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October 30, 2014

Campbell's *Reward (Boon)* Stage of the Monomyth


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 30, 2014 03:33 PM

Readers' Comments:

Erin Gaylord & Gabby Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
5 November 2014

Question:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “epiphany” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer:
Epiphany is, “an abrupt realization of divinity” (Vogler 181). The importance is the person realizes, “that he is the son of a god or a king, a chosen one with special powers” (Vogler 182). This in turn, gives them confidence.

In Watership Down, Fiver gets bad feelings before things go wrong. Every time he has these feelings something happens, but they have enough time to avoid the problem. Fiver has “special powers” and these feelings/visions give him more confidence. Fiver has feelings about the Sandleford Warren, and he was able to leave with Hazel and many other rabbits before the evil came. When they arrived to the second warren with cowslip, Fiver had a feeling that something wasn’t right. In the end, Fiver was right again when they discovered that Cowslip invited him in to get them to set off the snares so their own warren would be safe.

In Harry Potter, Harry realizes the amount of power he possesses and how important it is that he uses his power for good.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord, Gabriela Caminero at November 5, 2014 10:57 AM

Kendra, Summer
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
5 November 2014
Group 2

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “celebration” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Christopher Vogler states, “With the crisis of the Ordeal passed, heroes now experience the consequences of surviving death” (175). There are several examples of this in the books we have read in class together. One example of this is in Siddhartha. He experienced the death of Kamala, and was questioning this death and his son’s misbehavior. His reward for this (the boon) was reaching nirvana. Another example of this boon is in A Christmas Carol. Scrooge experiences a sort of death like experience when he sees his tombstone with the ghost of Christmas past. Scrooge’s boon after this is a change of attitude and having a new lease on life.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton and Summer Taylor at November 5, 2014 10:58 AM

Tyler Sommers and Kyle Vanburen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL-On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Transformation through Narrative CA01
05 November 2014

Question
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “self-realization” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer
Volger states the self-realization as, “They see who they are and how they fit into the scheme of things. They see the ways they’ve been foolish or stubborn. The scales fall from their eyes and the illusion of their lives is replaced with clarity and truth. Maybe it doesn’t last long, but for a moment heroes see themselves clearly”. (Volger pg 181) We have seen the self-realization while we were reading A Christmas Carrol. In that story Scrooge came to a self-realization after meeting with the three spirits. He came to realize that he was a bitter mean old man. In The Wizard of Oz, Dorthy comes to realize that she was not that unhappy with her home life and that she really wanted to take everything back that she said to her family.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers and Kyle Vanburen at November 5, 2014 11:01 AM

Zachary Sabo, Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
5 November2014

Question: 9. Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “new perceptions” and why they are important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The hero often times will set out on his journey with the anticipation of receiving some sort of award upon completion of this mission. With the journey complete and the dragon slayed or the princess saved, now it is time for the hero to collect his award, whether it is knowledge, power, or a significant other. The hero, in his epic ordeal has “truly tasted death, and for this is granted new powers of perception.” (Vogler 180) He has new perceptions on everything after experiencing this adventure and he may have a newfound sense of appreciation for everything he has accomplished. Looking back on the journey, the hero can appreciate the work he has done, and can accept his reward but with a different appreciation than he had prior to the journey. In Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Harry experiences a battle with Lord Voldemort, who has taken the form of one of his professors. The scuffle with Voldemort gives Harry new perceptions on who Voldemort is and how dangerous he can be, as well as insight to himself and how special he is, and how special his parents were. At the beginning of the story, Harry was unaware of these lessons and perceptions that there were to learn but upon completion of the ordeal, he realizes all of these things.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at November 5, 2014 11:08 AM

James Sierra & Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
5 November 2014
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02

Question #5:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “taking possession” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
In this reward stage, Christopher Vogler states that the “taking possession” stage is a step that the hero takes when seeking a possession. Examples that Vogler uses is, “Treasure hunters take gold, spies snatch the secret, pirates plunder the captured ship, and uncertain hero seizes her self-respect.” (Vogler 178) An example of something we have read is Siddhartha throughout the book. Siddhartha displays the need to possess enlightenment; he will search every place and talk to every knowledgeable person in order to reach enlightenment. An example from other works would be in the movie, “The Rock” when the main characters disarm the bomb. The reward is seen as the hero’s taking possession of their lives throughout their journey. Another example from other works would be, “Ocean’s Eleven” when George Clooney survives his journey successfully and is able to return back to his wife and take possession of his life.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 5, 2014 12:07 PM

Jazlynn Rosario and Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220Cl Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 November 2014


Group Question #9:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “new perceptions” and why they are important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?


Answer:
In the new perceptions section of the reward chapter Vogler states that, "Heroes may find that surviving death grants new powers or better perceptions" (Christopher Vogler 180). In A Christmas Carol, Scrooge saw his death and saw that it was coming fast if he continued to live a miserable life. Seeing this helped him to gain a better perception on how he should view and live his life from then on.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at November 5, 2014 12:07 PM

Leroy Pianka
Claudia Pierre
Bryce Veller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 November 2014

Question 12
The Reward (Boon)
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “self-realization” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical
citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Sometimes after a hero cheats death, he has an “Aha” moment. The puzzles of the journey are now coming together. In the movie “12 Years a Slave” Northrup is singing a Cristian song to mourn the death of a fellow slave. Northrup has been holding on to his faith in his own abilities for a very long time, but the death sparked a realization that he needed to have faith in something outside of himself.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at November 5, 2014 12:09 PM

Rebeccah Braun, and Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 November 2014


Question 6:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “seizing the sword” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
Vogler talks about Seizing the Sword in his Reward [Boon] stage. He explains that seizing the sword is “an active movement of the hero who aggressively takes possession of whatever was being sought in the Special World,” (Vogler 178). It is important because it is this moment that they are rewarded after completely their mission. An example of this is in Siddhartha. He leaves the Brahman village into his Special World to seek knowledge and an ideology better fit for him. After his adventure, he finally finds the knowledge he wanted.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at November 5, 2014 12:10 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth, Joanna Ozog, and Ashlee English
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 November 2014

Question #13:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “epiphany” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
An epiphany is important because the hero does not learn anything from the journey. The hero is being reformed with the epiphany and becomes more courageous. There were a few examples of epiphanies within the texts we have read so far. One of these examples is in Siddhartha, he has the ultimate epiphany when he achieves enlightenment. In Christmas Carol, Scrooge learns that if he does not change he will have a lonely death. In Wizard of Oz when Dorothy learns that she had the power to go back home all along, and there is no place like home. “One of the Rewards of surviving death is that others can see that heroes have changed (Vogler 181).”

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 5, 2014 12:17 PM

Bronwen Burke and Nathanael Jones
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
5 November 2014

The Reward (Boon)

Question 5:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “taking possession” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Vogler says, “A transaction has been made – the hero has risked death or sacrificed life, and now gets something in exchange” (Vogler, 178). It is important because the protagonist has finally achieved what they wanted and possesses a sense of accomplishment. An example of this is in The Little Mermaid, when Ariel gets her voice back, and she wins Prince Eric.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at November 5, 2014 02:34 PM

Ashley Gross and Abrar Nooh
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
7 November 2014

Question-The reward:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “seizing the sword” and why it is important.

Answer:
Seizing the sword is when the hero takes possession of whatever is being sought in the special world. The reward can be either a physical object or love. An example would be after King Kong abducts Fay, he cradles her in his palm and they have a tender moment. Like any hero, he gets the girl.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at November 7, 2014 09:33 AM

Blake Bromen & Joshua Natonio
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
November 5, 2014


Question #11:
Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “clairvoyance” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

In Christopher Vogler's Reward[Boon] Stage of the Hero's Journey, he explains that "after transcending death, may even become clairvoyant or telepathic, sharing in the power of the immortal gods." HG goes on to say that "Clairvoyant means simply 'seeing clearly.'" and that "a hero who has faced death is more aware of the connectedness of things, more intuitive" (Vogler 181).

"Clairvoyance" in A Christmas Carol, when Scrooge finally realizes he needs to change his ways so he does not die alone and forgotten (Dickens 62). This has happened in many movies, including Star Wars: A New Hope when Luke Skywalker took off his goggles that assisted him with his X-Wings weapons guiding system and relied on the "force" to guide his weapons.

Posted by: Joshua Natonio at November 7, 2014 10:27 AM

Jonah Robertson, Peter Bellini, Jake Gates
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
November 5, 2014


Question #2:


Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “celebration” and why is it important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


In Christopher Vogler’s book we see that celebration is defined by the heroes surviving the ordeal and coming back together to celebrate. We can see this shown vividly in A Christmas Carol when Scrooge has completed the trials of the three ghosts and is filled with a celebratory Christmas spirit. In media outside of class we can see the celebration at the end of The Return of the Jedi with the celebration of the Ewoks, Luke and the rest of the rebels after the defeat of the Empire.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson, Peter Bellini, Jake Gates at November 7, 2014 12:50 PM

T.J. Pagliaro, Rich Bennet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 March 2015

Question: How does Taking Possession/Seizing the Search/Elixir Theft Stage appear in the works of The Hobbit, Harry Potter & the Philosopher’s Stone, and A Christmas Carol?

Answer: Throughout The Hobbit, Bilbo takes possession of the ring in Gollum’s cave, and also takes the elixir theft reward share of gold that is in Smaug’s realm. In Harry Potter, the elixir reward that Harry receives is the Philosopher’s Stone when he defeats Professor Quirrell underneath the trap door. He also receives the invisibility cloak from Dumbledore gifted from his father. In A Christmas Carol, Scrooge takes possession of him realizing his fate on the grave stone. Dickens writes, “I will live in the Past, Present, and the Future” (Dickens 63). This means he is ready to take the responsibility to change himself before the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come takes his life away from him.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 27, 2015 02:21 PM

Wyatt Burttschell, Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys Into Narrative CA09
27 March 2015


Question: How does Scrooge from The Christmas Carol transform?

Answer: Scrooge is initially a grumpy, greedy and mean spirited man. The transformation for Scrooge is a detailed process that occurs throughout the story. The ghosts of Marley, Christmas past and present and even future assist in the process of transform Scrooge. Vogler describes a transformation by defining epiphany as “an abrupt realization of divinity.” (181) In some ways the transformation is associated with epiphany. Scrooge gains subtle hints of remorse throughout the story; however, after meeting with the Christmas future there is a sudden epiphany and transformation. The transformation becomes complete when Scrooge returns and is a changed man.

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell, Bryan Hess at March 27, 2015 04:34 PM

Hanna Kataria, Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03
29 March 2015
Reward Stage

In all of the books that we have read in the class so far, have not really had a Reward stage that included romance, love scene, or marriage sacred. This is something that does not always happen; it is normally located after the central ordeal in the story. In Siddhartha, there was a romance, however it was in the middle of the story, not after Siddhartha’s central ordeal. In The Painted Bird, there was no romance or love scene; it was nothing that was voluntary, it was rape. In the Christmas Carol, there was nothing either, any romance, or love interest. There was a mention of a past love, but there was not enough detail about that, the reader would have to assume about the love that Scrooge had. In Watership Down, you cannot really say that Holly is a love interest, she may just be a strong female character. In these books it is harder to find a Romantic reward, it is easier to see it in the films, as in Lion King, Simba got the girl in the end.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria; Maggie Izquierdo at March 29, 2015 11:27 PM

Celina Tahsini, Will Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys to Narrative CAO2
27 March 2015

Epiphany/Self-Realization:

In Vogler's text, he states, "Insight might be of a deeper type. Heroes can sometimes experience a profound self-realization after tricking death. They see who they are and how they fit into the scheme of things" (Vogler 181). Two stories which have instances where the main character of the story experiences a moment of self-realization or epiphany are "Siddhartha" and the "Painted Bird". In "Siddhartha", it was the moment when Siddhartha is by the river, and he suddenly realizes he had a completely wrong perspective of life, and in that moment of epiphany he completely alters his mindset. Along with the story of "Siddhartha", the "Painted Bird" also has a moment in which the young boy experiences self-realization (Hesse 33). In "Painted Bird", the young boy begins to be able to talk again which was a major moment in his life. Along with the ability to speak again, the boy also made the decision to start becoming evil and doing things with an evil mindset. Both of these stories incorporated self-realization and epiphany into the main character's story line, and it is used as a turning point in the story as well.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at March 30, 2015 12:13 PM

Jasmine Weaver & Marie Destin
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 March 2015

Transformation: In the book A Christmas Carol Scrooge had a major transformation and went from being a grouchy old man to a kind and caring one. "No, no," said Scrooge. "Oh no, kind Spirit! say he will be spared. Scrooge hung his head to hear his own words quoted by the Spirit, and was overcome with penitence and grief. (http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Christmas_Carol_(Dickens,_1843)/Stave_3 par. 96)”

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at March 30, 2015 12:17 PM

Kelsey Williams and Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
27 March 2015

Questions: Taking possession, seizing the sword, and elixir theft in the books and movies we have covered.

Answer: Taking possession is a necessary process of the hero’s journey. (Vogler 177-9). In Hesses’ Siddhartha, Siddhartha takes possession of the peace in life that he learned from life with Vasudeva and the river. While the boy in Kosinski’s The Painted Bird, he gains freedom from danger, and loses his independence that he had before his parents found him in the orphanage. He doesn’t achieve belonging and isn’t accepted by his parents. The parents have adopted another child, and he is sent out of the city to live with a tutor, which in a sense is his elixir/independence regained. And in Adams, Watership Down, the rabbits create a new warren for themselves.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield at March 30, 2015 03:02 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl & Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative
28 March 2016

10. Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “seeing through deception” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your words

Answer: This is important because in different ways sometimes this can be seen as a moment of clarity, which can also be looked at as seizing the sword. This can be seen with the film The Lion King because Simba realizes that he needs to go back home and fight for what has always been his own, he also has to defeat his Uncle Scar. But he’s so used to being away from home and running he needs to own up to what it is he left and made things right once again. This is important because it teaches Simba that he can’t run away from what he has always known, he needs to take his place at Pride Rock and become king just as he always was, and he needs to face his uncle and take over for his father, King Mufasa.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at March 28, 2016 11:04 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Charis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
The Reward
28 March 2016

Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “love scenes” and why they are important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.


According to Vogler, the hero may need love as a reward due to his deal of not feeling worthy of possessing love until they have done something to gain it (Vogler 177). For instance in the Lion King Simba leave home due to believing the lie his uncle Scar told him. After departing he felt hated and unworthy to be king and to be forgiven. Upon his return to Pride Rock he, has to defeat his uncle to discover the truth and accept his roll as king. As a result, he then realizes the reward of love that is offered to him from Nala and the people of his kingdom.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at March 28, 2016 11:05 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Charis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
The Reward
28 March 2016

Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “love scenes” and why they are important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.


According to Vogler, the hero may need love as a reward due to his deal of not feeling worthy of possessing love until they have done something to gain it (Vogler 177). For instance in the Lion King Simba leave home due to believing the lie his uncle Scar told him. After departing he felt hated and unworthy to be king and to be forgiven. Upon his return to Pride Rock he, has to defeat his uncle to discover the truth and accept his role as king. As a result, he then realizes the reward of love that is offered to him from Nala and the people of his kingdom.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at March 28, 2016 11:06 AM

Burke & Emily

2) Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “celebration” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?

- when vogler discusses the “Boon” for the hero, it is mostly meant to symbolize a reconciliation. By “Celebration” vogler implies that it is a natural instinct to replenish energy after the supreme ordeal. In “the Odyssey,” the heroes always offered a sacrifice and had a meal to give thanks after their struggle. The metaphoric explanation can be that strength is needed to return back to the normal world. In “A Christmas Carol,” Scrooge has a Christmas feast with his nephew’s family, to celebrate his overcoming of the spirits. In “Harry Potter & the Sorcerer’s Stone,” the feasts after the house cup are a celebration after receiving the ultimate boon for the hero.

Posted by: Burke & Emily at March 28, 2016 01:35 PM

Thomas and Jessica
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
29 March 2016

Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Reward [Boon]” stage, by “epiphany” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Vogler states "A hero may realize suddenly, after a moment of Supreme Ordeal, that he is the son of a god or a king, a chosen one with special powers. Epiphany is a moment of realizing you are a diving and sacred being, connected to all things." (Vogler 181) This is important because when the hero is reborn, it gives meaning to life and sharpens perception. In A Christmas Carol, Scrooge had an epiphany after his journey ended with the spirits. The spirit of Christmas yet to come showed him great insight of his life and how his life would turn out to be better off if he gave more. Scrooge realized that his wealth could be used for good instead of his selfishness. In the Matrix when Agent Smith killed Neo, he was reborn and through this rebirth he had his epiphany of how to control his body in the Matrix. He was The One, a god-like being in the Matrix. This is important because after this moment the hero has obtained their reward whether they were looking for it or not. Everything they have experienced in their journey finally adds up and makes sense.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at March 29, 2016 08:32 AM

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