty deciding what is real and unreal. In Aldiss’s short story, David seems to be capable of loving his Mummy; however, he is not able to put it into words. David, for a robot, seems to be able to think complex thoughts such as debating if he is real and being able to feel loneliness. For example, in “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long” David and Teddy have a conversation, “Teddy, I can’t think what to say!” Climbing off the bed, the bear walked stiffly over to cling to the boy’s leg. David lifted him and set him on the desk. “What have you said so far?” “I’ve said -” He picked up his letter and stared hard at it. “I’ve said, ‘Dear Mummy, I hope you’re well just now. I love you....’“ There was a long silence, until the bear said, “That sounds fine. Go downstairs and give it to her.” Another long silence. “It isn’t quite right. She won’t understand.” Inside the bear, a small computer worked through its program of possibilities. “Why not do it again in crayon?” When David did not answer, the bear repeated his suggestion. “Why not do it again in crayon?” David was staring out of the window. “Teddy, you know what I was thinking? How do you tell what are real things from what aren’t real things?” (Aldiss, 2). In this conversation between David and Teddy, we are able to understand that David is more advanced then Teddy in his thinking. David has a problem expressing himself because he is scared that his Mummy will not understand him. He seems to be able to feel love and loneliness, but does not know how to properly express himself in words.
I believe that the author is trying to say that being human is being able to feel love, loneliness, and copious amounts of emotion. Although, David is not human he is able to feel these things. However, he is not able to fully understand these emotions. David finds it difficult to express himself because he does not understand what he is feeling. To be human is being able to feel emotions. I believe that Aldiss’s is trying to make his audience understand that although David is a robot, he is in some sense a human. For example, David is able to sense that the psychiatrist treats him as if he were not real. In Aldiss’s short story it states, “Teddy gave him a friendly cuff over the head. “If you feel so bad, you’d better go to the psychiatrist again.” “I hate that old psychiatrist - he makes me feel I’m not real.” He started to run across the lawn. The bear toppled out of the window and followed as fast as its stubby legs would allow” (Aldiss, 5). This passage shows us that David has a sense of emotion making him real, although, he is simply a robot.

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at October 4, 2015 02:20 PM

ENG 122 CA03
Aldiss
4th September 2015

Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” why is David experiencing difficulties communicating with his Mummy? Why is his mother, Monica, incapable of communicating with her son? What is Teddy’s role in this particular situation? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: In the story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” David is experiencing difficulties communicating with his Mummy because he is afraid she doesn’t love him like she says and he thinks he isn’t a good son. In the passage it says, “I’m no good, Teddy. Let’s run away!”(Aldiss, p.5), “You’re a very good boy. Your Mummy loves you (Aldiss, p.5). Monica is incapable of communicating with her son because he thinks he is a bad kid and doesn’t talk to anything but the machine. Teddy’s role in this situation is to console David and convince him that he is loved and not bad kid.

Posted by: Tannor Berry at October 4, 2015 07:10 PM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
5 October 2015

Question: Science fiction stories often explore possible transformations in social relations resulting from developments in science and technology. What are some of the ways in which social relations are shaped by technology in Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”?
Answer: One way social relations are shaped by technology in this story is that technology has made it so everyone can stay skinny. It is said that, “I guess there’s nobody round this table who doesn’t have a Crosswell working for him in the small intestine, a perfectly safe parasite tape-worm that enables its host to eat up to fifty percent more food and still keep his or her figure” (Aldiss, 2). Another way is the teddy bear interacting with David. The bear can talk and walk. Aldiss wrote, “Climbing off the bed, the bear walked stiffly over to cling to the boy’s leg” (Aldiss, 2).

Posted by: Emma Duncan at October 4, 2015 07:36 PM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
04 October 2015

Question: In Brian Aldiss's short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," is David truly malfunctioning? Is his "verbal communication center . . . still giving him trouble?" Does he deserve to be resent to the factory from which he came? Why, or why not? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer: David is truly malfunctioning because there seemed to be no proof in the story of David having trouble communicating with him in the past. Also, it looks like this dilemma involving Monica and David's miscommunication came just in time because Monica and Henry were granted permission to having a baby after four years of waiting. Therefore, I don't necessarily think that David deserves to get re-sent back to the factory because every child is entitled to be loved, even if it's a robot. However, the difference between David and the child that was approved by the government to be born is that it is desired and David wasn't. Therefore, this proves to be true in the story, for example, "Artificial sunlight was growing long and golden across the lawn - and David and Teddy were staring through the window at them. Seeing their faces, Henry, and his wife grew serious. "What do we do about them?" Henry asked" (Aldiss 7) In other words, David was just a substitute child before the conceived child by Monica and Henry. Besides, if David was truly loved and desired, Henry wouldn't have asked that question. Furthermore, I believe David staying in Monica and Henry's home before and during the baby being present would hurt both parties because David wouldn't receive the equal amount of unconditional love then the conceived child.

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at October 4, 2015 10:21 PM

Zachary Pottle
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
5 October 2015

Question:

In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” is David truly malfunctioning? Is his “verbal communication center . . . still giving him trouble?” Does he deserve to be resent to the factory from which he came? Why, or why not?

Answer:

David is not truly malfunctioning. Monica tell's Henry that his "verbal communication center" is malfunctioning, and needs to be sent back to the factory. As Monica says in the story, "“His verbal communication-center is still giving trouble. I think he’ll have to go back to the factory again" (Aldiss 7). Monica says this to Henry, even though she knows David is not malfunctioning. In my opinion, David doesn't deserve to go back to the factory. David, although a substitute for a real child, is still Monica's son. She knew what an artificial child entailed, and still went through with it. At the very least I think she should have waited until the baby was growing up to see what life was like.

Posted by: Zachary Pottle at October 5, 2015 01:07 AM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA 06
17 February 2016

Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” the background details of the future depicted in this story suggest that, in spite of its many technological advances, this world is more dystopian than utopian. If you don’t know these words, fill in the gaps of your knowledge, and look them up first. What are some of the negative features of the world depicted in “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: In the world that is presented in “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”, contains technological advances. When Aldiss writes that “mowervator crouched, ready to cut or sweep or roll when the moment dictated (Aldiss 1),” and about a teddy bear that can function like a human (3), he sets a world where there are technological advances. The technological advance implies that the setting is futuristic or a utopia. However, in fact, there is an opposite. The world is shown as a dystopian. This is suggested when Aldiss says, “three-quarters of the overcrowded world are starving, we are lucky here to have more than enough, thanks to population control. Obesity’s our problem, not malnutrition (2).” This dehumanizing society that is unpleasant to live has majority of its population suffering from starvation, where the minority is not of healthy weight range but rather obese. It is also ironic because the world has technological advance which show improve and better the society; however, the society is suffering

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 17, 2016 10:47 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
17 February 2016

Question: Science fiction stories often explore possible transformations in social relations resulting from developments in science and technology. What are some of the ways in which social relations are shaped by technology in Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: In Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”, one social relation that was shaped by technology was between David and Monica Swinton. The story begins with Monica Swinton and David, who appears to be a robot toy, in the garden interacting (Aldiss 1). As the story develops, the reader is introduced to Teddy, who is also a robot toy. After calling David several times and have not received any response, Monica decides to call Teddy and question him about David’s location (4). Besides, both David and Teddy calls Monica mummy, which indicates there is some type relationship between them; possibly a mother-sons relationship. In addition, Henry Swinton and the full-size serving-man, who appears to be a robot toy with some level of intelligence is another example of a social relation that is shaped by technology. When Henry arrived home with the serving-man, Henry asked, “how do you like it,” and the serving-man expresses his thought by responding to Henry’s question (6). Therefore, social relations are shaped by technology through the interaction between humans and robot toys in the story.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 18, 2016 10:17 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
17 February 2016

“Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”

Q: #8 In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” why is David experiencing difficulties communicating with his Mummy? Why is his mother, Monica, incapable of communicating with her son?

A: The first hint that something is clearly wrong is when the author comments that Monica had “tried to love him” (Aldiss 1). David cannot communicate with his mom, because he is just a toy, and his mom knows it. She is waiting for a “real” child, and that is why she is so excited when the government grants her and Henry permission to have one (7). She knows she should communicate with David, but finds it hard and even asks the bear for information on why David does not talk to her, instead of just asking David herself. Her guilt (after reading all of David’s letters) makes her blame David and her communication on David’s computer. She says his “verbal communication center” is malfunctioning and that he needs to go back into the shop while she says the bear, who can only hold a basic conversation, is working well and “gives no trouble” (Fitzgerald 7). The person who craves a real relationship does not get one, and continues to wonder why he is not loved, and whether or not he is real or not.

Posted by: HannahRowe at February 18, 2016 10:52 PM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
18 February 2016

Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” why can’t the character David fully express himself? What is wrong with him? What might the author be trying to say about what it means to be human?

Answer: David struggles to feel accepted by his mother and is not sure that she loves him. HE’s at an age that he is curious about everything. He’s jealous that she talks to Teddy and feels as if he is more treated as a son more than he is himself. “David looked up at her and grinned without replying (Aldiss 1).” An example where he didn’t speak to his mother. “But before his mother could reach for a pair of slippers, he wriggled away and was gone into the silence of the house (Aldiss 1).” David ran away from his mother, and his mother didn’t chase him, I think if he would feel like she would love him.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at February 18, 2016 11:41 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
19 February 2016

Super Toys Last All Summer Long

Question #7: Comment briefly on the characterization of Monica Swinton in Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long.” Then, answer these two questions: “Is Monica capable of loving David?” and “Is Monica capable of love?”

Answer: Monica is a mixture of desperation and hopelessness. You can see her emptiness as she “stood in the middle of the room. Her face was blank; its lack of expression scared [David]. He watched fascinated. He did not move; she did not move. Time might have stopped, as it had stopped in the garden” (Aldiss 5). She wants an easy child that listens to her and does as she says, and she doesn’t know how to deal with David (2). It states that “she had tried to love him” which the past tense indicates that she was no longer trying (1). She clearly does not love him especially due to the ending where she calls him defective and wants to have him shipped away (8). Monica is capable of love, but she won’t unless it is convenient to her. If there is a struggle, she is not willing to fight.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 19, 2016 01:40 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
19 February 2016

Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” David is programmed to love Mrs. Swinton as if she were his real mother. Do you think that there is any significant difference between David’s love for Mrs. Swinton and the love of a “real” child for a “real” mother?

Answer: There is a difference between David’s love for his mother and the love from a “real” child to their mother. In the story, David writes letters to his mother to show that he loves her because he cannot talk to her. A child does not have to write letters to their mother to demonstrate their love because they know it is there. David states, “If she loved me, then why can’t I talk to her” (Aldiss 5). He starts to second-guess himself with the love his “mother” shows him and the love he gives to her.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 19, 2016 10:53 AM

Phillip Moss

Dr. Hobbs

Eng 122 Academic Writing CA06

19 February 2016


Question: In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” David is programmed to love Mrs. Swinton as if she were his real mother. Do you think that there is any significant difference between David’s love for Mrs. Swinton and the love of a “real” child for a “real” mother? Why do you think that Mrs. Swinton cannot love David? Answer in your words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer

Answer: in the short story “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” David is programmed to love Mrs. Swinton as a son would love his mother. This "love" is not the same as an actual bond between mother and child because David must “love” his mother regardless because of his programming. For similar Reasons, Mrs. Swinton has a difficult time showing affection for David. She realizes that his emotions are artificial and cannot create the same bond she would have with a child of hers. “She had tried to love him”(Aldiss 1)

Posted by: Phillip Moss at February 19, 2016 10:54 AM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
19 February 2016

Question: 10.) In Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” is David truly malfunctioning? Is his “verbal communication center . . . still giving him trouble?” Does he deserve to be resent to the factory from which he came? Why, or why not?

Answer: 10.) In the story Super-Toys Last All Summer Long, David is truly malfunctioning, during the story David never feels like Monica really loves him, he is told certain things but his “verbal communication centre” is still having problems processing what is being said to him, and is not able to communicate properly, he is having trouble communicating with Monica, “Why can’t we communicate?” (Aldiss, 4). I think David does deserve to be sent back to the factory because he needs to be able to communicate with people properly and understand when someone wants something from him, this is especially because they are now going to have a baby on the way and he needs to be able to act proper when the baby gets there, and Monica realizes that when she says “ We’ll see how he does before the baby’s born” (Aldiss, 7).

Posted by: Justin Robinson at February 19, 2016 02:22 PM

Phillip Moss, Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
17 February 2016

Question. 1.) identify the cultural symbol in the story. 2.)identify the contextual symbol in the story 3.) Answer this narrative (a) allegorical (b) mythological (c) parable-like (d) fable-like 4.)Identify a metaphor or a simile or both in your story.


Answer: 1.) in the short story “Super Toys Last all Summer Long” The primary cultural symbol is the family structure that Mrs. Swinton and David are trying to create. All readers understand the concept of the traditional family structure. 2.) A contextual symbol in the story is the piece of paper that Henry Swinton brings home announcing the child “Yes my darling we’ve won this week’s Parenthood lottery. We can go ahead and conceive a child at once” (Aldiss 7). 3.) (a) Allegorical 4.) an example of a metaphor in the short story is when Teddy is speaking with David in the yard, and the two discuss Mr. and Mrs. Swinton “you ask such silly questions David no one knows what ‘real’ really means let go indoors”(Aldiss 7).

Posted by: Phillip Moss at February 19, 2016 03:11 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic writing 2 CA06
22 February 2016

Question 11) In Brian Aldiss' short story "super toys last all summer long" what is the author's general tone throughout the piece? Is it positive, negative or both? If both, in that there's an ironic sense throughout, explain.

Answer 11) I think that the general tone throughout the piece is fairly negative. Firstly in the part of the narrative where Henry, his wife and his son are having trouble communicating is very negative and appears to be a broken home. However, the tone changes when it is come to their attention that they can have a real child, but they do not know what to do about David, the robot child.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 22, 2016 11:17 AM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
18 February 2016

Question: In spite of its brevity, Brian Aldiss’s short story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long,” gains resonance and depth through its indirect evocation of the well-known story of Pinocchio, the wooden puppet who desperately desires to be a real boy. If you aren’t familiar with that story, fill in the gaps of your knowledge, and look up a summary on site, such as Wikipedia. How is David like a science-fictional version of Pinocchio?

Answer: In this story, David is a science-fictional version of Pinocchio, because David is not a human, he is artificial intelligence similar to how Pinocchio was a puppet. Later in the story, David realizes that he is not human and says to Teddy, “I suppose Mummy and Daddy are real, aren’t they?” (Aldiss 7) and Teddy responds, “You ask such silly questions, David. Nobody knows what ‘real’ really means” (Aldiss 7).

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at February 22, 2016 12:19 PM

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