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September 17, 2014

Campbell's *Shapeshifter Archetype,* as Explained by Christopher Vogler


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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Posted by lhobbs at September 17, 2014 12:42 PM

Readers' Comments:

Matthew Basin and Peter Beoleli
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220CL-On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformational in Narrative
17 Sept. 2014

Question:
(a.) Why, according to Christopher Vogler, do students/readers “often have trouble grasping the elusive archetype of the Shapeshifter”? (b.) What, exactly, is his or her job? (c.) Who, or what, best fits this archetype in Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol?
Answer:
Shapeshifters change appearance or mood, and are difficult for the hero and the influence to pin down. The shapeshifter serves as the dramatic function of bringing doubt and suspense into the story. Jacob Marley would be the shapeshifter in A Christmas Carol because he sent the three ghost to show Scrooge how his life would be if he changed his mood. Marley brought suspense to the story by showing up in Scrooges room and turned Scrooges mood around.

“Shapeshifters change appearance or mood, and are difficult for the hero and the influence to pin down (Volger 59).”
“The shapeshifter serves as the dramatic function of bringing doubt and suspense into the story (Volger 61).”

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 17, 2014 02:10 PM

Jacob Gates & Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Jouney in Narrative CA01
17 September 2014

Question: 8.) (a.) Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: The biggest Shapeshifter in Dicken’s Christmas Carol may be Scrooge himself, because by the end of the story he has a complete transformation as a human being. Scrooge’s self-centeredness may also be an indication of Scrooge’s role in the story because he is only after his own gain at the beginning of the story, but changes his goals by the end of the story. The other possible Shapeshifter in the story would be the final spirit that Scrooge encounters in the story. The Ghost of Christmas Future is a void, it has no gender, it has no voice, and Scrooge is terrified when he first lays eyes on him. In Stave IV, the second paragraph, Dickens writes: “He felt it was tall and stately when it came beside him, and that its mysterious presence filled him with a solemn dread. He knew no more, for the spirit neither spoke nor moved.” (Dickens 50)

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 17, 2014 05:10 PM

Joanna , Tom , Bryce
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in Narratives
Sept.17, 2014

QUESTION 11
Identify the Shape shifter in Siddhartha, and explain Vogler’s discussion of the shape shifter archetype?

ANSWER
Now in the story we really have not come across a true shape shifter to label as. However, we can think of Siddhartha as a shape shifter now because of the new idea about Self and Nirvana that has prompted Siddhartha to leave his fellow Brahmins in the quest of learning how to reach Nirvana and reach true peace in himself. Siddhartha knows that the Brahmins cannot fulfill his quest to be taught how to reach Nirvana because no one in his fellow tribe has reached Nirvana personally. Siddhartha himself is a shape shifter for he wants to pursue higher knowledge.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 17, 2014 08:20 PM

Kendra Hinton and Blake Broman
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
17 September 2014

Question #8:
Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer:
Scrooge is the Shapeshifter. He is a good repetition of a powerful archetype and understands that the three spirits was there to be helpful in his life. In the beginning of the book Scrooge was unstable, but as the three spirits enter his life he was shifting back and forth until he encounter a change throughout the story, bringing doubt, because you would not think Scrooge would be a hero at the end of the story.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton and Blake Bromen at September 17, 2014 11:01 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Caitlin Christian
ENG 220 CL
17 September 2014

Question Group #3:

(a.) Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer:

In Vogler’s, The Writer Journey, it is discussed that a shapeshifter “changes as soon as you examine it closely.” The shapeshifter is also, “a powerful archetypes and understanding its ways can be helpful.” A shapeshifter can frequently change and make the reader question who or what the character is trying to do. (Vogler 59)

In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol there is multiple shapeshifters throughout the book. The hero, Scrooge encounters many ghosts on his journey who help him by changing his views. Marley, one of the spirits shaped into a doorknob and revealed himself when Scrooge was ready to see his face. Scrooge felt feelings of confusion, which caused him to question his sanity throughout the journey. Much of what Scrooge encountered with the spirits helped him realize the past and the mistakes he had made. One of the spirits even shaped into an old body, with a child’s face. This helped Scrooge grow and change along with the many shapes that the spirits took.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian & Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 21, 2014 11:25 PM

Ashlee English & Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 225CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
24 September 2014

QUESTION #9:
Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Hesse’s Siddhartha. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Hesse’s Siddhartha, if at all.

ANSWER:
The psychological function of the shapeshifter, expressed through the animus and anima, is seen in the character of Kamala in Hesse’s Siddhartha. She is a strong woman, expressing many of the masculine qualities yet also keeping her feminine ones as well.

Kamala was a teacher to Siddhartha in the art of love making. She had a romance with Siddhartha and confused him from his right path. She tells Siddhartha that in order to obtain any favors from her he must have “clothes, shoes, money” (Siddhartha). Kamala is the one that introduces Siddhartha to Kamaswami, the “richest merchant of the city” (Siddhartha), so that he could gain these items. Furthermore, she instructs Siddhartha to be Kamaswami’s “equal” and not a “servant” (Siddhartha).

It is hard to say if Kamala actually loves Siddhartha or if she is just intrigued by his ability to acquire money and gifts for her. As Kamala was charming, Siddhartha was entranced by this beauty and found himself caught up in material wealth and lust.

Posted by: Ashlee English & Sharrad Forbes at September 23, 2014 10:44 PM

Summer Taylor, Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
24 September 2014

QUESTION #9:
a)Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Hesse’s Siddhartha. (b.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Hesse’s Siddhartha, if at all.

ANSWER:
The shapeshifter in Siddhartha is Siddhartha himself. Siddhartha has this emptiness inside of himself that seems to never be filled and he is always looking to fill it with something. Siddhartha is never satisfied with anything in his life so he is unable to settle down with anything or anyone. Some examples of this constant change are: first giving up all of his possessions with being the son of a Brahman and becoming a Samana, then trying to get wealth back so he can get the services of a courtesan, he tries to become a holy man, and then finally he tries to become a ferryman. It is hard for the audience to pin down Siddhartha or what he will do or become next and that is exactly what a shapeshifter is. B) The function of a shapeshifter according to Vogler is, "The shapeshifter serves the dramatic function of bringing doubt and suspense into the story." This means that the audience never knows what the shapeshifter is going to do next, and it can be hard just which side the shapeshifter is on. This dramatic function also goes hand in hand with the psychological function of a shapeshifter. Many times one views the other gender as mysterious, elusive, and confusing, which is the shapeshifters forte. So, the shapeshifter expresses the animus and the anima in a person. The animus are male characteristics buried inside of the female subconscious, and the anima are the female characteristics buried inside of the male unconscious.

Posted by: Summer Taylor, Zachary Sabo at September 24, 2014 08:51 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 1, 2014 10:27 AM

Jeffrey Wingfield and Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
6 February 2015

10. (a.) Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

According to Vogler, the dramatic function of the Shape-shifter is to create doubt. He writes, "The Shapeshifter serves the dramatic function of bringing doubt and suspense into a story" (Vogler 61). In The Christmas Carol, Marley functions as a literal shapeshifter when he becomes a doorknocker. As far as creating doubt, all of the ghosts cause Scrooge to question his choices and way of life.


Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield and Chrissy Castro at February 6, 2015 03:05 PM

Sergio Velazquez and Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
6 February 2015

Question 11. (a.) Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Hesse’s Siddhartha. (b.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Hesse’s Siddhartha, if at all.

Answer: The shapeshifter in Hesse’s novella would be the Kamala, the courtesan. The dramatic function of Volger’s shapeshifter is to provide suspense in either male or female characters. In Siddhartha, Kamala tempts our protagonist, all while the reader is unsure of where Kamala’s loyalty lies. Kamala also makes a transformation herself from courtesan to falling in love with Siddhartha and bearing his child (Hesse 92).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Sergio Velazquez at February 6, 2015 03:51 PM

Marie Destin & HATIM SHAMI

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CAO1

3 February 2015

Question: (a.) Identify accurately the SHAPE SHIFTER in Hesse’s Siddhartha. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shape shifter archetype, and how this plays out in Hesse’s Siddhartha, if at all.

Answer: The Shape Shifter in Hesse’s Siddhartha is Kamala and Siddhartha. That Kamala is a shapeshifter by creating doubts into Siddhartha mind when figuring out if he can love or not. You are learning easily, Siddhartha, thus you should also learn this: love can be obtained by begging, buying, receiving it as a gift, finding it in the street, but it cannot be stolen. In this, you have, come up with the wrong path. No, it would be a pity if a pretty young man like you would want to tackle it in such a wrong manner” (Hesse, 50).In the text is shown that Kamala is persuading Siddhartha mind by showing him that what he do without her “Well yes,” she admitted. “But where would you be without me? What would you be if Kamala weren't helping you?” (Hesse, 54) .Siddhartha is a shapeshifter by changing his mindset when leaving the Samaras and became more focused on material things and love “You’ll see that I’ll learn quickly, Kamala, I have already learned harder things than what you’re supposed to teach me. And now Let get to it: You aren’t satisfied with Siddhartha as he is, with oil in his hair, but without clothes, without shoes, without money?(Hesse, 50) .

Posted by: Marie Destin & HATIM SHAMI at February 6, 2015 07:55 PM

Richard Bennet and Duane Daye
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220CL Journeys in narrative CA02
6 February 2015

Question: (a.) Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: The Shapeshifter is the one who bring doubt in the story, he or she makes the Hero doubt their loyalty. In Vogler's text he states that the “When heroes keep asking, "Is he faithful to me? Is she going to betray me? Does he truly love me? Is he an ally or an enemy?" a Shapeshifter is generally present(Vogler, 61). This plays out in the Dickens' Christmas Carol by the ghost and sprits. Marley ghost of christmas past, and presents best play out these functions. In a Christmas Carol, “The chain he drew was clasped about his middle. It was long, and wound about him like a tail; and it was made (for Scrooge observed it closely) of cash- boxes, keys, padlocks, ledgers, deeds, and heavy purses wrought in steel. His body was transparent; so that Scrooge, observing him, and looking through his waistcoat, could see the two buttons on his coat behind” (Dickens', 23).

Posted by: Richard Bennet and Duane Daye at February 8, 2015 08:17 PM

T.J. Pagliaro, Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 February 2015

Question 11: Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Hesse’s Siddhartha. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Hesse’s Siddhartha, if at all.

Answer: Throughout his journey, the chief Shape-shifter is Siddhartha because he chooses to join the Samanas who sacrifice their lives to acts of service instead of accepting scholarship and philosophy growing up. The main role of the Shape-shifter is to bring uncertainty and insecurity. The character that plays this role will often change his or her mood or appearance. It is possible for them to mislead the hero and their loyalty throughout the hero’s journey. This plays out in Siddhartha, by Siddhartha becoming his own person and choosing his path of waiting and thinking. However, he gets sidetrack when an idea comes to his mind where he thinks his life is going to be based upon, but eventually he burns it up. For example, he goes to the Brahmin, the Samanas, and then Kamala. All three, Siddhartha cannot find where he wants to be in life. He “shifts” when he meets Kamaswami and denies all of his offerings. Siddhartha does this because he chose a path of sacrifice and fasting.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 8, 2015 10:17 PM

Joe Marrah Matt Lemlis Will Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
8 February 2015

Question 7:Why, according to Christopher Vogler, do students/readers “often have trouble grasping the elusive archetype of the Shapeshifter”? (b.) What, exactly, is his or her job? (c.) Who, or what, best fits this archetype in Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol?

Answer: The shape shifter is a character who is constantly changing and is tough for the reader to figure out. They can have a positive or a negative effect on the hero, along with presenting him with a new challenge. One purpose of the Shapeshifter is to express the energy of the animus and anima, which are the male and female beings in the unconscious. The Shapeshifter varies often throughout stories, which is why it is tough to pin down the exact purpose of them in all stories. In Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol, Marley’s ghost makes a few appearances. Marley starts as a doorknob, and transforms to appear in front of scrooge wrapped in chains. Marley continues to change, which confuses not only Scrooge, but also the reader. The spirits appear different each time they present themselves until the ghost of the future who stays consistent.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at February 9, 2015 12:17 AM

Tyler Sedam and Nicholas Gaydos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 February 2015
Question: Identify accurately the Shapeshifter in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: Several characters in Charles Dicken’s A Christmas Carol could be said to be a Shapeshifter. However, The Ghost of Christmas Present seems to convey what Christopher Vogler says is the psychological function of the Shapeshifter archetype. Vogler explains that the psychological function of the Shapeshifter is to allow the hero to express their repressed opposite sex energy (Vogler 60). The Ghost of Christmas Past does this in a couple of ways. First, the spirit has a demeanor and behavior about him that is completely opposite of that of Scrooge. The spirit is already expressing the repressed behaviors and emotions of Scrooge by being jovial and inviting. Scrooge has shut out his anima, or his female, emotional side of his male unconsciousness, as Vogler explains, and the spirit points this out to him in their encounter in contrast with his behavior and attitude (Vogler 60). Also, the spirit takes Scrooge to the Cratchits’ house, where he shows Scrooge how poorly his relatives are doing. This instills in Scrooge his repressed compassionate side for his relatives. Scrooge, upon hearing the news that Tiny Tim will die if nothing is done to help them, begs the spirit, saying, “Oh no, kind Spirit! say he will be spared” (Dickens 40). The spirit has helped Scrooge, the hero, express his repressed emotional side by showing him the state of his relatives, fulfilling his psychological function of being a Shapeshifter.

Posted by: Tyler Sedam and Nicholas Gaydos at February 9, 2015 01:08 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Emily Buckley
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
3 February 2016

Question 7. (a.) Why, according to Christopher Vogler, do students/readers “often have trouble grasping the elusive archetype of the Shapeshifter”? (b.) What, exactly, is his or her job? (c.) Who, or what, best fits this archetype in Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol?

Answer: To Vogler, Student seem to find it difficult to grasp the concept of the elusive archetype of the shapeshifter due to its “ very nature is to be shifting and unstable” (Voguer 59). Shapeshifters play a significant role in the story. They frequently change whether in appearance or mood, making difficult for the hero to understand who they are; misleading them or keeping the confused about who they are and where they stand. In the Christmas Carol, the Shapeshifter is Marley. At first, he divulges as a character who was Scrooge’s friend and business partner. Eventually, he turns to an indecisive person who seems not to be an ally or enemy and then appears as the Herald.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at February 3, 2016 11:05 AM

Brianna, Jessica, Andre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 CL Journeys into Narrative
3 February 2016

Question 9: in your words explain Vogler’s discussion of the psychological function of the Shape shifter archetype, and how this plays out in Hesse’s Siddhartha, if at all.
Answer: In a way we feel as though Siddhartha could be considered the shape shifter. The best way of explaining this is said in the reading, “he realized that one thing that was left to him was a snake from his old skin.” Having to do with the psychological function can be explained as it’s said in the text when they say “there repressed qualities live within us and are manifested in dreams and fantasies as the animus or anima.” Another example from Siddhartha is when he is transformed into a woman, and once this happens, he realizes he is no longer himself

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 3, 2016 11:22 AM

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