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September 08, 2014

Flannery O'Connor's Hard Search for a "Good Man"


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

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Posted by lhobbs at September 8, 2014 04:10 PM

Readers' Comments:

Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2014

Question #21
Identify some “binaries” of the South O’Connor presents in “A Good Man is Hard to Find”. Prepare a list of at least three and briefly explain the significance of each in the story.

Answer
Three “binaries” of the South that O’Connor presented in “A Good Man is Hard to Find” are that Tennessee is good and Florida is bad, people used to be so polite, and that people have a good heart. O’Connor portrays that Tennessee is better than Florida using the grandmother. In the beginning of the story, the family was getting ready to go to Florida, but the grandmother wanted to go to Tennessee. She used the reasoning that, “the Misfit is aloose from the Federal Pen and headed toward Florida…I wouldn’t take my children in any direction with a criminal like that aloose in it.”(O’Connor 1). The children act so disrespectful in the story. They said things such as, “Tennessee is just a hillbilly dumping ground”(O’Connor 3) and “I wouldn’t live in a broken down place like this for a million bucks!”(O’Connor 5). This show different opinions about the South.

Posted by: Allison Ward at September 9, 2014 06:36 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2014


Question #20:
What might the road trip (and the specific images of the country road) symbolize based on what you have learned from the story at large? [Note: the road trip can symbolize many things, including the breakdown of Bailey’s family (consider the kids and their behavior), the passing of the time from the Old South to the New South, the journey for the confirmation of Christ and Christian living, the Misfit’s failed journey of redemption, etc.].


Answer:
The road trip in “A Good Man Is Hard To Find,” by, Flannery O’Connor is a symbol of many things for the main character and his family. One possible meaning of the trip itself is that it can be considered foreshadowing to the disaster that befalls them later on in the story.


The whole family is pessimistic about the trip to begin with, the grandmother wants to go to Tennessee instead of Florida, Bailey is anxious about driving and the trip in general, and the kids are just ungrateful and obnoxious (as small children are during long car rides). The whole family does not seem to have an understanding of one another. The grandmother tries to convince Bailey to go to Tennessee towards the beginning of the story, the children are rude not only to the grandmother but to Sammy Red, and Sammy’s wife as well. The family’s general disposition about the vacation was the cause of their untimely deaths, in other words karma.


They scenery in the story is described as very desolate and empty, “The road looked as if no one had traveled on it in months (O’Connor 6), symbolizing impending doom. Another potential meaning for the scenery of the road trip is the family and their disconnect; they are the bumps and ruts in the road. The car accident is another symbol of the family’s inability to get along; Bailey reluctantly and callously humors his mother and searches for the dirt road and because of his unwillingness they crash because he is only paying attention to his immediate emotions.


The passing from Old South to New South could also be a symbol of misfortune because it is a shift in time. The Old South was safe and quaint while the New south is unsafe and disrespectful, meaning that no matter what the family encountered it would be unfortunate because of the time they lived.


Confirmation of Christ and Christian living is a symbol of faith in a higher power when in need. An aspect of the Old South that which does not exist in the New South, as displayed between the Misfit and his men when they mercilessly kill the whole family. The Misfit was not seeking redemption or forgiveness from Jesus; he didn’t care about such things. He was killing in order to add meaning and pleasure to the life he viewed as having no pleasure (O’Connor 12).


Posted by: Emily Finck at September 9, 2014 11:15 PM

Zailet Martinez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL- Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 September 2014

Question #19:
Bailey’s family literally set out on a journey, the family vacation. How does the road trip function as a metaphor or symbol of this journey?

Answer:
The road trip is a metaphor because the family, but more importantly the grandmother goes through her whole life. First planning of the trip happened, the grandma trying to convince Bailey to go to Tennessee instead of Florida. At the beginning of the trip, the grandmother was telling the kids about her life when she was young. She told the kids about a man in her life named Edgar Atkins Teagarden that use to bring her watermelons. In addition, at the beginning of the road trip, she talks about the way she was dressed and her make-up in case she was to die in a car accident. “Her collars and cuffs were white organdy trimmed with lace and at her neckline she had pinned a purple spray of cloth violets containing a sachet. In case of an accident, anyone seeing her dead on the highway would know at once that she was a lady,” this is ironic because in the end she had lost her hat on the car accident (O’Connor, 2). The traveling serves as the family going into adulthood and everything they experience at the Red Sammy’s Barbecue. The family comes at the end of their road trip and their lives when the car crashes, and they are on the verge of dying not because of the car accident but because their upcoming encounter with The Misfit. Their life ends when the Misfit comes to help fix their car; first the whole family was killed except the grandmother. The grandmother was trying to convince the Misfit that he was a good man. The grandmother did not seem to be affected by her family dying. She was trying to fight for her life, she did not want to die, but the Misfit took no pity and killed her.

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at September 10, 2014 10:26 AM

Ahmed Almoailu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-210CL-CA02
10 September 2014

Question: What is the symbolic about the fact that the "phantom" plantation is just a figment of the grandmother bad memory?


I think the symbolic about the fact the the phantom plantation is just a figment of the grandmother bad memory is that if she didn’t lie about the house having six white columns and a secret panel, it would not seem so exciting for the kids to see and they would not go out of their way to search for the plantation and none of them would got hurt.

Posted by: Ahmed Almoailu at September 10, 2014 11:08 AM

Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
2 September 2014

Question #7: Consider the pattern of young women who are juxtaposed in the story as friends, “frenemies,” or sisters: great-aunt Harriet and he sister, Grace and Alida, Barbara and Jenny. How do their stories combine to shape our understanding of the main story here: Grace and Alida’s long standing relationship. Explain.

The stories combine to shape our understanding of the main story: Grace Ansley and Alida Slade’s long-standing relationship by providing us with similarities throughout the story before leading up to the climax. Both of the girls are running off with young men just as their mothers did when they were their age. Barbara is more energetic just as Mrs. Slade was and Jenny is more beautiful and calm just as Mrs. Ansley was. According to Mrs. Slade, Barbara will come back engaged to the available bachelor as she did to Mr. Slade 25 years ago. “She knew that Babs would almost certainly come back engaged to the extremely eligible Campolieri” (Wharton 5). The fact that the girls are half-sisters, Grace’s Great-aunt Harriet story comes into play. Harriet and her sister were in-love with the same man and she tricked her into exposing herself to Roman fever. "But she really sent her because they were in love with the same man—" (Wharton 6). All of the events are parallel to one another; only to show that history has a great way of repeating itself.

Posted by: irma sera at September 10, 2014 12:40 PM

Rebecca Messano
Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
September 10, 2014

QUESTION #17:
What might O’Connor mean when she says “Christ-haunted”? Why “Christ-haunted” instead of “Christ-centered”?

ANSWER:
I think when O’Connor chooses to say “Christ-haunted” instead of “Christ-centered” it is because if you use the term “Christ-centered” then that means that everyone in the South lives by and for Christ, whereas using the term “Christ-haunted” it means that the presence and awareness of Christ is noted and not always taken into account when they make choices or do things in the South.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano at September 10, 2014 01:19 PM

Anthony colello
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210 CA02 love and desire in literature 
10 September 2014

Question 9:
What does the grandmother mean when she says,"in my time" at the beginning of this passage? About the "cute little pickaninniny."

Answer:
 When the grandmother says, "in my time," she is referring to the time when she was a child or young adult. She refers to this time because back then people had no worries like they do today. Back in her time people were wealthy and powerful. Now people are poor and powerless, crime is  becoming more common and they blame it on the things they don't understand like the end of slavery and the war. Also, placing blame in foreign countries, "Europe was entirely to blame for the way things were now" (O'Conor, 4).  She says this however, she uses the word "pickaninny," which refers to a young black child, usually that is to young to work in the cotton fields (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=pickaninny).  With this word choice, the reader can infer that the grandmothers main belief for deteriorating standards of quality of life would be blamed on the African American slave gaining freedom. 

The grandmother displays this belief in her word choice "pickaninny,"(pg.4) and her debilitating, inability to live in the current times, keeps her stuck in the past, with the views of the old times. Unable to open her heart and love all people as equal children of God, she is more like the misfit than she knows.

Posted by: Anthony Colello at September 10, 2014 01:28 PM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire In Literature CA02
9 September 2014

QUESTION #11:
How does O’Connor use the grandmother to distinguish between the “Old” and “New South”?

ANSWER:
It seemed that O’Connor used the grandmother to distinguish past and present, to show her views compared to current day in her time. Whenever another race was mentioned in the text, she would have something to say about them making her seem a bit racist. For example, when they were on the road and saw a black child, “ look at that cute little pickaninny!” pointed to a Negro child standing in the door of a shack. "Wouldn't that make a picture, now?" she asked and they all turned and looked at the little Negro out of the back window. He waved”(O’Connor 2). Then when her granddaughter saw that he didn’t have on any pants, you can see that the new generation doesn’t know anything about African Americans. The grandmother then shows her true colors by saying, “"Little riggers in the country don't have things like we do. If I could paint, I'd paint that picture," she said”(O’Connor 2). Her son Bailey appears to feel a different kid of way than his mother does. When his children and mother ask to go to the old plantation he was solemn with grit on his face, sternly saying no (O’Connor 5). Then when he gave he responded with "All right," Bailey said, "but get this: this is the only time we're going to stop for anything like this. This is the one and only time" (O’Connor 5). You can see the difference in generation of the south from the children with no knowledge of African Americans, and Bailey being uncomfortable with the mentioning of plantations. Also, you can see a change when John Bailey asked his grandmother where the plantation was and the grandmother responded with, “Gone With the Wind”… “Ha. Ha.”(O’Connor 3).

Posted by: Thomas Watson at September 10, 2014 01:45 PM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire In Literature CA02
9 September 2014

QUESTION #11:
How does O’Connor use the grandmother to distinguish between the “Old” and “New South”?

ANSWER:
It seemed that O’Connor used the grandmother to distinguish past and present, to show her views compared to current day in her time. Whenever another race was mentioned in the text, she would have something to say about them making her seem a bit racist. For example, when they were on the road and saw a black child, “ look at that cute little pickaninny!” pointed to a Negro child standing in the door of a shack. "Wouldn't that make a picture, now?" she asked and they all turned and looked at the little Negro out of the back window. He waved”(O’Connor 2). Then when her granddaughter saw that he didn’t have on any pants, you can see that the new generation doesn’t know anything about African Americans. The grandmother then shows her true colors by saying, “"Little riggers in the country don't have things like we do. If I could paint, I'd paint that picture," she said”(O’Connor 2). Her son Bailey appears to feel a different kid of way than his mother does. When his children and mother ask to go to the old plantation he was solemn with grit on his face, sternly saying no (O’Connor 5). Then when he gave he responded with "All right," Bailey said, "but get this: this is the only time we're going to stop for anything like this. This is the one and only time" (O’Connor 5). You can see the difference in generation of the south from the children with no knowledge of African Americans, and Bailey being uncomfortable with the mentioning of plantations. Also, you can see a change when John Bailey asked his grandmother where the plantation was and the grandmother responded with, “Gone With the Wind”… “Ha. Ha.”(O’Connor 3).

Posted by: Thomas Watson at September 10, 2014 01:45 PM

Brianna Broughton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire CA02
10 September 2014

A Good Man Is Hard To Find
Question #8: What does the grandmother’s use of these words suggest about the racial views she holds? “Cute little pickaninny”

Answer: When the grandmother uses the term “cute little pickaninny” (O’Connor, 2) to describe the little black child they see as they are driving along the highway suggest that she was brought up in a time period where names like these were acceptable for black people. The word pickaninny translates to a small black child. This story was written in 1953 and set in Atlanta, Georgia. The south was very popular with racially motivated sayings, slurs, and gestures.

Posted by: Brianna Broughton at September 10, 2014 01:54 PM

Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 September 2014

Question #14: What does the grandmother think of the “modern woman”? What are some differences between the grandmother and the mother? How is she mocking each of them?

Answer:
The grandmother thinks that the “modern woman” isn’t acting ladylike and don’t have a conscious. She explains this by the family wanting to go on vacation to Florida, but there is a killer that is on the loose and may be also heading to Florida. “I wouldn't take my children in any direction with a criminal like that aloose in it. I couldn't answer to my conscience if I did” (O’Connor 1). This passage shows that the grandmother thinks that modern women just want to do what they and don’t think about the consequences that they could be causing on their children. She criticizes the mother for not traveling to a place where everyone could be safe. The differences between the grandmother and the mother are that the grandmother normally speaks her mind and is vocal about it. The mother, on the other-hand, doesn’t say much and focuses on caring for her baby. The mother of the children truly cares for her family by showing the sadness and grief when The Misfit encounters them, whereas the grandmother only cares about herself and doesn’t plead for any of the family member’s lives. She mocks each person in the family because she is trying to teach the kids that they should be consciousness of others, be honest, and not be selfish. However, at the end of the story the grandmother never pleads for her son, the grandchildren, or her daughter in law.

Posted by: Matthew Weller at September 10, 2014 02:06 PM

Gabriel Navarro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
10 Sept. 2014

Question #25:
What elements of "A Good Man is Hard to Find" would you describe as humorous?

Answer:
In the beginning of the story, it was very humorous in relation of the typical dysfunctional family. However, that light humor later changes to darkness after the car crash and the encounter with the Misfit. The comments after the crash are disturbing, yet humorous at the same time. Such as when the Misfit says to the grandmother, "She would of been a good woman…if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life” (O’Connor 12), jokingly saying that she was only good dead. Some humor is also shown from the family when June Star expresses disappointment as she said, “But nobody’s killed” (O‘Connor 6), while her grandmother recovers from the car crash. Some of the humorous comments that are said throughout the story and quite disturbing, but one can not really help but to find funny, because there is some agreement to it.

Posted by: Gabriela Navarro at September 10, 2014 02:12 PM

Sharonda S Byrd
Dr. Lee. B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL - Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2014
A Good Man is Hard to Find
“The children have been to Florida before," the old lady said. "You all ought to take them somewhere else for a change so they would see different parts of the world and be broad. They never have been to east Tennessee.” is the statement that this question is referring to. The definition of broad is having an ample distance from side to side and this passage means that the grandmother wants her grandchildren to see more of than Florida or she just does not want to go to Florida because of The Misfit. O’ Connors tone of the Grandmother of this passage is a concerned grandma. She cares about the well being of her grandkids and wants them to see the world. The grandmother feels that her son is keeping the children in a bubble and not letting them see more.

Posted by: Sharonda Byrd at September 10, 2014 02:23 PM

Rebecca Messano and Martin Terrasi
ENG 210CL Love and Desire In Literature
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
September 10, 2014

QUESTION #5: Characterize the grandmother

ANSWER: The grandmother in the story is a dynamic character. She starts off not wanting to go on the road trip and then says that she wants to go see a house that she thought was in Georgia. This leads the family to drive to Georgia and leads up to the car accident where they run into the murders and all eventually die. In the end it turns out that the house was not in Georgia, but actually in Tennessee. The grandmother’s stubborn personality and persistence basically led up to the death of her family. Right before she it shot, she feels a moment of grace and then the Misfit shoots her.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano & Martin Terrasi at September 10, 2014 03:07 PM

Group 3
Matt Weller
Emily Finck
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 September 2014

Question #7:
Explain fully how does O’Connor’s humor come through in this passage?

Answer:
O’Connor’s humor comes through in this passage by having a darker humor. He foreshadows how the family does not have a connection with each other and in the end; it bites them in the butt. The grandmother tries to teach her grandchildren how to be respectful, selfless, and non-hypocritical. When the family is at the Barbeque restaurant, June Star is dancing and the owner’s wife asks her jokingly if she would want to be her child. “June Star said. ‘ I wouldn't live in a broken-down place like this for a million bucks!” (O’Connor 4). The grandmother hisses back at her and wants her to be more respectful towards the women. At the end of the story when The Misfit has an encounter with the family, the whole family, besides the grandmother, is pleading for each other’s lives and cares for one another. However, the grandmother becomes hypocritical with her teachings in the beginning of the story and does not respect or care for any of the other’s lives. She becomes selfish and begs for her life only, and it ends up still biting her in the butt.

Posted by: Matthew Weller at September 10, 2014 03:20 PM

Gabriel Navarro & Ahmed Almoailu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
10 Sept. 2014

Question #1:
How does Flannery O'Connor describe the cultural and physical landscape of the South? (South in this story)

Answer:
As the family drives from Georgia to Florida, O'Connor points out number of things about the southern landscape such as the plantations that are basically no more. The physical setting of the south is very different compared to the pastimes.

Race also plays a great factor in the story. The grandmother specially does not accept the non-judgmental modern day ways versus the children who are more understanding and familiar with the new culture, and then the middle aged adults who are kind of stuck in the middle trying to compromise. Three different generations are present here to show the culture views of the story.

Posted by: Gabriel Navarro & Ahmed Almoailu at September 10, 2014 03:22 PM

Brianna Broughton & Zailet Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire CA02
10 September 2014

A Good Man Is Hard To Find

Question #21: Identify some “binaries” of the South O’Connor presents in “A Good Man is Hard to Find.” Prepare a list of at least three and briefly explain the significance of each in the story.
Answer:
1) The relationship between the grandmother and her son, Bailey. The grandmother is outgoing, joyful, and always eager to explore, whereas Bailey seems closed off, reserve, and irritated with his mother’s actions.
2) The grandmother is trying to convince The Misfit that he is a “good man” but he admits to not being good. "I just know you're a good man," she said desperately. “‘You’re not a bit common!” "Nome, I ain't a good man," The Misfit said after a second ah if he had considered her statement carefully, ‘but I ain't the worst in the world neither.’ ” (O’Connor, 9).
3) The three generations within the story seem to have such different views. The grandmother is very set in her ways and is very nostalgic. She refers to how children “used to be”; “‘In my time,’ said the grandmother, folding her thin veined fingers, ‘children were more respectful of their native states and their parents and everything else.” (O’Connor, 2). The middles generation, Bailey and his wife, don’t really have opinions on most things that happened on their road trip. Meanwhile the last generation, June Star and John Wesley, are like typical children and just say what comes to mind with no thought about race or empathy toward the person they are speaking too.

Posted by: Brianna Broughton at September 10, 2014 03:36 PM

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
11 September 2014

QUESTION #33:
The grandmother makes a gesture of inclusion toward The Misfit, calling him her son. What is the significance of her statement in contrast with the relationship toward her own son, the apparent merging of her real son with The Misfit, and the eventual outcome?

ANSWER:
The significance of her statement is that The Misfit had gone through a rough time and just needed someone to be there for him, on his side for once. The law enforcement tried burying him alive, and he could not even remember the reason for it, so he hated the world and everyone in it for what they had done to him. The grandma “saw the man’s face twisted close to her own as if he were going to cry” (O’Conner 12). This was when she attempted to reach out to him, comfort him, and offer to help him. She wanted him to see that he could be a good man, and his past did not have to affect his future. Bailey was her only son, and she loved him dearly. Her and her son did not see eye to eye on a lot of things though, and the grandma usually just let him be to do his own thing. Her cry out to the Misfit was essentially her cry out to Bailey telling him that she wished she would have gotten closer to him and made more of an effort to protect him. She would have been willing to use the Misfit as a second chance, and she would stick to her promise if he proved to her that he was really a good man. When the grandma called the misfit her own son, he “sprang back as if a snake had bitten him and shot her three times through the chest” (O’Connor 12). The Misfit proved that the times have changed, and no one can be trusted or are essentially good people anymore.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at September 11, 2014 09:03 AM

Thomas Watson, Allison Ward
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire In Literature CA02
10 September 2014


QUESTION #11
How does O’Connor use the grandmother to distinguish between the “Old” and “New South”?

ANSWER:
The grandmother serves as a traveling time machine in a sense. Everytime she had the opportunity to speak about how things were in the past she took it. She frequenltly mentions the plantation, as well as mentioning her good ol’ days. “"In my time," said the grandmother, folding her thin veined fingers, "children were more respectful of their native states and their parents and everything else”(O’Connor 2).

She speaks about African Americans in a way that Bailey and his wife don’t. Also the children seem oblivious to them, because it appears they aren’t aware of them. For example, “she said and pointed to a Negro child standing in the door of a shack. "Wouldn't that make a picture, now?" she asked and they all turned and looked at the little Negro out of the back window”(O’Connor 2). Then her granddaughter said he didn’t have any pants on, making it appear she hasn’t seen anyone of his likes before. Then the grandmother shows her true colors, “"He probably didn't have any," the grandmother explained. "Little riggers in the country don't have things like we do. If I could paint, I'd paint that picture," she said” (O’Connor 2). You can kind of see how Bailey feels when he gets pressured into going to the plantation. When he finally agrees to go he responds with,” "All right," Bailey said, "but get this: this is the only time we're going to stop for anything like this. This is the one and only time” (O’Connor 5).

Posted by: Thomas Watson at September 11, 2014 04:38 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 11, 2014
A Good Man is Hard to find
By:
Question 11:
The grandmother and her views are outdated, but reflective of the racial tensions during the time the story was written. Note that the grandmother wants the family to visit a plantation house along their journey, but that the plantation house is not where she remembered it to be. Answer the following question: “How does O’Connor use the grandmother to distinguish between the “Old and “New South” ?
Answer:
O’Connor uses the grandmother to distinguish between the old and new south by comparing every detail as the family travels. The grandmother compares the way children were more respectful back in the day than today. She quotes, “If I were a little boy, I wouldn’t talk about my native state that way. Tennessee is just a hillbilly dumping ground.” John Wesley said. “In my time, said the grandmother, children were more respectful of their native states and their parents and everything else.” (page 2) Grandmother makes sure to point out the negro children as well and compare them to her own grandchildren about not having the luxuries they do.

Posted by: Stephanie at September 11, 2014 07:35 PM

John Crane
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
10 September 2014

QUESTION #7: How does O’Connor’s humor or irony come through in the passage about making her family “broad” by “see[ing] different parts of the world”? Explain fully.

ANSWER: The irony of making her family broad by seeing different parts of the world is that she unknowingly took them to be killed. The family was in the car and they got into an accident (O’Connor 6), where the misfit found them on the side of the road. After killing off the rest of the grandmothers family, “the misfit sprang back and shot her three times through the chest” (O’Connor 12), keeping everyone on the trip from seeing the rest of the world.

Posted by: John Crane at September 11, 2014 09:10 PM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
11 September 2014

Question #5:
How would you characterize the grandmother? Consult the Edgar Roberts chapter on “Character” (on the libguide), if necessary.
Answer:
I would characterize the grandmother as a dynamic character because she is recognized and she changed throughout the story. She becomes less selfish at the end of the story. She could be represented as a main character but in this story, she isn’t. This is a kind of lady that is going to try and get things out of you. She thinks she is the lady of the house. For example, she is saying, “you wouldn’t shoot a lady, would you?” (O’Conner 8) The grandmother would be a protagonist because she isn’t necessarily heroic.
“You wouldn’t shoot a lady, would you?”
“Just you read it. I wouldn't take my children in any direction with a criminal like that alose in it. I couldn't answer to my conscience if I did.”

Posted by: Zachary Gary at September 11, 2014 11:04 PM


Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
11 September 2014

Question #28:
“What might the thwarted family road trip symbolize in O’Connor’s ‘A Good Man is Hard to Find?” Use evidence from the story to support you argument.

Answer:
The thwarted family road trip symbolizes a dysfunctional family. The grandmother only has interest in what she wants. She was trying to lure Bailey into going to Tennessee instead of Florida because she wanted to “visit some of her connections.” (O’Connor 1). She tried to disguise this by informing Bailey that there was a killer by the name of Misfit on the loose and that he was headed towards Florida. Another reason why she only cares about herself is that she snuck her cat into the car to bring on the road trip, already knowing that Bailey does not want the cat there but she brought him anyway. If she had brought the cat, the accident would have never happened either. After the misfits showed up the grandmother only pleaded for her own life and no one elses. She kept telling him “I just know you’re a good man” (O’Connor 9) trying to change his mind about killing her. The grandmother prevented them from having a nice vacation because everything had to go her way.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at September 11, 2014 11:33 PM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA07
12 September 2014

Question
O'connor's appropriation of external realities to suggest a level of meaning extends to the names of the people and places in the story. What is the significance of the characters with names and those without?

Answer
Firstly, the significance of the characters with names are that the kinds with names, June Star and John Wesley, were that they were nieve and gullible so they were easily influenced. Therefore the grandmother used the story with the man that had the initials that spelled E. E. T. and the way he was a gentleman and did nice things for her.

Also, "The Misfit" seemed as if he had no faith in God , and the grandmother would time after time to convince him to pray.

The significance of those with no manes is simply to create a real life situation. If there were no mother, in my opinion the story would've had to gone on longer to explain why there was no mother.

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at September 12, 2014 01:04 AM

Mickael Dodard
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
12 September 2014

Question # 1: How does Flanerry O’Cornor describe the cultural and physical landscape of the South in the story?

Answer:
The cultural landscape of the story was that it was written a long time a go so everything is pictured as ancient time. The author describes the physical landscape of the story by describing the nature. He mentioned the trees a lot of time. He said, “The trees were full of silver-white sunlight and the meanest of them sparkled.” He means that the trees bring an important aspect to the nature by reflecting the sunlight.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at September 12, 2014 09:47 AM

Elizabeth Brown
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-122 CA07 Academic Writing II
11 September 2014

Question #10:
How does the grandmother represent the South’s earlier times by using the word racially charged epithet “pickaninny”? Explain.
Answer:
The grandmother uses older terms that are not common anymore. She has no filter to stop her from using the words because in the old south it was common for a person to use such language. She was not being rude or degrading the child she saw, she was only using the terminology that she had been taught to use growing up. She represents the South’s earlier times, because she still speaks the way they did so long ago. She also refers to black people as niggers later on in the text, she does this not as a way of showing her superiority but just from old habits.

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at September 12, 2014 10:19 AM

Roslyn Thomas
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
12 September 2014

Question 32:
At the beginning of the story the grandmother is totally preoccupied with what she wants. Yes, as she travels on through the story she stumbles upon the meaning of life. What religious epiphany or epiphanies does the grandmother experience?

Answer:
The religious epiphany is Christianity. She chants Jesus, Jesus and telling the misfit to pray and keep praying. She’s telling him that he’s a good person no matter what he has been committed of. “The grandmother tells the Misfit to pray so that Jesus will help him. The Misfit says he’s fine on his own.” (O’Connor 5)

Posted by: roslyn thomas at September 12, 2014 11:13 AM

Gianna Anderson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA07
12 September 2014

Question #21:
Identify some "binaries" of the South O'Connor presents in "A Good Man is Hard to Find." Prepare a list of at least three and briefly explain the significance of each in the story.

Answer:
In Tennessee they have moutains, poor blacks kids, and blue tree tops. In Atlanta the have hills, "green as far as I could see."
As they drove up the hill to go and see the old house grandmother and use to hang out at, they looked out over the hills and saw the blue tree tops. On the car drive to Tennessee, as they looked out the windows, and saw the old plantations and farming lands as far as the eyes could see.

Posted by: Gianna Anderson at September 12, 2014 01:07 PM

Trejon Baynham

Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs

ENG. 122 CA 07

11 September 2014

QUESTION:

Who is the Real ‘Misfit’? How is the grandmother herself a misfit in the story?

ANSWER:

The real misfit of the story is the grandmother. The grandmother is a misfit within the context of time as she refers to occurrences during her generation, which provides conflicting views to that of her family. When June Star and John Wesley were making snide remarks about the landscape and atmosphere of their native states, the grandmother stated that “Back in her time” more respect was present in children towards their backgrounds (O’Connor 2). In addition, she also referred to the old film Gone with the Wind when John had asked her about the plantations (O’Connor 3).

Posted by: Trejon Baynham at September 12, 2014 01:22 PM

Shyra Bryant
Zach Gary
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA02
12 September 2014

Question:
The Grandmother thinks that taking the Georgia based family to east Tennessee would make them “broad” by seeing different parts of the world.” Look up the meaning of the word broad as used in this context. Based on what you know from the story, what do you think of this passage? What is O’ Connors tone here in her characterization of the grandmother.

Answer:
To be broad is to upgrade extent, expand yourself. “You all ought to take them somewhere else for a change so they would see different parts of the world and be broad,” Says the grandmother. O’ Connors tone in the passage, is very mellow and dull as if he isn’t up for the trip. The meaning of the word broad as used in the context is being used as facing new experiences, and going on adventures.

Posted by: Shyra Bryant and Zach Gary at September 12, 2014 02:04 PM


Danielle Kluender, Gianna Anderson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
12 September 2014

Question #8:
Try to imaging looking out the window of the sedan when the grandmother points out “the cute little pickaninny!” This is a very dated, and offensive, racial epithet to describe an African-American child. Additionally, the grandmother use another offensive, racist term. Consider the following questions keeping in mind the historical context of O’Connor’s story: What does the grandmother’s use of these words suggest about the racial views she holds?

Answer:
The grandmother used “the cute little pickaninny” as a racist slur without realizing how mean it sounded. The grandmother was trying to explain to June when the little boy did not have any “britches.” (O’Connor 2). The grandmother most likely grew up in a wealthy family and she is making it seem like not all black descent families have the things as she does. The grandmother said to June, “little riggers in the country don’t have things like we do. If I could paint, I’d paint that picture.” (O’Connor 2).

Posted by: Danielle Kluender, Gianna Anderson at September 12, 2014 02:07 PM

Irma Sera
Sharonda Byrd
9/12/14
ENG 210CL - Love and Desire in Literature
B. Lee Hobbs

#10 how does the grandma represent the south earlier times by using this word?

Answer: The grandmother represents the south earlier times by using the word “pickaninny,” which means a little black child who isn’t old enough to pick cotton. This word was used on plantations during the 1950s and the word was common around the grandmother’s household. "Little niggers in the country don't have things like we do. If I could paint, I'd paint that picture… (O’Connor).” This reveals how much she is stuck in her past and how much of it she has not let go. She is on the wrong side of history and brought it into the lives of her grandchildren, which is what was typically done in the past to the children.

Posted by: Sharonda Byrd at September 12, 2014 02:18 PM

Trejon Baynham, Stephanie Vera
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 07
12 September 2014

QUESTION:
Although the 1950s highways are not what they are today, how were they different than those in the 1930s/1940s rural roads in Georgia? What did they permit more people to do?

ANSWER:
As the grandmother recalled, rural roads within Georgia during her times were unsafe and “thirty miles was a day’s journey” (O’Connor 6). The advancements made for road development during the 1950s promoted traverse and combated conservatism through the reduction of safety hazards and time-consuming obstacles drivers faced.

Posted by: Trejon Baynham, Stephanie Vera at September 12, 2014 02:20 PM

John Crane and Sam Witte
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
12 September 2014

QUESTION #9: Keep in mind the “setup” information from the question #8. What does the grandmother mean when she says, “in my time” at the beginning of the passage?

ANSWER: The grandmother is stuck in the past and she has not adapted to the new times. She says things like “pickaninny” (O’Connor 2) which is not politically correct, even for the time the book was written. She said “little riggers” (O’Connor 2) which is also inappropriate, but she sees nothing wrong with saying that because she is from another time.

Posted by: John Crane and Sam Witte at September 12, 2014 02:21 PM

Antonella Aviles
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 210 Comparative Literatures CA02
12 September 2014

Question 2: What are the key themes Flannery O’Conner explores in “A Good Man is Hard to Find”?

Answer: The key themes are morals and irony because the Grandmother believed that she was above everyone because she was “a lady” when she didn’t even really have her own morals set in stone.

This was seen when she asked the Misfit to pray and she had a hard time leading the prayer. In addition, when the misfit questioned her about Jesus she was uncertain of the answers to his questions. It is also ironic in the sense that they went to not be in harm’s way of the misfit that escaped from prison and on their vacation is when they encounter him.

Posted by: Antonella Aviles at September 12, 2014 02:32 PM

Alyssa Davis & Rashad Knowles
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
15 September 2014

Question #2:
What are the key themes Flannery O’Conner explores in “A Good Man is Hard to Find”?

Answer:
One key term that O’Conner explores in “A Good Man is Hard to Find” is family. The grandmother was very big on the family sticking together. At the beginning of the story June Star mentions that her grandmother would rather go with the family on every trip rather than stay home alone. Towards the end of the story, while the Misfit was terrorizing the family, the grandmother wanted the family to stay together and not be broken apart. Another theme in the story would be religion. The grandmother tried to use religion to prevent the Misfit from killing the family. The Misfit thought about praying when the grandmother referred it to him but he still ended up killing the entire family.

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at September 15, 2014 10:33 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at September 15, 2014 04:09 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
24 January 2015

Question: Although the 1950s highways are not what they are today, how were they different from the 1930s/1940s rural roads in Georgia? What did they permit more people to do?

Answer: Rural roads in the 1930s/1940s were, for the most part, unmarked and dirt. As a result, it was difficult to distinguish one from the other. Unless you were a local, you would have no way to familiarize yourself with the road. “The grandmother recalled the times when there were no paved roads and thirty miles was a day’s journey.” (O’Connor 6) Unmarked identical roads would explain why the grandmother so easily confused the road in Georgia for the one she had seen in Tennessee. “… the house that she had remembered so vividly was not in Georgia but in Tennessee.” (O’Connor 6)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 30, 2015 01:04 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 15

A Good Man is Hard to Find Discussion Question

Question: What does O’Connor mean by “grotesque”? What elements of “A Good Man is Hard to Find” would you describe as “grotesque”?

Answer: O’Connor talks about “grotesque” meaning the ending regarding fatality and horrendous devastation. The elements that made “A Good Man is Hard to Find” grotesque would have to be the ending. The short story says, “if it had to been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life” (O’Connor 12). Throughout the ending of the story, the author describes the scene of how each member of the family was lead through the woods to be killed. “There was a piercing scream from the woods” (O”Connor 12) actually brings you to the scene as the writer describes the action in gory detail. The author even goes into detail about the grandmother being shot, which is extremely grotesque as well. The story says, “who half sat and half lay in a puddle of blood” (O”Connor 12). The mood set in this ending is eerie, and is done by the descriptive, grotesque language used.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at January 30, 2015 09:25 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
1 February 2015

Question 16: Though the story is told from the grandmother's point-of-view, does the story reveal praise and/or criticism for both the mother and the grandmother? How?

Answer: The story reveals criticism for both the mother and the grandmother. The mother based on the grandmother's standards dressed not a way a lady should be. Unlike the grandmother who dressed in her Sunday best, "the children's mother still had on slacks and still had her head tied up in a green kerchief." (O'Connor 2) The mother is also criticized at how her children behave. The grandmother talks to Jon Wesley, the grandson, about in her time "children were more respectful of their native states and their parents and everything else." (O'Connor 2) The mother could also be criticized for, not fighting for the lives of her children when The Misfit captures them. The children are running crazy, and it is The Misfit that has to tell her, "would you mind calling them children to sit down by you?" (O'Connor 8) The grandmother is criticized for being making the trip difficult. When her son says that they are going to Florida, she replies, "You all ought to take them somewhere else for a change." (O'Connor 1) She agrees to go with them to Florida but along the way she stops to mention that they should have gone to Tennessee. It is the grandmother's fault that they got into the accident because she made her son go to a house that "she had remembered so vividly was not in Georgia but in Tennessee." (O'Connor 6) From there she ends up killing the whole family when the grandmother identifies The Misfit screaming, "You're The Misfit!.. I recognized you at once!" (O'Connor 8)

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 1, 2015 11:45 AM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
1 February 2015

Question 17: Flannery O’Connor once said that, “while the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted.” What might O’Connor mean when she says “Christ-haunted”? Why “Christ-haunted” instead of “Christ-centered”

Answer: Although Christ is not a central figure for the South, he still is very influential in how they make their decisions.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 1, 2015 05:46 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
1 February 2015

“A Good Man Is Hard to Find”

Question #9: Keep in mind the “setup” information from question #8 above. What does the grandmother mean when she says, “In my time” at the beginning of this passage?

When the grandmother says, “In my time” at the beginning of the passages she is talking about the difference between when she was a child and children now. Her grandchildren were disrespectfully talking about Georgia and Tennessee. John Wesley said, “Tennessee is just a hillbilly dumping ground and Georgia is a lousy state too.” (Page 2) According to their grandmother when she was a child “children were more respective to their native states and their parents and everything else too” (Page 2) her grandchildren were just the opposite they did not seem to appreciate their parents or where they came from.

Posted by: Selena Hammie at February 1, 2015 09:31 PM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
1 February 2015

Question: What does the grandmother think of the “modern woman”? What are some differences between the grandmother and the mother? How is she mocking each of them?

Answer: The grandmother thinks of “modern woman” as not being true proper ladies and that they don’t take as much time to look good or teach their children to be polite and respect where they come from. Differences between the grandmother and the mother are that the grandmother dresses to impress at all times and is always prepared for anything that could possibly happen and the mother was wearing the same outfit that she had been wearing the night before. The grandmother does this because being proper is what matters most to her, unlike the mother. “The old lady settled herself comfortably, removing her white cotton gloves and putting them up with her purse on the shelf in front of the back window. The children's mother still had on slacks and still had her head tied up in a green kerchief, but the grandmother had on a navy blue straw sailor hat with a bunch of white violets on the brim and a navy blue dress with a small white dot in the print. Her collars and cuffs were white organdy trimmed with lace and at her neckline she had pinned a purple spray of cloth violets containing a sachet.”(Pg. 2)

Posted by: Rachel Addington at February 1, 2015 11:28 PM

Jorge Braham

Dr.Hobbs

Academic Writing II CA12

30 January 2015

Question:

What other technological, economic, and social changes did the U.S. highway system enable in the 1950’s?

Answer:

There was a complete difference this was back when they had slaves, so the roads were not very great. They rode on dirt roads and not too many turns and what not. They had to count out the miles they drove when they went off somewhere.

“They turned onto the dirt road and the car raced roughly along in a swirl of pink dust. The grandmother recalled the times when there were no paved roads, and thirty miles was a day's journey.” (O’Connor, 6)

Posted by: Jorge Braham at February 2, 2015 12:31 AM

Emma Riemer
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 February 2015

A Good Man Is Hard To Find

Question 5: How would you characterize the grandmother?

Answer:
The grandmother was very talkative, and manipulative. For example “… she was seizing at every chance to change Bailey’s mind”(O’Connor 1). She is a round and dynamic character according to Edgar Roberts because she was an original person and was the center of attention.

Posted by: Emma Riemer at February 2, 2015 01:07 AM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
1 February 2015

Question: What elements in a “Good Man Is Hard to Find” would you describe as humorous?

Answer: The author plays violence on the comedy of the lines in the story. One of the elements of humor that reoccurs is how the grandmother uses humor during the most serious moments while telling her story. “The Misfit put on his black hat and looked up suddenly and then away deep into the woods as if her were embarrassed again. "I'm sorry I don't have on a shirt before you ladies," he said, hunching his shoulders slightly. "We buried our clothes that we had on when we escaped and we're just making do until we can get better." (O’Connor 8) The quote is humorous because The Misfit had just ordered the men of the family to be taken into the woods and shot, but he apologizes to the women for not being properly dressed. The humor in the story can be described as a parody.

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at February 2, 2015 01:11 AM

Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
2 February 2015

Question 10: How does the grandmother represent the South’s earlier times by using the word radically charged epithet “pickaninny”? Explain.

Answer: "Children were more respectful of their native states and their parents and everything else. People did right then,” said the reminiscing grandmother to her family during the road trip (O’Connor 2). “In my time,” she then interrupts herself, “Oh look at the cute little pickaninny!" She confirms how southern she is by freely using an old stereotype (O’Connor 2). The term “pickaninny” was used in the south to describe an African American child. It was popularized in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The term was used to refer to a character, Topsy as a stereotype that overshadowed an attempted anti-slavery tool.

Posted by: Victoria Markou at February 2, 2015 06:51 AM

Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
30 January 2015

Question: #2
What are the key themes Flannery O’Connor explores in “A Good Man is Hard to Find”?
Answer:
Some of the themes shown in “A Good Man is Hard to Find” are religion, good vs. evil, family, and can also be society and class.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 2, 2015 08:56 AM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 February 2015

A Good Man is Hard to Find
Question #1: How does Flannery O’Connor describe the cultural and physical landscape of the south, in this story?
Answer: O’Connor describes the south through different characters in the story. According to John Wesley, “Tennessee is a hillbilly dumping ground, and Georgia is a lousy state” (O’Connor 2). June Star seemed to agree with her brother. The grandmother, on the other hand, described Georgia as a beautify state. She described the Stone Mountain, the blue granite on both sides of the highway, clay banks that sparkled with purple, and the rows of crops that looked like green lace (O’Connor 2). The grandmother also pointed out a poor child standing on his porch.

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at February 2, 2015 09:45 AM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
1 February 2015

Question: What are some additional changes the grandmother observes?
Answer: Some additional changes I see that the grandmother observes is that she seems to take note of her surroundings everywhere she goes. In the car she took note of the gas mileage before they left for the trip, she took note of the dirt road where they had to go back a turn down, and she also recognized The Misfit right away before anyone else. “You’re The Misfit!...I recognized you at once!” (O’Connor 8).

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at February 2, 2015 10:18 AM

Rously Paul
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 February 2015


Question: What is the significance of the Southern setting in O’Conner’s story? Would a setting in a different region have worked? Explain.

Answer: The southern setting is a driving force for the story, which starts with a Grandmother griping the state of affairs that are in place for her to travel to Florida she states: "Here this fellow that calls himself The Misfit is aloose from the Federal Pen and headed toward Florida.” If the story took place in a northern setting, the grandmother could add more dialogue on her experiences with individual states and would have shed a light on how much she has explored.

Posted by: Rously Paul at February 2, 2015 11:21 AM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
12 September 2015

Question: What is symbolic about the fact that the “phantom” plantation is just a figment of the grandmother’s bad memory?

Answer: In “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’ Connor, a family of 6 is taking a road trip from Georgia to Tennessee. The grandmother remembers “old plantation house she visited when she was younger” which has a “secret panel with the family silver” inside (O’ Conner 5). A while down the dirt road to this house, the grandmother realizes that the plantation is not in Georgia, but in Tennessee (O’ Conner 6). The phantom plantation and its supposed riches represent an enticement that we should stay away from: greed. The children were full of greed, especially shown when John Wesley says “Let’s go see it! We’ll find it! We’ll poke all the woodwork and find it” (O’ Conner 5). The greed and straying from the path to their destination ultimately leads to the entire family’s demise.

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 12, 2015 01:57 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 September 2015

Question #14

Question: What does the grandmother think of the “modern woman”? What are some differences between the grandmother and the mother? How is she mocking each of them?

Answer: The grandmother in the story has a very set standard of what a lady should be. She is stuck in the past holding her own standards as the only ones that matter. As far as a “modern woman” goes, to her, they should look and behave the same way as the women of her era. When the family is about to go vacation in Florida, the grandmother puts on a very organized and thought out outfit, suitable for a lady (O’Conner 2). There seems to be a strange focus on the fact that the mother of the children wears slacks. It is mentioned in the mother’s introduction to the story (O’Conner 1) and then again as they are about to start their car ride (O’Conner 2). The fixation might be so pronounced because the author wants the reader to realize that a) the “modern woman” is now wearing pants which eludes to the time frame and b) to show the contrast in the grandmothers clothing to that of her daughter-in-law. However a lady is not created merely from her wardrobe. There is also a specific way a lady should act and how she should raise her kids. The grandmother thinks the mother should have her children be more “broad” (O’Conner 1). She also makes a remark to her daughter-in-law’s features, comparing her face to that of a cabbage (O’Conner 1). Since a cabbage has never been the epitome of beauty and elegance, one could only assume the comparison was made to say that she was plain and didn’t put as much effort into her appearance as the grandmother did. Also the fact that grandmother constantly reprimands the children like during the car ride (O’Conner 2) and then again at the diner (O’Conner 4). Because she feels the need to do so instead of letting the parents punish their own children, shows that she doesn’t agree with the way the parents handle their kids. It also shows that she feels that the kids haven’t been properly brought up. These are both things that the grandmother probably blames the mother for, since a proper lady from her era would have been in charge of the child rearing.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 12, 2015 06:52 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 September 2015

Question: Though the story is told from the grandmother’s point of view, does the story reveal praise and/or criticism for both the mother and the grandmother? How?

Answer: The story raises more criticism for both the grandmother and the mother, rather than praise. The grandmother is seen as a manipulator throughout the entire story. At the beginning of the story she tries to persuade Bailey to not go to Florida for vacation because she wanted to visit her connections in east Tennes-see (O’Connor 1). She also tried to convince the Misfit to not shoot her by continually reassuring him that he was a good man, as well as asking him the question, “You wouldn’t shoot a lady would you?” (O’Connor 8). The only time the mother shows that she is upset at the end of the story when Bailey and the boy are taken into the woods.

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at September 12, 2015 11:23 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09

September 12, 2015


Question: How does the image above compare to O'Connor's descriptions of the mother and grandmother?

Answer: The image compares to the mother and grandmother in multiple ways. The grandmother is a classy, wealthy, and elegant woman. "In case of an accident, anyone seeing her dead on the highway would know at once that she was a lady." (O'Connor pg. 138). She was a real ladylike character, unlike the mother who is a messy, average, and careless woman. "The children's mother still had on slacks and still had her head tied up in a green kerchief." (O'Connor pg. 138). The woman in this image has all the characteristics of Bailey's grandmother; even her confident stance is an example of her character. Of course, the mother is the opposite image of this example. Her stance would not be so straight, confident and strong, her clothes would be the regular, modern-day woman's look.

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk at September 13, 2015 01:58 AM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 September 2015


“The grandmother recalled the times when there were no paved roads and thirty miles was a day’s journey. The dirt road was hilly and there were sudden washes in it and sharp curves on dangerous embankments. All at once, they would be on a hill, looking down over the blue tops of trees for miles around, then the next minute, they would be in a red depression with the dust-coated trees looking down on them.” (Flannery O’Connor 6)
“The road was about ten feet above and they could see only the tops of the trees on the other side of it. Behind the ditch they were sitting in there were more woods, tall and dark and deep.” (Flannery O’Connor 7)

Question: What other technological, economic, and social changes did the U.S. highway system enable in the 1950s?
Answer: Other technological, economic, and social changes that the U.S. highway system enabled in the 1950s are the evolving of transportation and fueled by the popularity of family cars.


Posted by: Hana Lee at September 13, 2015 02:27 PM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
13 September 2015


Question: How does Flannery O’Connor describe the cultural and physical landscape of the South, in this story?

Answer: Flannery O’Connor described the South as a place that has changed for the worse. According to the grandmother, when she was growing up the South was a safe, beautiful and wonderful place. Now all the beautiful places are either run down or disappeared. The South had a lot of tourist attractions like the Stone Mountain, which had blue granite, red clay banks, and crops (O'Connor 2). The South also had places that were there when the grandmother was younger, but not anymore. For example, when the grandmother and her family were on the road, they passed by a graveyard that belonged to the plantation when she was younger. When her grandson asked what happened to the plantation, the grandmother said, “Gone with the wind”, meaning that there no longer is a plantation there (O’Connor 3). As the trip continued, they were amazed at how many dirt roads there were. They were not used to not having pavement to drive on. (O'Connor 5). Later, the grandmother at a local dining place was talking to a guy. They were talking about the old days and how things have changed in the South, the man said, “I remember the day you could go off and leave your screen door unlatched. Not no more” (O’Connor 4). O’Connor described that now you have to be more careful about what you do in the South. You just cannot “leave your screen door unlatched (O’Connor 4).

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at September 13, 2015 02:39 PM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
12 September 2015

Question: Flannery O’Connor once said that “while the south is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted.” What might O’Connor mean when she says “Christ-haunted”? Why “Christ-haunted” instead of “Christ-centered”.

Answer: The term “Christ-haunted” might mean that even though people are holy and go to church still commit crimes. The grandmother talks with Red Sam about how people can’t leave there screen doors open anymore because of people. "A good man is hard to find," Red Sammy said. "Everything is getting terrible. I remember the day you could go off and leave your screen door unlatched. Not no more" (O’Connor). So O’Connor uses Christ-haunted instead of Christ-centered because of the crime that still goes on.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 13, 2015 06:22 PM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
13 September 2015

Question: Flannery O'Connor once said that, "while the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most Christ-haunted." What might O'Connor mean when she says "Christ-haunted"? Why "Christ-haunted instead of Christ-centered"?

Answer: When O'Connor describes the South as "Christ-haunted" she means that a majority of the people at the time used Christ as a way to explain everything. Whether their actions were right or wrong, people would support them with Christ. They used Him as an answer to everything, and sometimes it was not a good one. The grandmother from, "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" is an example of a "Christ-haunted" character. As " She reached out to touch him on the shoulder," him being The Misfit, she was killed (O'Connor 12). The grandmother was trying so hard to convince The Misfit to turn to Jesus and use him to allow her life to be spared. The people of this time thought that the reason bad people existed was because they lacked Christ in their life, being the reason they are "Christ-haunted".

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at September 13, 2015 07:07 PM

Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobb
English 122 Academic Writing II CA03
September 13, 2015

Question: How O’Connor’s humor or irony come through in the passage about making her family “broad” by see[ing] different parts of the world? Explain why.

By the grandmother trying to “broad” the family through sightseeing resulted in the entire family being killed. It is ironic because just before the trip, she was trying to stop the family from visiting Florida with the hopes of going Tennessee. However, she told other stories of why the family should not go Florida; like to help broaden the children. Also, she mentioned the criminals who broke out of prison and said, "Here this fellow that calls himself The Misfit is aloose from the Federal Pen and headed toward Florida and you read here what it says he did to these people… I wouldn't take my children in any direction with a criminal like that aloose in it.” (O’Connor 1). Her wanting to go visit a house people she knew live there upon a time was what got them killed.

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at September 13, 2015 10:35 PM

Shania Bienaime
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
11 September 2015

Question: Although the 1950s highways are not what they are today, how were they different from the 1930s/1950s rural roads in Georgia? What did they permit more people to do?

Answer: “The dirt road was hilly and there were sudden washes in it and sharp curves on dangerous embankments.”(Connor 6) Driving on the roads during that time period doesn’t seem to be safe the way it was described in the story. Today’s roads have high regulations such as speed limit, road safety, pot holes, or hills. “The grandmother offered to hold the baby and the children's mother passed him over the front seat to her.” (Conner 2) Passing a baby let alone having it in the front seat is also a big no when it comes to today’s roads safety.

Posted by: Shania Bienaime at September 13, 2015 11:10 PM

ENG 122 CA03
14 September 2015
O’Connor
Tannor, Lexi, Sabrina


Question: What elements of “A Good Man is Hard to Find” would you describe as humorous?
Answer: In “A Good Man is Hard to Find” the story is based on a southern Gothic theme. “Her collars and cuffs were white organdy trimmed with lace and at her neckline she had pinned a purple spray of cloth violets containing a sachet. In case of an accident, anyone seeing her dead on the highway would know at once she was a lady” (O’Connor 2.) Therefore, this is one example of the “dark humor” in the story.

Posted by: Tannor, Lexi, Sabrina at September 14, 2015 10:09 AM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing CA09
14 September 2015

Question:
How does the Grandmother represent the souths earlier times by using the word racially charged epithet "pickaninny"? Explain.
Answer:
She referred pickaninny as African Americans "Black Boys" She explained that they were people who didn’t have much things, very poor people. She said to her grandchildren that she would have loved to have taken a picture of the negro child. Saying " oh look at that cute little pickaninny!" "Wouldn’t that make a picture, now" (O'Connor 2) Explaining to her grand kids that sometimes negro couldn’t even afford britches and that’s why when he saw the pickaninny he was half naked.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at September 14, 2015 10:56 AM

Zach, Louis, Matt, and
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
14 September 2015

Question:

Look up the word "epiphany" if you do not understand what it means. At the beginning of the story the grandmother is totally preoccupied with what she wants. Yet, as she travels on throughout the story she accidentally stumbles upon the meaning of life. What religious epiphany or epiphanies does the grandmother experience?

Answer:

At the end of the short story the grandmother is alone with the misfit. After Bobby Lee has killed the entire family, the Grandmother has her epiphany. The reader tells us in the final passage, "His voice seemed about to crack and the grandmother's head cleared for an instant" (Hardy 12). Along with this moment of clarity, the Grandmother speaks her final words, which explains her last vivid moment of thought, "Why you're one of my babies. You're one of my own children !" (Hardy 12). This final exclamation is the grandmother coming to realize her hypocritical thoughts and attitudes in life have somehow shaped who the misfit is.

Posted by: Zachary Pottle at September 14, 2015 01:48 PM

Daniel Wright
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 September 2015

Question: What does the grandmother's use of these words suggest about the racial views she holds?

Answer: The use of racist terms mean she is racist. Although hers' seems tempered by humor and not intended in a malicious way. "...children were more respectful of their native states and their parents and everything else. People did right then. Oh look at the cute little pickaninny!" (A Good Man Is Hard to Find O'Conner 2)

Posted by: Daniel Wright at September 14, 2015 02:12 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
15 September 2015

Question: What themes does Flannery O'Connor explore in "A Good Man is Hard to Find?"

Answer: There are quite a few themes that O’Connor explores in the story such as the relationship of good vs. evil and trust but what seemed to be the most interesting theme explored was the incorporation of religion. The grandmother and the Misfit have an extended conversation about religion in which she tries to bring Jesus upon the misfit in hope that the misfit might spare her life. She talks about how she could tell that he was a good man and that if he just prayed for forgiveness Jesus would forgive him. This did not work with the misfit as he responded “Jesus was the only one that ever raised the dead, and he shouldn't have done it. He shown everything off balance. If he did what he said, then it's nothing for you to do but thow away everything and follow him, and if he didn't, then it's nothing for you to do but enjoy the few minutes you got left the best way you can by killing somebody or burning down his house or doing some other meanness to him. No pleasure but meanness” (O’Connor 12). Here the misfit references a biblical event in which Jesus rose from the dead but instead of believing in this event the misfit claims that Jesus might not have risen from the dead. Since he didn't rise from the dead what does it matter if one does any right in the world, one might as well engage in the pleasure of madness while alive on Earth because Jesus wasn't even legit in the first place. This is a huge surprise to the grandma as he then ends up shooting her in the chest.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at September 14, 2015 03:34 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 September 2015

Answer: Racism is a slight theme in "A Good Man Is Hard to Find:" The Grandmother unclose her racism when she interpret on the kid the family sees out the window: "Little niggers in the country don't have things like we do," calling him a "cute little pickaninny." However she acts compassion for the status of blacks, her feelings near them are obviously racist.

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 14, 2015 03:35 PM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
13 September 2015

Question: What are some additional changes the grandmother observes?

Answer: The Grandmother in A Good Man is Hard to Find is a product of the time she was raised in. It is inferred by her dialogue that she is from the civil war era, such as “and the story went that all the family silver was hidden in it when Sherman came through but it was never found” (O’Flannery 5). The grandmother notices constant changes in attitude and atmosphere from the time she grew up in. Her main observation is the difference in “womanly” behavior. She scolds those who don’t fit her moral code and passes judgement “’Ain't she cute?’ the woman repeated, stretching her mouth politely. ‘Arn't you ashamed?’ hissed the grandmother.” (O’Flannery 4). The grandmother also observes the changes in behavior in men, such as the misfit, whom she tries to convince to pray, and tries in vain to change his behavior, falling back on her lopsided moral code regarding ladylike behavior “You've got good blood! I know you wouldn't shoot a lady! I know you come from nice people! Pray! Jesus, you ought not to shoot a lady” (O’Flannery 11).

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 14, 2015 03:47 PM

Madison Helms
Yaribilisa Colon
Catalina Suarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CAO3
15 September 2015

Question: What is the significance of the southern setting in O’Connors story? Would a setting in a different region have “worked” just as well? Why or why not?


Answer: The family in the story are really old fashioned. The grandmother says things like “You all ought to take them somewhere else for a change so they would see different parts of the world and be broad. They never have been to east Tennessee."(pg.1) The family talks like they are not educated, which is a stereotype of the south. Another setting would not work, because the family is very simple and they would fit in to another region.

Posted by: Madison Helms at September 15, 2015 03:32 PM

Cannelle Samson
Emma Duncan
Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
14 September 2015


Question: Look up the word “grotesque” to see how it is used/understand in the study of literature. What are the effects of O’Connor’s being both humorous and grotesque in “A Good Man is Hard to Find.”


Answer: The effects of O'Connor's being both humorous and grotesque in "A Good Man is Hard to Find" could be reflected in the individual reaction of the reader. The reactions towards the short story will vary according to the audience. The audience of the period in which the author wrote "A Good Man is Hard to Find" might have not found this tale to be horrific in lecture but more humorous and grotesque because of the jokes related to the epoch and political circumstances of the time, whereas the audience nowadays might find his work to be dark and extremely grotesque. However, to understand such reaction is important to understand the specific literary meanings of the words. One perfect example is the word "grotesque" which would describe an antagonist who is both disgusting and empathetic. In some lines where the grandmother converses with him with find empathetic lines such as "I was never a bad boy that I remember of (O'Connor 10)." Lines like the previous one fed the reader hope towards a happy ending for the story. However, in the final moments of the story, the reader will experience a shock after reading that the Misfit unscrupulously shoots the grandmother in the chest three times after a touch of affection that could have meant redemption for the villain.
The story could also be humorous because of the real life similitudes expressed in the story. During the journey, the grandmother scolds her grandchildren, and she starts with the cliché phrase of every elder, "In my times." Therefore, the story is humorous if the reader can relate his experiences with the experiences of this family. General reactions that most modern readers would have when they read this work of O'Connor's is disgust and uncomfortableness because of the explicit language and events from the story.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 15, 2015 04:54 PM

Johnny Nguyen, Lady Hernandez, & Zeida Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09
14 September 2015

Question: What does O’Connor mean by “grotesque”? What elements of “a Good Man is Hard to Find” would you describe as “grotesque”?

Answer: O’Connor uses “grotesque” in a violent and repulsive manner. Basically the author uses it as unappealing to the reader. She uses graphic and twisted scenes, such as when the grandmother was shot three times. The story states, “"Why you're one of my babies. You're one of my own children!" She reached out and touched him on the shoulder. The Misfit sprang back as if a snake had bitten him and shot her three times through the chest.” (O’Connor 12)

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 15, 2015 08:22 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
January 28 2016

Question 2)What are the key themes Flannery explores in "A good man is hard to find"?

Answer 2)In the short fiction "a good man is hard to find" the key themes explored I believe are trust. At the beginning of the story, Red Sam tells the girls about how he let two guys charge the gas they bought and they weren't honest. This is when Red Sam says "a good man is hard to find" suggesting that it is hard to trust people these days. The story also has a lot of comparisons to old times and current times, when the children are acting the way that they do the Grandma often comments on how they had more respect in their day. The overall theme is how times have changed and with this time people have changed in the way they behave.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at January 28, 2016 01:38 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
28 January 2016

A Good Man is Hard to Find

Question #10: How does the grandmother represent the South’s earlier times by using the word racially charged epithet “pickaninny”?

Answer: The grandmother starts off her tale with the famous words “in my time…” (Flannery 2). It is a trend used in various media and real life to relate an old timer’s account of what the world was like back in the good old day. In her particular case, back in her day means the old South and how she represents it. We can see what it was like based off her vocabulary alone. “Pickaninny” is a derogatory, old Southern term that refers to a young, black child. You can determine that she was raised in a time where black people were still thought inferior to white people. From the way she says “Wouldn't that make a picture, now?” when seeing the black boy, you can tell she views them as an oddity, something that should be distant from yourself. Just like animals at the zoo they are meant to be observed from afar.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at January 28, 2016 08:17 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
28 January 2016

Question: How does Flannery O’Connor describe the cultural and physical landscape of the South, in this story?

Answer: O’Connor speaks about the physical landscape of the South quite fondly saying, “Stone Mountain; the blue granite that in some places came up to both sides of the highway; the brilliant red clay banks slightly streaked with purple; and the various crops that made rows of green lace-work on the ground” (O’Connor 2). The cultural landscape, however, was described as being country. In the story, O’Connor mentions that it’s a “hillbilly dumping ground” (2).

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at January 28, 2016 09:41 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: 8. Try to imagining looking out the window of the sedan when the grandmother points out "the cute little pickaninny!" This is a very dated, and offensive, racial epithet to describe an African-American child. Additionally, the grandmother uses another offensive, racist term. Consider the following questions keeping in mind the historical context of O'Connor's story: What does the grandmother's use of words suggest about the racial views she holds?

Answer: At the beginning of this short story, "A Good Man is Hard to Find", by Flannery O'Connor, the reader is introduced to the grandmother who says offensive terms. This is show when she says, "Oh look at the cute little pickaninny"(O'Connor 2) while pointing to an African-American child. Out of context, the grandmother's use of the words to describe the child suggests she is racists, which means she has hatred for those of a certain race; however, in context I don't think the grandmother is not racist but rather a product of her time. In her time in the south, racist slurs were commonly said, and it was not deemed wrong or offensive to say these racial slurs. Therefore, she is simply used to this offensive language because it was acceptable in her time. Although, her pointing at the child and staring at it may seem like the child is a sculpture in the museum and not a person, she does not seem malicious or intentionally offensive, just unaware. I also do not consider her racist because after she points out the African- American child, she comments that "If I could paint, I'd paint that picture. (2)" and John Wesley waved (2). The grandmother did not argue against him waving at the child nor did she say any malicious comment about any hatred she might have; instead she said she would capture the memory if the child. This suggests that she may be offensive because of her offensive language, but no way is she has hatred for African Americans.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at January 28, 2016 10:53 PM

Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
28 January 2016

Question #9: Keep in mind the “setup” information from question #8 above. What does the grandmother mean when she says, “In my time” at the beginning of this passage?

Answer: When the grandmother stated, “In my time,” she referred to her old southern social class (O’Conner 2). Years ago, in her days, people respected one another, and it took several hours just to travel a few miles. She was a well-regarded “lady,” who dressed as a woman should be in her time, but in the modern era, her son and his family did not listen to her. She lectured the children about respect and valuing their heritage, but afterwards, she disrespected an African American child when she stated, “Oh look at the cute little pickaninny!” (O’Conner 2). Clearly, it was a racist comment and thus jarred her memory of her days on the plantation.

Posted by: Heather Hauck at January 28, 2016 11:16 PM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: How does O’Connor’s humor or irony come through in the passage about making her family “broad” by “see[ing] different parts of the world”? Explain fully.

Answer: O’Conner uses irony in the passage by misreading the emotions and believing that everyone is feeling the same emotions as her. An example is when she misreads the personality of the misfit because the personality is one of sociopath. Another ironic moment occurs at the end when the grandmother has a change of emotion after she was fake; she begins to feel for the misfit, and we know because she says “Why you’re one of my babies. You’re one of my own children!”

Posted by: Omar Martinez at January 29, 2016 02:10 AM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
27 January 2016

Question: What are some additional changes the grandmother observes?

Answer: The grandmother observed that as the generation changes, children no longer admire their home state. John Wesley for example, rather leaves and expresses his feelings by stating, “Tennessee is just a hillbilly dump ground, and Georgia is a lousy state too” (O’ Connor 2). The grandmother, on the other hand, strong disagrees and reflects on her younger days when children would respect their native state, parents, and other things. Furthermore, the grandmother also discovers that finding a good man is a thing of the past and in today’s society, trying to find a good man is difficult and pointless(4). Therefore, people are changing, and they are not changing for the good, they are changing for the worse.

Posted by: vincia mitchell at January 29, 2016 10:30 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: Although the 1950s highways are not what they are today, how are they different from the 1930s/1940s rural roads in Georgia? What did they permit more people to do?

Answer: The roads in the 1930s/1940s were dirt roads compared to paved roads in the 1950s. The grandmother said, “there were no paved roads, and thirty miles was a day’s journey” (O’Connor 6). Going thirty miles a day was considers a long drive in the 1930s. The grandmother would recall “looking down over the blue tops of trees for miles around” (6). This allowed people to see the nature that is in their town.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 29, 2016 12:34 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 06 Academic Writing II
29 January 2016

Question 5.) How would you characterize the grandmother?
Answer: I personally would characterize the grandmother as an old-school mannered elderly lady that is concerned for her grandchildren. She wants to make sure that they grow up with a knowledge of the whole country not just their hometown. She dresses very abstract and wears women colored clothing to identify herself as such in case something terrible ever happened to her. The grandmother is characterized as the prototypical older lady who dwells on the past and loves her grandchildren.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at January 29, 2016 02:18 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 06 Academic Writing II
29 January 2016

Question 5.) How would you characterize the grandmother?
Answer: I personally would characterize the grandmother as an old-school mannered elderly lady that is concerned for her grandchildren. She wants to make sure that they grow up with a knowledge of the whole country not just their hometown. She dresses very abstract and wears women colored clothing to identify herself as such in case something terrible ever happened to her. The grandmother is characterized as the prototypical older lady who dwells on the past and loves her grandchildren.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at January 29, 2016 02:18 PM

Travis Farmer


Dr. Hobbs


ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06


29 January 2016


Questions: 3.) Although the 1950s highways are not what they are today, how were they different from the 1930s/1940s rural roads in Georgia? What did they permit more people to do?


Answer: The highways of the fifties were different from the rural roads in namely top speed. The roads transformed a days drive from thirty miles to three-hundred miles. The Grandmother in the story even recalled the times when thirty miles was a day's journey on the rural roads [O'Connor 6]

Posted by: Travis Farmer at January 29, 2016 02:23 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: 12.) What is symbolic about the fact that the "phantom" plantation is just a figment of the grandmother's bad memory?

Answer: 12.) It is symbolic because it is where the family used to be buried and when asked where it is she responded, "Gone With the Wind" (O'Connor, 3).

Posted by: Justin Robinson at January 29, 2016 02:23 PM

Allison Cobb

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06

29 January 2016



Question: The grandmother thinks that taking the Georgia-based family to east Tennesee would make them "broad" by "see[ing] different parts of the world". Look up the meaning of the word broad as used in this context. Based on what you know from the story, what do you think of this passage? What is O'Connor's tone here in her characterization of the grandmother?




Answer: The passage where the grandmother says “you all ought to take them somewhere else for a chance so they would see different parts of the world and be broad” (O’Conner 1) exemplifies her critical personality. It is very early on, but it’s a telling phrase. Throughout It’s Hard To Find A Good Man the grandmother is characterized as selfish and negative. The tone O’Conner uses in the first paragraph brings this up fast.

Posted by: Allison Cobb at January 29, 2016 02:49 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
31 January 2016

“A Good Man is Hard to Find.”

Q: The grandmother thinks that taking the Georgia-based family to East Tennessee would make them “broad” by “seeing different parts of the world”? Look up the meaning of the word broad in this context. Based on what you know from the story, what do you think of this passage? What is O’ Connor’s tone here in her characterization of her grandmother?

A: In this context, the grandmother wants her grandchildren to be “broad” as in “well-rounded”, but this is more for her desires than for theirs. She wants to visit old connections in East Tennessee, and so she is taking every opportunity to change her son’s mind( O’ Connor 1) about going to Florida. Because of using the word “broad”, and the ending of this passage, I think O’ Connor is highlighting that it the grandmother with the “narrow-mindedness”, and not the children. Where the grandmother is considered, O’ Connor’s tone remains the same throughout the story: the grandmother is a selfish, narrow-minded person that ultimately leads her family to their death…, which is also quite an ironic twist as well.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at January 31, 2016 04:58 PM

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