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October 30, 2014

Campbell's *The Road Back* Stage of the Monomyth


Source: http://files.crossroadscandles.com/sites/default/files/artwork/bj143.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 30, 2014 03:40 PM

Readers' Comments:

Kyle VanBuren and Tyler Sommers
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
17 November 2014

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on “The Road Back” stage, by “setbacks” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far?

Text source: “The Writers Journey,” By Christopher Vogler

Answer: Vogler states, “Another twist of The Road Back may be a sudden catastrophic reversal of the hero’s good fortune. Things were going well after surviving the Ordeal, but now reality sets in again” (Vogler 192). So like all other set backs, the hero faces some sort of obstacle prolonging him to achieve his ultimate goal. In “The Painted Bird,” by Jerzy Kosinski, the boy experienced many setbacks. One in particular occurred when the boy was thrown in the river while embarking on his journey for liberation.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 17, 2014 10:53 AM

Erin Gaylord & Gabby Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17 November 2014

Question:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “motivation” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer:
The hero is motivated to go back because they are scared that there will be consequences for their actions in the ordeal. “…there may be dangerous repercussions” (Vogler 189).
In A Christmas Carol, Scrooge was motivated to return and straighten out his life. He was scared of the repercussions of his current actions and wanted to change.
In Hunger Games, Katniss was motivated to return to her faction after she fought and won the games. She was motivated to return back home to see her mother and sister, but she was also happy that the killing was over and didn’t want to go through that again. She cheated the rules and didn’t kill Peeta. She left the games with him. Then she was chosen to go back in.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord, Gabriela Caminero at November 17, 2014 10:54 AM

Zachary Sabo Aaron Virelli Tashanna Harris
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 November 2014

Question #4: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “chase scenes” and why they are important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In most journeys the hero faces, after the ordeal and the reward is in the past, they still may not be fulfilled in their quest. The “Road Back” in stories refer to when the hero faces the decision to stay in the special world after the journey is over, or to return home, and most times they choose to go home. Chase scenes occur when the hero is on their journey home and they are running for their lives. “This stage is called racing for the curtain”, when the hero starts picking up his pace on his adventure and creating momentum for himself for the finish. In Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Harry is faced with the Road Back home after he finishes his school year at Hogwarts, even though he does not want to go back. The chase scenes occur when he is back at home with the Dursleys, with the two parties not getting along and butting heads on whether or not Harry should go back to school.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at November 17, 2014 11:04 AM

Bronwen Burke, Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
17 November 2014

Question:
According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of “The Road Back,” what is the “choice” that “heroes face” and why is this important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? Or, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer:
After learning the lessons, overcoming the central ordeal, and retrieving the reward, the hero enters the “Road Back” stage. In this stage, the hero faces a choice of “whether to remain in the Special World or begin journey home to the Ordinary World” (Vogler 187). The choice to return serves as the last final decision. By choosing to stay in the Special World, the hero renounces his past life for good, not returning to the life he once knew. On the other hand, by returning to the Ordinary World, this final decision completes the journey allowing the hero to share their reward with their initial land.
In modern film, Aladdin (1992), directed by Ron Clements and John Musker, provides a good example of staying in the special world. After defeating Jafar and releasing the Genie, Aladdin chooses to stay with Jasmine in royalties, leaving the world of poverty and street life behind. In the 2010 rendition of Alice in Wonderland directed by Tim Burton, Alice gives her final speech about loving and wanting to stay in this “Wonderland.” However, she realized through her journey that she does not belong in this world and must return. Even though she does return by taking the potion, she leaves and returns to England, taking her ideas and lessons with her back into the Ordinary World.

Work Cited:

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at November 17, 2014 11:09 AM

Kendra Hinton & Summer Taylor
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 November 2014
Group 3: The Road Back

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “retaliation” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In this stage, sometimes villains and shadows are found not to be dead in combat. “Heroes often learn that villains or Shadows who are not completely defeated in the crisis can rise stronger than before” (Vogler 190). Another, version of the retaliation stage can be a monster that one killed has a mate that comes back and tries to kill. One good example of this is in the book The Return of the King. In the book (and not in the third movie) the hobbits return to their home only to find their fellow countrymen are enslaved, and Sauramon is living in Bag End (Frodo’s home). Everyone had previously thought that Sauramon was still locked in his tower in Isengaurd guarded by the Ents. Instead of relaxing at home, the Hobbits were pulled into another battle with Sauramon and his henchmen that were enslaving the rest of the Shire.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton and Summer Taylor at November 17, 2014 11:17 AM

Jonah Robertson, Bryce Veller, Leroy Pianka
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
November 17, 2014

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “pursuit by admirers” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The “pursuit by admirers” is when a hero is pursued by those who look up to them or love them instead of by an enemy of some sort. In the beginning of “The Incredibles” Mr. Incredible finds Buddy in his car, and tells him that he works alone. Buddy doesn’t go home, but instead follows Mr. Incredible to the crime scene and almost gets seriously injured. This is a perfect example of a hero being followed by someone who looks up to them, and then the admirer getting in the way or being hurt.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at November 17, 2014 11:53 AM

Caitlin Christian & James Sierra
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
17 November 2014

Question #4:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “chase scenes” and why they are important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

Christopher Vogler talks about a stage that occurs in novels and movies where a chase scene occurs. During this period of time Vogler states that, “chases are useful for torqueing up a story’s energy.” (Vogler 191) The reader may be at a point in the story when it is at a standstill and needs a boost in the adventure, at this time in movies Vogler says that this stage is, “racing the curtain at a time when you want to pick up the pace and build momentum for the finish.” (191) In works that we have read in class such as Watership Down the adventure picks up when the rabbits are leaving general woundwort warren and they are chased through the forest. This up lifts the story and makes the reader see excitement from the characters. In a film such as Star Wars, the characters are chased through the death star in order to escape. This causes the characters to go through their inner transformation and changes the course of the movie.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 17, 2014 11:58 AM

Claudia Pierre, Ashlee English, Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
17 November 2014

QUESTION:
According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “The Road Back,” what is the “choice” that “heroes face” and why is this important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own
words.

ANSWER:
“The Road Back” the choice that the heroes face is returning to the starting point or continuing on the journey to a new locale or ultimate decision. The hero has to decide if they will like to face with the situation that they were given and move on with their task or would they not deal with the problem and return to the beginning with nothing to accomplish. This is important because the Hero has a journey that they need to start from the beginning to end with a task to accomplish.

In “The Lion King”, Simba decides to run away from his home because of the loss of his father, and his uncle taking over and destroying the land. He runs away, then Nala finds him to remind him he is needed to save the land and his family. He then decides to return and do his duty.

Posted by: Claudia at November 17, 2014 11:58 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth, Joanna Ozog, and Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
17 November 2014

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “motivation” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer: Motivation is a push for the hero to go back to the original world from the special world because of an inner resolve or external force. It is important because “often heroes are motivated to hit The Road Back when the forces they have defied in the Ordeal now rally and strike back at them,” (189). An example of this is in The Lion King, there was an external force to bring Simba back, Nala, who convinced Simba to come back to the Pride Lands. This usually occurs at the first step of the conclusion.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at November 17, 2014 12:11 PM


Rebeccah Braun, and Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 November 2014


Question 3: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “retaliation” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.


Answer:
In the chapter on “The Road Back” Vogler explains that the retaliation is an important lesson of martial arts because it teaches the hero they must finish the opponent. He explains that this is important because “heroes often learn that villains or Shadows who are not completely defeated the crisis can rise up stronger than before” (Vogler, 190). An example of this is in Watership Down when Hazel and the other bunnies return to their warren after leaving Efrafa. They try to sneak out with the does to avoid confrontation; however, Woundwort follows them all the way back to their warren where they have to fight them there. Another example of this is in the television show Teen Wolf, in the first season a character named Kate Argent is an extreme werewolf killer, and she is thought to be killed by a werewolf named Peter. In season four, the main villain is Kate. While they thought she was dead, she was actually turned into a were-jaguar and is a fierce, killing machine and has an army of berserkers who wreak havoc in Beacon Hills. Her main objective is to kill the leader of the group of werewolves to get revenge; however she escapes again after defeat.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at November 17, 2014 12:20 PM

Anet Milian
Matt Basin

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
17 November 2014
Question #6: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter “The Road Back” stage, by “Villain Escape” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we have read, as a class, thus far? Or what works have you read where this occurs?
Answer: In the chapter “The Road Back” stage, by the “Villain Escape”, Christopher Vogler discussed that this is an important stage because at this time, a shadow captured and controlled in the ordeal escapes and becomes more dangerous than before. For example, in this stage the villain may try to steal back the treasure. We have not experienced this stage in anything that we have read in class thus far. However, this stage is present in many movies. For example, in The Little Mermaid, King Kong, and Batman. In Batman, the Joker escapes prison after being captured and reseeks revenge. Also, in the Movie King Kong, King Kong escapes and goes on a rampage after being taken to New York to be displayed in chains.
Works Cited:
Foer, J. S. (2003). Everything Is Illuminated . New York: Perenial.

Posted by: Anet Milian at November 17, 2014 01:46 PM

Peter Bellini, Jake Gates, Jazlynn Rosaro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
November 17, 2014


Question # 7:


Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “setbacks” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


A setback in Vogler’s text is defined as “seem to doom the adventure. Within sight of the shore, the ship may spring a leak.” In readings outside of class Seabiscuit suffered a career injury to the front leg ligament rupture, and many people thought, he would never race again. After a year of rehab and recovery Seabiscuit returns to Santa Anita to place and go on to great success in the handicap races. In our class readings, Siddhartha leaves the Samana he joins in with the merchants and gamblers of the city. “because he wanted to continue gambling, he wanted to continue squandering, continue demonstrating his disdain of wealth. Siddhartha lost his calmness when losses occurred, lost his patience when he was not payed on time, lost his kindness towards beggars, lost his disposition for giving away and loaning money to those who petitioned him. He, who gambled away tens of thousands at one roll of the dice and laughed at it, became more strict and more petty in his business, occasionally dreaming at night about money!” The quote above shows the dramatic downward spiral that Siddhartha goes through after living the monk life with the Samana. This Setback throws the hero way off course of his adventure, and it seems that he will be trapped forever in the circle of the city-dwellers.

Posted by: Peter Bellini, Jake Gates, Jazlynn Rosaro at November 17, 2014 08:03 PM

Ashley Gross and Abrar Nooh
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 November 2014

Question- The Road Back #6:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “pursuit by admirers” and why it is important.

Answer:
The pursuit by admirers is a variation of the chase, however, rather than the chase being between the hero and the villain, it is between the hero and an admirer. The admirer may be a love interest or someone that is simply drawn to the character. The main character will often try to protect the admirer from the dangers of the journey and tell them to stay away. An example of this would be in "A Walk Among the Tombstones", when the main character is repeatedly followed by a young boy who is told to stay away for his own safety, but always reappears during the hero's journey.


Posted by: Ashley Gross at November 19, 2014 08:25 AM

Joshua Natonio & Blake
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
19 November 2014

QUESTION:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “villain escape” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
According to Christopher Vogler, “The Road Back” stage occurs “when the story’s energy, which may have ebbed a little I the quiet moments of Seizing the Sword, is now revved up again” (Vogler 187)


The “Villain Escape” that is depicted during Vogler’s “The Road Back” stage of the Hero’s Journey is a variant of the chase scene. During this scene, a Shadow that is captured and controlled in the Ordeal escapes at this stage and becomes more dangerous than before (Vogler 192). The “Villain Escape” is pivotal to adding to the story’s energy and building the necessary momentum needed for the continuance of the journey.


One example of the “Villain Escape” provided by Vogler would be when King Kong was brought to New York to be displayed to the public. King Kong would break free from his shackles and rampage through the streets of New York City (Vogler 192).


Another example of the “Villain Escape” in the cinematic universe would have to be in Star Wars: A New Hope. Prior to Luke Skywalker blowing up the Death Star, Darth Vader has Skywalker in his sights. Before Vader is able to shoot down Skywalker, Han Solo and the Millennium Falcon appear and are able to distract Vader long enough for Skywalker to deliver the final blow to the Death Star. The Millennium Falcon’s attacks on Vader’s TIE Fighter causes his ship to dislodge from its original course and Vader would escape from any additional harm. As we know from watching subsequent episodes in the Star Wars epic, Vader and the Dark Side become more aggressive in their efforts to eradicate the rebel forces.

WORKS CITED:
Vogler, Christopher. The writer's journey : mythic structure for writers. Studio City, CA:
Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print.

Posted by: Joshua Natonio & Blake at November 19, 2014 10:13 AM

Sergio Velazquez, Adam Alexander and Hatim
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 On a Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01
3/30/2015
The Atonement with the Father, In Greek mythology it is often seen as the act of the son taking his role as the father, and becoming himself For instance in the odyssey the son goes in search of his father, because his has become the age when there is no need to wait for permission and in doing so he leaves his mother.
The hero’s journey uses the same methods in such stories as StarWars : A New Hope and The Matrix. In, the Matrix Neo, a new warrior brought into the world of awareness has decided against all odds that he is going to save Morpheus. After Neo rescues Morpheus from the agent and he discovers himself and a New power is awoken. In Star Wars, Luke refuses to kill his father the evil Darth Vader, ad in doing so corrupts the evil with in him and together they defeat Darth Sidouis. At the end, Darth Vader dies but he tells his son, “You have saved me.”

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at March 30, 2015 02:13 PM

Jessica McKinney
Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 April 2016

Question 6: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “villain escape” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer: The Villain Escape, as Volger describes in his text as “A Shadow captured and controlled in the Ordeal escapes at this stage and becomes more dangerous than before.” (192 Volger) This is important because “the villain may steal back the treasure from the hero or make off with one of his team members. This could lead to pursuit by the hero and rescue or recovery.” (192 Volger) Relating this stage to the material we’ve covered in class, the movie Harry Potter is an example of the Villian Escape from Harry defeating Lord Voldemort and escapes.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney Emily Buckley at April 8, 2016 10:55 AM

Charis Lavoie and Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
08 March 2016

Question 2: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “motivation” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: Motivation is the thing that drives the hero to start their journey back. They might be getting complacent in their present being, therefore they need motivation to continue on with the journey back home by recalling the original goal of said journey. As stated by Vogler, “a plateau pf comfort has been reached and heroes must be pried off that plateau (189).” An example of this would be in The Lion King, Nala and Rafiki had to remind Simba of who he his in order to motivate him to return to the Pride Lands and save everyone from Scar.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at April 8, 2016 10:56 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl & Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220cl journeys into narrative
8 April 2016

Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Road Back” stage, by “chase scenes” and why they are important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your words.

Answer: Chases are useful for working up the energy of each and every story. If this isn’t put into affect, the odds of the audience getting tired will come into play at any point in time, so they do this as a wake-up call. There’s a chase scene in Watership Down, which was when Bigwig had just escaped with the does from womworth because they were being chased by him and friends. As they got help from Kehar and others to make sure they get away when needed. Also in the Lion King, when Simba runs away form the Pride Lands because he feels like its his fault that his father died, so he wanted a chance to start over and make things better for himself, but then when he remembers once he’s been gone for so long where he really needs to be in life and what he needs to do in order to get back to his old life.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at April 8, 2016 10:58 AM

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