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October 30, 2014

Campbell's *Return with the Elixir* Stage of the Monomyth


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 30, 2014 03:52 PM

Readers' Comments:

Bobbi Ausmus & Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
13 April 2015
#4
A story moves in a circle and pass certain points and eventually return to the starting point from whence it came; for example in The Matrix, Neo has to go back into the matrix and defeat Smith. The audience, also needs to be able to draw comparison according to Vogler. By returning to the starting point, it gives the story a feeling of completion. In A Christmas Carrol, Scrooge returns to the same point he left, but now he is changed. The world around Scrooge, has not changed only the attitude, which he views it has. In The Lion King, Simba must return to Pride Rock; to claim his rightful thrown as king and remove Scar and his wicked ways as ruler.


Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus and Cody Jean-Baptiste at April 13, 2015 03:01 PM

Hatim Shami and Marie Destin
Doctor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
13 April 2015

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Return with the Elixir” stage, by “The Open-Ended Story Form” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer: The open-ended story form is more of a story that does not have a clear conclusion. The idea is to make the story as close as the storyteller can to reader's hearts. "In the open-ended point of view , the storytelling goes on after the story is over; it continues in the minds and hearts of the audience." some writers also use this method for more mysterious conclusion, which can have many questions and answers or no questions at all (Vogler 218).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at April 13, 2015 03:05 PM

Kelsey Williams and Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
13 April 2015

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Return with the Elixir” stage, by the “Sadder but Wiser” concept and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA Joseph Campbell’s “The Return with the Elixir” Stage of the Monomythic Hero’s Journey, as Explained/Condensed by Christopher Vogler Questions Below from The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers, pages 214-28 parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: The characteristic of this stage of Return with the Elixir would be the “look back at their [Hero] wrong turns on the path” (Vogler 222). For example in the movie, the Lion King, Simba experiences a difficult situation in which he believes he killed his father. When later he learns he was merely a pawn in Scar’s plan to assassinate Mufasa. Simba must abandon his Hakuna Matata lifestyle to battle Scar and inherit his rightful place as king. In comparison to the positive outcome of this Disney film, Kosinski's The Painted Bird has the opposite effect. The young boy experienced the atrocities of humankind throughout this World War II based-novel. This boy survives humanity’s various levels of Hell, but in the end he knows the truth about humans and how to survive in those conditions. No matter the outcome, this kind of stage concludes the adventure and provides the consolation of knowledge.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield at April 13, 2015 03:08 PM

Richard Bennet and T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220cl Journeys in narrative ca02
13 April 2015

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Return with the Elixir” stage, by “Functions of the Return” and why they are important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: According to Volger, like the journeys other stages the return with the elixir can perform many functions. One thing that is significant being the last impact on the journey. It is the seizing to the sword which also may appear in the return as taking possession, retaliation, and or campfire scene. How ever the return is the hero's is the last chance for him or her to touch the emotions of the audience. The stage should also finish the story or journey so that it satisfies or provokes the audience.

Posted by: Richard Bennet and T.J. Pagliaro at April 13, 2015 03:30 PM

Maggie Izquierdo & Tyler Sedam
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
15 April 2015

Question: According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Return with the Elixir,” what does he mean by “Return” and why is this important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer: According to Vogler, the “Return” is the heroes talking about what happened on their journey. They may laugh about their injuries or act out certain scenarios. The Trickster will be the one who acts out certain scenarios to bring comic relief, and therefore healing. The heroes talking about their journey together is the elixir; it brings healing to these heroes. It is important stage because it implements change in their lives, and they use the lessons from their adventure to heal their wounds. (Vogler 216). Examples of this stage is in A Christmas Carol when Scrooge changes his ways, becomes nice, and helps everyone. He is the elixir by providing something that will help heal people like Tiny Tim. Watership Down is another good example of this because at the end of the book, the rabbits are telling this story to other rabbits who may want to join their warren. They have gotten past their tests and obstacles, and they tell their story to others.

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at April 13, 2015 07:48 PM

Joe Marrah and Wyatt Burttscell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
13 April 2015
Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Return with the Elixir” stage, by “Denouement” and why it is important.
Answer: Denouement is basically tying up all the loose ends at the end of an adventure. If a story ends as soon as the main conflict is resolved, it won’t provide proper closure. Throughout a story it is common to have different questions and issues raised. Sometimes they aren’t main factors of the story but just things that have unraveled in part of the adventure. If these details are not resolved by the end of the story, the reader will be left with questions. Dorthy ties all the loose ends when she returns home to the farm. Throughout the movie she learned many lessons that she puts to use at the end of her adventure. Instead of just leaving everything and going back to normal, she finds closure and shares it with everyone.

Posted by: Joe Marrah and Wyatt Burttschell at April 15, 2015 11:00 AM

Adam Alexander, Jasmine Weaver, and Sergio Velazquez

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01

13 April 2015

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Return with the Elixir” stage, by “Two Story Forms” and why they are important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far?

Answer: Vogler writes that there are two story forms, which relate to the last phase of the heroes journey. These are the “closure form” and the “open-ended” form. The “closure form” is familiar in Western culture and happens when “there is a sense of closure and completion.” This means that there is a solid conclusion that gives the Hero and the audience a sense of peace. The other form is the “open-ended” form, which is familiar in Easter culture. Vogler writes that the “open-ended approach in which there is a sense of unanswered questions, ambiguities, and unresolved conflicts,” (Vogler, 216).

In The Wizard of Oz, the film ends with Dorothy returning to the Ordinary World, reuniting with her family after defeating the Wicked Witch and leaving the strange Land of Oz. Dorothy is now at peace, and so is the audience, because she has completed her goal and is now safe. This is a sense of closure which makes this a “closed” conclusion. On the other hand, in movies like American Psycho, there are many questions left unanswered which give these films an “open-ended” conclusion. In American Psycho, it is left unclear whether the main character is actually a serial killer or if it is all in his mind. The story itself has little plot, so a closed conclusion would be very difficult to create for this film.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at April 15, 2015 02:27 PM

William and Celina
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220CL Journeys in Narrative
15 April, 2015

Question 10. Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Return with the Elixir” stage, by “The Elixir” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.
The Elixer is the reason for going on the journey. It is what the hero returns with upon their arrival. It’s the gift they bring back to prove that they went to the special world.“What does the hero bring back with her from the Special World to share upon her Return? Whether it's shared within the community or with the audience, bringing back the Elixir is the hero's final test. It proves she's been there, it serves as an example for others, and it shows above all that death can be overcome.” (Vogler 220) In Watership Down it was the doe bunnies and in The Christmas Carol it was the way he turn generous and understanding.


Posted by: William Pereira at April 15, 2015 06:48 PM

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