« Campbell's *Approach to the Inmost Cave* Stage of the Monomyth | Main | Campbell's *Reward (Boon)* Stage of the Monomyth »

October 30, 2014

Campbell's *[Central / Supreme] Ordeal* Stage of the Monomyth


Source: http://assets1.learni.st/learning_preview/845209/image/w583h583_117271-the-hero-endures-the-supreme-ordeal.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 30, 2014 03:21 PM

Readers' Comments:

Erin Gaylord & Gabby Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 November 2014

Question:
According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by the idea that “villains are heroes of their own stories,” and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer:
The villains think they’re doing what’s right. It depends on the point of view of the villain. “In their own minds, they are right, the heroes of their own stories” (Vogler 165). It’s important because the villains think they’re doing what’s right; they do not think they’re in the wrong. Also, if you look at the story from their point of view, they could be the hero of their own story.

In Watership Down, Holly is a villain in the beginning. He tries to stop them from leaving, and fights them. In his mind, he thinks he’s a hero. He is doing what he is told, and he may even think he’s protecting Hazel and his group of followers. Holly comes back and finds them, and he joins them as an ally.

In Harry Potter, Draco is fighting for Slytherin, and Harry is fighting for Griffindor. They are both fighting the same way for the same thing. If the point of view was changed, Draco could be the hero and Harry could be the villain of Draco. They both try to hurt each other and win overall.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord, Gabriela Caminero at November 3, 2014 10:55 AM

Kyle VanBuren and Tyler Sommers
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
November 3 2014

Question 13: According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by “facing the shadow” trope, and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?

Text source: “The Writers Journey,” By Christopher Vogler

Answer: Vogler explains that this is one of the most important “Ordeals” in the battle with the opposing force. Many times when the hero faces the shadow, it could be a deadly enemy villain, antagonist, opponent, or even a force of nature (Vogler 163). This type of ordeal is highly important because this is what makes the story interesting and intriguing. Facing the shadow has occurred in “The Painted Bird,” by Jerzy Kosinski many times as the boy has to face all his care takers. Many of his caretakers are abusive, henceforth, the boy facing the opposing force.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 3, 2014 10:59 AM

Kendra, Summer
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 November 2014
Group 10

Question: According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by “hero appears to die” trope, and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
It was important to the hero to be dead, so he/she can be born again. Therefore, the audience loves to see the hero cheat death because they wish they could cheat death. This is an important part in any story because it creates an emotional response in the audience. Vogler says, “The emotions ride higher for having been brought down so far” (162). One example of this is in Lord of the Rings where Gandalf appears to die. He is gone for a while before his companions realize that he is alive. The audience begins to feel more of an attachment for Gandalf and is sad when they believe he is dead. The audience is even more excited though when Gandalf seemingly “comes back to life.” Another example of a hero appearing to die is in Watership Downs when Bigwig seemingly “dies.” The audience is sad when this happens, but is elated to find out that he is still alive.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton and Summer Taylor at November 3, 2014 10:59 AM

Aaron Virelli, Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative CA01
29 October 2014

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Ordeal” stage, by “change” and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer: so when thinking about the ordeal in the story you defines it as the most profound challenge or the most skilled opponent the hero faces. Furthermore, this “is the mainspring of the heroic form and the key to its magic power.”(Vogler 155) When it comes to change Vogler explains it as the change that you see in that character after he either defeats or is defeated in the ordeal. It is a moment that will forever change hero because of its magnitude. We see a large amount of change in Christmas Carol with how scrooge acts after he gets done the night with the three spirits. He changes from an old and rotten geezer to spirited and jovial role model.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at November 3, 2014 11:02 AM

Bronwen Burke, Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
3 November 2014


Question:
According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by “a taste of death” and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/ occurred in anything we have read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer:
The taste of death takes the audience on a roller coaster of emotions, where “they grieve and the audience grieves with them, tasting death,” when the hero goes to the brink of defeat (Vogler 160). However, there is a “jolt that awakens fuller appreciation of life,” when the hero defeats the obstacle and comes back to life (Vogler 160). The hero Bigwig becomes ensnared in the silver wire pulling him to the brink of death and back, along with him, the readers’ emotions traveled with his friends who had to sit and watch the ordeal occur.
“There was a pause. Then Bigwig’s back legs began to kick once more, but feebly. His ears dropped. His eyes opened unseeing and the whites showed bloodshot as the brown irises rolled one way and the other. After a moment his voice came thick and low, bubbling out of the bloody spume in his mouth.” (Adams 111)
The reader’s emotions are brought up during the high intensity, dramatic event of the initial snare trap. However, like the rabbits watching the emotions spiraled downward when
“Bigwig did not stir. Suddenly it came to Hazel that if Bigwig was dead—and what else could hold him silent in the mud?—then he himself must get the others away before the dreadful loss could drain their courage and break their spirit.” (Adams 113)
Following the idea of the taste of death, the jolt occurs shortly after when the group begins to go against each other and Bigwig who was thought to be dead, speaks says “I’ll kill him,” in regards to Cowslip who threatened Fiver (Adams 115). Now that Bigwig has come back, the mood becomes lighter knowing that no one has been lost.

Work Cited:

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005. Print.

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at November 3, 2014 11:08 AM

Jonah Robertson, Peter Bellini, Jake Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
November 3 2014

Question: According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by “hero appears to die” trope, and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The hero appears to die in order to keep a dramatic tension throughout the story, and to lead to a sort of rebirth in the hero (Vogler 162). In Watership Down Hazel appears to die when he is shot, and the rest of his troop of rabbits has to figure out how to move on, until it is revealed that he is not dead, simply injured. In the final Harry Potter book Harry appears to die when fighting Voldemort in the final battle, until it is revealed that he survived.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at November 3, 2014 12:10 PM

Nuri Salahuddin, Maria Aguilera, and Jazlyn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
2 November 2014

Question: According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by the idea that, in “classic hero myths,” “heroes cheat death,” and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/Occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer: The idea that “heroes cheat death,” means when a hero is supposed to ultimately die but does not. “There mythic heroes face certain death but survive where others have failed because they have wisely sought supernatural air in the earlier stages” (Vogler, 165). There are many stories in which the heroes “cheat death,” for example, in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, Harry was supposed to die after Voldemort attempted to murder him. Harry cheats death with the resurrection stone and comes back to life shocking everyone including the audience. Another example of heroes cheating death would be in Snow White, when Snow White dies from eating the poisonous apple but then Prince Charming saves her with a true loves kiss. In A Christmas Carol, Scrooge cheats death when he learns with the ghost of Christmas future about his death if he continues on the path he was on. Scrooge becomes a better person because he did not like what he saw and heard from the ghosts.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at November 3, 2014 12:16 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth, Joanna Ozog, and Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 November 2014

Question 21: According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by the “sacred marriage” and “balance” and why is this important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer: Sacred marriage is the balancing of opposing inner forces. It is a battle within a person. Balance is the “state of being . . . centered, and not easily dislodged or upset,” (Vogler 167). Hazel is constantly stressed with the ideas of the group and must find an inner balance with his thoughts and emotions. Siddhartha is also very balanced because he is not easily upset, and he has a balanced marriage between himself and life.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at November 3, 2014 12:17 PM

Ashlee English &Thomas Meseroll
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
30 October 2014

QUESTION:
25. In his discussion of his chapter on the “Ordeal” stage, clarify what Christopher Vogler means by the “facing the greatest fear” trope and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
ANSWERS:
Volger states that “The Ordeal” is defined as the moment the hero faces his greatest fear. The hero has to face this fear to overcome the ordeal and further his journey/ accomplish his goal and return to the ordinary world. The greatest fear illustrated in A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens when Scrooge is fearful that he will be forgotten after his death, and no one (inclusive of his family) will care that he has died. In Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban Harry had to face his greatest fear, which was materialized the Boggart, in class, which came in handy when he had to fight the Dementors (soul-sucking creatures).

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 3, 2014 12:19 PM

Claudia Pierre, Bryce Veller, Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL: On A Proverbial Road Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 November 2014


QUESTION:
23. In his discussion of his chapter on the “Ordeal” stage, clarify what Christopher Vogler means by the “negative animus or anima” why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


ANSWER:
“Sometimes in the journey of our lives we confront negative projections of the anima or animus. This can be a person who attracts us but isn’t good for us. . . .” (Vogler, pg. 169). It can be a confrontation and a life threatening situation in a relationship or a person’s development. A film that we have seen and can relate to an anima/ animus is the Lion King. The brother Scar was very jealous of Mufasa (The King) and his family, he goes off to kill his brother just to take over the jungle and become King.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at November 3, 2014 09:16 PM

Ashley Gross and Abrar Nooh
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
5 November 2014

Question- The Ordeal:
According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by the “villain escapes” trope, and why is it important?

Answer:
In this section, the hero may hurt the villain or kill an underling. The main villain escapes, but shows up again in later acts. An example would be when Harry potter defeats Lord Voldemort while battling over the Sorcerer's Stone, only to have him return later.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at November 5, 2014 08:42 AM

Rebeccah Braun, James Sierra, and Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 November 2014


Question 27:
In his discussion of his chapter on the “Ordeal” stage, clarify what Christopher Vogler means by the “youth versus age” trope and why it is important. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
In the “Ordeal” stage, Vogler explains that the trope “youth versus age” is when the younger generation starts to challenge the older generation, the drama can be on a worldwide level. This trope is imperative because these conflicts are expressed both internally and externally. Vogler explains “the new Self can’t be born until the old one dies or at least steps aside to leave more room on the center stage,” (Vogler, 171). An example of this is in Siddhartha when he goes to tell his father he wants to leave the village. He is challenging his father’s belief of the Brahman lifestyle with him wanting to leave and become a Samana. This conflict is resolved when Siddhartha's dad allows him to leave the village and go on his quest.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at November 5, 2014 12:11 PM

Bobbi Ausmus & Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
25 March 2015

Topics: Adams and Potter

Watership Down: In this novel, the characters must fight to maintain a safe, healthy, and prosperous warren. Thus far in the story, the main battle is against General Woundwort and keeping him from finding their warren, because if he does it will must certainly mean death for all those living in the warren.

Harry Potter: In this movie, the central ordeal comes when Harry must fight for his life against the two-faced Quirrell. During the fight, it is revealed to Harry that Snape has not been trying to kill him but instead trying to keep him safe. Harry also must face Voldemort, or the barely living creature of him and deal with the emotions that arise from the memory of his parents being killed by this villain.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus and Cody Jean-Baptiste at March 25, 2015 03:04 PM

Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
25 March 2015


Topic: The Central Ordeals in the Painted Bird and Star Wars

Answer: When the Kalmucks came to rape and pillage the village in which the young boy was in (Kosinski 107-112) is the central ordeal as the boy witness the atrocious committed that results in his change. This point in the story also represents the crisis in which the situation is at it’s most hostile point (Vogler 156-7). While in Lucas’ Star Wars, the central ordeal is the trash compactor. As Volger describes, Luke appears to die (161), it happens in the center of the story and is the deepest, darkest part.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield at March 25, 2015 03:19 PM

Hanna Kataria, Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03
26 March 2015

The Central Ordeal: The Painted Bird and Lion King

The central ordeal in stories are where the hero faces “the greatest challenge and the most fearsome opponent yet” (Vogler 155). It is the “deepest darkest moment in the story” (Sebek, David. [Video]). In the Lion King, the central ordeal is the scene where Simba pushes/throws his Uncle, Scar, down the cliff. This scene falls into the category of the hero witnessing death. Not only does he see his Uncle “falling to his death” he also at the beginning of the story he witnesses the death of his father. Simba causes “death” because he pushes/throws this Uncle off the cliff. He only did so because he changed how he thought of his Uncle once he learned the truth about how his father died. Unlike the Lion King, in The Painted Bird, the central ordeal category would be the change. The boy, in the end, had changed significantly from when he was reunited with his parents. He had gone through so much hardship; from being beaten, a slave, going from place to place, and in hiding all the time. It all changed him, just like the truth changed Simba.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria; Celina Tahsini at March 26, 2015 11:36 PM

Richard Bennet and T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220cl Journeys in narrative ca02
25 March 2015

Question: What is the ordeal for Harry Potter and Siddhartha? What is the central crisis for both or is there a delay of the crisis?

Answer: The ordeal in Siddhartha would be when he become a gambler. He wasn't very happy cause it was all just things that were for himself. This is illustrated by him becoming older and fatter. He seemed to have lost the will to live. He had done everything to explore materialism. The ordeal for harry potter is meeting professor Quarrel/ Voldemort in the camber of secrets.

Posted by: richard Bennet and T.J. Pagliaro at March 27, 2015 11:05 AM

William Pereira and Maggie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
25 March 2015

Topics: Wizard of Oz and the Hobbit
The central ordeal is usually the final battle and where the hero faces there greatest fear. There is usually a witness and this is most times where the hero meets the final boss. In the Hobbit the central ordeal is the final battle of the five armies following the death of Smaug the Dragon. Thorin comes to a self-realization that the Arkenstone took his prudence. When Bilbo steals the stone and tries to broker a deal is when the scene starts to transpire and Thorin starts his self-realization. The next film in Oz the central ordeal was when Dorothy had to find a way to obtain the Witch’s broom. She ended being captured by the Witch on her way to do so and was imprisoned. She was given a choice of giving up her red slippers, which was her only protection against the witch, and her ally and dog, Toto. Dorothy ends up going up against the Witch and wins by dousing water on her. The aftermath of the ordeal is that Dorothy sees through the deception that is the Wizard. Toto’s curiosity is what reveals the real Wizard of Oz, a man behind a curtain controlling the illusions of Oz. She finally sees behind the illusion of this powerful Oz is a human being with emotions that can be reached. (Vogler 183).

Posted by: William Pereira at March 27, 2015 01:13 PM

Rachel Andrews & Chrissy Castro

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02

27 March 2015

Question: Find and Identify Central Ordeal in text and movie: Dickens and Lion King

Answer: Then Central Ordeal in any journey is the stage when the Hero is standing in “the deepest chamber if the Inmost Cave, facing [their] greatest challenge and most fearsome opponent” (Vogler 155). These ordeals vary in every journey and can come in many different forms. In Charles Dickens, ‘ The Christmas Carols’ the conditions of Scrooges ordeal is Change. The final spirit shows him his fate if he does not change his ways, “this experience at the edge of death” (Vogler 157) has made Ebenezer “more sensitive to the needs of others” (Vogler 157). In the Lion King, our hero Simba has a different ordeal but it still changes him. Simba Faces the Shadow when he comes back to Pride rock and has to “battle or confront with the villain” (Vogler 163).

Posted by: Rachel Andrews & Chrissy Castro at March 27, 2015 02:19 PM

Joe Marrah & Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA02
30 March 2015

The Ordeal
Wizard of Oz
When Dorthy is captured by the witch of the west she faces a crisis. She had to retrieve the broom from the Witch of the West and bring the broom back to the Wizard of Oz. During this adventure she was captured by the Witch and had no way of bring the broom back to Oz. Along with being trapped she had to give up her magic slippers. She was able to complete her adventure after dumping water on the witch, which made her melt away. Dorthy went through the frightening experience of being captured and went through this crisis on the way to getting back home. This makes this scene the crisis, but not the climax.

Right away in the story of Watership Down, the rabbits face the beginning of their adventure. Fiver has the ability to see what can happen in the future, along with whether it will be good or bad. After leaving the others behind, they begin their adventure. Soon after this, Fiver witnesses a near death situation. The rabbits went to the farm to bring back does, and Hazel is badly injured. This results in Fiver saving him, and experiencing a near death situation. This is a low point for Fiver, and after he recovers he continues on the adventure.

Posted by: Joe Marrah and Bryan Hess at March 30, 2015 11:01 AM

Burke & Thomas

15. According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by the “death of a villain” trope, and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?

- According to Vogler, the “death of the villain” trope is the overcoming of the narrative antagonist. It is not always their physical death, but a triumph over their negativity on the hero. There are still non-physical forces to be overcome before the adventure is over. This is NOT the end of the journey, but rather the victory of the opposition. In “the Hen who dreamed she could fly,” it was when Sprout had confronted the weasel about her children, making her no longer a viable threat. In “Wizard of Oz,” it is when Dorothy defeats the Wicked Witch. In both of these examples, the antagonist/villain is defeated; however, the hero’s journey is not yet over.

Posted by: Burke and Thomas at March 23, 2016 10:59 AM

Charis Lavoie and Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 March 2016

Question 16: According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by the “villain escapes” trope, and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words
Answer: The villain escapes allowing the hero to come across the villain once more in a final showdown. For example, when Simba flees the Pride Lands from Scar he goes through a transformation with Timon and Pumbaa that help him discover himself which eventually leads him to return to the Pride Land and defeat Scar and his evil ways.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at March 23, 2016 11:07 AM

Jessica McKinney
Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
23 March 2016

Question 10: According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by “hero appears to die” trope, and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer: Volger explains this ordeal from the hero appearing to die by saying “They love to see heroes cheat death. In fact, they love to cheat death themselves identify with the hero who bounces back from death is bungee-jumping in dramatic form.” (Volger 162) This ordeal is important because it grabs the audience attention and keeps the narrative dramatic. For example, in the narrative “The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly” the hero Sprout cheats death from escaping the Hole of Death and being eaten by the weasel.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney Emily Buckley at March 23, 2016 11:08 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Andre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
23 March 2016
The Ordeal

According to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Ordeal,” what is meant by “hero witnesses death” trope, and why is it important? How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

According to Christopher Vogler, the hero witnessing death represents the ordeal, where the hero must face the challenge and become reborn or renewed in order to move forward. In Star Wars a New Hope, Vogler states, “Luke is devastated and feels the death as keenly as if it were his own” (Vogler 163). In this way, witnessing death is also meant to be the ordeal. Vogler also describes the ordeal as the hero having to die and be reborn, he writes, “heroes must die so that they can be reborn” (Vogler 155). Vogler writes, “despite physical death he is able to give Luke crucial advice at later points in the story,” and this in turn aids the hero (Vogler 163). It is important because it brings about change in the hero moving on to the next stage, and it provides the hero with a new perspective in overcoming obstacles and tests along the journey.

Posted by: Andre and Jonothan at March 23, 2016 11:24 AM

Google
My Blog

Creative Commons License
This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Some rights reserved. 2006.