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October 01, 2014

Looking Under The Hood of Claude F. Cheinisse's "Juliette"


Image Source:http://www.heyuguys.com/images/2010/11/cs131_405Tpub.pub16n.136.jpg


Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 1, 2014 09:36 AM

Readers' Comments:

Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
2 October 2, 2014

Question #7
What parallels exist between what the narrator can do, and what Juliette can do? For example, while the narrator eats at a restaurant, what does Juliette do? Find other such behavioral parallels/equivalents between Juliette and the narrator, and, in your own words, explain your response.

Answer
In the story, the narrator is a doctor, and Juliette is a machine; so there are certain things that the narrator can do that Juliette cannot do, and vice versa. One example of this parallel is when they go to the restaurant. The narrator ordered, “a medium rare steak," while Juliette ordered, “twenty liters and a grease job." Juliette couldn’t show any real emotions while the narrator could. Juliette is a machine; so she grew old at a faster rate than the narrator.

Posted by: Allison Ward at October 2, 2014 04:02 PM

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA07
October 2, 2014


QUESTION #2:
When and where is this story taking place? What evidence exists to back up your claim? Compare the time setting to the date the narrative was written. Was much expected by the future? Did the author’s dream/nightmare of the future come true? Did it come true in another way?

ANSWER:
The story is taking place in France during the adult years of the narrator’s life, which could have probably been much like the 60’s. He describes in his view that “at the turnpike exit, just before the sharp turn that overlooks the Seine, a new Dodge passed us going full speed” (Cheinisse 5). The Seine is a river in France and it would be in the countryside because he describes many winding roads that he traveled on. The future looked bright for making new machines and vehicles, yet this narrator didn’t seem to like the idea of letting go of the past. His nightmare of losing Juliette, which is his car, came true at the end. He thought of this car as a girl, and he “meant to tell her of all [his] affection, promise her again how many fine vacations [they’d] have, and fine spins along scenic routes…but she was already gone” (Cheinesse 7). The narrator found love in his car in the way one falls in love with another person. At the end, he receives a new car that could make his dream come true if he starts to get more used to it. He could end up falling in love with this car and become just as happy as before.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at October 2, 2014 08:14 PM

Anthony Colello
Dr. Hobbs 
ENG CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
3 October 2014

Question:
Consider the final lines of the story. Does this echo sentiments used elsewhere in the story? If so, where? Is there any evidence to support that the narrator actually believes these words? Why? Or why not?

Answer:
At first the reader is lead to believe that Juliette is a female human companion of the doctors. Throughout the story the author transitions the text to reflect, the love that is shared between the doctor and Juliette, in such a way that the reader infers that Juliette is not human. An example of such a transition is evident in these excerpts from the text read in order from beginning to end, "Juliette closed the door" (Cheinisse's, 1). Then, "The steak and grease job were followed by a grapefruit and a wash" (2). Finally, "after all she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine... " (5). It is evident that the doctor is in love with his car on a level that is beyond the realm of physical love. He has gone as far as to personify the car into an attractive female companion that understands him, as good if not better than himself.

Posted by: Anthony Colello at October 3, 2014 10:17 AM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 October 2014

QUESTION #10:
In this narrative, which characters qualify as flat, and why? In your own words, explain your response.

ANSWER:

In this story, there are a few flat characters, and some in which the narrator considers dynamic however it is static. To begin, the women that the narrator dates are flat. As noted, “Before dinner, we went to pick up Josiane (the week before, it had been Christiane. A little earlier, Veronique. Before that… I don’t remember. They’re so much alike… all I ask of them is to be pretty, a bit dumb, and willing)”(Cheinisse 3). All of the cars mentioned within the text, as we know are all vehicles that drive and do some of the same things with minor differences. However, Juliette is mentioned throughout the story as a dynamic character although Juliette is a vehicle. It’s mentioned twice in the story what Juliette truly is, “ After all, she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine….”(Cheinisse 5). Therefore, Juliette is like any other vehicle, depreciating over time.

Posted by: Thomas Watson at October 3, 2014 11:57 AM

Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
1 October 2014

Question #11:
Does Juliette have feelings? What range of emotions does she show throughout the course of the narrative? What does the narrator do, at times, to facilitate an emotional response from Juliette? Why would that matter to the story, at large? In other words, why are Juliette’s emotional capabilities/ exhibitions significant?

Answer:
The narrator makes it seem like Juliette has feelings. “Juliette closed the door, pulled away gracefully” (Cheinisse 3). The narrator makes it seem like she cares about him because she picked him up from work and closed his door from him and the drove him to a restaurant. All these emotions that the narrator gives Juliette portrays her to be a person throughout the whole story but at the end it was shocking to find out that she was just a car. It was believed to be a woman until the end of the story because they gave Juliette emotions as if she was a human. For example making it seem as if she was actually speaking to him. “So long, darling..” (Cheinisse 7) is what she said to him when she was going away.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at October 3, 2014 12:04 PM

Ahmed Almoailu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
3 October 2014


Question 16 : [Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”] The narrator uses, at least, two names to signify the vehicle that replaced his old car. What are those names, and why they are significant? How is it/they different from what he called his old car. There seems to be some confusion, at the end of the story, about what Juliette wants, and what the narrator wants. In the end, what finally/ really happened to Juliette? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The two names are The New One and the Intruder. They are signifying that he was not happy with the new car and he didn’t wanted it. Also I think he feels like he was forced to take the new car, He did not want to take the car. “ the salesman tried to talk to me about “ trade-in on the old model,” but I interrupted him, almost shouting:” no, I don’t want us to separate Julitte’s going to stay with me. “ (Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”, page 7). It’s different from what he called his old car because was in love with his old car and he called it Juliette which means baby girl. The name of his old car had emotions in it, he loved that car, but the new one he didn’t have any kind of feeling toward her. The doctor didn’t want to leave Juliette, but he knows that she won’t be able to drive everyday. Therefore, he said he will drive it in the evening or Sundays, but Juliette didn’t seem happy with that answer. At the same time she would not be able to drive everyday. “ she said in an absent tone: “ that’s it, the evenings- or Sundays…”” (Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”, page 7). At the end, Juliette didn’t work at all.

Posted by: Ahmed Almoailu at October 3, 2014 01:12 PM

Gabriela Navarro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
3 Oct 2014

QUESTION #3:
What is the occupation of the story's protagonist? What title do others use to address the protagonist? in terms of authority, or, financial freedom, how does s/he compare to other characters in the story? How does this shape/inform the story? Does the economic class factor in to this story, in any way (class conflict)? In your own words, explain your response.

ANSWER:
The protagonist at the beginning of the story examined the area and said, "all around me, interns and externs," (Cheinisse, 3), and again later stating that s/he's "laboratory and course at the university," shows hat his occupation must be a doctor and/or professor. I believe finical freedom is a well fit title for the protagonist since s/he can own such an advance car. S/he is oddly attached to a car in contrast with the other characters who believe that car to be "nothing but a machine" (Cheinisse, 7). I do not believe the economic class factor into this story because there was not enough evidence presenting such a topic.

Posted by: Gabriela Navarro at October 3, 2014 02:00 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 October 2014


Question #2:
[Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”] Setting: Where and when is the story taking place? What evidence exists to back up your claim? Compare the time and setting to the date the narrative was written? Was much expected of the future? Did the author’s dream/nightmare of the future come true? Did it come true, perhaps, in any other way? You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
The setting of Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette” takes place in the future outside of a hospital, and at a dinner. The main character reveals the setting to the reader by his discourse with the doorman.”…they still didn’t know how to graft on an artificial arm, yes, the Doctor was very tired from his morning’s consultation” (Cheinisse 1).


The setting is not currently a reflection of the time in which the story is written, because Cheinisse wrote this short story in 1961. The story itself is about a love interest between an automaton and the main character. He trades in an older model automaton “Citroen” for a newer model “Juliette” (4). During the 1961, the schematics for automatons was not yet conceived since technology had not yet evolved to the point of artificial life.


This short story is a result of an interest in the future and the rapid rise in advancement of technology, where automatons would do basic tasks for their masters, such as drive. Very much is expected of the future; however, the time the story was written was a hindrance to the concept.


Chienisse’s dream/nightmare came true in a sense in the modern day 2000’s. There have been advancements in technology, and a few concepts of artificial life have been executed in Japan, and not very prevalent in everyday living. There have been major advancements in cell phone technology, and many phones can, locate themselves, Google search if you ask them to, and make calls or send texts. Society may not have the everyday use of automatons, but cell phones come close.

Posted by: Emily Finck at October 3, 2014 02:06 PM

Alyssa Davis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
5 October 2014

Question #12:
What daily challenges does the narrator seem to face, no matter how trivial? How does Juliette provide alleviation for the narrator? What is her emotional role in his life? If the narrator is a happier person because of the presence of Juliette in his life, what evidence from text backs this up? In your own words, explain your response.
Answer:
The daily challenges the narrator faces his every day after work he has to answer the same questions from the same veteran. The narrator states “I had to answer him patiently once more that, yes, the weather was clearing, no, they still didn’t know how to graft on an artificial arm, yes, the Doctor was very tired from his morning’s consultation,” (Cheinisse 3). Juliette served as an outlet for the narrator. He looked forward to seeing her after his busy day. Each day, Juliette would have a lit cigarrate waiting for him and she would ask if he was tired. Having Juliette in the narrator made him a better person. When Juliette began to give up because she was getting old, the narrator became very emotional and did not want to let her go. The narrator said “No, I don’t want us to separate, Juliette’s going to stay with me. I-I’ll use her in the evenings, or Sundays. I don’t want anybody to tire her out any more; she has the right to get some rest,” (Chenisse 7).

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at October 5, 2014 09:17 PM

Zailet Martinez

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 210CL- Love and Desire in Literature

5 October 2014

Question #14:

Who are Josiane, Christiane, and Veronique? Are they round or flat characters? What is their significance to the story? Are these persons that the narrator has a real interest in? How does Juliette feel about them? Have you ever heard about persons involved in illicit, illegal, or otherwise socially unacceptable relationships having a “cover”? Is this what’s happening? If so, why? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer:

Josiane, Christiane, and Veronique are women of service. Since they were different every week, and he asks for them to be a little dumb and willing we can predict that they are prostitutes. They are flat characters to the story because they are not as important as Juliette is to the story. Juliette is the main character in the story and everything revolves around her. The three women had no significance to the story, and the narrator has no real interest in them. Juliette is the main focus of his life. “I knew by the faint interruptions in the purring motor that Juliette was laughing, very quietly to,” (Cheinisse, 5). Juliette found the narrator’s encounters with the women as funny and had no real meaning to her. The narrator and Juliette when home happy after his encounter with the Josiane. “Juliette and I went home to bed about one in the morning, light, and relaxed, whistling together” (Cheinisse, 5).
I have heard of persons involved in illicit or illegal relationships having a “cover”. For example, a drug dealer and a man acting a cop that work together involved in illegal actions. A man acting as a cop has a cover, because he does illegal things while in police uniform. I do not think this is what’s happening on the story. Juliette and the narrator have a close relationship, but they don’t do anything illegal together, other than picking up prostitutes. They had a loving relationship, after long days at work, the narrator always looked forward to meeting Juliette because immediately his day got better. “…as I did every day, my exhaustions vanished all at once: Juliette was waiting for,” (Cheinisse, 3).

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at October 5, 2014 09:59 PM

Irma Sera

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG. 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02

4 September 2014

Question #11:

Does Juliette have feelings? What range of emotions does she show throughout the course of the narrative? What does the narrator do, at times, to facilitate an emotional response from Juliette? Why would this matter to the story, at large? In other words, why are Juliette’s emotional capabilities/exhibitions significant? In your words, explain your response.

Answer:

Yes, Juliette does have feelings, “Juliette closed the door, and pulled away gracefully, swerved to frighten an extern she didn’t like and headed toward the restaurant…” (Claude Cheinisse, pg. 3). Juliette actions showed that she was jealous or upset with some of the interns and externs. Throughout the narrative, Juliette shows that she is caring and sympathetic towards her owner. “… It was only after two red lights that she offered me a lit cigarette and asked tenderly, “tired?” (Cheinisse, pg. 4). The narrator at times, pretend to be interested in other cars just to tease Juliette. It is clear that she becomes jealous when he has his attention on another car. This matters in the story because the narrator holds Juliette close to his heart. He sees her more than a machine, “I meant to tell her of all my affection, promise her again how many fine vacations we’d have, and fine spins along the scenic routes…” The way she made him feel was special, and he treated her as if she was an actual woman with real feelings.

Posted by: irma sera at October 5, 2014 10:55 PM

Mickael Dodard
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II Ca07
6 October 2014

Question #9

(Claude F. Cheinisse’s Juliette) Character. In literature, round characters are dynamic, and more three-dimensional than the other characters (they change/transform), and flat characters are static, often stereotyped, and more one-dimensional than the main characters. In this narrative, which characters qualify as round, and why?

Answer:
In this narrative, Juliette is the round character. When the author said, “I tried to agree with her, but only said “I’m tired…” She had already made all agreements, all it needed was my signature.” Which means that Juliette, which is the name of the doctor’s car is a round character because the car is getting old and the car is not functioning right anymore as it used to.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at October 7, 2014 11:03 PM

Trejon Aman Baynham
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 07
3 October 2014

QUESTION:
Without spelling it out literally, what sexual euphemisms/innuendos are present in this narrative? What language does the author use to make his suggestions? Is it effective or, does it stop short of being completely clear? Why, or why not? In your own words, explain your response.

ANSWER:
The wordplay within the text of Cheinisse’s Juliette can be described as very sensual and intensely passionate. Cheinisse’s usage of sexual euphemisms/innuendos is plentiful and effectively conveys the depth of affection that the protagonist possesses for his car, Juliette. On one occasion, the protagonist mentions that Juliette had “offered herself” to which they toured the view of a scenic route “feeling the same joy at each rhythmic turn” (Cheinisse 5). In many instances similar to this, Juliette is personified through the author’s articulation of “her” and the protagonist’s interactions as a living being – comparable to that of a wife or lover of sorts. This connection becomes clear when the protagonist in the story’s denouement expresses regret at not informing Juliette of all his compassion towards her, in spite of her being “nothing but a machine” (Cheinisse 7).

Posted by: Trejon Baynham at October 7, 2014 11:46 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
October 6, 2014
Juliette
By: Claude F. Cheinisse
Question 8:
Why does the narrator call his relationship with Juliette, an “affair”? An “affair” can mean many things. Might the narrator mean more than one thing, here, or is only one inferred? How is an “affair” different from other types of relationships and social institutions, e.g., friendship, comradery, marriage, etc.? Can legal definitions of adultery, for example, apply to relationships between a human and a machine?
Answer:
The narrator calls his relationship with Juliette an affair because he has some sort of attachment to it (his car). “My affair with Juliette dated three years back. At the first glance, I had fallen violently in love with her, taken out my checkbook... (Cheinisse, 4).” The narrator’s affair is different because it is not fit the normal definition of affairs, it is with a car. In some aspects one can view this relationship with a machine as a legal definition of adultery. If the narrator was married and is giving all his love and attention to a car instead of his wife, that could be viewed as an adulterous act.

Posted by: Stephanie Vera at October 8, 2014 12:02 AM

Ashjan Alrashid
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2014

 Question #6 :
Who is Juliette? Is she a person? What is her connection to the narrator? What are her “capabilities”? Are some of her functions merely suggested, and not stated outright in plain language? What do you suspect is going on between the narrator and Juliette?
Answer: 
Juliette is an intelligent car, not a person. As the narrator said "the agency where we had met, three years ago.”(cheinisses 3) Although Juliette was his car, she was so close to him that he did not even say “bought” but in fact he said “met”(6). He treated her as a friend or a family. He somehow loved her and was proud of having her by his side. Juliette had many functions as a car. The narrator stated most of her functions. At first "As soon as I passed through the impalpable curtain that barred the hospital entrance”,“Juliette started her engine and opened the door.”(3) So, she is intelligent, and she can work on her own. "she offered me a lit cigarette and asked tenderly, “Tired?””(4) she can even light a cigarette and speak to him. "Juliette was asleep”(6) she disconnect herself and wake up on his command and so many more functions stated in the story. Juliette was not just “nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine”(7) to the narrator. In fact, She was so close to him that he was hurt because she is not with him anymore.

Posted by: ashjan alrashid at October 8, 2014 01:04 AM

Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 October 2014

Question #9:
[Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”] Character: In literature, round characters are dynamic, and more three-dimensional than the other characters (they change/transform), and flat characters are static, often stereotyped and more one-dimensional than the main characters. In this narrative, which character qualifies as round, and why?

Answer:
In this narrative, Juliette would be considered a round character. The narrator of the story goes and buys Juliette and falls in love with “her” at first sight. Juliette, however she was shy and did not open up to the narrator right away. “Juliette herself took a long time to lose her shyness, to consider me as a friend rather than her master” (Cheinisse 4). Before the narrator bought her, Juliette was unhappy and broken. It took her a while for her to warm up and become friends with the narrator. After some time, they end up becoming the greatest of friends. They know everything about each other. They know each other’s tendencies and how they feel. When the narrator gets off work, Juliette knows not to talk to him because he just had a stressful day. In the end, the narrator does not want to let Juliette go because they have developed such a close bond with one another. In this short story, Juliette changes from being shy to the narrator to becoming his best friend. This makes Juliette a round character.

Posted by: Matthew Weller at October 8, 2014 11:25 PM

Brianna L Broughton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love & Desire in Literature
10 December 2014

Juliette

Question 4: What types of technology are available to people in the futuristic world of this narrative? There are, at least, two mentions of technological breakthrough, so identify and explain, at least two. If such technologies were to actually exist, how would/might they impact society? How do they seem to have impacted society in this narrative? Is the world a better place, or a worse place, because of them? Why, or why not? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: In this futuristic narrative, two of the technological advancements are talking and self-driving cars and what I believe to be similar to a water dispenser, but the driver is able to choose a variety of beverage options.
“ I got dressed, grumbling, turned the dispenser dial to “coffee” and poured myself a big cup, then went down to the garage.” (page 5-6).
“Juliette closed the door, pulled away gracefully, swerved to frighten an extern she didn’t like, and headed toward the restaurant, all without saying a word:…” (page 3-4).
These new technologies might impact the world positively because a machine can be very efficient and safe and in the case if the cars, it can drastically cut down on vehicular accidents. However, they can also negatively impact society because a machine can become out dated, have malfunctions, and with a task such as driving, the task could cause more accidents. A person driving can see obstacles that can cause trouble where as a machine may not. These technological impacts do not seem to have many negative impacts according to the narrative.

Posted by: Brianna Broughton at October 10, 2014 02:51 PM

Rebecca Messano/Allison Ward
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature
October 10, 2014

Question 11: Does Juliette have feelings? What range of emotions does she show throughout the course of the narrative? What does the narrator do, at times, to facilitate an emotional response from Juliette? Why would this matter to the story, at large? In other words, why are Juliette’s emotional capabilities/exhibitions significant? Explain your response.

Answer: For one thing, Juliette is a car. It is obvious that the narrator has some sort of strange, emotional attachment to Juliette saying, “Juliette herself took a long time to lose her shyness, to consider me her friend rather than her master.” Juliette’s emotional capabilities/exhibitions illustrate how attached she is to the narrator, and vice versa. She most definitely does have feelings; no matter how hard one tries to prove otherwise. He tries to make her jealous by looking at other cars, and when the car salesman tries to convince him to trade her in, and he says he wants to keep her, that he’ll “use her on the evenings, or Sundays” Juliette says, “the evenings-or Sundays” because she is saddened by that thought.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano/Allison Ward at October 10, 2014 03:06 PM

Question 13: If you are not familiar with the words “innuendo” and “euphemism”, fill in the gaps of your knowledge and look them up. This is a very short story, but a lot happens. Without spelling it out literally, what sexual euphemisms/innuendos are present in this narrative? What language does the author use to make his suggestion? Is it effective or, does it stop short of being completely clear? Why, or why not? In you own words explain your response.
Answer: On page 5 the Doctor had an intimate drive with Juliette on a scenic route. This descriptive language is very suggestive, and the words are picked carefully. “…one guiding the other, one in the other, feeling the same joy at each rhythmic turn, at each acceleration when the motor’s thunder roared…” (page 5). When two people in love, or if they are very passionate, will be very in harmony with each other, keeping up with each other pace and rhythm when having sex. This is very effective, and the passion the Doctor has for Juliette and vice versa is very clear throughout the story.

Posted by: Brianna Broughton at October 10, 2014 03:14 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL CA02
10 October 2014
Question: Why does narrator call his relationship with Juliette, an “affair”? An “affair” can mean many things. Might the narrator mean more than one thing, here, or is only one inferred? How is an “affair” different from other types of relationships and social institution, e.g., friendship, comradery, marriage, etc.? Can legal definition of adultery, for example, apply to relationships between a human and a machine?

Answer: The narrator considered his relationship with Juliette because he builds personal feelings for the car. Even though she is just artificial, an intimate object. It may have started as an official business affair but the narrator becomes attached on a deeper level, becoming a relationship were the narrator feels for the car and the car “shows” feelings back. With the idea of an affair, it gives the idea that this is a relationship that he does not want to make public or at least try to keep quite. “My affair with Juliette began three years back.” (Cheinisse 4)

Posted by: Martin Terrasi Matt Weller at October 10, 2014 03:28 PM

Ahmed Almoailu & Zailet Martinez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG210CL
October 10, 2014

Question 3:
[Claude F. Cheinisse’s “juliette”] Character/Plot: What is the occupation of the story’s protagonist? What title do others use to address the protagonist? In terms of authority, or, financial freedom, how does s/he compare to other characters in the story? How does this shape/inform the story? Does economic class in to this story, in any way (class conflict)? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of the answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The occupation of protagonist Science teacher. Others address him as Doctor/ scientist. He had the freedom to do what he wanted, and he was providing the money. The story shaped by his everyday activities. The economic class is a factor, because he has money to do as he wishes, and he seems to be part of the middle class. “ the salesman tried to talk to me about the “trade-in on the old model,” but I interrupted him, almost shouting: “No, I don’t want us to separate.” (Cheinisse, 7)

Posted by: Ahmed Almoailu at October 10, 2014 03:34 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
October 6, 2014
Juliette
By: Claude F. Cheinisse
Question 8:
Why does the narrator call his relationship with Juliette, an “affair”? An “affair” can mean many things. Might the narrator mean more than one thing, here, or is only one inferred? How is an “affair” different from other types of relationships and social institutions, e.g., friendship, comradery, marriage, etc.? Can legal definitions of adultery, for example, apply to relationships between a human and a machine?
Answer:
The narrator calls his relationship with Juliette an affair because he has some sort of attachment to it (his car). “My affair with Juliette dated three years back. At the first glance, I had fallen violently in love with her, taken out my checkbook... (Cheinisse, 4).” The narrator’s affair is different because it is not fit the normal definition of affairs, it is with a car. In some aspects one can view this relationship with a machine as a legal definition of adultery. If the narrator was married and is giving all his love and attention to a car instead of his wife, that could be viewed as an adulterous act.

Posted by: Stephanie Vera at October 11, 2014 02:33 PM

Ashjan Alrashid, Sharonda S Byrd
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 October 2014


Question #14 :
Who is josiane, Christiane, and veronique? Are they round or flat characters? What is their significance to the story? Are these persons that narrator has interest in? How does Juliette feel about them? Have you ever heard about persons involved in illicit, illegal, or otherwise socially unacceptable relationship having a "cover" ? Is this what's happening? If so, why? in your own words explain the response.
Answer :
Josiane, Christiane, and Veronique are all flat characters in the story. Those girls were all girls that he went out with. He had a deferent girl every time, and we know that they do not mean anything to him because all he felt is "They’re so much alike . . . all I ask of them is to be pretty, a bit dumb, and willing"(Cheinisse 5). So he does not care much about their personality. Juliette was "laughing, very quietly, to herself" (5) because she knew that they meant nothing to him. The relationship between him and Juliette is weird and unreasonable to him and to the world he live in "The salesman looked at me rather pityingly. “It’s nothing but a machine, Doctor. A beautiful machine.”"(7) , but she was not just a machine to him. For that reason, he might have been trying to use those girls as a cover to what he feels for Juliette or maybe as a reminder of what a true human companion feels like.

Posted by: ashjan alrashid at October 12, 2014 07:01 PM

Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
13 October 2014

Question #7:
What parallels exist between what the narrator is able to do, and what Juliette is able to do? For example, while the narrator eats at the restaurant, what does Juliette do? Find other such behavioral parallels/ equivalents between Juliette and the narrator, and, in your own words, explain your response.

Answer:
The narrator is clearly a human being, and Juliette is a machine.“[…] Ordered a medium rare steak for me and twenty liters and grease job for herself.” While he ordered a steak to eat, she ordered a tune up. As much as the reader wants to separate the narrator from the car, they are one. He is in love with her. Just like he becomes tired, so does the car. Just like he needs some affection so does she. The love the narrator and his car share are spread out throughout the story, which makes it one of the most interesting stories we have read.

Posted by: irma sera & Emily Fink at October 13, 2014 02:29 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 February 2015

Question: What is the occupation of the story’s protagonist? What title do others use to address the protagonist? In terms of authority, or financial freedom, how does he compare to other characters in the story? How does this shape/inform the story? Does economic class factor into this story, in any way (class conflict)?

Answer: The story’s protagonist works in a hospital and teaches students. “…I passed through the impalpable curtain that barred the hospital entrance to microbes and unwanted visitors…” (Cheinsse 3) Others call the protagonist ‘The Doctor.’ “I had to answer him patiently once more that, yes, the weather was clearing, no they still didn’t know how to graft on an artificial arm, yes the Doctor was very tired from this morning’s consultation.” (Cheinsse 3) Doctors make enough money to purchase luxury items, unlike other lower income people. The doctor has the freedom to enjoy nice cars and spend the money on them. This allows for the doctor to be prideful in his nice car. The doctor notices how people look at her enviously even when Juliette herself does not notice. “She was unaware of the envious looks of passing students, who were examining her contours minutely.” (Cheinsse 3) He looks at his car ‘Juliette’, compares her with others’ cars, and believes she is superior.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 18, 2015 12:47 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA 12
18 February 15

“Juliette” Discussion Question

Question 17: Consider the final lines of the story. Does this echo sediments used elsewhere in the story? If so, where? Is there any evidence to support that the narrator actually believes these words? Why or why not? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The final lines of the story echo sediments used in three paragraphs above the final one. The echoed paragraph similar to the last paragraph states, “It’s nothing but a machine, doctor. A beautiful machine” (Cheinisse 5). There is evidence that the narrator actually believes these words because he states, “No, I don’t want us to separate, Juliette’s going to stay with me” (Cheinisse 5). He also states, “Juliette was humming gaily” (Cheinisse 3). The narrator believes that Juliette is a beautiful machine, but he does not want anyone to take her away from him. Even though she is getting old, the narrator states, “I’ll use her in the evenings, or Sundays” (Cheinisse 5). He genuinely believes in Juliette’s beauty as a machine but does not want to see her go.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 18, 2015 04:36 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
19 February 2015

Question 10: In literature, round characters are dynamic, and more three-dimensional than the other characters (they change/transform), and flat characters are static, often stereotyped, and more one-dimensional than the main characters. In this narrative, which characters qualify as flat, and why?

Answer: There are many flat characters in this story. From the beginning, Cheinisse gives a brief description of "interns and externs [that] were getting up with a great hubbub." (Cheinisse 3) He goes on to mention an old doorman, "an ancient gold-braided wreck, decorated in the war of 1970." (Cheinisse 3) There also many other flat characters such as the passing students, the waiter at the restaurant and salesman at "the agency where we had met, three years ago." (Cheinisse 6) Juliette herself is classified as flat, "she was nothing but a machine" (Cheinisse 7). Throughout the story there was not any change from Juliette, she remained the same as there could not be much change. As the narrator pointed out, she was nothing but a machine.

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 19, 2015 12:07 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Question 13: This is a very short story, but a lot happens in it. Without spelling it out literally, what sexual euphemisms/innuendos are present in this narrative? What language does the author use to make his suggestions? Is it effective or, does it stop short of being completely clear? Why, or why not? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: A few of the innuendos presented in this story were such things as “..never let her drive herself,..(Cheinisse 4)” and “Juliette was offering herself.. (Cheinisse 5).”

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 19, 2015 04:42 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
19 February 2015

“Juliette”

Question #4: What types of technology are available to people in the futuristic world of this narrative? There are, at least, two mentions of technological breakthrough, so identify and explain at least two. If such technologies were to actually exist, how would/might they impact society? How do they seem to have impacted society in this narrative? Is the world a better place, or a worse place because of them? Why, or why not? In your own words, explain your response.

The technologies that were available to the people in to futuristic world of this narrative was a machine that made coffee for you so that people wouldn’t have to go through the trouble of making their own, he just had to “..get dressed, grumbling, turned the dispenser dial to “coffee” and poured myself a big cup.” (Cheinisse page 5-6 ) The coffee was made freshly for him to drink. The second, form of technology that was available to people was a car, although, we have cars no this one did everything for these people, even spoke to them as if it was a real- life person. Cars don’t last forever, but he wishes Juliette did but in the end when the salesman brought reality to light and told him “It’s nothing but a machine, Doctor. A beautiful machine.” (Cheinisse page 7) If this technology existed in today’s world it would impact society in a negative way because then nobody will do the work or the labor to do anything they would let the machine do all the work for them. In the narrative, it seemed to have impacted them in a negative way also because he became dependent on his car and when she was “tried” he had a difficult time giving her up. The world would be a better because things will be more efficient and faster. It will make the world worse because people will become dependent like he did.

Posted by: Selena Hammie at February 19, 2015 08:54 PM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
19 February 2015

Question : 5. Every narrative has an antagonist or a character that works against the protagonist even if the antagonist is internal, i.e., “inside the head” of the protagonist. What character or concept best functions as the antagonist in the narrative? (Identify the protagonist and whatever it is the protagonist wants).

Answer: In “Juliette” the character, Juliette is the antagonist. The protagonist is the narrator, unnamed man, and he wants to keep his car Juliette, because he has built a personal relationship with car but Juliette is an older model of a car and had become too old to drive. Juliette is the antagonist because she went against the narrator and based on some of her actions. “I tried to suggest a little overhaul in Milian: I could perfectly well take cabs for a month, but Juliette did not answer. She left me in front of the hospital steps and left without telling me where she was going.” (Cheinisse 4) The author is using personification by giving “Juliette” the car life-like characteristics. Juliette is tired so she goes to where her owner first bought her to trade herself back in. "I tried to argue with her but she only say “I’m tired...” She had already made all of the arrangements all it needed was my signature.” (Cheinisse 3-4)

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at February 20, 2015 12:57 AM

Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing CA 12
20 February 2015

Question 11:
Does Juliette have feelings?
Answer:
Throughout this story Juliette came off as someone who did not have feelings. She was mostly angry and acted as though she did not care.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 20, 2015 01:38 AM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
19 February 2015

Question: In literature, round characters are dynamic, and more three- dimensional than the other characters (they change/ transform), and flat characters are static, often stereotyped, and more one-dimensional than the main characters. In this narrative, which characters qualify as flat and why? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: In Juliette the doctor is a round character. This is so because from the beginning of the story to the end he makes multiple changes. At the beginning of the story, he is an annoyed, tired, and even depressed person. "Avidly, when the first patient left I lit my first cigarette" (page 1) "I walked down an endless hall" (page 1) "I had to answer him patiently" (page 1) all of these lead me to believe he is an unhappy person. Then, he leaves work and walks out to what he seems to describe as the love of his life. "At first glimpse, I'd fallen violently in love with her." (Page 2) Then he has another change at the end of the story. He becomes indifferent of his beloved Juliette. "After all she was nothing but a machine". (Page 5)

Posted by: Rachel Addington at February 20, 2015 02:34 AM

Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
20 February 2015

Question 16: The narrator uses, at least, two names to signify the vehicle that replaced his old car. What are those names, and why are they significant? How is it/they different from what he called his old car? There seems to be confusion, at the end of the story, about what Juliette wants, and what the narrator wants. In the end, what finally/really happens to Juliette? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The narrator calls his new vehicle both the names of the “Replacement” and “machine,” it signifies that he does not care as much for it as he did for Juliette (Cheinisse 7). He personified Juliette, calling their relationship an “affair” and he had “fallen violently in love” with her, at first sight, she had meaning to him (Cheinisse 4). She wanted him to “leave right away,” to trade her in for a new model and he said that he “does not want them to separate,” trying hard to convince her to stay with different bargains (Cheinisse 7. In the ending, before he knew it, “she was gone” and had died (Cheinisse 7).

Posted by: Victoria Markou at February 20, 2015 05:24 AM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Question: [Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”] Who are Josiane, Christiane, and Veroniqe? Are they round or flat characters? What are their significance to the story? Are these persons that the narrator has a real interest in? How does Juliette feel about them? Have you ever heard about persons involved in illicit, illegal, or otherwise socially unacceptable relationships having a “cover”? Is this what’s happening? If so, why? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: Josiane, Christiane, and Veroniqe are girls that the Doctor picks up and takes on dates. They are flat characters because they are only mentioned once in the story, and you don’t learn anything about them. The narrator seems to not have an interest in these girls. “Before dinner, we went to pick up Josiane (the week before; it had been Christiane. A little earlier, Veronique. Before that…I don’t remember. They’re so much alike…all I ask of them is to be pretty, a bit dumb, and willing” (Cheinisse 5). That quote is showing us that these girls don’t have a big part in this story; they’re merely just a distraction for the Doctor. Juliette laughs at the girls he takes out, so she must not really like them. Yes, I have heard of socially unacceptable relationships having a “cover”. This socially unacceptable relationship seems to be happening with the Doctor because he thinks that his car is a person that he is in love with, but it’s simply just a machine. “After all, she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine…”(Cheinisse 7).

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at February 20, 2015 09:16 AM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA12
19 February 2015


Juliette
Question:
Setting: when and where is the story taking place? What evidence exists to back up your claim? Compare the time setting to the date the narrative was written? Was much expected of the future? Did the author’s dream/nightmare of the future come true? Did it come true, perhaps, in any other way? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
At first it was taking place at a hospital then they drove toward the restaurant that they liked and they took a scenic rode that they enjoyed because one of them was feeling down.” I sat down in the passenger’s seat with a sigh of relief. Juliette closed the door, pulled away gracefully, swerved to frighten an extern she didn’t like, and headed toward the restaurant, all without saying a word: she always respected the numb silence of my first few minutes.” (Cheinisse Pg 4)

Posted by: jorge Braham at February 20, 2015 09:48 AM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Juliette
Question #6: Who is Juliette? Is she a real person? What is her connection to the narrator? What are her “capabilities”? Are some of her functions merely suggested, and not stated outright in plain language? What do you suspect is going on between the narrator and Juliette? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: Cheinisse’s story gave many hints that Juliette was the Doctors’ car; “ordered a medium rare steak for me, and twenty liters and a grease job for herself” and “the grease job followed by a wash…and a timing adjustment” (Cheinisse 4). The Doctor saw Juliette at an agency three years prior and fell “violently in love with her” (Cheinisse 4). The Doctor was on his way to work when he began having problems starting Juliette. The doctor decided he needed a newer car. He went back to the agency to trade her in, and decided to keep her for nights and Saturday’s (Cheinisse 7).

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at February 20, 2015 10:46 AM

Alison Colon
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA12
21 February 2015

Question 12: What daily challenges does the narrator face? How does Juliette provide alleviation for the narrator? What us her emotional role in his life.

Answer: The narrator faces numerous trivial problems throughout his day such as , his exhaustion from his long day at work (Cheinisse 3). The narrator also has to deal with whether or not to get rid of Juliette for something better or not. Juliette is not just a car to the narrator. The narrator loves Juliette , she relieves his stresses ; He states that when he sees her “at last all his exhaustion vanished at once”(Cheninisse 3 and 4). In this text you can tell that Juliette is more then a car to the narrator he loves her and doesn’t want to change her due to the humanistic characteristics in which she posses. The narrator sees Juliette as his comfort zone and he refuses to let anyone else drive her nor take her away from him (Cheinisse 4 and 7). Juliette is more of important to the narrator then people think . Juliette brings stability , happiness , and emotional attachment to the narrator.

Posted by: Alison Colob at February 23, 2015 09:14 AM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CAO3
September 28, 2015

Question: [Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”] Character: What daily challenges does the narrator seem to face, no matter how trivial? How does Juliette provide alleviation for the narrator? What is her emotional role in his life? If the narrator is a happier person because of the presence of Juliette in his life, what evidence from the text back this up? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of the your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The challenges the narrator faces is dealing with Juliette is was he talks about his love for her. The narrator says “My affair with Juliette dated from three years back. At first glimpse, I’d fallen violently in love with her […]” (Cheinisse 1). The narrator shows that he is happy when he is around Juliette when he says “Juliette and I went home to bed about one in the morning, light and relaxed, whistling together. Not for a moment did I imagine this would be our last day of happiness” (Cheinisse 3). This quote shows that he is very happy when he is around Juliette and he never wants it to end.

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 28, 2015 01:18 PM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
28 September 2015

Question: Who is Juliette? Is she a real person? What is her connection to the narrator? What are her "capabilities"? Are some of her functions merely suggested, and not stated outright in plain language? What do you suspect is going on between the narrator and Juliette? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The narrator describes Juliette as a car at one moment, and the next she'll be a human speaking. (Then she said, "She's young . . ." and laughed contentedly" (Cheinisse 5). In my opinion, I don't believe she is a real person because there is so much evidence in the story that Juliette is a car rather than a person. The text states, "I heard myself answer: "After all, she was nothing but a machine. . . A beautiful machine" (Cheinisse 7) Also, Juliette seems to be someone he can't let go of, so she is like an imaginary friend to him. Besides, Juliette can speak and order dinner for her and the narrator. (Cheinisse 4) Not only are her functions merely suggested but they are also stated outright in everyday language. For example, at the beginning of the story, the narrator said that he liked the smell of her perfume and suggested that she picked him up from work and drove them to the restaurant. On the contrary, the when the were ordering dinner, the narrator had ordered a steak and Juliette had ordered herself twenty liters and a grease job. (Cheinisse 4)

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 28, 2015 02:19 PM

Madison Helms
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
28 September 2015


Question: The narrator uses, at least, two names to signify the vehicle that replaced his old car. What are those names, and why are they significant? How are they different from what he called his old car? In the end, what finally happens to Juliette?


Answer: The two names the narrator uses for the replacement car are, Intruder and beautiful machine. "When I arrived at the laboratory with the intruder, toward the beginning of the afternoon, and automatic cop was waiting for me" (pg.4). "After all she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine..." (pg.4). At the end of the story, I believe he ends up keeping Juliette because he has been through so much with her and he loves her.

Posted by: Madison Helms at September 28, 2015 06:00 PM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
28 September 2015


Question: What’s is the occupation of the story’s protagonist? What titles do others use to address the protagonist? In terms of authority, or, financial freedom, how does s/he compare to other characters in the story? How does this shape/informs the story? Does economic class factor in to this story, in any way (class conflict)? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The protagonist of "Juliette" by Claude Cheinisse works as a doctor at a hospital and lectures at a university; therefore, other characters in the story address him as doctor.

In terms of authority, or, financial freedom, the character seems rather wealthy and powerful. Many people of this story address him as Doctor inside and outside of the workplace. An example of the story could be found at the end when the car dealer refers to him by his title as if he were a frequent customer of this dealership. Also, the character a tremendous financial liberty to keep two expensive cars and to pay speeding tickets. The story is about the beauty and affection of the "machine" he drives. These two factors played a huge role in the life of the character. The doctor of the story is often arrogant, impatient, and snobbish. The reader can almost feel the character's level of intolerance when he approaches people after work; he either avoided to talk to anyone because he was tired, or because he did not like them. An example of such arrogance is present in an earlier section of the story, "I had to answer him patiently once more that, yes, the weather was clearing (Cheinisse 3)."

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 29, 2015 12:55 AM

Cannelle Samson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
29 October 2015

Question: [Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”] Setting: When and where is this story taking place? What evidence exists to back up your claim? Compare the time and setting to the date the narrative was written? Was much expected of the future? Did the author’s dream/nightmare of the future come true? Did it come true, perhaps, in any other way? In your own words explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: I believe that the short story “Juliette” by Claude F. Cheinisse is taken place in Italy in the late 1900s and early 2000s. In “Juliette” it mentions that the narrator bought “Juliette” in Milan and returns her to Milan in her old age. The narrator states, “She never talked much about it, but I think she had been very unhappy before coming with me: half broken in, hardly out of the factory in Milan…” (Cheinisse, 4). When Juliette breaks down of old age, her owner takes her back to the factory in Milan with no sign of a long trip. On the contrary, he drives Juliette to the factory in Milan. The narrator states, “But she braked to draw up in front of the agency where we had met, three years ago” (Cheinisse, 7). This means that as the narrator leaves work he drives to the agency to trade in Juliette. The narrative was writing in August of 1961. Although the story takes place around the early 2000s where technology was booming, it seems as if the narrator is stuck in time. He describes places as if it were old and not improved. For example, the description given in the beginning gives the thought as if the story was written in the early 1900s. The narrator states, “While I was putting on my jacket, someone came up to me and handed me a few more papers to sign; then I walked down an endless hall and passed the doorman, an ancient gold-braided wreck, decorated in the war of 1970s” (Cheinisse, 3). Not only does this give an image of everything being old, but it also gives a hint that the narrative is taking place in the late 1900s or early 2000s. I do not believe that the author expected much of the future. He expected a war and not much to have changed as is seen in the quote above. The author’s nightmare of retiring Juliette has come true as he realized that she is simply a machine. In the end of the story he states, “I had to keep appearances, above all in front of a cop, human or not. I heard myself answer: ‘after all, she is nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine…” (Cheinisse, 7).

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at September 29, 2015 07:34 PM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
29 September 2015

Question #4: What types of technology are available to people in the futuristic world of this narrative? There are, at least, two mentions of technological breakthrough, so identify and explain, at least two. If such technologies were to actually exist, how would/might they impact society? How do they seem to have impacted society in this narrative? Is the world a better place, or a worse place, because of them? Why, or why not?
Answer: Cars that drive themselves and talk to you is what the futuristic technology is in the story. They also seem to have their own personality. In the story the narrator explains that, “She liked to make a point of her experience, even while groaning sometimes (I didn’t take her very seriously) about her advancing age and the imaginary slowing down of her reflexes” (Cheinisse, 4). The narrator proves the car has a personality because he explains, “Juliette knew or sensed it, grew very gentle – without being asked, she took the way to a scenic route that we loved, and once there, asked quietly, ‘Do you want to drive?’” (Cheinisse, 5). If this technology actually existed the world would most likely be a safer place because we wouldn’t have drunk drivers. Society would be a better place if we had this in our everyday lives right now.

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 29, 2015 08:11 PM

Yaribilisa Colon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
9/29/2015

QUESTION: What is the primary conflict of the story? What happened to Juliette, near the end of the story? How was it dealt with and how was the outcome significant to the story? Did the narrator do the right thing? Did Juliette do the right thing? Was there an agreement between the two lovers about what was best? How was it resolved? In your own words, explain your response.


QUOTE: “I called her: she switched on her wake-up current immediately. I heard the starters wine, but the sound of the motor didn’t follow. A second try, then a third had no more effect. In a timid little voice, Juliette said, “excuse me…” I reassured her quickly, called a taxi, then the mechanic” (Pg. 6)

“The salesman tried to talk to me about the “trade-in” on the old model, but I interrupted him, almost shouting “no I don’t want us to separate, Juliette’s going to stay with me”. I’ll use her on evening and Sundays” (Pg. 7)


ANSWER: The primary conflict of the story is Juliette which is a car, is getting old and tired. Near the end of the story Juliette pretty much started giving out. When the doctor got called for an emergency, Juliette wouldn’t start. Therefore the doctor ended up having to take a cap. The doctor then realized that Juliette can’t be driven on a daily bases anymore, so he then decided to purchase a new car. As the salesmen started mentioning the trade-in on old models, the doctor came to the conclusion that he didn’t want to get rid of Juliette. His reason was because “he didn’t want anyone else to tire her out, because she deserves rest”. Juliette and the doctor both came to the agreement that she will only be driven on Sundays and some weekends. In my opinion I think both Juliette and the doctor did the right thing, especially since the doctor has such a huge attachment to Juliette.

Posted by: Yaribilisa Colon at September 29, 2015 10:59 PM

Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09
29 September 2015

Question #9: In this narrative, which characters qualify as round, and why? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The round characters would have to be the narrator and Juliette. The narrator is in first person the entire story for its character by using “I” throughout. Also, the narrator is third person objective when speaking about Juliette. For example, the author uses phrases such as “Juliette was waiting for me” throughout.

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 29, 2015 11:46 PM

ENG 122 CA03
“Juliette”
Cheinisse
30 September 2015


Question: Every narrative has an antagonist, or, character that character that works against what the protagonist wants/is after, even if that antagonist is internal. What character or concept best functions as the antagonist character in this story? You must (a.) first identify the protagonist, and (b.) second identify whatever it is the protagonist wants.
Answer: The protagonist in this story is Juliette, she is the main character which everything revolves around her. The antagonist in this story is the narrator which is in love with Juliette and just wants her attention. The antagonist wants Juliette to be his companion and he tries everything to make it right. Juliette wanted to feel beautiful and loved and everyone was envious of her.

Posted by: Tannor Berry at September 30, 2015 01:14 AM

Zachary Pottle
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
30 September 2015

Question: Who are Josaine, Christiane, and Veronique? Are they round or flat characters? What is there significance to the story? Are these persons that the narrator has a real interest in? How does Juliette feel about them?Have you ever heard about a persons involved in illicit, illegal, or otherwise socially unacceptable relationships having a "cover"? Is this what's happening? If so, Why?

Answers:

Josaine, Christiane, and Veronique are what I believe to be prostitutes. As the narrator states, "Before dinner, we wine to pick up Josiane (the week before, it had been Christiane. A little earlier, Veronique. Before that...I don't remember. They're so much alike...all I ask of them is to be pretty, a bit dumb, and willing) (Cheinisse 5). These characters are flat, as the narrator gives no further mention of them. Their significance to the story is rather interesting. The narrator describes them as almost items. When he takes them on a ride, he tells the reader that the Juliette is laughing when he is whispering into the girls ear. This gives the reader the idea that there might be some feelings of affection between the narrator and Juliette.

Posted by: Zachary Pottle at September 30, 2015 04:08 AM

Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
28 September 2015

Question 8: Why does the narrator call his relationship with Juliette, an “affair”? An “affair” can mean many things. Might the narrator mean more than one thing, here, or is the only one inferred? How is an “affair” different from other types of relationship and social institutions?

Answer: When people hear the word affair they do not normally think that of a relation with a car. Most people assume that the affair is with someone, a person, which they are seeing without the spouse of one knowing. In Juliette it starts off where the writer is a little confusing and as you go on into the story you realize that his relation is with his car and that his affair from which he drives hos others cars is that he drives Juliette with care and affection.

Posted by: Jaclyn Taylor at September 30, 2015 08:53 AM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
28 September 2015

Question: what parallels exist between what the narrator is able to do and what Juliette can do?

Answer: “not for a moment did I imagine this would be our last day of happiness.” the narrator fell madly in love with Juliette and traded in his old car that had no personality. He spent on his money on her and it took Juliette some time to consider him as a friend and not a “master.” For one he is a human and she is motorcycle, no more than a machine but he didn’t think if that until the accident.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 30, 2015 09:29 AM

Luis Bautista
Dr. Hobbs
ENG -122 Academic Writing
30 September 2015

“On the way back, at the turnpike exit, just before the sharp turn that overlooks the Seine, a new Dodge passed us going full speed. Juliette said only, in a very soft voice, “ beginners…” And slowed up.” ( Cheinisse 2)
Question; Does Juliette have feelings? What range of emotions does she show throughout the course of the narrative? What does the narrator do, at times, to facilities an emotional response from Juliette? Why would this-this matter to the sort, at large? In other words, why are Juliette’s emotional capabilities/ exhibitions significant? In your own words explain your response.
Answer; Throughout the whole story, Juliette, which is a car, shows her emotions through the story to her driver. She almost behaves as a wife for her driver. She shows jealousy, confusion, nostalgia, and joy. For example, in the passage above, Juliette starts to act jealous as her driver starts looking at a brand new Dodge. She claims that it’s just a beginner. I believe the author gave life to a “car” feelings to make the audience understand how much we get attach to our material objects and how would it be if these object could actually express their feelings. The whole story rotates around the fact that she is getting old and that she doesn’t want to leave her driver (be sold). “Even though she admits that she is getting old her driver doesn’t want to leave her either. I meant to tell her of all my affection, promise her again how many fine vacations we’d have, and fine spins along the scenic routes… but she was already gone” ( Cheinisse 7).

Posted by: luis Bautista at September 30, 2015 09:33 AM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015

Question #5

Question: Brown was called “silly” in the story by the old woman. Why? Did the townspeople not like him? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: Goody Cloyse says “Yea, truly is it, and in the very image of my old gossip, Goodman Borwn, the grandfather of that silly fellow that now it” (Hawthorne 74). The devil is taking on the form of Brown’s grandfather, someone the old lady knew well as she referenced him as her “old gossip” (Hawthorne 74). When calling Brown silly, she was comparing him to his grandfather. The fact that she would call him silly would imply foolishness. Goody Cloyse and Goodman Brown’s grandfather were both in league with the devil (Hawthorne 74). At this point in the story Brown hasn’t given in to the devil’s cult yet. Because he has lived his life piously up to this point, the other townspeople are aware that Goodman Brown is not one of them. To say that he is silly is to say he doesn’t fit in or not following the status quo. It could also imply his ignorance, in that he didn’t realize these people were evil and just took them on their word (Hawthorne 72).

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 30, 2015 04:08 PM

Peyton Farrier, Sidnee Yeager
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA09
30 September 2015

Question: Setting: When and where is this story taking place? What evidence exists to back up your claim? Compare the time setting to the date the narrative was written? Was much expected of the future? Did the author’s dream/ nightmare of the future come true? Did it come true, perhaps, in any other way? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The story Juliette written by Cheinisse took place right after the war of 1970 “Walked down an endless hall and passed the doorman, an ancient gold-braided wreck, decorated in the war of 1970” (3 Cheinisse). The story seems to take place in a large town because they go to numerous locations like the hotel, a restaurant, a University, as well as a lab. It took place in the future of about ten years because it was written in 1961, but it talks about time near the war of 1970. Much was expected of the future back then because being 2015 were just now inventing things he was thinking of but towards the end he speaks about the machine “human or not. I heard myself answer: ‘After all, she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine’” (7 Cheinisse). His dream of the future eventually came true with the Google car, Siri, and drones. We have self-driving cars, Phones that can talk to us, and planes that can fly by itself.

Posted by: Peyton Farrier\ at September 30, 2015 04:09 PM

Daniel Wright, Hana Lee

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09

30 September 2015

Question: Consider the final lines of the story. Does this echo sentiments use elsewhere in the story? If so, where? Is there any evidence to support that the narrator believes these words? Why, or why not? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: "After all, she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine..." (Cheinisse 7) The Doctor does not believe this line, but many other people in this society do; especially when the salesmen states the line first. There is no evidence that tells us the doctor feels the sort of apathy the statement projects, even when the salesmen tries to convince him to trade in an old model, "But I remained very firm: I wouldn't sell Juliette" (Cheinisse 7).

Posted by: Daniel Wright at September 30, 2015 04:10 PM

Michael Mooney, Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015

Question: What daily challenges does the narrator seem to face, no matter how trivial? How does Juliette provide alleviation for the narrator? What is her emotional role in his life? If the narrator is a happier person because of the presence of Juliette in his life, what evidence from the text backs this up?
Answer: The narrator, as a doctor/professor at a teaching hospital (a profession hinted at several times in the text), has a busy schedule. On a daily basis he deals with piles of paperwork, lackadaisical students, stressful procedures, and so forth. Juliette and the Narrator have formed a close friendship over their years together. As such, Juliette does her best to help the Narrator alleviate his stress. Juliette knows a great deal about the narrator, enough that she is able to read his emotions “I was tired, and was especially worn out by the hundred snickering students who had pretended to listen to me. Juliette knew or sensed it, grew very gentle, without being asked, she took the way to a scenic route that we loved…(and) asked quietly ‘do you want to drive?’” (Cheinisse 3) and knows his preferences “…she always respected the numb silence of my first few minutes. It was only after two red lights that she offered me a lit cigarette and asked tenderly, ‘Tired?’” (Cheinisse 2). Juliette acts as the narrator’s confidant and relief from the stresses of his day. Juliette means a great deal to the narrator, as evidenced by his conversations with Juliette and his reactions to her growing mechanical problems “’I’m getting old…’ ‘You’re not going to start that foolishness again, are you?’ I protested” (Cheinisse 4). When Juliette was destroyed the Narrator was crushed, despite his outward behavior “I had to keep up appearances, above all in front of a cop, human or not. I heard myself answer: ‘after all, she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine…’” (Cheinisse 5).

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 30, 2015 04:11 PM

Group 7
Brittany and Anayah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015

Question: What parallels exist between what the narrator is able to do, and what Juliette is able to do? For example, while the narrator eats at the restaurant, what does Juliette do? Find other such behavioral parallels/equivalents between Juliette and the narrator, and, in your own words, explain your response.

Answer: While at the restaurant, the narrator is eating dinner and Juliette orders "twenty liters and a grease job for herself" (Cheinisse 4). This shows that while the narrator is eating, or refueling, so is Juliette. When the narrator is tired after a day of work, Juliette asks the narrator if he would like to drive. This is equivalent to the end of the story when Juliette is tired, and the narrator only wants to drive her a few times, so not to exhaust her. When the narrator goes home "to bed" he puts Juliette in the garage, so they both get the equivalent to rest (Cheinesse 5).

Posted by: Brittany and Anayah at September 30, 2015 04:18 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09

September 30, 2015


Question: Who is Juliette? Is she a real person? What is her connection to the narrator? What are her capabilities? Are some of her functions merely suggested, and not stated outright in plain language? What do you suspect is going on between the narrator and Juliette?


Answer: Juliette is the Narrator’s beloved car; he treats the car as if it is his significant other. In the story, the Narrator loves his car, Juliette, and Juliette loves him in return. “Juliette was waiting for me. She was unaware of the envious looks of passing students, who were examining her contours minutely, without even trying to be surreptitious about it.” (Cheinisse pg. 3). Her functions are stated outright in plain language, for example, she has a conversation with her master. “It was only after two red lights that she offered me a lit cigarette and asked tenderly, tired? “ (Cheinisse pg. 4). The narrator has an obsession with his car, Juliette; he takes her for a person more than just a machine. To the narrator, Juliette is a beautiful machine. “After all, she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine….” (Cheinisse pg. 7).

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayselcuk at September 30, 2015 04:23 PM

Group 11
Shania Bienaime, Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015

Question: [Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”] Character. Does Juliette have feelings? What range of emotions does she show throughout the course of the narrative? What does the narrator do, at times, to facilitate an emotional response from Juliette? Why would this matter to the story, at large? In other words, why are Juliette’s emotional capabilities/exhibitions significant? In your words, explain your answer.

Answer: Although Juliette is an automobile, the author conveys the idea that she could feel and have human emotions. The intimate relationship between the Professor and Juliette reveal emotions of sadness and happiness. “In the morning Juliette didn’t want to talk to me. It took the hint of badly controlled skid on the pavement to make her whisper, “I’m getting old. . . .”” (Cheinisse 6). The narrator would let Juliette drive herself to feel comfortable and get an emotional response from her. “I slid over into the passenger’s seat; with a joyful heart, I lit a cigarette and unfolded my paper. Juliette was humming gaily” (Cheinisse 5). Juliette’s capabilities are significant to the context of the text. The technology in the story is advanced to the point where humans can interact with it beyond just a physical level.

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at October 1, 2015 12:46 AM

Zeida Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
28 September 2015
Question: Character/perspective: What is the name of the story’s protagonist? What person is the story told in? What does anonymity contribute to this narrative? Does the anonymity matter (does it detract from the narrative)? Why or why not? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: In the narrative by Claude F. Cheinisse, Juliette, The protagonist is the narrator whom the reader does not know their name. The story is told in first person point of view, proven by part of the first sentence, “I lit my first cigarette of the day” (Cheinisse, 3). Anonymity contributes to this narrative a sense of confusion for the reader to try and comprehend. The anonymity does not detract from the story because another element of surprise to the reader. It entices the reader to want to know more about the relationship between the protagonist and Juliette. For example, throughout the first paragraphs, Juliette is interpreted by the reader as a beautiful woman picking the narrator up from work. That is, until this line in the narrative, “… When the waiter ran up, ordered a medium rare steak for me, and twenty liters and a grease job for herself,” (Cheinisse, 4)

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at October 1, 2015 03:09 PM

Freddie Williams and Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CAO9
30 September 2015

Question: In Literature, round characters are dynamic, and more three-dimensional than the other characters (they change/transform) and flat characters are static, often stereotyped, and more one-dimensional than the main characters. In this narrative, which characters qualify as flat and why? In your own words explain why?

The robot, people at the restaurant, the three girls that he picks up, and the car salesman are all examples of “flat” characters because they don't really talk too much and they don’t make decisions or have any big effect on the plot. “week before, it had been Christiane. A little earlier, Veronique. Before that… I don’t remember… They’re so much alike” This quote demonstrates how little of role the girls have in this story because they are basically the same people just different names. Also, showing how they are “flat”.

Posted by: Freddie Williams & Conner Knarsboro at October 1, 2015 03:27 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA 06
11 February 2016

Question: What parallels exist between what the narrator is able to do, what Juliette is able to do. For example, while the narrator eats at the restaurant, what does Juliette do? Find other such behavioral parallels/equivalents between Juliette and the narrator, and, in your own words, explain your response. In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In the short story, “Juliette”, the narrator does performs an activity simultaneously with his car. This happens at the restaurant, when the narrator eats, Juliette gets greased and toned. While the narrator got steak, Juliette got "twenty liters and a grease job for herself (Cheinisse 4)." This also happened at night when, he and Juliette "went home to bed about one in the morning, light and relaxed, whistling together (5)." Therefore, when the narrator was sleeping the car was resting as well. This parallel suggests that Juliette is a person, at least in the narrator's eyes. Throughout the story, the narrator describes the car attributing to human qualities. An example of this is shown when the reader is introduced to the Juliette and the narrator describes her as taking "a long time to lose her shyness (4)." Being shy is usually attributed to human beings, and Cheinisse attributing human-like characteristics to the car throughout the story make the car resemble a woman. These parallels and descriptions personify the car, adding to the implication of the car representing an actual human being.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 13, 2016 07:25 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
12 February 2016

Question: Character: In literature, round characters are dynamic, and more three-dimensional than other characters (they change/transform), and flat characters are static, often stereotyped, and more one-dimensional than the main characters. In this narrative, which characters qualify as flat, and why?. You must use quoted passage from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In the narrative “Juliette”, the flattest character is the doctor. The reader first meets the doctor while he was about to leave work; where he reveals that after his final patient was gone, he lit his first cigarette and put his jacket on (Cheinisse 3). He then makes his was to Juliette, who drives him around and pampers him. The next day, Juliette dropped him off at work, and he carries on with his daily role as a doctor. When it was time for him to leave work, Juliette was already there waiting for him, and he continued with his daily routine until Juliette decides to move on (6). Therefore, the doctors role was the same throughout the narrative; he experienced no growth or change. Juliette, on the other hand, experienced growth or change because she decided to move on.


Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 14, 2016 01:39 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
15 February 2016

“Juliette”

Q: 5) What character or concept best functions as the antagonist Character in this narrative? A) Identify the protagonist and b) identify whatever it is the protagonist wants.

A: In this story, one could argue that the story’s antagonist is also the story’s antagonist. Juliette is not a person; she is a car. The car’s owner believes that they have a real relationship, saying, “Juliette herself took a long time to lose her shyness, to consider me as her friend rather than her master” (Cheinisse 4). However, all feeling aside, a car is just a car. He loves this car, though, and that is why it ruins him when it breaks and needs to be replaced. Because of his love for the car, and how it is hurting him to give up, one could argue that the protagonist is his own antagonist considering the ongoing internal conflict he has with himself.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at February 15, 2016 10:59 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing 122 CA06
15 February 2016

Question: When and where is the story taking place? What evidence exists to back up your claim? Compare the time setting to the date the narrative was written? Was much expected of the future? Did the author’s dream/nightmare of the future come true? Did it come true, perhaps, in any other way? In your own words explain your response.

Answer: The story takes place during the 1970s. The narrator states that it was the “war of 1970” (Cheinisse 3). He is a doctor during this time and has to deal with a lot of stress at work. The narrative was written during August 1961, and the story takes place ten years later. The author did not expect much of the future. His nightmare did come true because he had to trade in his car for a new one. He was very adamant about selling it “I don’t want us to separate, Juliette’s going to stay with me” (7). The doctor was telling the salesman that he would only “use her in the evenings, or Sundays” (7). He wishes he did not have to get a new car, but he had to do what was best.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 15, 2016 11:19 AM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
13 February 2016

Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliete” (1961)

Question #8: [Claude F. Cheinisse’s “Juliette”] Why does the narrator call his relationship with Juliette, an affair? An “affair” can mean things (look it up). Might the narrator mean more than one thing, here, or is only one inferred? How is an “affair” different from other types of relationships and social institutions. E.g., friendship, comradery, marriage, etc.? Can legal definitions of adultery, for example, apply to relationships between human and machine? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: He calls his relationship with Juliette an affair because Juliet is not his wife nor his girlfriend, just someone he has a very close bond too and wants to do everything with in the hopes of something more. Juliette is also a car which affair can mean an object of a particular type. An affair is different from other types of relationships, because in a way it’s not real both persons take different things from the relationship for their own reasons. I do not believe that a relationship between a man and a machine can be considered any form of legal adultery, just because it’s not an actual person with feelings and emotions. Regardless what this man thinks his machine thinks and feels its only real to him which is the way I think would not be adultery. One can see this kind of roleplay that he performs with when he says, “Juliette knew or sensed it, grew very gentle-without being asked, she took the way to a scenic route that we loved, and once there, asked quietly, do you want to drive?” Cheinisse 5).

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 15, 2016 01:20 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA06 Academic Writing II
15 February 2016
Question 3.) What is the Occupation of the Protagonist in the story, how does the occupation help shape the story?
Answer: The occupation of the protagonist is some type of a mechanic. He is always seen talking about cars and fixing them up, and even sometimes, washing them. Juliette is one of his favorite cars he has ever laid his eyes on and speaks about how he is having an affair with his other car. Because he handles so many cars it really puts to prospective how nice he thinks Juliette is.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at February 15, 2016 02:13 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA06 Academic Writing II
15 February 2016
Question 3.) What is the Occupation of the Protagonist in the story, how does the occupation help shape the story?
Answer: The occupation of the protagonist is some type of a mechanic. He is always seen talking about cars and fixing them up, and even sometimes, washing them. Juliette is one of his favorite cars he has ever laid his eyes on and speaks about how he is having an affair with his other car. Because he handles so many cars it really puts to prospective how nice he thinks Juliette is.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at February 15, 2016 02:13 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
15 February 2016

Question: 17.) Consider the final lines of the story. Does this echo sentiments used else where in the story? If so, where? Is there any evidence to supports that the narrator actually believes these words? Why or why not? In your own words explain your response.

Answer: 17.) Yes, this sentiments is used earlier on in the story when the Doctor says, “No, I don’t want us to separate, Juliette’s going to stay with me. I’ll use her in the evenings, or Sundays. I don’t want anybody to tire her out anymore; she has the right to get some rest“(Cheinisse, 7). Her saying this shows that she cares about the old, tired machine more than a brand new one. Yes, the author believes these words in the last lines because throughout the entire story the author is talking about how beautiful a machine she is and how she’s not letting her go.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at February 15, 2016 02:16 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
16 February 2016

Question: What parallels exist between what the narrator is able to do, and what Juliette is able to do? For example, while the narrator eats at the restaurant, what does Juliette do?

Answer: While the narrator was eating at the restaurant, Juliette ordered: “twenty liters and a grease job for herself” (Cheinisse 4). So, when the narrator was eating, Juliette was eating as well, as if they were on a date. After the steak and the grease job, the narrator had a grapefruit, while Juliette had a wash and later a cup of coffee and a timing adjustment.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at February 16, 2016 02:12 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA06
February 16 2016

Question 11)Does Juliette have feelings? What emotions does she show throughout the course of the narrative? What does the narrator do, at times, to facilitate an emotional response from Juliette? Why would this matter to the story at large? In other words why are Juliette's emotional capabilities significant? In your own words explain you response.

Answer 11) In the short story Juliette, the writer personifies the car, Juliette. He gives the car an emotional relationship with the owner and even uses the narrators imagination to do so. The narrator tells us that the car has trust issues because of the way it was treated by the previous owner. The writer makes Juliette even more human like when she speaks, for example when she is forced to break suddenly on page 5 and she says "beginner" implying that the breaking was caused by a new car.

The emotion of Juliette in this short story is significant because of it's relationship with the narrator, it shows us that if you care for something enough, no matter what it is you can form a relationship with it and the writer does a very good job of using personification to demonstrate this.

Posted by: chloe lelliott at February 16, 2016 08:17 PM

Clark de Bullet, Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
15 February 2016

Juliette

Question: Discover the themes -> (repeating patterns) that are values. What is the primary value theme?

Answer: A theme of Juliette would be desire. The narrator wants to badly to be loved he creates a fantasy in which the desire is so great, his lover would kill herself for him (Cheinisse 7). Juliette is a car. This can be blatantly seen when the narrator says Juliette gets a grease job and a wash and even adds, “I don’t like to think about anyone else driving Juliette” (4). Because she is an inanimate object, she can’t truly love anything. The narrator, even though it is a one-sided love, envisions that Juliette reciprocates his feelings. The narrator wants many things from his relationship with Juliette: love, passion, sex, intimacy, confidence and loyalty. He desires everything a human relationship can give him but from his car.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 17, 2016 04:01 AM

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