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September 18, 2014

Campbell's *Trickster Archetype,* as Explained by Christopher Vogler


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 18, 2014 03:25 PM

Readers' Comments:

Erin Gaylord, Nathanael Jones, Abrar Nooh
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
25 September 2014

Group Question # 8:

Tricksters,” claims Christopher Vogler, “serve several important psychological functions.” In you own words:

a) Explain what Vogler means by the THIRD psychological function of the Tricketer: pointing “out folly and hypocrisy”

b) Show how this occurs, if at all, in Herman Hesse’s novel Siddhartha.

Answer:

a) They find the faults of the hero and their lifestyle. If the hero tries to be virtuous, the Trickster points out the bad things about them to prove they are not virtuous.

b) The ferryman is the trickster; he points out that Siddhartha wanted to leave his father when he was young because he was not learning, yet Siddhartha wanted to father his son. “MY dear friend, have you forgotten that instructive story about Siddhartha, the Brahmin’s son, which you once told me here? Who protected Siddhartha the Samana from Samsara, from sin, greed and folly?” (Hesse 121). Siddhartha sought to protect, teach, and raise his son, against his son’s will. Like father, like son, Siddhartha fell into the same habitual attitude as his father when he grew up.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 29, 2014 11:06 AM

Claudia Pierre, Jonah Robertson, Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
29 September 2014

QUESTION #9:
In addition to serving all three of the stated psychological functions, Christopher Vogler claims that, in drama, Trickster archetypes also perform “the dramatic function of comic relief.” Show how Trickster archetype/s in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol restore balance by relieving tension, suspense, and conflict in the audience or reader, if at all. In your response, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
“The Trickster archetype embodies the energies of mischief and desire for change. All the characters in stories who are primarily clowns or comical sidekicks express this archetype.” (Vogler, 77) The Trickster that we revealed in the Christmas Carol was the ghost of Christmas Present. The Ghost of Christmas Present tend to serve as a symbol of the Christmas ideal state, celebration.

“He’s a comical old fellow,” said Scrooge’s nephew, “that’s the truth; and not so pleasant as he might be. However, his offenses carry their own punishment, and I have nothing to say against him.” “I am sure he is very rich, Fred, “hinted Scrooge’s niece. “At least you always tell me so.” (Dickens, 45)

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 29, 2014 06:22 PM

(Do Over)
Olivia Ago-Stallworth, Sharrad Forbes, Bryce Veller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
29 September 2014

QUESTION #12:
Sometimes, suggests Christopher Volger, the job of the Trickster archetype is to undermine “the status quo.” Take time to fill in the gaps of your knowledge and look up the concept of “status quo” so that you fully understand it. For this question you’ll need to (a.) identify who the Trickster is in the story (there may be several), and (b.) identify what the status quo is in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha. Once you’ve that, (c.) explain how the Trickster tries to challenge the status quo in this narrative, if at all. In your response, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
The Trickster in Siddhartha is Siddhartha. Siddhartha broke the status quo because he did not want to be a Brahman like his dad. Siddhartha tries to challenge this status quo by thinking teachers cannot teach something to someone, and the person has to experience the moment in order to learn. “I am like you. You cannot love either, otherwise how could you practice love as an art? Perhaps people like us cannot love (Hesse 59).”


Work Cited
Hesse, Hermann. Siddartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 29, 2014 07:32 PM

Zachary Sabo, Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
1 October 2014

Group Question #11: Sometimes, suggest Christopher Vogler, the job of the trickster archetype is to undermine “the status quo.” Take time to fill in the gaps of knowledge and look up the concept of “status quo” so that you can fully understand it. For this question you’ll need to (a) identify who the trickster is in the story (there may be several), and (b) identify what the status quo is in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol. Once you’ve done that, (C) explain how the trickster tries to challenge the status quo in this narrative, if at all. In your response, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The status quo typically refers to the normal, existing state of affairs in one’s daily life. Basically these are the norms that go on in people’s lives, and the job that the trickster has is to alter the status quo, which differs from person to person. In the beginning of A Christmas Carol, Scrooge is the trickster, because he goes against what the status quo is. His partner, Bob, and his nephew are examples of the status quo, being average citizens, and Scrooge says “Bah, humbug!” to everything they stand for. (Dickens 3) As the story progresses however, the ghosts that come to talk to Scrooge are considered ally tricksters, because they are trying to change Scrooge and his “status quo” of being harsh, stubborn cold-hearted, etc. They are called ally tricksters, however, because although they are changing the status quo, they are doing it for the better.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 30, 2014 06:56 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
30 September 2014

Question #4:
“Tricksters,” claims Christopher Vogler, “serve several important psychological functions.” In your own words, (a.) explain what Vogler means by the FIRST psychological function of the Trickster: cutting “big egos down to size” and (b.) show how this occurs, if at all, in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha. In your response, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Vogler claims that the trickster method on “cutting big egos down” is bringing the trickster, hero, and reader down to earth. He discusses how laughter can help realize common bonds, but shown how a story can have a hypocrisy. However, he transition how a story can bring a healthy change and transformation, but can lead into absurdity. In the story of Siddhartha, I feel that Siddhartha is the trickster. Siddhartha was the trickster overall due to his ego, based on his pure illusion of self. “Siddhartha learned a great deal from the Samanas; he learned many ways of losing the Self. He traveled along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue. He traveled the way of self-denial through meditation, through the emptying of the mind through all images. Along these and other paths did he learn to travel. He lost his Self a thousand times and for days on end he dwelt in non-being. But although the paths took him away from Self, in the end they always led back to it (Hesse, 15).” Siddhartha goes through a temporary process of hypocrisy.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 1, 2014 12:12 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
1 October 14

Question #6:
“Tricksters,” claims Christopher Vogler, “serve several important psychological functions.” In your own words, (a.) explain what Vogler means by the SECOND psychological function of the Trickster: helping Heroes to “realize [their] common bonds” and (b.) show how this occurs, if at all, in Herman Hesse’s novel Siddhartha. In your response, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
(a.) Vogler is trying to say that the trickster is an acquaintance to the hero in the sense that they help the hero by creating change in their life that results in them bettering themselves. For example, the merchant can be considered a trickster because he initiates a change in Siddhartha. This change makes him realize that he has done all this work to get rid of his need for material possessions, and makes him understand that he doesn’t need the material possessions to continue in his pursuit of enlightenment. (Hesse 49-55)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at October 1, 2014 09:20 AM

Summer Taylor, Kendra Hinton, Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01

QUESTION #13:
Review what Christopher Vogler had to say about the "trictster hero" mashup. Is there such a hybrid archetype as the "trickster hero" somewhere in Charles Dicken's novel A Christmas Carol? If so, who is it, and how so?

ANSWER:
Vogler says that trickster heroes are very popular characters especially found in folk lore. Vogler goes on to say that this type of character brings, "big egos down to size;" which is certainly the case in A Christmas Carol. Marley can be classified as the trickster hero in this story. He tricks Scrooge by thinking he is hallucinating seeing Marley's face as his own door knocker. Marley also makes all the bells ring in Scrooges house to scare him. Marley is also a type of hero in this story because he talks to Scrooge and tells him that if he doesn't change his ways that Scrooge will end up like him in the afterworld- in chains. Though Scrooge does not believe that Marley is real Marley's words have a big impact on Scrooge through the rest of the story. Since Marley used to be partners with Scrooge, he knows exactly what to say to Scrooge to make Scrooge think. This, and the other ghosts words, ultimately are what save Scrooge from his fate.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at October 1, 2014 09:26 AM

Tashanna Harris and Tyler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
01 October 2014
Group #5

Question #12
Sometimes, suggests Christopher Volger, the job of the Trickster archetype is to undermine “the status quo.” Take time to fill in the gaps of your knowledge and look up the concept of “status quo” so that you fully understand it. For this question you’ll need to (a.) identify who the Trickster is in the story (there may be several), and (b.) identify what the status quo is in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha. Once you’ve that, (c.) explain how the Trickster tries to challenge the status quo in this narrative, if at all. In your response, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The Trickster in Siddhartha is Kamala and Kamaswami. Siddhartha status quo is him trying to find his purpose in life and trying to be reborn again into a better person than what he was. Kamala and Kamaswami challenge the status quo because they make him believe that it's much more to life than living like a Brahmin. It's more to life than thinking, fasting and waiting. You can have riches and that you can live life with ease if you had riches and love. Kamala wouldn't even teach Siddhartha because he wasn't good enough. "He must have fine clothes, fine shoes and plenty of money in his purse and presents for Kamala" (Hesse 54).

Posted by: tashanna harris at October 1, 2014 09:46 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
01 October 2014

Question #3
Explain what Vogler means by the first psychological function of the Trickster: cutting "big egos down to size". (b) show how this occurs if at all in Charles Dickens's novel A Christmas Carol.

Answer:
The first psychological function of a trickster is cutting "big egos down to size" which means that if you think to highly of yourself, always serious about life the trickster would be the one to bring out another side of you that changes you from uptight to someone who needs to see life from a positive and more joyful point of view. In Charles Dicken's A Christmas Carol The Ghost of Christmas Past made Mr. Scrooge realize that you can't go through life being grumpy you have to look back on times when Christmas meant something and enjoy the Christmas spirit.

Posted by: Tashanna Harris at October 1, 2014 10:04 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
1 October 2014

Question #2
What Does the trickster embody? How is this embodiment performed in Hermann Hesse novel Siddhartha?
According to Volger, he states that the archetype “embodies the energy of mischief and desire.” In Hesse Herman Siddhartha, the embodiment of the trickster would be Siddhartha himself. Siddhartha is always seeking change and begins a journey to learn and experience everything ,"I, also, would like to look and smile, sit and walk like that, so free, so worthy, so restrained, so candid, so childlike and mysterious. A man only looks and walks like that when he has conquered his Self. I also will conquer my Self...No other teachings will attract me, since this man's teachings have not done so." (Hesse Ch.3)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 1, 2014 10:21 AM

Blake Bromen & Josh Natonio
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
29 September 14

Question #9:
In addition to serving all three of the stated psychological functions, Christopher Vogler claims that, in drama, Trickster archetypes also perform “the dramatic function of comic relief.” Showhow Trickster archetype/s in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol restore balance by relieving tension, suspense, and conflict in the audience or reader, if at all. In your response, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The ghost of Christmas future is a trickster, because they shook up the situation that Scrooge was in by making him think into the future about all aspects of his life and how he needed to pull himself together. Since he saw the situation that was coming he knew he had to fix something now to make it worthwhile in the future. (Dickens 32-33) Scrooge is more future oriented in the aspect of saving money, but has no care for the present or past.

Posted by: Blake Bromen & Josh Natonio at October 1, 2014 10:32 AM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
1 October 2014

Question #7
“Tricksters,” claims Christopher Vogler, “serve important psychological functions.” In your own words, (a.) explain what Vogler means by the THIRD psychological function of the Trickster: pointing “out folly and hypocrisy” and (b.) show how this occurs, it at all, in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol.”

Text Source: “The Writers Journey,” By Christopher Vogler

I believe that Vogler is trying to explain that before we judge “the trickster,” we should probably look at ourselves. When we do that, we may find some common bonds between the Trickster and us. Vogler says, “By provoking healthy laughter they help us realize our common bonds… Above all, they bring about healthy change and transformation” (Vogler 77)… If I had to point out “A Trickster” in “A Christmas Carol,” by Charles Dickens, I would have to point out the several Ghosts that visited Scrooge. In a way, these Ghosts trick Scrooge when they threaten him of death and bound in chains if he doesn’t change. Scrooge takes their “trickster” advice in my opinion, and changes his life.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at October 1, 2014 11:05 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
29 September 2013

Question #6: “trickster,’ claims Christopher Vogler, “serve several important psychological functions.” In your own words, (a.) explain what Vogler means by the second psychological function of the trickster: helping Heroes to “realize [their] common bonds” and (b.) show how this occurs, if at all, in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha.
Answer: According to Vogler, the psychological function of the trickster serves to help the hero realize how they are not too different from everyone else.
Work Cited
Hesse, H. (1951). Siddhartha; New York: New Directions.

Posted by: Anet Milian at October 1, 2014 11:25 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 1, 2014 01:01 PM

Marie Destin and Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
13 February 2015

Question: “Trickster” claims to Christopher Vogler, “severe several important psychological functions.” In your own words (a.) explain what Vogler means by the FIRST psychological function in the Trickster: cutting “big egos down to size” and (b). show how this occurs, if at all, in Charles Dickens’ novel A Christmas Carol. In your response use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: (A.) When Vogler mentions cutting “big egos down to size” (77), he is referring to bringing the hero’s faults to light, usually in a comical fashion. This function allows the audience, and sometimes the hero, to observe the need for change by “drawing attention to the imbalance” (Vogler 77). (B.) In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, by Volger’s function of the trickster would be Scrooge’s nephew, Fred. Within the first chapter, Fred counters his Uncle’s poor attitude asking, “what right have you to be dismal?” (Dickens 10) which points out the folly of Scrooge’s manner.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Marie Destin at February 13, 2015 03:23 PM

Jasmine Weaver & Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
13 February 2015

Question: In your own words, (A.) explain what Volger means by the second psychological function of the trickster: and (B.) Show how this occurs, if at all, in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol.

Answer: Heroes can be very serious, become cocky, and caught up in their work so the trickster brings them down to earth. They lighten up the situation a little and the audience doesn't focus only on the negative things that happen. “They cut big egos down to size, and bring heroes and audiences down to earth” (Vogler 77).
The three ghost can be considered tricksters because Scrooge isn't aware of what is going to happen and when. They just pop up, show him his past, present, and future, and when they are done they disappear and the next ghost shows up.

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at February 13, 2015 03:24 PM

Hatim Shami & Chrissy Castro
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
15 February 2015

Question 1: What according to Christopher Vogler, does the Trickster archetype “embody”? How is this “embodiment” performed, if at all, in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol?

Answer: There are many Tricksters in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol. Probably the most important one is Marley’s ghost. Despite the fact that Marley came back as a spirit, he also pretended to be the door’s knocker (Dickens 21). All the ghosts are Tricksters because they all carefully chose what to show him, in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol. The ghost of the future is the most important trickster among all the other ghosts. He took Scrooge to a place where people were talking about a man who had a business and money who died. Scrooge knew most of these men and realized they were talking about his death (Dickens 118,119). He told Scrooge he is dying but never told him when.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 15, 2015 08:37 PM

Hanna Katarua, William Pereira, Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
15 February 2015

Siddhartha

Question 2: What, according to Christopher Vogler, does the Trickster archetype “embody”? How is this “embodiment” performed if at all, in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your words.

Answer: According to Vogler, a trickster is similar or associated with a character that is like a jokester. However, there are still differences, as is they want change that is good and like to attract attention to things that may be different. In Siddhartha, the trickster would be Buddha. Because he teaches, and people like Govinda believed in everything. Siddhartha is on the hunt for healthy change, which is real enlightenment, at that point he split to go and find it. Siddhartha goes to Buddha to find the truth and answers, but he did not find it. Buddha said that it had all worked for him, but may not work for everyone. Buddha dragged everyone along with his teachings, but it was not guaranteed that it would work for everyone. However, the fact that he was teaching it was for healthy change for others.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria;William Pereira; Matthew Lemonis at February 15, 2015 10:02 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
15 February 2015

Question 11

Answer: The Trickster in A Christmas Carol is considered to be more than one character. In the novel of A Christmas Carol, the Tricksters are the three spirits Scrooge encounters. When Scrooge encounters the three spirits, he is clueless as to what may occur next. The unpredictability of the three spirits is what most identifies them as the tricksters in the novel. The status quo in A Christmas Carol is challenged by the Trickster. In the novel, the status quo challenged by the Trickster is Scrooge and his future. The last spirit also a Trickster challenges Scrooge the most because of what he shows Scrooge in the future. Scrooge’s future is what frightens him because his future death went by unnoticed by the people he had known all his life. The Trickster challenges Scrooge by giving him a foreshadowing of his tragic future.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 16, 2015 12:28 AM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01

13 February 2015

Question : Sometimes , suggests Christopher Volger , the job of the Trickster archetype is to undermine “ the status quo “ .Take time to fill in the gaps of your knowledge and look up the concept of “status quo” so that you fully understand it .For this question you’ll need to (a.) Identify who the Trickster is in the story (there may be several ), and(b) identify what the status quo is in Herman Hess’s novel Siddhartha . One you’ve done that, (c.) explain how the Trickster tries to challenge the status quo in this narrative, if at all.

Answer: The trickster in this novel could be Kamaswami because he distracted and disrupted Siddharta journey. That Kamaswami was a businessman who taught Sidhartha the world of business. When getting involved with the world of business, it takes over his mindset. That being involved in the world of materials he thinks that is the only way to gain happiness. Also, obtaining the money from the business will make him be with Kamala. In the text it showed, “. The company was good enough to provide him with the money for Kamala, and it earned him much more than he needed. (Hesse,64). Then Siddhartha became unhappy and contemplated taking his life. The sight of wealth and materialism divert from his goal.

Posted by: Marie Destin at February 16, 2015 05:00 PM

Joe Marrah Brian Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA02
17 February 2015

The first psychological function of the trickster is to cut big egos down to size, and bring heroes and audiences down to earth. This means when a character is exaggerating a moment or over-doing something, the trickster is right there it straighten them up. Sometimes the trickster is much needed in the situation, and sometimes they make a comment when it really might not be necessary.

Posted by: Joe Marrah Brian Hess at February 18, 2015 12:57 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl, Emily, Andre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
10 February 2016

Question 9: In addition to serving all three of the stated psychological functions, Christopher Vogler claims that in, archetype’s in Charles Dickens novel A Christmas Carol restore balance by relieving tension suspense, and conflict in the audience or reader, if at all. In your response, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your words.

Answer: In the Christmas Carol, we feel as though the trickster of the book is initially Scrooge especially at the end of the book, we feel like he’s the trickster because of how by the end of the book we see Scrooge running around and being really happy with everything which was such a difference from what was said at the beginning of the book. As said in the book “ He became as good a friend, as good a master, and as good a man, as the good old city knew, or any other good old city, town, or borough, in the good old world.”

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 10, 2016 11:16 AM

Jessica McKinney
Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 February 2016

Question: 13. Review what Christopher Vogler had to say about the “Trickster Hero” mashup. Is there such a hybrid archetype as the “Trickster Hero” somewhere in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol and Siddhartha?

Answer: The Trickster Hero is always the little guy, as Vogler said “These stories pit the defenseless but quick-thinking rabbit against much larger and more dangerous enemies…. Somehow the tiny rabbit always manages to outwit his hungry opponent, who usually suffers painfully from dealing with a Trickster Hero.” (Vogler 78) In the Christmas Carol, there is a Trickster Hero displayed; Scrooge followed and didn’t try to outdo or trick the either of the ghosts. In Siddhartha Herman Hesse, Siddhartha somehow managed to try to think quickly against the Illustrious One when speaking with him. Siddhartha said to the Illustrious One “You have learned nothing through teachings, so I think, O Illustrious One, that nobody finds salvation through teachings. To nobody, O Illustrious One, can you communicate in words and teachings what happened to you in the hour of your enlightenment.” (Rosen 34) Siddhartha out smarted the Buddha by telling him in order for him to be enlightened or to become a Buddha, he has to go on his own journey as the Illustrious One have and not just learn teachings.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at February 10, 2016 09:51 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journey n Narrative
10 February 2016

Question 11: Sometimes, suggest Christopher Vogler, the job of the Trickster archetype is to undermine the “status quo.” Take time to fill in the gaps of your knowledge and look up the concept of “status quo” so that you fully understand it. For this question you’ll need to (a.) identify who the trickster is in the story (there may be several), (b.) identify what the status quo is in Charles Dicken’s novel A Christmas Carol. Once you’ve done that, (c.) explain how the Trickster tries to challenge the status quo in this narrative, it at all. In your response, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your words.

Answer: In the novel A Christmas Carol the status quo was merely Scrooge embracing life in a mediocre way; treating everyone as if they were not important. Therefore based on Vogler’s definition of a Trickster, the role of Trickster was portrayed through The Ghost of Christmas Present. The Ghost of Christmas Present did this by tricking Scrooge into believing what he was seeing was real even though it was an illusion or possibly simply a dream. With these illusions, The Ghost of Christmas Present slowly desensitizes Scrooge and eventually with the help of the other spirits archives the goal of changing Scrooge’s view on life and the way he relates to it. On the other hand within the plot of Siddhartha, both Siddhartha and Kamala play the role of trickster. Both characters fall for one another but play as if they did not feel a deep love for one another; tricking the other to believe that their relationship could not evolve into something more fulfilling. In the text, they consistently address each other as “friend” or would say, “if you want to be Kamala’s friend” but they never preceded to be more that (Hesse 40). They simply played each other until they parted ways.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at February 12, 2016 12:01 AM

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