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October 30, 2014

Campbell's *Approach to the Inmost Cave* Stage of the Monomyth


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 30, 2014 01:13 PM

Readers' Comments:

Bryce Veller, Jake Gates
ENG220CL- Journeys in Narratives
Dr.Hobbs
31 October 14

Question: Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Approach to the Inmost Cave” stage, by The concept of an “emotional appeal to a guardian” in the cinematic adaptation of The Wizard of Oz (a film we have been looking at closely in the video lecture series for this course).How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen,as a film) where this occurs?
Answer : The concept of emotional appeal to the guardian, is a method of persuasion that is designed to create an emotional response. Emotional appeals are considered fallacies, because they manipulate emotions in the story and audience. Emotional appeals can be used in courtrooms during trials and in persuasive essays to increase the effectiveness of arguments. Examples in The Wizard of Oz, when Dorothy said “why are you picking on that little dog, pick on someone your own size”, to the Lion who realized he was wrong for doing that and felt bad about it later.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at October 31, 2014 12:08 PM

Matthew Basin
Anet Milian
Eng.220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
31 OCT 2014

Question 10:
In his discussion of his chapter on the “Approach to the Inmost Cave “stage, clarify what Christopher Vogler means when he says that heroes should “be prepared.” Vogler uses the cinematic adaptation of The Wizard of Oz (a film we have been looking at closely in the video lecture series for this course) as his example. How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
In this chapter, Approach to the Inmost Cave, Christopher Vogler says that heroes should be prepared. According to the text, hero's known they’re facing a great ordeal and are wise to make themselves ready. For example, Warriors polish and sharpen their weapons or students doing final drills before a big exam. Another example is when the young boy in The Painted Bird, the boy has to fend for himself when his caretaker dies and he goes through a great ordeal when he goes to the different huts to live at and defends himself against the attack by the group of boys. For example, Captain America goes from a scrawny not fit man to a fit man who has capabilities to take down the bad guy. He makes his shield in order to protect himself and can use it to take down the villain. “Heroes know they are facing a gread ordeal, and are wise to make themselves as ready as they’ll ever be, like warriors polishing and sharpening their weapons or students doing finals drills before a big exam” (Vogler pg. 146).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 31, 2014 12:18 PM

Emily Buckley and Jessica McKinney
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
21 March 2016

Question: How, according to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Approach to the Inmost Cave,” are heroes in this stage like “mountaineers”? Explain your response.

Answer: Vogler says “Hero’s at this point are like mountaineers who have raised themselves to a base camp by the labors of testing and are about to make the final assault on the highest peak.” (Vogler 143) The journey is like a mountain because they have to start from the bottom and struggle to get to the very center of the hero’s journey which is the peak at the top of the mountain. Vogler continues to write, “During this journey they encounter the mysterious zone with its’ own threshold guardians with its’ own theories and tests.” (Vogler 143)

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Jessica McKinney at March 21, 2016 11:22 AM

Burke & Thomas.

2. Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Approach to the Inmost Cave” stage, by the “functions of approach.” How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?

- According to Vogler, the “functions of approach” refers to the layout or plan the hero makes deep within the special world. It is a type of preparation or habits to be done before the big, important special event that will occur. In Siddhartha, he hero planned his journey. It is a planning stage, similar to how Bilbo plans his assault on Smaug in “the Hobbit” and Luke’s preparing before his attack on the Death Star.

Posted by: Burke & Thomas at March 21, 2016 11:23 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Andre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
21 March 2016
Approach to the Innermost Cave

Clarify what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “Approach to the Innermost Cave” stage, by the “bold approach.” How has this sometimes worked/occurred in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? OR, what works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer:

In the phase the “Approach to the Innermost Cave” within the subtopic The Bold Approach Vogler mainly is describing a gung-ho hero. He clearly states that, “some heroes boldly stride up to the castle doors and demand to be let in” in the depiction of this bold approach.” Also he states, “Confident committed heroes will take this approach.” (Vogler 144). This is alluding to the gang-ho hero, a character whom rushes in to danger with no fear or hesitation. This type of character is evident in the film such as the Lion King when Simba returns to his homeland, Pride Rock, to take back and restore it to its original beauty and strength. Simba accomplished this when he fought his uncle and the hyenas. Lacking all hesitation Simba undertakes his bold approach falls into his inner most cave when he is in the position to alone and has to kill his uncle and retake the throne as king to uplift the kingdom once more.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Andre at March 23, 2016 10:32 AM

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