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September 18, 2014

Campbell's *The Refusal of the Call* Stage of the Monomyth, as Explained by Christopher Vogler


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 18, 2014 04:07 PM

Readers' Comments:

Erin Gaylord & Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
15 October 2014

Question:

What does Christopher Vogler mean by the “artist as hero” concept he discusses in his chapter on “The Refusal of the Call” stage? How does it sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?

Answer:

The artist must fully put themselves into the world they are working in, “But we must also at times withdraw from the world, going alone to actually make the art” (Vogler 110). The artist has to make difficult decisions to make the story. In The Painted Bird the author had to choose when to make the scenes graphic or when to stoop into the child’s imagination to come up with another way the child could perceive the situation.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 15, 2014 11:21 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth and Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
15 October 2014

QUESTION #1:
According to Christopher Vogler, even though the “Crossing of the [First]
Threshold” stage has not yet occurred, the hero/heroine still stands at a
symbolic threshold in the “The Refusal of the Call” stage of the monomyth.
What is that threshold, and what does it mean for the story? Explain your
response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears
in your own words.

ANSWER:
The threshold of fear is what stops the hero from pursuing the adventure at first but changes his or her mind. The hero or heroine could changes their mind with the last statement by the Herald and that character leaving to give the hero some time to think. “This halt on the road before the journey has really started serves an important dramatic function of signalling the audience that the adventure is risky (Vogler 107).”

Work Cited
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. Studio City, CA: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 15, 2014 12:01 PM

Caitlin Christian & James Sierra
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. Hobbs
15 October 2014

Group #3
Question #3:
What does Christopher Vogler mean by the “excuses” concept he discusses in his chapter on “The Refusal of the Call” stage? How does it sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The excuse concept in, “The Refusal of the Call’ chapter means that the hero simply uses many excuses in order to avoid going on some sort of journey or fulfilling an adventure. Christopher Vogler states, “These are temporary roadblocks, usually overcome by the urgency of the quest.” (Vogler 108) In Dickens, “A Christmas Carol” Scrooge is called upon to complete a journey, which will change his life. Each ghost Scrooge encounters ideally is placed in his life to fulfill his adventure. Scrooge is one example of this concept; Scrooge believes he will be perfectly fine in life without listening to these ghosts.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian & James Sierra at October 15, 2014 12:05 PM

Bryce Veller, Claudia Pierre
ENG220CL- Journeys in Narratives
Dr.Hobbs
10 October 14

Question: What does Christopher Vogler mean by the “willing heroes” concept he discusses in his chapter on “The Refusal of the Call” stage? How does it sometimes work/ occurring anything, we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?Explain your response.
Answer: Willing Heros are people who have accepted or even sought out the Call of Adventure without refusal or reluctance. Even thou they know the dangers that are to come, represented by the Refusal of the Call by other characters they still push on. Ex: Tarzan the monkey man, did not refuse the call of adventure to get an elephant hair.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at October 15, 2014 12:09 PM

Leroy Pianka
Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
15 October 2014

Group 5
What does Christopher Vogler mean by the “conflicting calls” concept he discusses in his chapter on “The Refusal of the Call” stage? How does it sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Mr. Vogler is discussing how a hero can have two calls at the same time. He talks about the call to the heart’s adventure and the call of the hero’s ego. “The Call to the heart’s adventure comes from his sweetheart, but the one he answers is the Call of his male ego, telling him to strike out alone on a macho path.” (Vogler 109) In Disney’s “Hercules”, Hercules is torn between finishing off Hades or saving Megara. If Hercules saves Megara, he will live a happy life as a mortal with someone he loves. If Hercules kills Hades, he will return home to Mount Olympus as a God.

Works Cited
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey. Ed. Paul Norlen. Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Novel.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at October 15, 2014 12:21 PM

Jonah Robertson & Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 15 2014


Question #2:


What does Christopher Vogler mean by the “Avoidance” concept he discusses in his chapter on “The Refusal of the Call” stage? How does it sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


In “The Refusal of the Call” we see that this is a theme repeated in many different stories and is defined by the hero trying to avoid the adventure. In our class readings “A Christmas Carol” was filled with examples of the refusal of the call up until he sees his own grave. Scrooge refuses the call when he meets Marley after his death and informs him that he will be visited by three separate spirits. In our experiences, the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy starts off with Frodo’s refusal of the call in the form of attempting to return the ring to Gandalf.

Posted by: Peter Bellini & Jonah Robertson at October 15, 2014 12:38 PM

Ashley Gross and Abrar Nooh
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 October 2014

Question #7:
What does Christopher Vogler mean by the “willing heroes” concept he discusses in his chapter on “The Refusal of the Call” stage? How does it sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer:
A willing hero is a hero that seeks the adventure. While many heroes are reluctant or fearful of the adventure, the willing hero will pursue the journey. Siddhartha is an example of the willing hero. He seeks the adventure of leaving home and finding his path to enlightenment, while other characters express fear.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at October 16, 2014 08:38 AM

Jazlynn Rosario & Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
16 October 2014


Question #9:
According to Christopher Vogler, what role/s do “threshold guardians”
sometimes play in “The Refusal of the Call” stage? How does this sometimes
work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have
YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?

Answer:
The Threshold Guardian plays a "powerful embodiment of society or culture, warning the hero not to go outside the accepted bounds" (Christopher Vogler 112). They raise the "banner of fear and doubt," and they block the adventure before it has begun (Vogler 112). In Siddhartha, the threshold guardian is his father who at first did not want Siddhartha to leave. Siddhartha has to prove to his father that he is worthy to leave into the forest. In Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, the threshold guardian is Fluffy, a three headed dog, who is guarding the entrance to find the stone.

Posted by: Jazl at October 16, 2014 10:00 PM

Rebeccah Braun, Joanna Ozog and Britney Polycarpe

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

10 October 2014

Question # 6: What does Christopher Vogler mean by the “artist as hero” concept he discusses in his chapter on “The Refusal of the Call” stage? How does it sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

In “The Refusal of the Call” chapter, Vogler explains that when an artist is the hero they must become fully immersed in the world. The become a part of that world “to find the materials for (their) art” (Volger, 110). At times, they must leave the world to go alone and make their art.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at October 17, 2014 06:09 AM

Bronwen Burke, Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
15 October 2014

Question 1:
According to Christopher Vogler, even though the “Crossing of the [First] Threshold” stage has not yet occurred, the hero/heroine still stands at a symbolic threshold in the “The Refusal of the Call” stage of the monomyth. What is that threshold, and what does it mean for the story? Explain your response.

Answer:
The “Refusal of the Call” represents itself in a mental form, an internal hesitation of the hero. “The pause to weigh the consequences makes the commitment to the adventure a real choice in which the hero, after this period of hesitation or refusal, is willing to stake her life against the possibility of winning the goal” (Vogler 108). “‘I – I think I’d rather not,’ said Scrooge” (Dickens 15). Simply said, as Marley’s Ghost confronts Scrooge about the three spirits, he simply says, “I’d rather not,” as he hopes to bypass the need of the ghosts and just continue living his life. Even after Marley explains that the spirits are his only hope, Scrooge still tries to find a way around making the journey long with “tak[ing] ‘em all at once” (Dickens 15).

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 17, 2014 06:55 AM

Zachary Sabo, Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 October 2014

In Vogler’s chapter on the refusal of the call, he notes that excuses sometimes plague the hero when being summoned to his adventure. The excuses subtitle refers to the laundry list of reasons that the hero will give in order to avoid his inevitable fate. In Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Scrooge is upset when his nephew invites him to his Christmas dinner, and does not want to go. He does not give any valid reasons as to why he doesn’t want to go, instead he repeatedly utters the phrase “Bah Humbug!” (Dickens 3) This is a prime example of using excuses to avoid the inevitable. In the movie 300, the Spartans call upon the Greeks to seek help in fighting the Persians because they do not have enough men. Some weak excuses given are that they do not believe they should help an army that would not do the same for them, in addition to believing that they are inferior fighters to the Spartans. They are afraid of fighting, as a result of not believing they are as good of warriors.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 17, 2014 09:27 AM

Anet Milian
Matt Basin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
29 September 2013
Question #4: What does Christopher Vogler mean when he claims that “persistent refusal leads to tragedy,” in this chapter on “The Refusal of the Call” stage? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have you read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.
Answer:
He means it can be a disastrous and continued denial of a high calling is one of the marks of a tragic hero. It can work in our readings we have done so far and outside of that because it can pertain to anyone not just what we have read in this class. There are many examples for this but one that I thought of was in Shooter with Mark Wahlberg, he doesn’t want to join the agency so after he helps them, the try to kill him and end up shooting his dog.

Posted by: Anet Milian at October 17, 2014 11:31 AM

Tyler Sommers and Kyle Van Buren
Dr B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 October 2014

Question
8.) According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on “The Refusal of the Call,” Vladimir Propp called one classification of archetype “seekers.” What was Propp talking about here, and what is the opposite version of this archetype, and why? Does this work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? If so, what, and why? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer
Propp was referring to the kind of people who go out and search for the mission. They type of person that some people would consider “go-getters”. The opposite of these “seekers” that Propp is referring to would be people that avoid the situation. A seeker is a person that “thinks ahead to possible dangers, and reflect on past disasters.” (Volger 107) Volger states,”its natural for heroes to first react by trying to dodge the adventure.” (Volger 108) Scrooge did this by avoiding the issues that his nephew tried warning him of before the three ghosts came to visit him. Another time where we see this occurrence is when Rocky refuses to fight Apollo.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers and Kyle Van Buren at October 20, 2014 05:56 PM

Andre and Jonathan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
26 February 2016

Question: What does Christopher Vogler mean when he claims that persistent refusal leads to tragedy,” in his chapter on stage? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Vogler explains that persistent refusal leads to tragedy when the hero refuses to believe, is in denial, or is too comfortable in the present world, and believes a shift would be taking the hero out of his or her comfort zone. Voguer explains, “in red river Tom Dunson refused a call to an adventure of the heart and begins to slide into almost certain doom…but when he finally accepts the call in act three he is redeemed and spared the tragic hero's fate” (Vogler 109). In Dickens ‘A Christmas Carol,’ Scrooge refuses the call of his friend, Marley, who announced the need for change. Scrooge also refused to believe, or was in denial when the first two ghosts challenged him to see that it was he who needed to change, it was only when the third ghost appeared that he finally accepted the call and he escaped the tragic hero’s fate. In ‘A Christmas Carol, the spirit takes Scrooge to his grave where his name was engraved on it, “Scrooge crept towards it, trembling as he went; and following the finger, read upon the stone of the neglected grave his own name, Ebenezer Scrooge…The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!” (Dickens 48). In this way, Scrooge finally accepts the call and avoids his impending fate.

Posted by: Q4_Andre and Jonathan at February 26, 2016 11:03 AM

Burke & Emily.

3) What does Vogler mean by the “excuses” concept he discusses in his chapter? How does it sometimes work in anything we’ve read thus far? What works have you read/seen where this occurs?

- Vogler describes excuses as a barrier between the hero accepting the call to adventure. He claims they list a “laundry list” of reasons why the hero does not initially go on the adventure. They are seen as temporary “roadblocks,” and are often seen as a higher priority. This is portrayed in many different stories, notably “A New Hope” and “the Hobbit.” Luke skywalker initially declines Obi-Wan’s invitation, claiming that his crop season is much urgent. While Bilbo is very adamant that there are lesser issues plaguing him that will prevent him from going. Even in “the Lion King,” simba does not wish to return back to Pride rock at first until convinced otherwise. In all of these examples, the hero declines the call to adventure (or the Return) by providing excuses as to why not.

Posted by: Burke & Emily at February 26, 2016 11:20 AM

Thomas Egyed and Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 February 2016

Question #8 According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on “The Refusal of the Call, ” Vladimir Propp called one classification of archetype “seekers.” What was Propp talking about here, and what is the opposite version of this archetype, and why? Does this work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? If so, what, and why? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The seeker is the hero who is eager to accept the call to adventure with no restraint. "They are willing heroes who have accepted or even sought out the Call to Adventure." (Vogler 110) The best example of a hero who is a seeker is Siddhartha. He wanted to seek knowledge and sought out the call to adventure right away. The opposite of this archetype is the victimized hero. The other characters would be the ones who show doubt and refuse the call to adventure. The best example is in Harry Potter because his Aunt and Uncle are the ones who refused the call to adventure. Harry had no idea about the call and when he found out he was willing to accept it with no resistance.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 27, 2016 03:16 PM

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