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September 18, 2014

Campbell's *The Ordinary World* Stage of the Monomyth, as Explained by Christopher Vogler


Image Source: https://rebeccabelliston.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/luke-skywalker-tatooine.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 18, 2014 03:42 PM

Readers' Comments:

Erin Gaylord & Gabby Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
10 October 2014

Question:

Why, according to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, does every “hero need both an inner and outer problem”? Begin by explaining the meaning of both types of problem.

Answer:

Inner problems are personality flaws or an inner struggle the hero has to face. Outter problems are the obstacles the person has to complete. For example, in Pans Labyrinth, the girl has to complete the 3 tasks before she can return to the underworld. Characters without inner problems seem unevolved; they have to have some “personality flaw or a moral dilemma to work out” (Vogler 89). They have to learn something throughout the story. They have to have an outter problem to have a story.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 10, 2014 11:05 AM

Kyle VanBuren and Tyler Sommers
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
10 October 2014

Question #7
How, according to Christopher Vogler, is the way in which a hero/heroine makes his/her “entrance” connected to the “The Ordinary World” stage? How will readers get a sense of ordinariness based on what the character is “doing”? Explain your response.

Text source: “The Writers Journey,” By Christopher Vogler

Answer:
Vogler explains that a hero/heroine making his/her entrance is connected to the ordinary world stage by addressing what the character is wearing, who is around him, and how they react with him. Also, what the character’s attitude is, his emotion, and present goal that the character is pursuing (Vogler 89). Vogler states, “What is he wearing, who is around him…”(Vogler 89). We can get a sense of ordinariness based on what the characters doing, as we become to understand the characters first action that appears to be “a wonderful opportunity to speak volumes about his attitude, emotional state, background, strengths, and problems” (Vogler 89).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren and Tyler Sommers at October 10, 2014 11:09 AM

Sharrad Forbes, Britney Polycarpe, and Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
10 October 2014

QUESTION:
In his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, what does Christopher Vogler mean in his discussion of the “[i]dentification with universal needs” function? Why is this function supposed to happen in this stage? How can we, as readers, detect that the narrative is achieving this? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Christopher Vogler identifies the audience with the hero using the universal needs function, by giving “heroes universal goals, drives, desires, or needs” (Vogler 91). These universal needs form the basis for which the audience can relate to the hero because of our need for “recognition, affection, acceptance, or understanding” (Vogler 90).

It functions on stage as a form of relation of the audience to the hero during his experiences achieving his goal. Vogler mentions the example of screenwriter Waldo Salt, in his creation called the Midnight Cowboy, where hero Joe Buck, driven by a desire of physical contact (touch).

The narrative is achieving this when we, as the audience, sympathize with the hero because we have either experienced the same feelings or know someone that has. It is this sympathy, this understanding that “establishes a bond between audience and hero” (Vogler 91).

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 10, 2014 11:59 AM

Rebeccah Braun and Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 October 2014

Question # 14: First, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, what does Christopher Vogler mean by the expressions “Backstory” and “Exposition”? Second, why is this stage “the most appropriate place to deal” with both of them? In other words, why is it informative for exposition to occur here, rather than in some other/later stage in the journey? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer: Vogler says, “the Ordinary World is the most important place to deal with exposition and backstory” (Vogler, 94). He then defines the backstory as the history, background, and information of a character that is relevant to the story. He explains the exposition to be revealing the backstory and information of the plot in an interesting manner so that the audience can understand who the main character is and what the story entails. The backstory and exposition should be in the first stage because it gives a better understand of the story and helps develops the story. If it was in another stage than the audience would be left blind until after major events occur.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at October 10, 2014 12:04 PM

Jonah Robertson & Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 10 2014


Question #11:


First, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, what does Christopher Vogler mean by the “Tragic Flaw” concept, and, second, why/how can it be connected to this stage of the hero’s journey? Why is it informative to learn about it here, rather than some other stage in the journey? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


A Tragic-flaw is an Achilles heel or a prominent weak-point in the hero. In the Painted Bird, the young hero is full of childhood innocence and many times his gullibility gets him into dangerous situations. The tragic flaw is introduced in the ordinary world to show the reader the hero’s flaw in a safe setting where it does not cause harm. We see in our two examples the tragic flaw is what drives the action in the story. In the story of Troy, Achilles, the seemingly invincible warrior finally dies from an arrow wound to his heel. This pattern is repeated in the Painted Bird as the hero enters his many adventures through his childish gullibility. “The monstrous idea that my parents were not here and would not be here passed through my mind. I sat down and began to cry again, calling for my father and mother and even nanny. A crowd of men and women was gathering around me, talking in a dialect unknown to me. I feared their suspicious looks and movements. Several were holding dogs which snarled and strained toward me. Someone jabbed me from behind with a rake. I jumped aside. Someone else pricked me with a sharp prong. Again I sprang away, crying loudly. (Kosiński Pg. 6)

Posted by: Peter Bellini & Jonah Robertson at October 10, 2014 12:46 PM

Aaron Virelli, Zach Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 October 2014

Question: How, according to Christopher Vogler, does the “The Ordinary World” stage, often perform the function of “raising the dramatic question,” and why is this important to the narrative? In other words, what is the “dramatic question” and what does it do for the story? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Question: In the “ordinary world” stage of the journey the action of “raising the dramatic question” the subliminal message given to the audience that brings a question about the hero’s journey. This comes about and relates to the hero and whether not they will achieve their goal or overcome the obstacle at hand. In return, the lesson learned will help he on her journey. Some examples of the dramatic question are “will Dorothy get home from OZ? Will ET get home to his planet? (Vogler 88) This is important to the narrative because it keeps the audience on their toes thinking about the question they have in mind. When having that question answered a new one arises keeping the flow and thought linked together. This also makes us think about the characteristics like personality and emotion, and how they will affect the narrative.

Posted by: aaron virelli, Zach Sabo at October 10, 2014 02:37 PM

Bronwen Burke and Nathanael Jones
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
10 October 2014

Question #4: First, be sure you understand the concept of “foreshadowing.” Then, answer the following question: How, according to Christopher Vogler, does the “The Ordinary World” stage, often perform the function of “foreshadowing”, and why this is important to the narrative? Explain your response.

Answer: According to Vogler, “foreshadowing” predicts the hero’s “battles and moral dilemmas” (Vogler 88). “The Ordinary World” stage is a boring and dull life for the hero. The Ordinary World often performs the function of foreshadowing. For example, in The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy “clashed with ornery Miss Gulch and is rescued from danger by three farmhands. These early scenes foretell Dorothy’s battles with the Witch and her rescue…” (Vogler 88). The foreshadowing function is important in the narrative because it prepares readers for future intense dramatic events.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 12, 2014 08:15 PM

Kaitlin Christian, James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
10 October 2014


Question 13
How, according to Christopher Vogler, does the “The Ordinary World” stage, often perform the function of “establishing what’s at stake,” and why is this important to the narrative? In other words, what does it mean if something is “at stake” and what does it do for the story? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The “Ordinary World” establishes what the Hero’s “normal” world is like. What is at stake in the ordinary world for the hero are shown or hinted at. The consequences of what will happen if the Hero does not answer the call to action. Gives the Hero a chance to test himself and either fail or succeed. According to Vogler, “In other words, what does the hero stand to gain or lose in the adventure? What will the consequences for the hero, society, and the world if the hero succeeds or fails (Vogler 94)?”

Posted by: James Sierra at October 13, 2014 12:29 AM

Summer Taylor and Kendra Hinton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02

QUESTION #1:
We have already learned that a monomythic hero has two worlds: An Ordinary
one, and a Special one. According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the
“The Ordinary World” stage, are we, as readers and human beings, limited to
only ONE Special World in our lives? Explain what Vogler means about
heroes traversing a “succession of Special Worlds” and what happens to
each of them as the journey progresses. Use quoted passages from the text to support
the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Vogler states that, "The Ordinary World in one sense is the place you came from last. In life we pass through a succession of Special Worlds which slowly become ordinary as we get used to them" (Vogler 87). This means that a person in real life or a character can pass through an infinite number of Special Worlds and are not limited to just one world. An example of this is a farm boy that only has lived on his uncles farm his entire life that suddenly gets called into battle. These battles he encounters are first unusual for the farm boy because never in his wildest dreams did he think he would get called into battle. These battles would be his new special world, but when the farm boy gets used to the battles they are no longer unusual or part of his Special World, and are part of his ordinary world. Then maybe the farm boy now solider gets knighted for his valor and lives with royalty, this would become his new Special World. This switching in and out of different Special Worlds is the succession of how Special Worlds work.

Posted by: summer taylor at October 13, 2014 09:15 AM

Blake Bromen & Tashanna Harris
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
10 October 14

Question #1:
We have already learned that a monomythic hero has two worlds: An Ordinaryone, and a Special one. In his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, Christopher Vogler maintains that “The Special World of [a] story is only special” if what, exactly? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
“The ““special world”” of the story is only special if we can see it in contrast to the mundane world of everyday affairs from which the hero issues forth.” (Vogler 87) The special world can only be determined when there is something for comparison (the hero’s everyday life). (Vogler 87)

Posted by: Blake Bromen & Tashanna Harris at October 13, 2014 10:01 AM

Nuri Salahuddin and Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Transformations in the Journey of Narrative CA02
12 October 2014

Question #12: First in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, what does Christopher Vogler mean by the “wounded Hero” concept?

Answer: Christopher Vogler describes a wounded hero as a hero that is wounded, lacking or incomplete. “Your hero’s wounds and scars mark the areas in which he is guarded, defensive, weak, and vulnerable.” (Vogler 93). It connects to the stage of the hero’s journey because throughout the journey every obstacles he/she faces makes him/her stronger. It is informative to learn about it here because the obstacles are what shapes the hero at the end of it all.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin and Maria Aguilera at October 13, 2014 11:37 AM

Ashlee English & Jacob Gates
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
9 October 2014
QUESTION:
10. First, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, what does Christopher Vogler mean by “The Hero’s Lack” concept, and, second, why/how can it be connected to this stage of the hero’s journey? Why is it informative to learn about it here, rather than some other stage in the journey? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Volger defines the Hero’s lack as when he or she is “lacking something or something is taken away from them”, (Volger 91). Often this includes the lost of a family member which the hero avenges, or the need for an elixir to improve his quality “These missing elements … missing piece in a character” (Vogler 91), thus forcing him to cross the threshold into the mythical world.
Additionally, in the ordinary world everything is mundane, as such, the disturbed normality of things is due to the lack (i.e., death of a family member(s), need for elixir). Therefore, the hero’s lack being placed here in the journey creates the framing device for journey and adventure he will have.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 13, 2014 11:39 AM

Matthew Lemonis, Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Jounreys in Narrative
25 February 2015


Question: How, according to Christopher Vogler, does the “The Ordinary World” stage, often perform the function of “raising the dramatic question,” and why is this important to the narrative? In other words, what is the “dramatic question” and what does it do for the story? Explain your response.

Answer: The dramatic question is posing a serious of questions about the hero, some questions relate primarily to the action or plot of the story. The dramatic question revolves around the aspects involving the hero’s emotions and personality. The dramatic questions hook the audience and involve them with the emotions of the characters. (Vogler Pg 88).

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis, Maggie Izquierdo at February 25, 2015 02:04 PM

Celina Tahsini, Richard Bennet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys to Narrative CA02
25 February 2015

Question #3

Answer: The contrast is important to the narrative because it shows the differences between the boring Ordinary world and the exciting special world. This is illustrated in the special world in "A Christmas Carol" are the dream worlds that the spirits take Scrooge into. The dream world which Scrooge journeys through with the spirits is symbolic of the special world described in Vogler's discussion. In contrast, Scrooge's reality outside of the dream world before he encountered the three spirits is symbolic of the Ordinary World explained in Vogler's discussion. In Vogler's discussion, it states, "The hero's problems and conflicts are already present in the Ordinary World" (Vogler 87). This explains the same reality of hostility and bitterness towards his past, present, and future Scrooge is living throughout the novel of "A Christmas Carol".

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 25, 2015 02:09 PM


T.J. Pagliaro, Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 February 2015

Question: First, be sure you understand the concept of “foreshadowing.” Then, answer the following question: How, according to Christopher Vogler, does the “The Ordinary World” stage, often perform the function of establishing “foreshadowing,” and why is this important to the narrative? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Foreshadowing is a literary device that allows the audience to predict or guess ahead of an event based on context clues, and arouses the reader. “In many works, writers usually use the Ordinary World section to develop a small prototype of the Special World, foreshadowing its battles and moral dilemmas” (Vogler 88). It is important to the narrative because it displays a sense of understanding of where the Hero comes from and what kinds of challenges they are encountering throughout the narrative.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 25, 2015 02:21 PM

Hatim Shami and Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
25 February 2015

Question: 6. Why, according to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, does every “hero need both an inner and outer problem”? Begin by explaining the meaning of both types of problem. Then, use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: According to Volger, the outer problem gives the audience a series of questions such as how the hero will achieve their goal. An inner problem contributes to the hero by avoiding “flat and uninvolving” (Volger 88) characters. This problem establishes a bond between audience and hero, and the hero’s lack of something provides a universal trait to achieve completion. This lacking can either be inner, such as “compassion… or the ability to express love” (91), while outer lacking may be a lost or missing family member.

Posted by: Hatim Shami and Kelsey Williams at February 25, 2015 03:19 PM

Bobbi Ausmus & Rachel Andrews & Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
25 February 2015


Question #4

The Ordinary World stage performs the function of establishing foreshadowing, by creating a small model of that world. In a movie if someone says something such as the character shouldn’t do something, then in most cases the character will still do the said action. Vogler describes the concept of foreshadowing differently than what most scholars would say. Vogler states that many writers use the Ordinary World to foreshadow conflicts in the Special World. Seemingly normal events the Hero goes through in the Ordinary World foretell battles and moral dilemmas the Hero will face in the Special World. He uses the Wizard of Oz as an example, the three farm hands who save her in the Ordinary World foreshadow her allies in the Special World the Tin Man, Scarecrow, and Lion.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus and Cody Jean-Baptiste and Rachel Andrews at February 25, 2015 03:24 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield and Jasmine Weaver
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
25 February 2015

Question: We have already learned that a monomythic hero has two worlds: An Ordinary one, and a Special one. According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, are we, as readers and human beings, limited to only ONE Special World in our lives? Explain what Vogler means about heroes traversing a “succession of Special Worlds” and what happens to each of them as the journey progresses. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The “succession” that Vogler talks about is the idea that the model repeats itself inside itself. Each journey is made up of smaller journeys. He writes, “The Ordinary World in one sense is the place you came from last. In life we pass through a succession of Special Worlds which slowly become ordinary as we get used to them” (Vogler 87). The hero’s go through the departure stage from the ordinary world into initiation in the extra ordinary world and the return to the ordinary world. For example, Dorthy went from Kansas, to Oz, and back to Kansas.

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at February 26, 2015 12:04 AM

Hanna Kataria, Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
26 February 2015
Group 2

The Ordinary World

Question #2: We have already learned that a monomythic hero has two worlds: An Ordinary one, and a Special one. According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, are we, as readers and human beings, limited to only ONE Special World in our lives? Explain what Vogler means about heroes traversing a “succession of Special Worlds” and what happens to each of them as the journey progresses. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In “The Writer’s Journey” written by Vogler, he discusses “The Ordinary World”. In our lives, we are not limited to one special world we can have multiple worlds. The Special World is like a new place. The “Succession of Special Worlds” states that over time the special world over time “become[s] ordinary as we get used to them” (Vogler 87).

Posted by: Hanna Kataria; Bryan Hess at February 26, 2015 12:08 PM

Marie and Sergio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
26 February 2015
Q)10. First, in this chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, what does Christopher Vogler mean by “The Hero’s Lack” concept, and, second, why/how can it be connected to this stage of the hero’s journey? Why is it informative to learn about it here, rather than some other stage in the journey? Explain your response.
The “heros lack,” is the Hero’s greatest weakness and the mine driver of the character, either to avoid his/her weakness or embrace it. For example, Luke Skywalker is very ambitious but he has never been outside his home planet where he is a farmer and has a very humble life. One of Luke’s set back is he does not know anything about his father, and he does not know much about himself, as he goes through his Journey he discovers that his father is evil and also discovers that there is evil in himself. We learn of his ignorance of his father in the beginning of the story so it could be a motivation for him to pass the threshold of the ordinary world. For a moment he is frozen about finding his father dark history and after facing the darkness with in, he is able to face his father.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at February 27, 2015 01:58 PM

Adam Alexander and Chrissy Castro

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220Cl On The Proverbial Road CA01

27 February 2015

Question: In his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, what does Christopher Vogler mean in his discussion of the “Identification with universal needs” function? Why is this feature supposed to happen in this point? How can we, as readers, detect that the narrative is achieving this? Explain your response

Answer: “In some way we should recognize that the hero is like us.” Vogler goes on to say that the Hero does not have to be likeable, as long as the reader can relate to them. “The story invites us to step into the hero’s shoes, to see the world in their eyes.” If the reader can not relate to the Hero, or even see a part of themselves in the character, “the magic does not work.” Vogler writes “you must establish a strong bond of sympathy or common interest between the hero or audience.”

How can we detect this? Vogler says the writer needs to “Create identification by giving heroes universal goals, drives, desires, or needs. We can all relate to basic drives such as the need for recognition, affection, acceptance, or understanding.”

Posted by: Adam Alexander at February 27, 2015 03:02 PM

Burke & Jonathon.

5) How, according to Christopher Vogler, does the “The Ordinary World” stage, often perform the function of “raising the dramatic question,” and why is this important to the narrative? In other words, what is the “dramatic question” and what does it do for the story? Explain your response.

- The “dramatic question” is often considered to be the call to adventure, whether or not the hero wants to take up the call to action and confront the issue at hand. How he answers the dramatic question sets the tone for the rest of the story. The hero, coming from a world often polarized to a point of making them unique, is required to become something different, or better, in order to achieve what they need to. The dramatic question is important to the narrative because it sets both the pace and atmosphere for the hero’s journey and story as a whole. How he answers the call to adventure determines the flow of the narrative because if he decided to accept the call, the journey will bring forth a change that will benefit the hero, but on the other hand if he rejects it the story will remain flat and boring as it remains within the barrier of the ordinary world.

Posted by: Burke & Jonathon at February 22, 2016 10:53 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl & Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey into Narrative
22 February 2016

Question 14. First, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, what does Christopher Vogler mean by the expressions “Backstory” and “Exposition”? Second, why is this stage “the most appropriate place to deal” with both of them? In other words, why is it informative for exposition to occur here, rather than in some other/later stage in the journey? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: What Vogler means by backstory is this, it’s what the character has been through throughout his past, as well as his present so it makes up a story that we the readers can follow along with what all has gone on with this character. What Vogler means by exposition is, the way the backstory is presenting, as well as all the details of what things the characters have essentially gone through. It’s important to have a clear exposition because if you don’t you will leave the reader very confused and unaware of what is really going on with each character. “the audience will feel more involved if they have to work a little to piece together the backstory from visual clues or exposition blurted out while characters are emotionally upset or on the run.”

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 22, 2016 10:57 AM

Emily Buckley and Andre Gilbert
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
22 February 2016

Question 6: Why, according to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Ordinary World” stage, does every “hero need both an inner and outer problem”? Begin by explaining the meaning of both types of problem.

Answer: According to Christopher Vogler the hero needs both an inner and outer problem. The hero needs an outer problem to maintain the drama in the story. They also need an inner problem, without it the characters are flat and boring. They need “a personality flaw or a moral dilemma to work out. They need to learn something in the course of the story…Audiences love to see characters learn.” (Vogler 89) To have a successful story the hero needs both the inner and outer problem to show that the hero has changed in some way.

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Andre Gilbert at February 22, 2016 10:58 AM

Jessica McKinney Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
22 February 2016

Question: 13. How, according to Christopher Vogler, does the “The Ordinary World” stage, often perform the function of “establishing what’s at stake,” and why is this important to the narrative? In other words, what does it mean if something is “at stake” and what does it do for the story? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: This is important to the narrative because if the stakes aren’t high enough, then the audience wouldn’t be interested in the story, the narrative would be boring. The Ordinary World stage performs the function of establishing what’s at stake from the beginning of a fairytale or myth by “often setting up a threatening condition that makes the stakes of the game very clear.” (Vogler 96) Also, in the narrative, the Ordinary World could be at stake. An example of this function would be “the hero must pass a series of tests or his head will be cut off.” (Vogler 96) Another example that Vogler used in his text was “Other tales put family members in jeopardy like the father who is threatened in Beauty in the Beast. (Vogler 96)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at February 22, 2016 11:20 AM

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