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October 30, 2014

Campbell's *Resurrection* Stage of the Monomyth


Source: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-5T_6BDXqhe0/U1R9hyJEHRI/AAAAAAAADQM/RsAnED08gNM/s1600/resucitado.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 30, 2014 03:44 PM

Readers' Comments:

T.J. Pagliaro Rich Bennet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 April 2015
Discussion Question 3: Resurrection Stage

3. Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Resurrection” stage, by “Two Great Ordeals” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response

Answer: According to the Vogler text, the Resurrection Stage is the central crisis or Supreme Ordeal is like a midterm exam; the Resurrection is the final exam. Heroes must be tested one last time to see if they retained the learning from the Supreme Ordeal. In The Matrix, Neo is first tested by Morpheus to see if he is the one to save humanity and then at the final stage (Resurrection), he is tested by the agent. Also, in Dickens, A Christmas Carol, Scrooge is first tested by Marley. He warns him that he will be haunted by Three Spirits. This is setting up Scrooge for his Resurrection Stage. Dickens writes, “You will be haunted,” resumed the Ghost, by Three Spirits” (15 Dickens). Scrooge must go through three tests before he gets to his Resurrection. In the end, Scrooge is put to the ultimate test when he is haunted by the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come and realized his fate. When he sees his grave, he understands that he must “live in the Past, Present, and the Future” (63 Dickens). This is when Scrooge goes through his Resurrection Stage.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at April 10, 2015 02:15 PM

Bobbi Ausmus & Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
10 April 2015
#6
Every story has a least one great battle that its character(s), must face and pull through in one way or another. These great battles are called the showdown by, Voglor and will occur during the resurrection phase of the hero’s journey. In Watership Down, the battle happened between General Woundwort and Hazel’s warren. Leading up to the fight between the two rabbits, bigwig thinks “No doubt Woundwort knew perfectly well where he had been” (Adams, 202). In The Matrix, Neo must face Agent Smith and Neo actually dies, but is brought back to life and rewarded for his actions giving him many supernatural powers; which he then further uses to finally defeat Agent Smith.

Posted by: Bobbi and Sergio at April 10, 2015 03:11 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield & Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
10 April 2015

Question 4: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Resurrection” stage, by the “Physical Ordeal” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The Physical Ordeal is when the hero faces death for the final time and when death is at its broadest scale. Instead of only the hero’s life being on the line, often it’s their whole world or humanity. This portion of the Resurrection is important because it gives the hero one last taste of death as they leave the Special World. For example, in the Wizard of Oz, Dorothy is sent on a final mission to acquire the Wicked Witch’s broom after traveling to Oz.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield at April 10, 2015 03:16 PM

Rachel Andrews & Chrissy Castro

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of

Narrative CA02

10 April 2015

Question:

Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Resurrection” stage, by “Choice” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Vogler states that the Resurrection Stage can come in many forms. In Hesse’s Siddartha, the protagonist has to make a Choice about where his life will go. “A climatic choice among options that indicates whether or not the Hero has truly learned the lesson of change” (Vogler 201), Siddartha has to decide if he wants to keep living the life he had in the Special World or if he’s going to become enlightened.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews & Chrissy Castro at April 10, 2015 03:22 PM

Adam Alexander and Hatim Shami
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01
10 April 2015

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Resurrection” stage, by “cleansing” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far?

Answer: Vogler describes the purpose of the cleansing during the resurrection phase as a way to "cleanse the heroes of the smell of death, yet help them retain the lessons of the ordeal." This can be an actual cleansing with water like a shower after a big sports tournament or something symbolic. The cleansing relates back to resurrection and even baptism, when the subject dies and then is reborn in a new life with their new ideas and values.
In The Wizard of Oz, after the protagonists kill the Wicked Witch, they meet with the Wizard, who "cleanses" them with confidence and rewards. The bodies that previously were, all insecure (the Lion thinking he was a coward, the Scarecrow and his stupidity), are now reborn as confident creatures with the Wizard's gifts and words.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at April 10, 2015 03:23 PM

Tyler Sedam and Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
13 April 2015
Question: According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Resurrection,” what does he mean by “A New Personality” and why is this important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?

Answer: Christopher Vogler defines the new personality that a hero takes on at the end of their journey as one that “should reflect the best parts of the old selves and the lessons learned along the way (Vogler 198).” The resurrection stage typically depicts a symbolic, mental, or physical death of the hero, who comes back to life, in some fashion, as a new being. While they may still retain a lot of the personality traits and such from before the journey, the hero has changed into a being that is, essentially, everything that they were and everything that they have experienced and learned. For example, in the film “The Matrix,” Neo, the hero, is killed during the rescue of his friend and mentor, Morpheus. However, Neo experiences a resurrection, after which he is both capable of free will and everything that he was already able to do, but is also now one who can manipulate and control the Matrix itself however he wants. In terms of a “new personality,” Neo is now both himself, and this new being who can control the very reality of the Matrix. He has changed as a result of the resurrection to have a balance between both what he was before the journey and these experiences, lessons, and abilities he has gained from the journey.

Posted by: Tyler Sedam and Wyatt Burttschell at April 13, 2015 01:01 PM

Hanna Kataria; Maggie Izquierdo; Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
13 April 2015
Discussion Question 7: Resurrection Stage

Question 7. Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Resurrection” stage, by the “Death and Rebirth of Tragic Heroes” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: In most stories, the villain is the one that “die[s] or … [is] defeated” (Vogler 200). However, they are not the only one that may go through death or defeat. The heroes that do go through this, are reborn or resurrected “in the sense that they usually live on in the memory of the survivors, those for whom they gave their lives” (Vogler 201). This ‘death’ can be symbolic and realistic, or both. In The Christmas Carol, Scrooge is the one that experiences death when he sees his grave with the ghost from Christmas future. In Siddhartha, he experienced resurrection, death and rebirth, when Kamala died and when he was a Samana because they were starving themselves. However, with those two scenes, it is most likely that it is that it was when Kamala died. In Watership Down, the scene where Hazel falls into the river. Resurrection, death and rebirth, is something that almost every storyline, it can be something that is very distinctive or something that makes one think about it.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria; Maggie Izquierdo; Bryan Hess at April 13, 2015 02:08 PM

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