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October 29, 2014

Campbell's *Tests, Allies, and Enemies* Stage of the Monomyth


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 29, 2014 10:46 AM

Readers' Comments:

Tyler Sommers and Gabriela Caminero
Dr B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
31 October 31, 2014

Question
4. What does Christopher Vogler mean, in his chapter on the “Tests, Allies, and Enemies” stage, by the concept of “forging a team”? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer
Volgler states that “many stories feature multiple heroes or a hero backed up by a team of characters with special skills or qualities.” When forging a team, the hero will come together with allies it meets along his/her journeys. In Watership Down, Hazel forges a team with the other rabbit in their warren including Fiver and El-ahrairah. Fiver has special skills that are almost like premonitions. The prophetic visions that Fiver has could represent the special skills or qualities that one has.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers and Gabriela Caminero at October 31, 2014 10:57 AM

Erin Gaylord, Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
31 October 2014

Question:
Why, according to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Tests, Allies, and Enemies” stage, should the readers “first impression of the Special World […] strike a sharp contrast with the Ordinary World”? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? Or, what works have You read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer:
Within the Special World, everything has a different impression and set of rules compared to the Ordinary world. “Things are more dangerous, and the price of mistakes is higher.” (Vogler 136) In Watership Down, the band of rabbits after leaving the Sandleford Warren goes from having a constant source of protection to being completely lost. The biggest contrast between the Sandleford Warren and the wilderness comes in the form of the lack of rules. Vogler states that one of the sources of contrast comes from the different rules in Special World, and for the band of rabbits, they go from following the rules set by Thearah to being rule free. Under the guidelines of survival, the band of rabbits have to learn the rules of their new Special World as they travel on their journey.

Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005. Print.

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 31, 2014 10:57 AM

Caitlin Christian, Peter Bellini, Jonah Robertson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 31 2014


Question #3:


What does Christopher Vogler mean, in his chapter on the “Tests, Allies, and Enemies” stage, by the concept of “sidekick”? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


In Vogler's text, a sidekick is defined by “a long-standing bond between a hero and a sidekick” (Vogler 137). Our example from our reading we choose Fiver as Hazel’s sidekick. Hazel is undoubtedly the Chief Rabbit, but he cannot guide his colony of rabbits without the prophetic visions of his steadfast companion, Fiver. In readings outside of the class, Lord of The Rings gives us a textbook definition of a Sidekick in the character Sam. Sam fits the definition of Sidekick by constantly supporting Frodo and aiding him in dire situations risking life and limb for the adventure the two young hobbits are on.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian, Peter Bellini, Jonah Robertson at October 31, 2014 12:01 PM

Kendra, Summer, Ashley, Abby
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
31 October 2014
Group 8

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Tests, Allies, and Enemies” stage, by the concept of “watering holes.” How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
For example the movie of Lord of Rings, the “watering holes” the hobbits go to the “Inn of the Prancing Pony” and meet Aragon. They were wet, tired, and soaking wet when they got to the Inn and got a surprise when they got there. The hobbits were only used to being near other hobbits, but since the Inn of the Prancing Pony is a gathering place, they saw many other races of people there.

Posted by: Kendra, Summer, Abby, Ashley at October 31, 2014 01:09 PM

James Sierra, Rebeccah Braun, Ashlee English, Thomas Meseroll, Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
28 October 2014

Question 8: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Tests, Allies, and Enemies” stage, by the concept of “watering holes.” How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The “Watering Hole” would be a good spot for the Hero and his team to gather their thoughts, talk about what they already know, and come up with a plan of action. The cantina in Star Wars: A New Hope would be a good example of this. Another example would be when the Fellowship if the Rings gather at the Elves village. Frodo gets a glimpse of a possible future. Frodo is offered the opportunity to leave the Fellowship to return home. According to Vogler, “The Watering hole is a natural congregating place and a good spot to observe and get information (Vogler 139).


Question 1:
Why, according to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Tests, Allies, and Enemies” stage, should the readers “first impression of the Special World [ . . . ] strike a sharp contrast with the Ordinary World”? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
In the “Tests, Allies, and Enemies” stage, Vogler says the Special World should have a distinct contrast from the Ordinary World. Vogler states, “A Special World, even a figurative one, has a different feel, a different rhythm, different priorities and values, and different rules” (Vogler 136). The ordinary world in the Watership Down is the burrow where the rabbits live in the beginning of the book. The special world is outside their home. In contrast to the warren; a fortified, high rise of land with burrows for quick escapes, the special world is a flat forest filled with many dangers, “I know. I’ve found… if you like it (Adams 41).” as such without the rabbits do not feel safe.

Posted by: James Sierra at November 1, 2014 09:55 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth, Joanna Ozog, and Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
31 November 2014

Question #6:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Tests, Allies,
and Enemies” stage, by the concept of “the rival.” How has this sometimes
worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works
have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.
Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the
part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer:
The concept of “the rival” is an enemy but is not particularly out to kill the hero. The rival wants to defeat the hero in the competition. In Pokemon Ash and Gary were rivals because they were competing with each other to be the number one Pokemon Trainer. In Siddhartha, Govinda and Siddhartha are rivals because with the lifestyles that were experience, Govinda found a way of life faster than Siddhartha did and was happy about his decision. Siddhartha, on the other hand, had to go to three or four other places to find out where he belongs. “You're mocking me. Mock me if you like, Siddhartha! But have you not also developed a desire, an eagerness, to hear these teachings? And have you not at one time said to me, you would not walk the path of the Samanas for much longer (Hesse Ch. With the Semanas)?"

Work Cited
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Barcelona: Plaza & Janés, 1993. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 2, 2014 03:23 PM

Bronwen Burke and Kyle Vanburen
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
31 October 2014

Question 12:

Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Approach to the Inmost Cave” stage, by the concept of an “emotional appeal to a guardian” in the cinematic adaptation of The Wizard of Oz (a film we have been looking at closely in the video lecture series for this course). How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?

Answer:

As described by Vogler, “an emotional appeal can break down the defenses of Threshold Guardians” (Vogler, 148). Emotional appeal to a guardian was used in a scene of The Wizard of Oz when the Sentry “returns to report that the Wizard says, ‘Go away’” (Vogler, 147). Dorothy and her allies “break down and lament” because their wishes will never come true, and Dorothy won’t be able to get home. The "sad story brings floods of tears to the Sentry’s eyes, and he lets them in” (Vogler, 147).

Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse, shares the same concept of an emotional appeal to a guardian. Siddhartha confronts his father about leaving to begin his journey, and his father is unhappy – “…there is displeasure in my heart” (Hesse, 10). As the Brahmin watched his son, “his heart filled with anger, with anxiety, with fear, with sorrow” (Hesse 11). Eventually, he is swayed and tells Siddhartha to begin his journey – “You will go into the forest and become a Samana” (Hesse 12).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at November 3, 2014 02:38 AM

Zachary Sabo, Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 November 2014

Question #3: What does Christopher Vogler mean, in his chapter on the “Tests, Allies, and Enemies” stage, by the concept of “sidekick”? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Throughout the hero’s journey, the hero has a task he is trying to complete to the best of his abilities. During this journey, the hero may be caught up in what is happening and need some assistance in completing his journey, which is where his sidekick comes in. The sidekick “generally rides with the hero and supports the his adventures.” (Vogler 137) He can provide assistance or sometimes even comic relief when it is necessary to help the hero. In The Lion King, Timon and Pumbaa provide some comic relief for the hero, Simba, as they teach him the phrase “hakuna matada”. This is the kind of relief Simba needs as he continues his journey.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at November 3, 2014 09:34 AM

Blake Bromen & Josh Natonio
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
31 October 14

Question #6:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Tests, Allies, and Enemies” stage, by the concept of “the rival.” How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.
Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The rival is a special type of enemy, who is the hero’s competition, and loves sports, business, or some other enterprise. The rival is usually not out to kill the hero but is there to beat them in the competition. (Vogler 138) The Buddha can be thought of as a rival in Siddhartha because he “stole” his friend (Govinda). This has happened in many movies, including Harry Potter, where his rival is Draco Malfoy. This also happens in many television shows, such as Heroes where Peter Petrelli is a hero and Sylar is his rival.

Posted by: Blake Bromen & Josh Natonio at November 3, 2014 10:30 AM

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