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September 18, 2014

Campbell's *The Call to Adventure* Stage of the Monomyth, as Explained by Christopher Vogler


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 18, 2014 03:51 PM

Readers' Comments:

Erin Gaylord & Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
13 October 2014

Question:

What do heroes, initially, “often have trouble distinguishing” in the person who “lies behind the Herald’s mask,” according to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage? How will/should heroes make a correct interpretation? Explain your response.

Answer:

Heroes have trouble distinguishing if the “Enemy or the Ally lies behind the Herald’s mask” (Vogler 101). When making a decision, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. The heroes are usually unaware that anything is wrong until later down the road when they look back. “Shadowy figures may make ambiguous offers” (Vogler 101). For example, Adam and Eve listened to the snake instead of listening to what God originally told them.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 13, 2014 10:53 AM

Tashanna Harris, Bronwen Burke & Summer Taylor
Dr.Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative
13 October 2014
Group 1

Question #1
Call to Adventure stages goes by many different names.A). What are those other names?B) what functions do they agree on?

Answer:
The Call to Adventure goes by other names such as: the inciting or initiating incident, the catalyst or the trigger. These all agree upon one thing that an event has to happen to get a story going. "Once the work of introducing the main character is done"(Vogler 99). Identify the main character and the story soon forms itself.

Posted by: Tashanna.harris at October 13, 2014 10:57 AM

Caitlin Christian & Jazlynn Rosario
10/13/14
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02

Group #7
Question #7:
According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, (a.) what is the name of “a common early phase in a story,” (b.) what scholar first identified it, and (c.) which character often performs this function? How is this a way that the Call to Adventure can manifest itself? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
In Christopher Voglers, The Writers Journey, Reconnaissance is recognized as the common early phase in a story. Vladimir Propp identified this early phase. The meaning is centered on the villain making a survey of the hero’s territory. Christopher Vogler stated, “This information-gathering can be a Call to Adventure, alerting the audienace and the hero that something is afoot and the struggle is about to begin.” (Vogler 101) The Call to Adventure can manifest itself by introducing the villain and a problem for the hero to solve.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian & Jazlynn Rosario at October 13, 2014 11:59 AM

Rebeccah Braun and Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
13 October 2014

Question # 4: What does Christopher Vogler mean by the summoning with “temptation” technique he discusses in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage? How does it work in narrative? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The Call to Adventure can summon a hero through temptation. They are compelled toward something that is their destiny to do unknowingly. The temptation “could be the glint of gold, the rumor of treasure, the siren song of ambition” (Vogler 100). An example of this call to adventure would be in the movie Twelve Years a Slave where the protagonist, Solomon Northrup, is drawn to the promise of money and then is sold into slavery changing his life drastically.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at October 13, 2014 12:09 PM

Nuri Salahuddin and Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
13 October 2014

Question:
What do heroes, initially, “often have trouble distinguishing” in the person who “lies behind the Herald’s mask,” according to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage? How will/should heroes make a correct interpretation? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: According to Christopher Vogler, “the hero has trouble distinguishing whether the Herald is their Ally or Enemy.” (Vogler 101). It may be difficult for the hero to distinguish whether the Herald is their Enemy or Ally because sometimes “a hero has mistaken a well-meaning mentor’s Call for that of an Enemy, or misinterpreted the overtures of a villain as a friendly invitation to an enjoyable adventure.” (Vogler 101). The hero will not distinguish their Ally or Enemy right from the beginning but as the story continues the Herald’s true colors will come out.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 13, 2014 12:10 PM

Joanna Ozog, Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
13 October 2014

Group Question 8: Explain what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure,” when he claims that this stage “can often be unsettling and disorienting to the hero.” Why can the call to adventure cause the hero discomfort?

Answer: The call to adventure cause discomfort because heralds appear under a “guise to gain the hero’s confidence and then shifting shape to deliver the call,” (102). The call to adventure can also be uncomfortable because they may not be prepared for the adventure, though it is “necessary for their growth” (102). The call to adventure may also be unsettling because the hero may not want the adventure and fear the journey ahead.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 13, 2014 12:17 PM

Peter Bellini & Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 13 2014


Question #6:


In the part of his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, subtitled “Heralds of Change” (BEFORE the “Reconnaissance” section), Christopher Vogler claims that, sometimes, a hero “may be in a state of denial.” (a.) What does Vogler mean by this and (b.) what is the Herald’s duty when this happens? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


Vogler claims that sometimes a hero may be in the state of denial meaning that heroes are sometimes unaware that there are problems in their Ordinary World and thus do not see any need for change. The Herald serves to get the story rolling when the hero is in a state of denial by presenting an invitation or challenge to face the unknown. “The job of the Herald is to kick away these supports, announcing that the world of the hero is unstable and must be put back into healthy balance by action, by taking risks and by undertaking the adventure” (Vogler 101).

Posted by: Peter Bellini & Maria Aguilera at October 13, 2014 02:38 PM

Claudia Pierre, Olivia Ago-Stallworth, Jake Gates, Matt Basin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220 CL: On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
13 October 2014


QUESTION:
According to Christopher Vogler, the “The Call to Adventure” stage goes by many different names by “[v]arious theories of screenwriting.” (a.) What are those other names and (b.) on function do they all agree? Explain your response.

ANSWER:
The other names that Vogler identified as stage names goes by inciting or initiating incident, the catalyst, or a trigger. “All agree that some event is necessary to get a story rolling, once the work of introducing the main character is done”. (Vogler, 99)

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at October 13, 2014 04:27 PM

Zachary Sabo, Gabriela Caminbro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
13 October 2014

Group Question #4: What does Christopher Vogler mean by the summoning with “temptation” technique he discusses in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage? How does it work in narrative? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The hero can be summoned in narratives by the allusion of a “temptation”, which can be a variety of things. The hero may be allured by “an exotic travel poster or the sight of a potential lover”, and this will entice the hero to embark on his journey. (Vogler 100) In narratives, it works in a very similar manner, as the hero will notice something that will give him motivation and tempt him into starting his adventure. The hero needs some kind of motivation to receive something as a result of his journey.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 13, 2014 09:25 PM

Blake Bromen, Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
13 October 2014

Question:
In the part of his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, subtitled “Heralds of Change” (before the “Reconnaissance” section), Christopher Vogler claims that, sometimes, a hero “may be in a state of denial.” (a.) What does Vogler mean by this and (b.) what is the Herald’s duty when this happens?

Answer:
The hero lives his life in the ordinary world, day in and day out, due to the constant life the hero may not realize that any issues exist. The hero “barely getting by, us[es] an arsenal of crutches, addictions, and defense mechanisms,” to deny the necessities of change when the Herald performs the “Call to Adventure” (Vogler 101). The Herald then serves the purpose “kicking away these supports” by further revealing the state of instability stating that the hero must go on the adventure to the world into a “healthy balance” (Vogler 101).
In A Christmas Carol, the ghost of Jacob Marley serves the archetypal role of herald, showing Scrooge what his life will reap in the afterlife. Revealing that his cynical nature will only do him harm, the ghost of Marley gives Scrooge no other choice but to allow each ghost to visit him if he wants to change his fate. By eliminating Scrooge’s crutch of his closed-mindedness, Marley begins to reveal the instability in Scrooge’s life (Dickens 11-16).

Work Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print


Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 14, 2014 06:13 PM

James Sierra, Bryce Veller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
13 October 2014


Question 2:
In the part of his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, subtitled “Get the Story Rolling” (BEFORE the “Synchronicity” section), Christopher Vogler outlines, at least, three forms in which a hero’s Call to Adventure may come or be. Identify and explain three examples of the Call to Adventure that get the story rolling. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
One form of the Call to Adventure may come in the form of a message or messenger. When Harry Potter receives the letters from Hogwarts would be an example of this type of Call to Adventure. Another form may come from within the Hero’s mind in the form of dreams, fantasies, and visions. In Siddhartha, he came to a conclusion on his own that he needed to venture out to find his path to enlightenment. A third form may be that the Hero is at his breaking point with the current situation he finds himself in, and desires to remove himself, and answer his own Call to Adventure. An example given from the text is “Joe Buck in Midnight Cowboy has simply had enough of washing dishes in a diner and feels the Call building up inside him to hit the road of adventure. In a deeper sense, his universal human need is driving him, but it takes that one last miserable day in the diner to push him over the edge (Vogler 100).”

Posted by: James Sierra at October 14, 2014 07:04 PM

Joshua Natonio & Kendra Hinton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
13 October 2014

QUESTION #7:
According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, (a.) what is the name of “a common early phase in a story,” (b.) what scholar first identified it, and (c.) which character often performs this function? How is this a way that the Call to Adventure can manifest itself? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Joseph Campbell first termed the phrase “Call to Action.” Essentially, the Call to Adventure is the catalyst needed in a story to get the proverbial ball rolling (Vogler 99) According to Vogler, the Call to Adventure is often delivered by a character in a story who manifests the archetype of the Herald. A character performing the function of Herald may be positive, negative, or neutral, but will always serve to get the story rolling by presenting the hero with an invitation or challenge to face the unknown (Vogler 101)

It was Vladimir Propp who first identified the common early stage in a story, called “reconnaissance.” In this stage, “a villain [the Shadow] makes a survey of the hero’s territory, perhaps asking around the neighborhood if there are any children living there, or seeking information about the hero.” This gathering of information acts as a Call to Adventure, alerting the audience and the hero that something is afoot and the struggle is about to begin.

WORKS CITED:
Vogler, Christopher. The writer's journey : mythic structure for writers. Studio City, CA:
Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print.

Posted by: Joshua Natonio & Kendra Hinton at October 15, 2014 10:06 AM

Joe Marrah Will Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENGCL 220 Journeys in Narrative
27 February 2015

Question: Is it possible, according to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the stage, that a story can have more than one Call to Adventure? If so, why can this happen? What might another Call to Adventure in a story frequently focus on? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: It is very possible for a story to have more than one call to adventure. Many stories have many different levels, meaning there is more than one thing going on. If a story had only one plot, and no new adventures, it would most likely be a boring story. A new call to adventure can come from things such as death, or anything that can sway the mindset of the hero. In “The Painted Bird” the young boy experiences lots of death and plot twists throughout the story. These are all examples of new calls to adventure.

Posted by: Joe Marrah Will Pereira at February 27, 2015 01:56 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield and Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
27 February 2015

Question 4: What does Christopher Vogler mean by the summoning with “temptation” technique he discusses in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage? How does it work in narrative? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Vogler refers to the “temptation” method that lures the hero away from the Ordinary World into the Special World (100). This temptation can come in the form of an escape from the Ordinary world, like the circumstance of leaving the world of responsibility in the Lion King. The gaining of something, such as knowledge in the Matrix, is also a kind of temptation. This temptation works as a herald, to draw the hero into the adventure (Vogler 100).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield at February 27, 2015 03:01 PM

Bobbi Ausmus &Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
27 February 2015

Question # 6

In Stage Two: The Call to Adventure, Volger means, the Herald doesn’t see any need for change. “They have been just barely getting by, using an arsenal of crutches, addictions, and defense mech.” (Vogler 101). The Herald removes the supports that the Hero has used previously showing the world is unstable and needs to be put back into the right order by action thus the adventure must be taken.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus & Chrissy Castro at February 27, 2015 03:18 PM

Rachel Andrews & Cody Jean-Baptiste

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02

27 February 2015

Explain what Christopher Vogler means, in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure”, when he claims that this stage “can often be unsettling and disorienting to the hero.” Why can the Call to Adventure cause the hero discomfort? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

The “Call to Adventure” can be unsettling and disorienting to the Hero because the Herald often disguises themselves to gain the Hero’s confidence and trust. After they have gained the trust they shift into their true form and deliver the “Call”. This discomfort and unfamiliarity are necessary for the growth of the Hero; it is vital for their transformation. It shows the Hero is constantly growing throughout the story.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews & Cody Jean-Baptise at February 27, 2015 03:23 PM

Marie Destin, Jasmine Weaver, & Hatim Shami
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01 27 February 2015

Question: According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, (a.) why are “gung-ho heroes” so rare? (b.) What does Vogler mean in his claim that the “Call to Adventure is a process of selection”? Explain your response.

Answer: A.) Gung-ho heroes are rare because most heroes try to avoid the call to adventure. There will be some heroes that volunteer themselves but more often the hero doesn’t want to be the hero at first.
B.) According to Volger it is a process of selection because “a problem arises and someone volunteers or is chosen to take responsibility. Willing heroes select themselves and reluctant heroes have to be called repeatedly as they try to avoid the responsibility. (Volger104)” Call to adventure is self explanatory. Something happens and someone is chosen to handle the problem.

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at February 27, 2015 03:37 PM

Richard Bennet and Duane Daye
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220CL Journeys in narrative CA02
25 February 2015

Question: According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, (a.) what is the name of “a common early phase in a story,” (b.) what scholar first identified it, and (c.) which character often performs this function? How is this a way that the Call to Adventure can manifest itself? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer: According to Chris Volger “the call to adventure” is the Herald Change (Volger 101). The first scholar that identified it was Jung. Generally the herald is the archetype who performs this function in the story. The herald may be “positive, negative, or neutral, but will always serve to get the story rolling by presenting the with an invitation or challenge to face the unknown” (Volger 101).

Posted by: Richard Bennet and Duane Daye at February 28, 2015 12:18 AM

Adam Alexander and Sergio Velazquez

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01

2 March 2015

Question: In the part of his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, subtitled “Get the Story Rolling” (BEFORE the “Synchronicity” section), Christopher Vogler outlines, at least, three forms in which a hero’s Call to Adventure may come or be. Identify and explain three examples of the Call to Adventure that get the story rolling.

Answer: Vogler first describes the form in which a hero’s adventure may come to be like a messenger. Vogler writes, “The Call to Adventure may come in the form of a message or a messenger. It may be a new event like a declaration of war or the arrival of a telegram” (100). This means that the idea of a change or adventure is brought to the hero from someone or something else. The message must be delivered to the hero so that the journey can begin.

The next form is described as “a stirring within the hero, a messenger from the unconscious, bearing news that it's time for a change. These signals sometimes come in the form of dreams, fantasies, or visions. Prophetic or disturbing dreams help us prepare for a new stage of growth by giving us metaphors that reflect the emotional and spiritual changes to come” (100). This form comes directly from the hero.

The last form is described as “the hero may just get fed up with things as they are. An uncomfortable situation builds up until that one last straw sends him on the adventure. In a deeper sense, his universal human need is driving him, but it takes that one last miserable day in the diner to push him over the edge” (100). Not to be confused with “a stirring within the hero,” this form is more of a need for change for something better. The hero is essentially unhappy and is looking for something, whereas the “stirring within” is just a change, in general.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at March 2, 2015 02:37 AM

Bryan Hess and T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
2 March 2015

Question: (#1) According to Christopher Vogler, the “The Call to Adventure” stage goes by many different names by “[v]arious theories of screenwriting.” (a.) What are those other names and (b.) on function do they all agree? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: According to Christopher Vogler, the other names for the call to Adventure are, “the inciting or initiating incident, the catalyst, [and] the trigger” (Vogler, 99). Also, Vogler states that the primary function of the Call to Adventure is to begin the story once the main character has been introduced to the audience.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at March 2, 2015 12:31 PM

Tyler Sedam and Hanna Katkria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA02
2 March 2015

Question: What does Christopher Vogler mean by “the mysterious force of synchronicity” he discusses in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage? How does it work in narrative? Explain your response.

Answer: Christopher Vogler defines this “mysterious force of synchronicity” as a series of events or actions that occur that serve to bring the hero into the journey, either by force, or by introducing the issues that may lead to the adventure (Vogler 100). Vogler states that these series of events, actions, or words “can take on meaning and draw attention to the need for action and change (Vogler 100).” This series of events could function as the herald itself in some instances, but typically serves to present the issues at hand so that the herald can arrive later and issue a challenge to the hero to go on the adventure and change what has happened.

Posted by: Tyler Sedam and Hanna Katkria at March 2, 2015 01:04 PM

Charis Lavoie and Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 February 2016
Question 9: Is it possible, according to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the stage, that a story can have more than one Call to Adventure? If so, why can this happen? What might another Call to Adventure in a story frequently focus on? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: Yes, there can be more than one call to adventure. Stories tend to operate on multiple levels, so it would not be out of the ordinary to have more than one call to adventure. Two different calls can be the physical call and the call of the heart. There is a battle between what the hero needs to do and what the hero wants to do.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie and Thomas Egyed at February 24, 2016 11:03 AM

Emily Buckley & Jessica McKinney
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 February 2016

Question: What does Christopher Vogler mean by the summoning with “temptation” technique he discusses in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage? How does it work in narrative? Explain your response.

Answer: In this chapter Vogler mentions “the call to adventure may summon a hero with temptation such as allure of exotic travel poster or the sight of a potential lover.” (Vogler 100) He goes on to list examples of this technique in narratives. One of the examples is an “Arthurian legend of Percival from the hero in the story being summoned to adventure by five magnificent kings in armor and riding off on some quest.” (Vogler 100) Depending on the narrative, the hero might be drawn to different temptations.

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Jessica McKinney at February 24, 2016 11:20 AM

Emily Buckley & Jessica McKinney
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 February 2016

Question: What does Christopher Vogler mean by the summoning with “temptation” technique he discusses in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage? How does it work in narrative? Explain your response.

Answer: In this chapter Vogler mentions “the call to adventure may summon a hero with temptation such as allure of exotic travel poster or the sight of a potential lover.” (Vogler 100) He goes on to list examples of this technique in narratives. One of the examples is an “Arthurian legend of Percival from the hero in the story being summoned to adventure by five magnificent kings in armor and riding off on some quest.” (Vogler 100) Depending on the narrative, the hero might be drawn to different temptations.

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Jessica McKinney at February 24, 2016 11:20 AM

Emily Buckley & Jessica McKinney
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 February 2016

Question: What does Christopher Vogler mean by the summoning with “temptation” technique he discusses in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage? How does it work in narrative? Explain your response.

Answer: In this chapter Vogler mentions “the call to adventure may summon a hero with temptation such as allure of exotic travel poster or the sight of a potential lover.” (Vogler 100) He goes on to list examples of this technique in narratives. One of the examples is an “Arthurian legend of Percival from the hero in the story being summoned to adventure by five magnificent kings in armor and riding off on some quest.” (Vogler 100) Depending on the narrative, the hero might be drawn to different temptations.

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Jessica McKinney at February 24, 2016 11:20 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
24 February 2016


According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, (a.) Why are gung-ho hero so rare (b.) What does Vogler mean in his claim that the “Call to Adventure is a process of selection”? Explain your response.

Answer: In the Chapter on “The Call to Adventure” stage it mentions that the gung-ho hero is rare due to the fat that most heroes are too comfortable in their ordinary lives and are not so willing to accept a drastic change by entering into a new world and facing new challenges. Due this comfort Vogler implies that the gung-ho hero was rare because there are very few stories in which the hero readily and impulsively accepts the change. By Vogler’s description “most heroes have to be prodded, cajoled, wheedled or tempted” to accept this challenge, therefore, making it rare or a hero to go forth excited to face the new problem as the face of “ The Call to Adventure.” Also linked to “The Call to Adventure” Vogler relates the summoning to a process of selection. (Vogler 105) Within this process selection “an unstable situation arises and someone volunteers or is chosen to take responsibility,” but in most cases the hero is reluctant to accept but then eventually convinced to become the hero that they were meant to be by taking the call.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at February 24, 2016 11:22 AM

Andre and Burke
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
24 February 2016

Question: In the part of his chapter on the “The Call to Adventure” stage, subtitled “Heralds of Change” (BEFORE the “Reconnaissance” section), Christopher Vogler claims that, sometimes, a hero “may be in a state of denial" (a.) What does Vogler mean by this and (b.) What is the Heralds duty when this happens? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Volger explains that the hero may be in a state of denial because he does not believe in himself, not believing that there is anything wrong with the ordinary world, and does not see the need for change. Voguer writes, “The call to adventure can often be unsettling and disorienting to the hero” (Vogler 102). Whereas, the Herald kicks away the supports of the hero and can bring the hero back to balance by taking risks. In The writer’s Journey, Vogler explains that the Herald’s duty is to sow, “the seeds go change,” (Vogler 99) and “it may come in the form of a message or messenger” (Vogler 100). Therefore, the duty of the Herald or messenger is to make the call to adventure and get the story rolling.

Posted by: Andre and Burke at February 26, 2016 11:06 AM

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