« Campbell's *Guardian Archetype,* as Explained by Christopher Vogler | Main | The Inescapable Discomfort in Zora Neale Hurston's "Sweat" »

September 16, 2014

Weathering Kate Chopin's Short Story, "The Storm"


Image Source: http://izquotes.com/quotes-pictures/quote-so-the-storm-passed-and-every-one-was-happy-kate-chopin-36618.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 16, 2014 04:43 PM

Readers' Comments:

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
16 September 2014

QUESTION #10:
In Kate Chopin’s short story, “The Storm,” how does the storm itself function as a character?

ANSWER:
The storm functions as a character because it is able to express conflict that corresponds to its own changes. The storm acts as a symbol for internal conflict between right and wrong that a normal character does face. As Calixta was cheating on her husband, the rain from the storm “beat upon the low, shingled roof with a force and clatter that threatened to break an entrance and deluge them there” (Chopin 2). The story contains personification of the storm to create an image for the reader of someone who is watching and placing judgment upon the actions of Calixta. Toward the end of the story, the storm changes much as a character does along the way. The storm ended and “the rain was over; and the sun was turning the glistening green world into a palace of gems” (Chopin 4). The storm was over, and Calixta was back with her husband and son. The storm showed Calixta’s actions by how severe it became, therefore functioning as a character in the story.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at September 16, 2014 09:40 PM

Alyssa Davis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
16 September 2014

Question #14:
Look up the words “immoral’ and “amoral” and be sure you understand the difference. First, explain the meanings in your own words. Then decide which modifier, if either, best fits Calixta. Why? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer:
To be immoral is to go against your personal principles and beliefs. To be amoral is to not question whether something is wrong or right. Calixta would be more if an amoral person. She would be amoral because when she had an affair with Alcee Laballiere, she didn’t stop to question if what she was about to do was wrong or right. When Alcee first began to enclose in her and kissed her lips she did nothing to stop him. “He looked down into her eyes and there was nothing for him to but to gather her lips in a kiss, (Chopin 3). When he kissed her, it brought back memories of the past that they once had together, and she wanted to relive that past event. “If she was not an immaculate dove in those days, she was still inviolate; a passionate creature whose very defenselessness had made her defense, against which his honor forbade him to prevail,” (Chopin 3). She did not stop to think if her decision of having this affair would affect her family and the morality of her marriage.

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at September 16, 2014 09:56 PM

Elizabeth Brown
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
16 September 2014

Question #5:
Is there any reason to believe that Clarisse ever suspects anything? Why or why not? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text.

Answer:
Clarisse may have known about her husband’s affairs because in the text it states (pg. five), “Devoted as she was to her husband, their intimate conjugal life was something which she was more than willing to forego for a while.” This shows that she was relieved not have the stress of their marriage and that she was more than willing to be separate for the time being. she was unhappy, and probably knew she didn’t really love her husband like she used to.

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at September 16, 2014 11:41 PM

John Crane
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA07
16 September 2014
The Storm
QUESTION #8: Is it simply a coincidence that Alcee arrives at calixta’s just in time to be trapped there by the storm?

ANSWER: Yes, because “he had unthinkingly drawn her into his arms” (Chopin 3) and he “expressed an intention to remain outside” (Chopin 2) which means that he had no intention of being there at that time.

Posted by: John Crane at September 17, 2014 12:42 AM

Mickael Dodard
Dr.Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
15 September 2014


Question # 3
Does Bobinot love his spouse? Be sure to state your definition of “love” before you answer. Why, or why not? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text.

Answer:
My definition of love is when two individuals share feeling for each other take care of each other. I think that Bobibot loves his wife because he always wanted her to love him and forgive him when he does a mistake. “Bobinot’s explanations and apologies which he has been composing all long way, died on his lips as Calixta felt him to see if he were dry to express nothing but satisfaction at their safe return.” This quote means that the couple had conflicts; it also show that despite all of their conflicts they still love each other and care about each other.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at September 17, 2014 09:57 AM

Justine Gonzalez
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
16 September 2014

Question #9:
Review the SLU Core Values. Do Calixta and Alcee either exhibit or lack any of the core values? Explain which ones, in particular, and why. Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer:
In the story Calixta and Alcee, both lack Saint Leo Core Values. They lack values like respect, community, and integrity. The reason that Calixta lacks respect is because she had no respect for her husband. She is a married women kissing and sleeping with another man is against their values and promises towards her husband. She has no respect for her marriage. “With one hand she clasped his head, her lips lightly touching his forehead. The other hand stroked with a soothing rhythm his muscular shoulders” Chopin 4). As respect for her husband and her marriage, she could have stopped what was happening, but she did not and continues her actions. Alcee lacks community because as a community people are supposed to respect each other and act as one and touching and kissing another mans wife is not an act of being part of a community. “When he touched her breasts abundance of her passion, without guile or trickery, was like a white flame which penetrated and found response in depths of his own sensuous nature that had never yet been reached” (Chopin 4). Calixta lacks integrity. Integrity means being honest and having strong moral principles. When cheating on her husband she showed that she had no morals and not telling her husband is not being honest with him or herself. Calixta and Alcee lacked other core values like personal development and responsible stewardship, not being honest with the things they did was wrong.

Posted by: Justine Gonzalez at September 17, 2014 12:00 PM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
17 September 2014

Question #21:
What seems to be the reason that writer Kate Chopin show any repercussions in the story?

Answer:
There is repercussions in the story because Claixta and Alcee use to be a thing back then and they never worked out. They got married to 2 different people and ever since they didn’t work out, they didn’t see each other since.(Chopin 1) The story explains the rights and wrongs toward the sexual passion.they meet back up at the end of the story and cheat on who they were both with. It is kind of irony because everyone did wrong things to each other but everyone ended up happy.
“She had not seen him very often since her marriage, and never alone.”
“She had clasped Bibi and was kissing him effusively. Bobinôt's explanations and apologies which he had been composing all along the way, died on his lips as Calixta felt him to see if he were dry, and seemed to express nothing but satisfaction at their safe return.”
“Alcée Laballière wrote to his wife, Clarisse, that night. It was a loving letter, full of tender solicitude. He told her not to hurry back, but if she and the babies liked it at Biloxi, to stay a month longer.”

Posted by: Zachary Gary at September 17, 2014 12:38 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 16, 2014
The Storm
By: Kate Chopin

Question 12:
How important is the setting of “The Storm” to the narrative? For example, if the setting had been different (a beautiful, sunny day in modern-day New York City, for example), would the story have been different? Does the setting reinforce the plot, in some way? Make your case for the case for the significance of the setting to “The Storm” and support your case/theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).
Answer:
The setting is very important the short story “The Storm.” In this case the setting is what makes the story makes sense. The story is taking place in what seems like a small town or village where there is plenty on nature. It is stormy and is what causes all the events to happen. The storm keeps the husband and son from returning home and the wife inviting an old flame into her home during the storm. If the storm had not occurred all the events would have been different. The following happens after Calixta allows Alcee into her home. “My! What a rain! It’s good two years sence it rain’ like that,” exclaimed Calixta as she rolled up a piece of bagging and Alcee helped her to thrust it beneath the crack (Chopin, 2). As the storm grew heavier and closer to the home it led to Calixta and Alcee lip locking. After her husband returns home she is happy, although, it is not what the husband expects and Alcee writes a letter to his wife. So the storm passed and everyone was happy” (Chopin, 5).

Posted by: Stephanie at September 17, 2014 12:52 PM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing CA07
17 September 2014

Question
Do Alcee or Calixta love each other? Be sure to state your definition of "love" before you answer. why, or why not? support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text.

Answer
Yes, in a sense it can be seen as love but in actuality i think its infatuation. because the passage never spoke of intimate moments where love would be involved, yet it spoke of an "old-time infatuation" when he held her.
as seen on page 2 lines 14 - 15 "The contact of her warm, palpitating body when he had unthinkingly drawn her into
his arms, had aroused all the old-time infatuation and desire for her flesh." this clearly states that he, maybe even both of them were infatuated with each other.

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at September 17, 2014 01:02 PM

Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
16 September 2014

Question #6:
What, if anything, might be the long-term repercussions of Alcee and Calixta’s encounter? Explain.

Answer:
There will be no long-term repercussions of Alcee and Calixta’s encounter. They chose for it to a onetime thing and for no one else to know about their sexual encounter. That night after the storm, Calixta did not any different around her family either. As we can tell from the quote in the story, “Bobinot and Bibi began to relax and enjoy themselves, and when the three seated themselves at the table they laughed much and so loud that anyone might have heard them.” (Chopin 4). The story ended by saying, “So the storm passed and everyone was happy.” (Chopin 5). As we can tell there will be no repercussions based on Alcee and Calixta’s actions.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at September 17, 2014 01:18 PM

Gianna Anderson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English Academic Writing II CA07
17 September 2014

Question
Point out in Kate Chopin’s narrative “The Storm” where that emphasizes Bonitos love for his spouse. Support your answer with quoted passages from the text (not optional)


Answer:
In my opinion the story didn’t really emphasize Bonitos love for Calixta but there are moments that shows his effort to make her happy, for example he went to the store in a storm to get a can of shrimps. Also on the way back he cleaned Bibi and himself just so Calixta wouldn’t be worried that they were caught in the storm and could’ve possibly been hurt.
As seen on page 5 lines 6 – 7, "I brought you some shrimps, Calixta," offered Bobinôt, hauling the can from his ample side pocket and laying it on the table.
And on page 4 lines 17 – 19, Bobinôt and Bibi, trudging home, stopped without at the cistern to make themselves presentable. "My! Bibi, w'at will yo' mama say! You ought to be ashame'.

Posted by: Gianna Anderson at September 17, 2014 01:42 PM

Trejon Baynham, Elizabeth Brown
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
17 September 2014

Question #21:
Calixta is married; why does she do what she does with Alcée? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer:
Calixta and Alcée had an attraction at one point in their lives. Alcée takes advantage of the situation and distracts Calixta with smooth lines and soft embraces. She is reminded of old feelings and lust, she cannot help herself, and she succumbs to his temptation. “Alcée clasped her shoulders and looked into her face. The contact of her warm, palpitating body when he had unthinkingly drawn her into his arms had aroused all the old-time infatuation and desire for her flesh.” (Chopin pg. 3)

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown, Trejon Baynham at September 17, 2014 02:11 PM

Danielle Kluender, Gianna Anderson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
17 September 2014

Question # 17:
What might have been the purpose of including sex in Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm.” Be sure to consider all sections, not just section II. Support your theory.

Answer:
At first Alcee was just trying to comfort Calixta by saying “Calixta, don’t be frightened.” (Chopin 1). The purpose in including the sex in the story is because it made Calixta feel appreciated and it brought back old memories. They used to have a previous romance so they both were caught up in the moment and took the chance that they had. In the end, no harm was done by it because neither Calixta’s husband nor Alcee’s wife knew that this has happened, and in the end, they were all happy.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender, Gianna Anderson at September 17, 2014 02:12 PM

Trejon Baynham
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 07
16 September 2014

QUESTION:
How significant is the title of “The Storm”? For example, if the title had been different (“The Affair, “or “The Cajuns,” for example), would it have been just as effective? Is there a double-entendre to the title? Is it symbolic, humorous, or ironic, in some way? Make your case for the importance of the title to “The Storm” and support your case/theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

ANSWER:
The title of the narrative is significant given that its denotation and connotation are both preyed upon throughout the text. Had it been any other title, the narrative would not have been as effective. Firstly, the title familiarizes the reader with the setting of the story, which is a raging storm. Secondly, it is a representation of the inner turmoil present within Alcee and Calixta. When lightning struck near the window that Alcee and Calixta were peering through, “The contact of her warm, palpitating body when he had unthinkingly drawn her into
his arms had aroused all the old-time infatuation and desire for her flesh.” (Chopin 3) Due to this, he revitalizes in her the memory of what happened between them in Assumption. In this sense, the storm is symbolic of lust and the overpowering feelings that are involved with it. In contrast to the values often associated with matrimony and monogamous relationships, Calixta and Alcee “did not heed the crashing torrents, and the roar of the elements made her laugh
as she lay in his arms.” (Chopin 3)

Posted by: Trejon Baynham at September 17, 2014 02:12 PM

Mickael Dodard & John Crane
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
17 September 2014

Question #23
Why is Clarisse happy at the end of the story? Explain. Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional)

Answer:
Clarisse is happy because Alcée wrote her a letter saying that she can stay longer. “The first free breath since her marriage seemed to restore the pleasant liberty of her maiden days.” (Chopin 5). This quote demonstrates that she is cheating on her husband and she was happy about that.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at September 17, 2014 02:21 PM

Zach Gary, Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA07
17 September 2014


QUESTION #24:
How is it that everyone can be happy at the end of the story?

ANSWER:
They can all be happy at the end of the story because no one knowingly had a reason to be sad. “Alcee Laballiere wrote to his wife, Clarisse, that night. It was a loving letter…” (Chopin 5). Alcee cheated on his wife that same day, and did not regret it, but she thought everything was perfect and fine after reading the letter. She had no idea that he was doing that. Calixta was in a similar situation. She cheated on her husband with Alcee, and he had no idea. “The storm passed and everyone was happy” (Chopin 4). All of the bad was over that occurred during the storm, and everyone was happy even though the whole truth was not being revealed.

Posted by: Samantha Witte, Zach Gary at September 17, 2014 04:43 PM

Rashard Knowles & Stephanie
Dr. B Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic writing CA07
20 September 2014

Question
Revisit and consider the relationship between Calixta and Alcée. Does Chopin prepare her readers
for the adultery that occurs, or is it a surprise? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages
from the text (not optional).

No, because as I read the passage, it seemed as if Alcee simply needed a place to stay before the storm came down harder on him. Although, as I re-read it, I then realized that obviously in a sense there was some kind of plot by Calixta to get her husband and child out of the house so that she could have time with Alcee. Obviously being alone with someone in circumstances such as the “light rain beating on the roof,” Alcee placed his arms around her comfortably reminiscing of old times.

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at September 20, 2014 03:08 PM

Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
28 September 2014

Question #20
Revisit and consider the relationship between Calixta and Alcée. Remember that this was written in 1898. Is the affair itself shocking, or is it only Chopin's explicit description that creates discomfort in the readers? Or is it something else?

Answer
The relationship between Calixta and Alcee is nothing but a love affair. The fact that they are having an affair is a little bit shocking, but the disturbing part is that Alcee still acts like he loves his wife. On page three, Chopin states that the two have met more than once. Calixta and Alcee talk about “Asuumption”, and how, “he kissed her and kissed her and kissed her; until her senses would well nigh fail…”(Chopin 3). In the end of the story, it is stated how Alcee, “wrote a letter to his wife, Clarisse that night. It was a loving letter, full of tender solicitude.”(Chopin 5). Alcee still loves his wife because of this letter, but it is peculiar that he told his wife “not to hurry back” in the letter.

Posted by: Allison Ward at September 28, 2014 03:12 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
29 September 2014


Question #20:
Revisit and consider the relationship between Calixta and Alcee. Remember that this was written in 1898. Is the affair itself shocking, or is it only Chopin’s explicit description that creates discomfort in the readers? Or is it something else? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).


Answer:
The affair that is portrayed between Calixta and Alcee in Kate Chopin’s “The Strom” is shocking a little shocking. Chopin alludes to the two having been intimate together some time ago. “The contact of her warm, palpitating body when he had unthinkingly drawn her into his arms, had aroused all the old-time infatuation and desire for her flesh” (Chopin 3). Since they have obviously married different people, they should not still feel this strongly about one another.


The intensity and explicit content in which Chopin describes affair is disconcerting to the reader. Alcee and Calixta are both married with children and claim to love their spouses dearly, but they interact with each as if they had just fallen in love. “Her lips seemed in a manner free to be tasted, as well as her round, white throat and her whiter breasts” (3). No married man or woman should ever explore another’s body, but that of their spouse, in such a way.


The exchange between Calixta and Alcee causes some discomfort in the reader because of the overly sexualized content between them, and in the way Calixta acts towards her husband and son when they get home. She acts genuinely concerned for their wellbeing when not even moments before they arrive home she is practically in bed with Alcee. Calixta can look them both in the eyes and express concern for them, but also has half a mind to lie with another man whenever the moment presents itself.

Posted by: Emily Finck at September 28, 2014 04:07 PM

Shelby Rexroth
September 28th, 2014
ENG210

19) Revisit and consider the relationships between Calixta and Alcee. Does Chopin prepare her readers for the adultery that occurs, or is it a surprise? Support your theory (answers) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

The adultery that happens between Calixta and Alcee prepares us in a way in the story. It talks about the connection between them, and then it explains a certain setting and then it goes into detail about them kissing. Their first sexual encounter is described in the following paragraph “"Calixta," he said, "don't be frightened. Nothing can happen. The house is too low to be struck, with so many tall trees standing about. There! aren't you going to be quiet? say, aren't you?" He pushed her hair back from her face that was warm and steaming. Her lips were as red and moist as pomegranate seed. Her white neck and a glimpse of her full, firm bosom disturbed him powerfully. As she glanced up at him the fear in her liquid blue eyes had given place to a drowsy gleam that unconsciously betrayed a sensuous desire. He looked down into her eyes and there was nothing for him to do but to gather her lips in a kiss.”

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at September 28, 2014 09:31 PM

Zailet Martinez

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG210CL- Love and Desire in Literature CA02

29 September 2014

Question #27:

Revisit and consider the central idea and/or theme/s of Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm.” How might this be a story about sexual attractiveness? Explain. Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer:

The Storm can be a story about sexual attractiveness because it concentrates in the desire of Calixta towards Alcee. Even though, there was a storm coming, Calixta was very calm and warm. She seemed very friendly with Alcee, even though she had not seen him alone for quite a while. It is obvious they had a past together before they both got married. When Alcee decided to take shelter in Calixta’s gallery, he began to notice how much Calixta had changed over the year. “She was a little fuller of figure than five years before when she married,” thought Alcee as they were contemplating the rain (Chopin, 2). It seems that Calixta wanted Alcee as she gave in to him when she ”staggered backward. Alcée's arm encircled her, and for an instant he drew her close and spasmodically to him” (Chopin 3). After the embrace they shared, Alcee desired Calixta as well.

They were sexually attracted to each other and during the storm they gave in to carnal pleasure not caring about their spouses. They spoke about all times together and enjoyed the feeling of eachother’s bodies. ‘The Storm’ not only represents the weather outside but the desire Alcee and Calixta have for each other. Their moment builds up slowly remembering old experiences, and it builds up little by little with the touching, the kissing, and finally the sex that leads to the climax of their storm. After the storms have passed, everyone went their separate way, and everything went back to normal. “So the storm passed and everyone was happy” (Chopin, 5).

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at September 28, 2014 10:53 PM

Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
28 September 2014

Question #21:
Calixta is married; why does she do what she does with Alcee? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer:
Even though Calixta is married, she ends up making love to Alcee because she presumably still has feelings for him since their previous fling. When he first enters her home, she is already excited to see him and cannot contain herself. However, it is clear between the both of them that the love they had previously for one another still exist. They were always very intimate but never sexual with each other; both persons had desires to feel each other. Alcee respected Calixta enough to not have sex with her and honor her virtuous, “[…] to save her he would resort to a desperate flight. If she was not an immaculate dove in those days, she was still inviolate; a passionate creature whose very defenselessness had made her defense, against which his honor forbade him to prevail.” Therefore, when they finally come together, the encounter seems to be very satisfying (and long over-due) to both Calixta and Alcee.

Posted by: irma sera at September 29, 2014 12:35 AM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 September 2014

Question #17: What might have been the purpose of including sex in Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm”? Is it possible that the two adulterers feel any sense of remorse for their actions? Why, or why not?

Answer:
The purpose behind incorporating sex in Chopin’s “The Storm” was to make it a simile. As we all know from nature’s course, storms don’t last forever which goes to say the same as the affair that occurred in the story. As the Sun comes out you realize how wonderful the weather can really be using the weather as an simile to a spouse’s relationship. So Calixta and Alcee are married, and they just happened to be old lovers. As the two get reacquainted during the storm, we come to realize that they are both married. So this affair is similar to a storm, blocking out the Sun. After the affair is over both parties realize how much they care for their spouses, which is like the good weather coming back.

The two adulterers don’t feel any remorse in my opinion. They were both good sports about leaving each other, “The rain was over, and the sun was turning the glistening green world into a palace of gems. Calixta, on the gallery, watched Alcee ride away. He turned and smiled at her with a beaming face; and she lifted her pretty chin in the air and laughed aloud”(Chopin 4). Also, both were ecstatic about their spouses’ once the storm ended. You can see Calixta’s exuberance on page 5, “Oh, Bobinot! You back! My! But I was uneasy”. Also, you can see her enthusiasm after Bobinot brought her the shrimp, she then says, ““Shrimps! Oh Bobinot! You too good fo’ anything!” and she gave him a smacking kiss on the cheek that resounded, “J’vous responds, we’ll have a feas’ to-night! Umph-umph!”’(Chopin 5). Then Alcee wrote to his wife Clarisse that night. He missed his wife and children but after he realized that their health and pleasure was to be the first thing to consider, he decided not to rush them back. Even the last sentence of the story back up why there is no remorse for their actions, “So the storm passed, and every one was happy”(Chopin 5).

Posted by: Thomas Watson at September 29, 2014 01:13 AM

Anthony Colello
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
29 September 2014

Question:
What does the can of shrimp symbolize in Chopin's, "The Storm?" Why?

Answer:
In this short story, Bobinot purchases a can of shrimp for his wife while he is at the store with his young son Bibi. Calixta, Bobinot's wife, is at home sewing and performing various housewife chores. Bobinot, "purchased a can of shrimps, of which Calixta was very fond" (Chopin,1). Such a purchase shows the reader a conscious effort from Bobinot to please his wife. The fact that he knows what she likes shows that he cares enough about her to invest in their relationship.
In a macro evaluation of the shrimps meaning, one may infer that the shrimp represent Bobinot.
Chopin describes Bobinot's as, "Bobinôt was the embodiment of serious solicitude" (4). Bobinot seems to be a good father and a caring husband, and like the shrimp he makes his family happy. However, he is unable to fulfill all of Calixta's needs just as the shrimp cannot fulfill all of a person's needs.

Posted by: Anthony Colello at September 29, 2014 10:08 AM

Gabriela Navarro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
29 Sep 2014

QUESTION #24:
How is it that everyone can be happy at the end of the story?

ANSWER:
The Story ends with "So the storm passed and every one was happy" (Chopin 5) and this concluded that it did not matter how bad things got, because at the end everyone ends up "happy," because everything ended up being okay. I believe its stating that everything falls into place at the end and regardless of whether the affair actually ends between Calixta and Alcée or not, or whether Clarisse and Bobinôt ever find out about it, everyone is happy.

Posted by: Gabriela Navarro at September 29, 2014 01:18 PM

Ahmed Almoailu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210Cl
9/29/14

Question 22:
Alcee is married; why does he do what he does with Calixte? support your theory with quoted passages from the text.

Answer:
Alcee and Calixte were in romantic relation ship six years ago. and also the following year after that they were still likes each other.
I think Alcee did what he did with Calixte because they were not over each other yet. So when she backed up to Alicee arms, they both remembered how they were feeling with each other. "had aroused all the old-time infatuation and desire for her flesh."

Posted by: Ahmed Almoailu at September 29, 2014 01:40 PM

Rebecca Messano
ENG 201 Love and Desire In Literature
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
September 29, 2014

Question 23: Why is Clarisse happy at the end of the story? Explain. Support your theory with quoted passaged from the text.

Answer:
In the story, The Storm, Clarisse is a married woman whose husband, Alcee Laballiere, is away from home. Together they had two children whom he missed very much. At the end of the story, Alcee wrote a letter to his wife. The letter he wrote to them was sympathetic and loving. He put his family’s health and pleasure first by saying that telling them “not to hurry back, but if she and the babies liked it an Biloxi, to stay a month longer.” (pg. 5) He was willing to “bear the separation a while longer.”
The letter that her husband sent saying all of these nice things made her extremely happy because everything in her life was going so well from where she was. She had her friends there, everyone who lived there “was agreeable” (pg. 5) and it all reminded her of before she was married when she was free.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano at September 29, 2014 01:41 PM

Sharonda S Byrd
B. LEE HOBBS
ENG 210CL
28 September 2014
The Storm
Question: In the short story, “The Storm”, what does the author’s attitude toward the adultery seem to be? Explain. Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).
Answer: The author’s attitude toward the adultery seems to be very relaxed because even though Calixta and Alcée did in fact cheat on their spouses they carry on with their day to day life. Her son, Bibi tells his father that "Mama'll be 'fraid, yes, he suggested with blinking eyes “, but even though she is a afraid of storms Alcée seems to keep her relaxed even though its lightning outside and her child and husband is out there. The author in this story does not see adultery as a bad thing because neither Calixta nor Alcée seem distraught by what just took place. Calixta greets her child and husband and kisses and ask them where they have been and exclaims she was uneasy about their whereabouts. If that’s the case then why during the rainstorm she was kissing another man? Calixta was obviously not that worried about them also Alcée wrote a letter to his wife telling her and the kids to stay on vacation longer, he obviously wants to spend more quality time with Calixta.

Posted by: sharonda byrd at September 29, 2014 01:45 PM

Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
29 September 2014

Question #30:
Identify as many of the conflicts in Kate Choppin’s short story “The Storm,” as you can, both external conflicts and internal conflicts. After you have done that, make a case for which of the existent conflicts (list them out) is the chief conflict of the narrative?

Answer:
In the short story “The Storm,” there are a few different conflicts being displayed. First, and the most obvious conflict, is the fact that there is a great storm passing through. Bobinôt is not at home and cannot take care of his wife Calixta. “Calixta, at home, felt no uneasiness for their safety” (Choppin 1). She is all alone and is scared of the storm that is going on. Another conflict then soon occurs. Alcee showed up to Calixta’s house and was a pass lover of hers. They both are married as well. They then start flirting with each other, then suddenly become attracted to one another again, and end up having sex. This is the main conflict that happens in this short story. “The rain beat softly upon the shingles, inviting them to drowsiness and sleep. But they dared not yield” (Choppin 4). The both just cheated on their spouses, and this is the climatic conflict of the story. After the storm passed, Calixta goes and sees her husband and Alcee writes to his wife. In the end, neither of the spouses knows what Calixta and Alcee did. “So the storm passed and every one was happy” (Choppin 5).

Posted by: Matthew Weller at September 29, 2014 02:13 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 1, 2014 10:10 AM

Rebecca Messano/Sharonda Byrd
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature
October 6, 2014

Question #28:
Revisit and consider the central idea and/or theme/s of Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm.” How might this be a story about finding out who you are? How so? Support your theory with quoted passages from the text.

Answer:
There is a first part to this story, that we assume she is happily married and in love with her husband and her choice to marry him. Unfortunately, it did not stay that way. This story tells a lot about who a person is. For example, it tells you if you are faithful, or have self-control. Self-control stood out a lot to me because the storm in the story represented sex. At the end of the story it says, “So the storm passed and every one was happy.” I think this is saying that once she finally made the decision she wanted to make, she was really and truly happy.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano and Sharonda Byrn at October 6, 2014 02:57 PM

Brianna Broughton & Matt Weller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL - LOVE AND DESIRE IN LITERATURE
Group Activity

The Storm

Question 15: Point out places in Kate Chopin's narrative "The Storm" that emphasize Bobinôt love for his spouse. Support your answer with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: Bobinôt is married to Calixta. He shows love for his spouse by buying her shrimp because he knows how much she enjoys them. "I brought you some shrimps, Calixta," offered Bobinôt, hauling the can from his ample side pocket and laying it on the table.” (Page 5).
Bobinôt also shows love to his spouse by taking splendid care of their child, Bibi. He was “accustomed to converse on terms of perfect equality with his little son” (page 1), this shows his respect for the child.

Posted by: Brianna Broughton at October 6, 2014 03:01 PM

Martin Terrasi, Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210 CL02
6 October 2014
Question: What might have been the purpose of including sex in Kate Chopin’s “The Storm”? Is it possible that the two adulterers feel any remorse for their actions? Why, or why not? Support your theory with quoted passages from the text.
Answer: The idea of telling the audience about the sexual affair is to give a more personal feeling and insight and to shed light into what’s happening in the at the time. Neither of them feels guilty about the situation. They were both willing and enjoyed themselves. “The generous abundance of her passion, without guile or trickery, was like a white flame which penetrated and found response in depths of his own sensuous nature that had never yet been reached.” (Chopin 4)

Posted by: Martin Terrasi Emily Finck at October 6, 2014 03:10 PM

Ashjan Alrashid, Thomas Watson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 October 2014

The fault of the affair lies with the most at Alcée. He was the one who "got up and joined her at the window”(Chopin 3). Since he came to her first and stood behind her while she’s looking out the window he even "clasped her shoulders and looked into her face.”(3) So he is the who started it, and that makes him the most at fault. He was also taking advantage of her vulnerability and fears into his advantage.

Posted by: ashjan alrashid at October 6, 2014 03:13 PM

Allison Ward/Gabriela Navarro
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 6, 2014

Question #27
Revisit and consider the central idea and/or theme/s of Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm.” How might this be a story about sexual attractiveness? Explain.

Answer
The central theme of the story is sex, and how it is, “ force as strong, inevitable, and natural as the Louisiana storm which ignites it.” Storm is a symbol of sexuality in the story, so the situation of the storm and the location could have brought out sexual attractiveness

Posted by: Allison Ward/Gabriela Navarro at October 6, 2014 03:46 PM

Shelby Rexroth & Irma Sera
October 6th, 2014
ENG210 CA02

25) In the short story, “The Storm,” what does the author’s attitude towards the adultery seem to be? Explain. Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text. (Not optional)

From reading the story the author’s attitude doesn’t seem to be affected by the act of adultery. “So the storm passed and every one was happy” this showed that it wasn’t a big deal, and it was just two people rekindling their love from a past relationship. “Oh, Bobinot! You back! My! But I was uneasy. W’ere you been during the rain? An’ Bibi? He ain’t wet? He ain’t hurt? She had clasped Bibi and was kissing him effusively.” This quote shows that she wasn’t bothered emotionally or felt guilty about what happened. By the author making it seem like it wasn’t a big deal, it shows that the author didn’t feel shameful about what happened.

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at October 6, 2014 08:12 PM

Brianna Broughton
Dr. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
11 October 2014
The Storm
Question 29: Revisit and consider the central idea and/or theme/s of Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm.” How might this be a story about finding out who you are? How so? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).
Answer: The short story by Kate Chopin, The Storm, can be viewed as being about finding who you are because one of the main characters, Calixta, makes a decision that she might not have normally done. Calixta had the life she always wanted with her husband Bobinoit, and her child Bibi. However, her longtime friend Alcee and herself had an intimate exchange. “She was a revelation in that dim, mysterious chamber;” (page 3). Calixta realized that although what she was doing was wrong it felt very right for her to have this passionate and intimate moment with Alcee.

Posted by: Brianna Broughton at October 11, 2014 02:23 PM

Aderias N Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
Question 2: Does Calixta love her Spouse? Be sure to state your definition of “love” before you answer. Why, or why not?
Love is an emotion of a strong attraction and personal attachment. It can also be a virtue representing human kindness, compassion, and affection. No, I feel that they had a lost romance in the midst of a storm; this story tells the sexual standards and restraints of the late nineteenth century. I think she is with her former lover because she has to be but is still in love with her ex-boyfriend. On page 3 and "Do you remember in Assumption, Calixta?" he asked in a low voice broken by passion. Oh! She remembered; for in Assumption he had kissed her, kissed, and kissed her; until his senses would well-nigh fail, and to save her he would resort to a desperate flight. In addition, she had clasped Bibi and was kissing him effusively. Bobinôt's explanations and apologies, which he had been composing all along the way.

Posted by: aderias ewing at February 3, 2015 02:36 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 February 2015

Question: What, if anything, might be the long-term repercussions of Alcée and Calixta's encounter? Explain. Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional)

Answer: Alcée wrote to his wife and told her and their children to enjoy the trip they were on and if they enjoyed themselves to stay longer. "He told her not to hurry back, but if she and the babies liked it at
Biloxi, to stay a month longer." (Chopin 5) This conversation allows the reader to draw the conclusion that there will be more encounters. This assumption is confirmed when readers hear that his wife also is enjoying her freedom from him and is willing to stay away as well. "And the first free breath since her marriage seemed to restore the pleasant liberty of her maiden days. Devoted as she was to her husband, their intimate conjugal life was something which she was more than willing to forego for
a while." (Chopin 5) The reader could also make the assumption that the wife may be having an affair as well because she is enjoying the liberty of her maiden days. If Alcée and Calixta continue to have a sexual relationship, they have the potential of getting pregnant, or being discovered by their spouses which can lead to the ending of both their marriages.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 4, 2015 12:14 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
4 February 2015

“The Storm”
Question #5: Is there any reason to believe that Clarisse ever suspects anything? Why or why not?

I do not think Clarisse suspects anything because she was relieved to hear from her husband. For her, it was “the first breath since her marriage seemed to restore the liberty of her maiden days.” (Chopin page 5 section V) She seemed to be satisfied with the letter stating what he was going to do for the next month.

Posted by: Selena Hammie at February 4, 2015 02:41 PM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
CA12
5 February 2015

Question: Is there any reason to believe that Bobinôt ever suspects anything? Why, or why not?
Answer: There is no reason to believe that Bobinôt ever suspected anything because his wife acted as if nothing had happened while her husband and son were away during the storm. "Shrimps! Oh, Bobinôt! you too good fo' anything!" and she gave him a smacking kiss on the cheek that resounded, "J'vous réponds, we'll have a feas' to-night! umph-umph!" (Pg. 5)

Posted by: Rachel Addington at February 5, 2015 02:31 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 February 15

The Storm Discussion Question

Question: Why is Clarisse happy at the end of the story?

Answer: Clarisse is happy at the end of the story because she is on vacation and finally had “a first free breath since her marriage” (Chopin 5). Her husband wrote her a letter and told her that her children were doing well and that her “health and pleasure” (Chopin 5) were the most important thing in his mind. Clarisse is ecstatic to know that she can stay on her getaway for a month longer, and finally be free from her everyday life for a little while.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 5, 2015 05:31 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
5 February 2015

Question 12: How important is the setting of "The Storm" to the narrative? For example, if the setting had been different (a beautiful, sunny day in modern-day New York City, for example), would the story have been different? Does the setting reinforce the plot, in some way? Make your case for the significance of the setting to "The Storm" and support your case/theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: The setting of "The Storm" is essential to the narrative. It expresses the emotions of Calixta. While her husband and son are away at the store, she awaits for Alcée, the man she has her affair. The storm brings heavy perspiration and with it Calixta gets nervous, feeling "very warm and often stopped to mop her face on which the perspiration gathered in beads." (Chopin 1) The line, "The rain beat upon the low, shingled roof with a force and clatter that threatened to break an entrance and deluge them there" (Chopin 2) shows the emotion that Calixta feels when the two of them are being intimate. If the story never included a dark and rolling thunderstorm, there would not have been clues as to how Calixta feels when she is with Alcée. If the storm had been a light drizzle, it would have changed the passion presented in the story. Being with Alcée brings her "crashing torrents and the roar of the elements made her laugh as she lay in his arms." (Chopin 3)

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 5, 2015 09:22 PM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing CA12
5 February 2015

Question: Calixta is married; why does she do what she does with Alcee? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: During the massive storm, Calixta’s husband and son were out, and she was left in her house all alone. Both of them were worried about each other and hoped that each other were safe. Meanwhile, Alcee came galloping in on his horse and asked Calixta if he could keep safe while the storm passed over, and she told him yes. I believe that since she felt alone, and Alcee was there to comfort her is the reason she does what she does with Alcee. “’If I only knew w’ere Bibi was!’ She would not compose herself; she would not be seated. Alcee clasped her shoulders and looked into her face” (Poe 3). Also in the past it is said that they had a little fling together as well, so the flashback could have made her feel like it was that moment again. “…Oh! She remembered; for in Assumption he had kissed her and kissed and kissed her…” (Poe 3).

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at February 6, 2015 10:21 AM

Diego Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 February 2015

Discussion Question

Question: Review the SLU Core Values. Do Calixta and Alcée either exhibit or lack any of the core values? Explain which ones, in particular, and why. Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: Calixta and Alcee lack the core values of integrity and respect. They are both married with children, but they decide to cheat on their spouses during a storm. In the text, it vividly shows how they made love during the storm. For example, “When he touched her breasts they gave themselves up in quivering ecstasy, inviting his lips. Her mouth was a fountain of delight. And when he possessed her, they seemed to swoon together at the very borderland of life's mystery.” (Chopin 4).

Posted by: Diego Garcia at February 6, 2015 11:41 AM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 February 2015

Question: Does Bobinot love his wife? Why or why not? Explain what love is.

Answer: Love is a strong and intense feeling of deep affection from one partner to another. It’s an equal amount of romantic emotion shared between two people. In the story, Bobinot seemed to be more afraid of his wife than having any romantic emotions toward her. For example when Bobinot buys his wife his shrimp to please her after he returns, once he realizes she’ll be alone in the storm. “Bobinot arose and going across to the counter purchased a can of shrimps, of which Calixta was very fond. Then he returned to his perch on the keg and sat stolidly holding the can of shrimps while the storm burst.” (Chopin 1) In addition, when their son Bibi gets mud on his clothes Bobinot is only concerned with what Calixta would say if she had seen Bibi, so he tries to hurry and get him cleaned up. "My! Bibi, w'at will yo' mama say!” (Chopin 4) Overall, Bobinot did care for his wife but they did not share an equal amount affection towards each other. Bobinot felt this way because in the story Calixta seems emotionally distant from her husband and son. “Calixta, at home, felt no uneasiness for their safety. She sat at a side window sewing furiously on a sewing machine. She was greatly occupied and did not notice the approaching storm. But she felt very warm and often stopped to mop her face on which the perspiration gathered in beads.” (Chopin 1)

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at February 7, 2015 03:18 AM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
7 February 2015

The Storm

Question #13: How significant is the title of “The Storm”? For example, if the title had been different (“The Affair,” or “The Cajuns,” for example), would it have been just as effective? Is there a double-entendre to the title? Is it symbolic, humorous, or ironic, in some way? Make your case for the importance of the title to “The Storm” and support your case/theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: Kate Chopin’s “The Storm” has a very significant, double-entendre to the title. The story beings by Bobinot pointing out the storm to Bibi, “called the child’s attention to certain somber clouds that were rolling with sinister intention from the West, accompanied by a sullen, threatening roar” (Chopin 1). The following section explains how oblivious Calixta is to the storm. When she finally realized the storm was coming, she closed the windows and doors and gathered the clothes from outside. While outside, Alcee asked for permission come inside to stay dry. Calixta soon became nervous with Alcee around and worried about the storm. He comforted her, “Alcee’s arms encircled her, and for an instant drew her close” (Chopin 3). That moment of intimacy leads to a kiss, old memories, and a brief affair. The storm was over, and Alcee left. Chopin deliberately gave the story a title with a double-entendre; the actual storm and the affair. If the title were anything different, “The Affair” or “The Cajuns”, the story would not be as meaningful.

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at February 8, 2015 12:24 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 February 2015

Question 10: We know that, sometimes, parts of the setting behave, in some ways, as if they are characters. In Kate Chopin’s short story, “The Storm,” how does the storm itself function as a character? Think of static characters and dynamic characters, to get you started. Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: The storm let those it affected embrace their desires. The storm passed and every one was happy (Chopin 5).

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 8, 2015 05:28 PM

Emma Riemer
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
8 February 2015

The storm

Question 17: What might have been the purpose of including sex in Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm”? Is it possible that the two adulterers feel any sense of remorse for their actions? Why, or why not?

Answer:
Given that the story was written during a time when sex was not openly talked about, The purpose for including sex in the story was to show that it was something that was happening even when it was not being talked about. The two adulterers do not feel any sense of remorse, Alcee just leaves like it was nothing happened and Calixata starts preparing dinner. “Calixta, on the gallery, watched Alcee ride away. He turned and smiled at her with a beaming face; and she lifted her pretty chin in the air and laughed aloud” (Chopin 4). They were happy about what had happened. Alcee had also written his wife telling her to stay away longer and, “Alcee Laballiere wrote to his wife, Clarisse, that night…he told her not to hurry back, but if she and the babies liked it at Biloxi, to stay a month longer. He was getting on nicely…” (Chopin 5). This could be evidence that Alcee would cheat again. It could also be evidence that he has been cheating the entire time his wife has been away. The author writes, “So the storm passed and everyone was happy” (Chopin 5). Everyone went on with their lives, the adulterers did not care.

Posted by: Emma Riemer at February 8, 2015 11:04 PM

Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
7 February 2015

Question 15: Point out places in Kate Chopin's narrative "The Storm" that emphasize Bobinôt love for his spouse.

Answer: After the storm Bobinôt and Bibi get home, he makes sure both of them are extensively cleaned off before entering the house. The text says that “He scraped the mud off Bibi's bare legs and feet with a stick and carefully removed all traces from his heavy brogans” and cautiously entered the house hoping his “over-scrupulous housewife” would not be too mad about the mud (Chopin 4). His extreme precaution indicates that he cares about his wife’s opinions and thoughts, he loves her and wants to please her. He offers her shrimp, a token of his affection just to please her and when they sit down to eat “they laughed much and so loud,” he really enjoys her company (Chopin 5).

Posted by: Victoria Markou at February 9, 2015 12:09 AM

Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing CA 12
6 February 2015

Question 8:
Is it simply a coincidence that Alcee arrives at calixtas just in time to be trapped there by the storm?
Answer:
Yes, Alcee arrives a coincidence as soon as the storm begins. I feel as though it was planned, because how did he just so happen to end up at her house before the storm. As soon as the storm did begin, he automatically felt as though this was his chance to spark the history he had with Calixta. The storm is what brings them both together and allows them to have a love affair.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 9, 2015 12:43 AM

Alison Colon
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CAO2
7 February 2015

11. Imagine you are a judge in a case that determines fault in the affair of Alcée and Calixta. Decide which character the fault of the affair lies with THE MOST. In other words, which of the two characters is the guiltiest of allowing it happen? Support your case/theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Based on the information provided in the text I would favor against Calixta. I feel that Calixta is to blame for allowing the affair to happen. When she allowed him in the house she knew what the chances were that she would have an affair with Alcee being that they already seemed to have a past together. Regardless of if she was allowing him to stay in the house because she did not want anything bad to happen to him during the storm she could have refrained from allowing him to hold her while she cried drawing “her close and spasmodically to him “ (Chopin 3) . She could have kept her distance while they were watching the storm. Calixta also encouraged this affair when she allowed him into her bedroom (Chopin 3 and 4), if she truly did not want to cheat on her husband she wouldn’t have allowed him to “gather her lips in a kiss”(Chopin 3) and then furthermore allow him into her room as well as “the white couch she lay upon”(Chopin 3) . Lastly was the kiss on Alcee’s forehead (Chopin 4) as if she had been waiting for this affair to happen for quite sometime and she had finally been satisfied. Calixta could have stopped what was going on at anytime being that it was her house and the storm had ended.

Posted by: Alison Colon at February 9, 2015 09:26 AM

Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
9 February 2015
Question: 14. Look up the words “immoral” and ‘amoral” and be sure you understand the difference. First, explain the meanings in your own words. Then decide which modifier, if either, best fits Calixta. Why? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: Immoral means that someone cannot die, when amoral is simply a person who does not see a difference between good and evil . Calixta is rather amoral, she is showed as someone who is not moved by situations that just happened. “Calixta was preparing supper. She had set the table and was dripping coffee at the hearth. She sprang up as they came in” (4 Chopin)

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak at February 9, 2015 09:49 AM

Cannelle Samson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
16 September 2015

Question: Do Alcée or Calixta love each other? Be sure to state your definition of “love” before you answer. Why, or why not? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: As I read Chopin’s “The Storm” I came to the conclusion that Alcee and Calixta do not love each other; however, they have a strong lust for each other. Love is having strong affection for s percent without the physical being of an importance. It is caring, thinking, and worrying about a person in any situation. Love is having extremely deep affection for a person while putting their joy and happiness before you own. Love is always putting the person you love first, and always wishing the best for them. I believe that Alcee and Calixta have a deep physical attraction to each other. As Alcee was comforting Calixta from the dangers of the storm, the audience can already realize his deep attraction to Calixta. In “The Storm” it states, “The contact of her warm, palpitating body when he had unthinkingly drawn her into his arms, had aroused all the old-time infatuation and desire for her flesh” (Chopin, 3). In the text it specifies Alcee’s desire for Calixta’s flesh not her love or heart. The text continues to explain Alcee’s lust for Calixta, “He pushed her hair back from her face that was warm and steaming. Her lips were as red and moist as pomegranate seed. Her white neck and a glimpse of her full, firm bosom disturbed him powerfully. As she glanced up at him the fear in her liquid blue eyes had given place to a drowsy gleam that unconsciously betrayed a sensuous desire. He looked down into her eyes and there was nothing for him to do but to gather her lips in a kiss. It reminded him of Assumption” (Chopin, 3). Alcee remember Assumption where both of them where being intimate with another. He does not state their love for each other, nor good and loving times they had together. Alcee simply remembers his physical attraction to Calixta. When Alcee leaves Calixta’s house, both are happy to be back to their spouses. Calixta is enjoying her evening with her family, and Alcee has writing a loving letter to his wife. Therefore, Alcee and Calixta are simply physically attracted to each other. They do not love each other.

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at September 16, 2015 12:18 PM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
16 September 2015

Question: Does Bobinot love his spouse? Be sure to state your definition of "love" before your answer. Why, or why not? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: Love is an intense feeling of deep affection that involves being romantic or having a sexual attachment to someone. In Kate Chopin's story, "The Storm", I believe that Bobinot loved his spouse. Once the storm approached, he had reassured Bibi that his mother wasn't going to be afraid of being alone. Also, Bobinot seems like he is a great man that treats Calixta with respect because I didn't see otherwise in the reading. Plus, as Bobinot and Bibi were in the store waiting for the storm to pass, Bobinot had bought Calixta shrimps that were her favorite. For instance, the story states, "Bobinot arose and going across to the counter purchased a can of shrimps, of which Calixta was very fond" (Chopin 1)

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 16, 2015 10:21 PM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 - Academic Writing II CAO3
September 17, 2015

Question: What does the can of shrimp symbolize in Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm”? Why? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: The can of shrimp to me can symbolize relief and enjoyment. “Bobinôt arose and going across to the counter purchased a can of shrimps, of which Calixta was very fond” (Chopin 1). The sentences shoes that the people enjoy having these can of shrimps. At the end of the story Bobinôt pulls out the shrimps and Calixta becomes very excited. "Shrimps! Oh, Bobinôt! you too good fo' anything!" and she gave him a smacking kiss on the cheek” (Chopin 5). Then they all enjoy the shrimps together around the table. “Bobinôt and Bibi began to relax and enjoy themselves, and when the three seated themselves at table” (Chopin 5).

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 17, 2015 12:05 PM

Zeida Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
16 September 2015
Question: Look up the words “immoral” and ‘amoral” and be sure you understand the difference. First, explain the meanings in your own words. Then decide which modifier, if either, best fits Calixta. Why? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: “Immoral” and “amoral” are similar words that have to do with morality, what is good and bad, but have a different way of interpreting it. “Amoral” is not truly understanding what is right or wrong. “Immoral” on the other hand, is knowing that there are a right and a wrong, and deciding to do what is wrong. The word “amoral” fits Calixta the best since she did not feel guilt for her affair with Alcée, and did not see the wrong she was doing. “As she glanced up at him the fear in her liquid blue eyes had given place to a drowsy gleam that unconsciously betrayed a sensuous desire” (Chopin, 3), she allowed herself to fall for him. Once her husband and son came home after the storm, the affair was never even acknowledged, so there was no underlying remorse, or anything in the text that could lead to that assumption.

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at September 17, 2015 12:27 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
17 September 2015

Question: is it simply a coincidence that Alcee arrives at Calixta’s just in time to be trapped there by the storm? Why or why not?

Answer: Alcee and Claixta used to be lovers before she got married and with his sudden visit and her husband away the real storm happens inside the home. There was a scene where she finds comfort in him again, “Calixta put her hands to eyes, and with a cry, staggered backward Alcee’s arm encircled her, and for an instant he drew her close and spasmodically to him.” She then realized what the situation meant and pushed him back. She yelled and fought for respect to her marriage but he leaned in to kiss her. The author talks about a storm outside while they are making love but the actual storm is the passion and electricity of their passion for one another.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 17, 2015 01:50 PM

Luis Bautista
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 – Academic writing
17 September 2015

“The rain was over; and the sun was turning the glistening green world into a palace of gems. Calixta, on the gallery, watched Alcée ride away. He turned and smiled at her with a beaming face; and she lifted her pretty chin in the air and laughed aloud” (Chopin 4)
Question; We know that, sometimes, parts of the setting behave, in some ways, as if they are characters. In Kate Chopin’s short story, “The Storm,” how does the storm itself function as a character? Think of static characters and dynamic characters, to get you started. Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).
Answer; The “storm” in the story played not only a setting of the story but also a major character in the story itself; a dynamic character. In fact, at the beginning of the story the rain falls with abundance and with fury. The rain plays almost a role as an accomplice for the two longstanding lovers to meet again and drown in passion. In fact, when Alcee arrives at Calixta’s home the rain falls with more and more wrath, almost as if the storm was falling at the write time so Calixta’s husband and her son wouldn’t find out. “The rain beat upon the low, shingled roof with a force and clatter that threatened to break an entrance and deluge them there” (Chopin 4). While the storm falls as a background song in the scene, the passion between Calixta and Alcee is so intense that during the act Calixta forgets about her husband and son. Incredibly, when Alcee leaves the house the rain stops. “The growl of the thunder was distant and passing away. The rain beat softly upon the shingles, inviting them to drowsiness and sleep. But they dared not yield. The rain was over; and the sun was turning the glistening green world into a palace of gems. Calixta, on the gallery, watched Alcée ride away. He turned and smiled at her with a beaming face; and she lifted her pretty chin in the air and laughed aloud”(Chopin 4). Bobinot and Bibi can now come back home as if nothing has happened. Alcee goes home and writes a letter to his wife in vacation, telling her he loves her and that she can stay longer and enjoy her vacation. Seems as if after the storm everything has return to reality and everybody is happy.

Posted by: luis Bautista at September 17, 2015 07:08 PM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
17 September 2015

Question 5: Is there any reason to believe Clarisse ever suspects anything? Why, or why not?
Answer: No Clarisse does not suspect anything. She was happy to hear from her husband, but she wanted a break as well. Chopin writes, “Devoted as she was to her husband, their intimate conjugal life was something which she was more than willing to forego for awhile” (Chopin, 5).

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 17, 2015 10:05 PM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
17 September 2015


Question: How significant is the title of “The Storm”? For example, if the title had been different (“The Affair,” or “The Cajuns,” for example), would it have been just as effective? Is there a double-entendre to the title? Is it symbolic, humorous, or ironic, in some way? Make your case for the importance of the title to “The Storm” and support your case/theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: The importance of the title of the story lays upon the emphasis that the author makes about the storm. In almost every section of the story, Chopin describes the powerful storm that attacks the characters and endangers them. This constant remainder is what makes the readers focus on the storm. However, if the story have had a different title such as "The Affair," or "The Cajuns," they would have worked as effective because the titles depict a detail that is constantly being repeated in the story. Due to the slang of the characters, the reader can imagine that the story is taking place in Louisiana; in fact, most of the lines have French and English slang mixed like one of Calixta's lines, "if this keeps up, Dieu sait if the levees goin' to stan it! (Chopin 2)." Therefore, the readers' focus would have been directed towards the character's speech rather than the storm, and the same change would have been applicable for "The Affair" because when the author is narrating the scene of betrayal, she provides a detail description of the event. However, the tittle's name could have a double-entendre. The author could have referenced the affair between Calixta and Alcee as the "storm" besides the physical storm described in the tale. The wordplay used by the writer in the story could be ironical depending on the interpretation of the reader. The last sentence of the story, "So the storm passed and everyone was happy (Chopin 5)," could be interpreted in many ways. Either the storm brought true relief by going away, or Calixta was happy and satisfied because her "storm" had gone away.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 18, 2015 12:08 AM

Zachary Pottle
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
18 September 2015

Question:

What, if anything, might be the long-term repercussions of Alcée and Calixta's encounter?

Answer:

There are some long standing repercussions of Alcee and Calixta's encounter. At the end of the story, Alcee writes a letter to his wife. This letter expressed to the reader that he was not truly in love with his wife, which is expressed by this quote from the narrator, "and the first free breath since her marriage seemed to restore the pleasant liberty of her maiden days," (Chopin 123). This quote suggests that Alcee is not in love, and that he wishes to be with Calixta.

Posted by: Zachary Pottle at September 18, 2015 01:07 AM

Alexis Clayton
Doctor Hobbs
Academic writing II CA03
18 September 2015

Question 17: What might have been the purpose of including sex in Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm”? Is it possible that the two adulterers feel any sense of remorse for their actions? Why, or why not? Support your theory (answer) with quoted passages from the text (not optional).

Answer: In Kate Chopin’s story, The Storm, she includes sex because it is natural like the storm, which is what lead up to the sex scene. When Kate wrote, “he had kissed her and kissed and kissed her; until his senses would well nigh fail, and to save her he would resort to a desperate flight( Page 3 Chopin). That was the start of the main characters, Calixta and Alcée, coming together right when the storm was happening. I do not think the adulterers felt remorse for their actions because it had happened once before. For example, Alcee says,“He looked down into her eyes and there was nothing for him to do but to gather her lips in a kiss. It reminded him of Assumption (Page 3 Chopin). To me this makes me believe that this has been a ongoing thing between them behind there spouses backs and has not stopped them.

Posted by: alexis clayton at September 18, 2015 06:13 AM

Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA03
17 September 2015

Question: 2) Does Calixta love her spouse? Be sure to state your definition of “love” before you answer. Why, or why not?

Answer: Love is the warming feeling your body gets and the butterflies that you get in your stomach when you see someone or the worries and hominess that you feel with them, such as a significant other or your family. It seems in the story that Calixta does loves Bobinôt. She's worried for his safety when he's out in the storm, super relieved when he and Bibi return unharmed, and nearly ecstatic when presented with the shrimps he brought her. She seems to be making a real effort to maintain a happy family life. Despite that fact that she had only just cheated on her husband before his return.

Posted by: Jaclyn Taylor at September 18, 2015 08:33 AM

Group 6; Lady Hernandez & Johnny nyugen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
17 September 2015

Question: Discuss the setting in Kate Chopin’s “The Storm”

Answer: The story takes place in the 19th century, during the civil war and gilded age. It starts in the public place of the Friedheimer’s store and then leads to Alcee going to Calixta and her husband’s home. Her husband is not present during his visit. Context includes the economic status between to the two lovers. Where she comes from a farmer lifestyle and he is of wealth and they have to marry within their status. Chopin also mentions a storm during Alcee’s visit when the storm represents the sexual scene between Calixta and Alcee.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 18, 2015 10:18 AM

Hannah Rowe, Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
3 February 2016

“The Storm”

Q: Plot and Climax in "The Storm"

A: In Kate Chopin’s “The Storm,” there are two main conflicts that stand out: man vs. nature and man vs. self. The story opens with a raging storm that is trapping both Babi and Bobinot at a general store, leaving Calixta home alone. Because of this “man vs. nature” conflict, the story continues to the next conflict: Calixta is home alone with an ex-boyfriend. Now it becomes a battle of “man vs. self” as she debates whether she should become romantic with him. When he puts his arm around her, she hurries away, ‘ “Bonte!” she cried, releasing herself from his encircling arm […] ‘ “If I only knew w’ere Bibi was” (Chopin 3). However she gives in, and the climax is reached when her husband returns home. The reader is anxious to see whether he will find out, but he does not. It is all over, just like the storm.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at February 4, 2016 02:52 PM

Google
My Blog

Creative Commons License
This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Some rights reserved. 2006.