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September 18, 2014

Campbell's *Shadow Archetype,* as Explained by Christopher Vogler


Image Source: http://thedreamingwizard.com/images/site_graphics/nosferatushadow2.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 18, 2014 03:08 PM

Readers' Comments:

Peter Bellini
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA02
26 September 2014


Question #13:


In his discussion on the subject, Volger claims that, like “the other archetype, Shadows can express positive as well as negative aspects.” (a.) ” What possible “positive” aspects could there be to the shadows functioning in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, if any? (b.) Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


A Christmas Carol has a very interesting main character that has much internal conflict and undergoes a drastic dynamic change; this man is undeniably Scrooge. Ebenezer Scrooge is a massive shadow at the beginning of the story with his miserly wages and lifestyle. “Shadows can be all the things we don’t like about ourselves, all the dark secrets we can’t admit, even to ourselves”(Vogler Pg. 65). We can see how his attitude affects his life and the people around him in a very toxic way. “the clerk’s fire was so very much smaller that it looked like one coal. But he couldn’t replenish it, for Scrooge kept the coal-box in his own room; and so surely as the clerk came in with the shovel, the master predicted that it would be necessary for them to part. “ (Dickens Pg. 2) This toxic energy Scrooge displays eventually brings in the ghosts who ultimately drive the dynamic change. “Villains who fight bravely for their cause or experience a change of heart may even be redeemed and become heroes themselves.”(Vogler Pg. 67)The Shadow of the old Scrooge serves to show that anyone can change on the moral spectrum of life and how they eventually can grow for the better or worse. “I’ll send it to Bob Cratchit’s!” whispered Scrooge, rubbing his hands, and splitting with a laugh. “He sha’n’t know who sends it. It’s twice the size of Tiny Tim. Joe Miller never made such a joke as sending it to Bob’s will be!”(Dickens Stave 5) The growth of scrooge shows the Christmas spirit in every corner of life if only a shadow can see the light.


Work Cited:


Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 26, 2014 01:23 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
27 September 2014

Question #10:
(a.) In your own words, explain what Vogler means by the “Mask of the Shadow.” (b.) What masks are used/worn, and by what characters, in Hesse’s Siddhartha? Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Vogler meaning of the “Mask of the Shadow” is a function or mask worn by the character. However, the mentor of the story can wear the shadow of the mask. The “Mask of the Shadow” can go trails and error by processing the best out of their situation. “Siddhartha learned a great deal from the Samanas; he learned many ways of losing the Self. He travelled along the path of self-denial through pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue. He travelled the way of self-denial through meditation, through the emptying of the mind of all images. (Hesse 15).” Siddhartha was walking in the Shadow of the Samana by eliminating the “self” to attain spiritual fulfillment. “At his side lived Govinda, his shadow; he travelled along the same path, made the same endeavors. They rarely conversed with each other apart from the necessities of their service and practices (Hesse, 16).” Govinda is a Shadow of Siddhartha, because he followed the same paths and undertook the same efforts and values. Therefore, he is being called Siddhartha “Shadow,” because he looks at Siddhartha as a role model.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 27, 2014 01:44 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #5:
a)In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shadow archetype.
b) How is this energy represented in Dicken’s A Christmas Carol? Finally use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shadow archetype explains that the Shadow represents repressed feelings. The Shadow is just that sketchy side that humans have that they are constantly fighting with in problems that have to do with bad habits and old fears. The three shadows in A Christmas Carol represent the Shadow archetype because all three spirits helped Scrooge overcome his bad habits and old fears that he carried with him since he was young. He learned from all three Spirits and by the end he was a changed man. “I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach!” (Dickens 84).

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 28, 2014 04:06 PM

Matthew Basin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
28 Sept 2014


Question:
a.) In your own words, explain what Vogler means by the “Mask of the Shadow.” b. What masks are used/warn, and by what characters, in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol? Be sure to used quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own.

Answer:
What I think Vogler means by the Mask of the Shadow is that any character can wear it at any time throughout the story. The shadow can act like many other archetypes like tricksters or heralds and can have hero qualities in some instances. The Mask of the Shadow can be powerful when it combines with other archetypes like Hero, Shapeshifter and many more. In The Christmas Carol, Jacob Marley wears the Mask as a mentor for Scrooge. Jacob sent three ghosts to Scrooge, Ghost of Christmas Past, Present and Future. Jacob sends his mentors out at different times to show Scrooge what his Christmas would be like if he changed his mood and his thoughts on things. After all the Ghost, visit Scrooge, he decides to change his attitude and turns out to be an excellent person in the end. If it was not for Jacob and he did not send his mentors to Scrooge, he would have stayed the same person.

“Like other archetypes, the Shadow is a function or mask which can be worn by any character (Vogler 66).”
“They may function as Tricksters or Heralds, and may even manifest heroic qualities (Vogler 67).”
“You cannot hope to shun the path I tread. Expect the first tomorrow, when the bell tolls one. Expect the second on the next night at the same hour. The third upon the next night when the last stroke of twelve has ceased to vibrate. Look to see me no more; and look that, for your own sake, you remember what has passed between us (Dickens 15).”

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 28, 2014 05:31 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
END 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 September 2014

Question:
(a) In your own words, explain Volger’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the Shadow archetype.
(b) How does the shadow “Challenge” the hero in Dicken’s A Christmas Carol? Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parenthesis) to support the part of your answer that appears that appears to your own words.

Answer:
(a) Volger writes that the villain bring out the best in the protagonist by putting the hero in a life-threatening situation. “It’s often been said that a story is only as good as its villain.” (Volger 66). The shadow archetype can be one person or multiple people throughout the story.
(b) The shadow in A Christmas Story would be the Ghost of a Christmas future because that character was the one that scared Scrooge straight. The Ghost of a Christmas future showed Scrooge what his future would be like if he continued to be how he is, which was not going to be a good future. “Spirit! I see, I see. The case of this unhappy man might be my own. My life tends that way, now. Merciful Heaven, what is this!” (Dickens 56).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 28, 2014 10:04 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
29 September 2014

Question #5: (A) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the shadow archetype. (B) How is this energy represented in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol? Finally, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: (A) The shadow archetype symbolizes the energy that the dark side gives off. It is often the repressed, rejected and unexpressed aspects of something in the hero’s journey. Vogler writes that it is “often the home of the suppressed monsters of our inner world” (65) It is basically the part of our unconscious that we constantly struggle with, whether it may be a fear or a bad habit.
(B) The example of the shadow archetype in A Christmas Carol is when the ghost of Christmas yet to come arrives to see Scrooge, and it is a symbol of his repressed feelings that he cannot avoid any longer. “You are about to show me shadows of the things that have not happened, but will happen in the time before us, is that so, Spirit?” (Dickens 50) The spirit is a result of Scrooge’s decisions in life and it is leading him down a dark path. He has always had to unconsciously deal with this shadow, but it is finally time for him to face it.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 28, 2014 11:29 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
29 September 2014

QUESTION #8:
(a.) In your own words, explain Vogler's discussion of the "dramatic function" of the Shadow archetype. (b.) How does the shadow "challenge" the hero in Hesse's Siddhartha?

ANSWER:
The dramatic function of the Shadow archetype is to challenge the hero by causing struggle and conflict. This is meant to bring out a change in the hero and bring out the best in them. Vogler says that, "Heroes themselves can manifest a shadow side" (Vogler 66). This is very true is the book Siddhartha. Many times Siddhartha get's in his own way of his ultimate goal- peace. One example of this is when Siddhartha is with the "childlike" people. He knows that material things are not the ultimate path to peace, but he gets so caught up in them that he distracts himself from his true path.

Posted by: summer taylor at September 29, 2014 08:57 AM


Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
29 September 2014

Question: In your our words, what does Vogler mean by “Humanizing the shadow”.(a) are any shadow characters “ humanized” in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, and b) if so, how and how

Answer: When Vogler goes on to explain the “humanizing of a shadow” I smaller terms I feel it means to give nice kind of soft and elegant features still holding that strong vibe to evil and getting what they want this shadow creature would play both side of the card. In Charles dickens, we see this with all of all ghosts were being “humanized” they have very different plans for the night playing all side of possibility. Also, all of the ghosts had a different appearance form each other such as the last ghost was a big man with beautiful garments and vines and life all around. Also, Jacob Marley was largely humanized he is the one truly pushing scrooge through this adventure. Jacob comes right in a breaks scrooge down and makes him realize the magnitude of his actions (Dickens’s 30).

Posted by: aaron Virelli at September 29, 2014 09:04 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
10 September 2014

Question #7:
(a.) In your own words, explain Volger’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the shadow archetype. (b.) How does the shadow “challenge” the hero in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol?

Answer:
The shadow presents the hero with the greatest challenge, pushing the hero past his or her breaking point. Whether internal or external the shadow serves to cause pain, turmoil, grief, and doubt, in attempts to prevent the hero from finishing their journey (Volger 66). In Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, the proverbial torch of shadow is presented to Scrooge, the hero, himself.
“‘I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will in live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!’” (Dickens 62)
Though the three spirits take on the mask of shadow throughout the story, the shadow that presents Scrooge with the hardest challenge is changing his heart. Scrooge’s heart throughout his Spirits visitations rebelled against the change Scrooge needed to change, until the moment that Scrooge saw his name on the gravestone; he was still reluctant to change. In the end, it is said that Scrooge “was better than his word,” maintaining a joyous life, defeating his heart of stone, and proving to the Spirits he did change according to their demands (Dickens 68).

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 29, 2014 09:05 AM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
29 September 2014

Question #12
In your own words, explain what Vogler means by “Humanizing the Shadow.” (a.) Are any shadow characters “humanized” in Hesse’s Siddhartha, and, (b.) If so, who and how?

Text Source: “The Writers Journey,” By Christopher Vogler

When Vogler explains, “humanizing the shadow,” he refers to the villains in stories who simply have a touch of human characteristics that are not specifically evil. Vogler states, “Shadows need not be totally evil or wicked. In fact, it’s better if they are humanized by a touch of goodness, or by some admirable quality (Vogler 67). An example of a shadow includes, “…the beautiful but wicked queen from Snow White” (Vogler 67)… Also, Vogler describes a shadow as a villain who is vulnerable with underlying weaknesses and emotions (Vogler 68). In Siddhartha, overlooking the book as a whole, I believe that perhaps Kamala could be a shadow when she lures Siddhartha into her tent to sleep with her. Kamala was not a pure individual and strikes the reader as a prostitute; however, Kamala turns out to have great emotions and admirable wise advice to pass on to Siddhartha.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 29, 2014 09:08 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220CL
29 September 2014

Question #1
Correctly identity the Shadow. (B.) explain what aspects of the shadow archetype I'm Dicken's A Christmas Carol are ones that the Hero rejects.

Answer:
The shadow in A Christmas Carol is The old, bitter Mr. Scrooge. Starting out he would be nasty to his employees, he would have his work office so cold & without heat that it soon became unbearable. His attuitude towards Christmas was just grumpy and not to fond of it.

Posted by: Tashanna harris at September 29, 2014 10:17 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
29 September 14

Question #6:
(a.)In your own words, explain Vogler’s Discussion of the “psychological function” of the shadow archetype. (b.)How is this energy represented in Hesse’s Siddhartha? Finally, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
(a.)The Shadow archetypes psychological function is to create psychosis that can impede the journey of the hero or even destroy the hero completely. (Vogler 65-66) (b.) I would say Kamala is a shadow character in Siddhartha because the merchant she puts Siddhartha with tries to destroy all the work Siddhartha has been trying to do to get rid of his materialistic mindset. (Hesse 45-61)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 29, 2014 10:40 AM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
September 29 2014

Question #12:
In your own words, explain what Vogler means by "Humanizing the Shadow." (a.) Are any shadow characters "humanized in Hesse's Siddhartha, and, (b.) if so, who and how? Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to suppose the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
It is difficult to point out a specific character as the Shadow in Siddhartha. Instead, one could view Siddhartha's negative characteristics as the story's Shadow. When Siddhartha is taken in by the pleasures of the world while he is working for Kamaswami, the darker sides of his person appear. The greed and materialism that manifest in him are really the Shadow in this tale, as they prevent him from obtaining the enlightenment he was searching for, until he is finally freed. These faults of Siddhartha's are incredibly humanized in this tale as they are represented by him. He is vulnerable while encompassed by greed, and eventually succumbs to depression (Hesse 42-43).

Works Cited:
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Mineola: Dover, 1998. Print.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 29, 2014 10:53 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 225CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
29 September 2014

10. (a.) In your own words, explain what Vogler means by the “Mask of the Shadow.” (b.) What masks are used/worn, and by what characters, in Hesse’s Siddhartha? Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

The “Mask of the Shadow” is a character that “can combine in powerful ways with other archetypes” (Vogler 66). Characters can be a mix of various other archetypes as well as a Shadow. For example, a character can be a Mentor as well as a Shadow. Teaching the character, yet standing in their way.

In the story of Siddhartha the “Mask of the Shadow” is worn by Govinda, his close friend. When Siddhartha starts off on his journey Govinda follows right behind him. He wants to “follow him as his friend, his companion, his servant, his spear-carrier, his shadow” (Hesse 3).

Siddhartha and Govinda meet up at various parts in the book, sometimes on opposite paths from one another. When they both were Samanas Govinda was shown to be Siddhartha’s shadow “by his side lived Govinda, his shadow” (Hesse 8). When Siddhartha and Govinda split from one another to follow their paths Siddhartha comments that Govinda “who had been my shadow and is now Gotama’s shadow” (Hesse 17).

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 29, 2014 10:55 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
29 September 2014.

QUESTION #11: In your own words, explain what Vogler means by “Humanizing the Shadow”. (a.) Are any shadow characters “humanized” in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, and, (b.) if so, who and how? Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in the parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Vogler states that humanizing the shadow is the process of endowing the shadow with a touch of goodness or some admirable quality. In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge the protagonist, with a dominant shadow archetype at the beginning of the story, “Oh!, But he was… Scrooge never did.” (Dickens 2) is humanized through the lessons he learns from the three apparitions that visit and orchestrates his intervention. As such, at the end of the novella, Ebenezer is endowed with the admirable quality for goodwill, which stems from his redemption “He became a good…quite enough for him.” (Dickens 68), from his sinful life of stinginess.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 29, 2014 11:46 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
28 September 2014


Question 8:
8. (A.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the Shadow archetype. (b.) How does the shadow “challenge” the hero in Hesse’s Siddhartha? Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The Shadow servers as an obstacle for the hero to overcome. Much like Elijah Price in Unbreakable, they do not see themselves as villains. In my observation, one of the Shadows in Siddhartha is his son. Siddhartha is faced with the challenge of loving his son, even though they do not understand each other very well. The knowledge Siddhartha has gained, he wants to teach his son, but he cannot. His son inadvertently teaches Siddhartha unconditional love. He realizes when his son leaves, the heartache he must have caused his own father when he left home to search for knowledge.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 29, 2014 12:04 PM

Caitlin Christian
29 Septmeber 2014
ENG 220 CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative

Question #2: In his chapter on the Shadow, Christopher Vogler says that this archetype represents “the unexpressed, unrealized, or rejected aspects of something.” (a.) Before beginning, you will need to correctly identify the Shadow. (b.) In your own words, explain what aspects of the shadow archetype in Heese’s Siddhartha are ones that the Hero rejects. Then, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
Christopher Vogler describes shadows in stories as, “all the things we don’t like about ourselves, all the dark secrets we can’t admit, even to ourselves.” (Vogler 65) Siddhartha is identified as the hero in Heese’s text, who goes on a journey in search of enlightenment. Through this journey, Siddhartha realizes many things about himself that he shares but also some things he would rather not admit. These hidden qualities are Siddhartha’s shadows; one shadow Siddhartha continually battles with is the concept of wealth. Many individuals that Siddhartha encounter share that certain qualities are not acceptable to boast about to others. Vogler goes on to explain, “The qualities we have renounced and tried to root out still lurk within.” (Vogler 65) Siddhartha tried his hardest to hide his needs for wealth, desire, and even passion. These feelings continue to come through Siddhartha’s conscious thoughts and daily expressions. Siddhartha realizes through his journey that these thoughts and feeling are normal and are associated with human needs.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 29, 2014 01:56 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys and Tranformation in Narrative
30 September 2014

Question:
What, according to Christopher Volger, does the Trickster archetype “embody”? How is this “embodiment” performed, if at all, in Charles Dicken’s novel A Christmas Carol?

Answer:
Volger states, “The Trickster archetype embodies the energies of mischief and the desire for change.” (pg 77) In A Christmas Carol, all of the ghosts that came to Scrooge played part as the Trickster archetype as they brought the energies of mischief and desire for change. After they all visited Scrooge he came to the realization that he needed to change the way he lived his life in order to become happy and bring happiness into other peoples’ lives.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 30, 2014 09:06 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 1, 2014 10:29 AM

Bobbi Ausmus Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
English 220 CA02
9 February 2015


Question #8: Kamala, challenges Siddhartha in many various ways; of these “But you did want. Listen, Kamala, when you throw a stone into the water, it finds the quickest way to the bottom of the water. It is the same when Siddhartha has an aim, a goal (Hesse,60).” Kamala acts quickly, without thinking beforehand; while in contrast, Siddhartha sits and thinks through his actions before he actually carries them out.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus and Cody Jean-Baptiste at February 9, 2015 02:55 PM

Chrissy Castro & Marie Destin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys into Narrative CA01
09 February 2015

Question: (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shadow archetype. (b.) How is this energy represented in Hesse’s Siddhartha? Finally, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: (A.) According to Vogler, the Shadow archetype “represent[s] the power of repressed feelings” (Vogler 65). In other words, it can be tied to a dark past or a negative aspect or fears. (B.) In Siddhartha, the shadow character is Kamala. She showed him the life of sin and within twenty years of being with her, his life was in shambles. He dreamed of Govinda “wrapped around his arms” (Hesse 37) but then Govinda was no longer Govinda anymore, “but a woman” (Hesse 37). This now woman “intoxicated him and rendered him unconscious” (Hesse 37). Siddhartha is trying to reject sin and his dream is making it hard.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro & Marie Destin at February 9, 2015 03:08 PM

Jasmine Weaver & Kelsey Williams
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 February 2015

4. Shadows, says Vogler, can take three different manifestations: villains, antagonists, or enemies. They are not exactly the same. (a.) In your own words, explain how they are differentiated, according to Vogler. Then, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words. (b) .Which one of these types of shadow is present in Hesse’s Siddhartha, and why? Is more than one present?


Answer: (a).Villains and enemies aim to defeat the hero through any means necessary compared to an antagonist “may not be quite so hostile” (Volger 65). The antagonist may share the same goal as the hero, but disagree with the hero’s tactics. Antagonists are not equal to villains and enemies per say. (b.) Siddhartha’s shadow would be himself. As he journeys through his life, he tries to become something he is not. Siddhartha notoriously places more emphasis on everyone’s decisions, when in reality the only force stopping him, is himself.

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver & Kelsey Williams at February 9, 2015 03:23 PM

Hanna Kataria and Tyler Sedam
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
10 February 2015

A Christmas Carol

Question #7: (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the Shadow archetype. (b.) How does the shadow “challenge” the hero in Dickens’sA Christmas Carol? Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The dramatic function of a shadow archetype is to challenge the hero to force them to go through it and rise above it. The shadow should be a worthy opponent that will make the hero struggle; usually the villain in the story, but they can also be the within the hero themselves. The shadow puts the hero into deadly situations through conflicts and bringing the best out of them. In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, the Shadow was Scrooge himself before he changed. The Spirits are the ones that helped change him by challenging him with him facing the guilt and his past. They forced him to face the past guilt by taking him to his past, the present, and the future if he did not change. By showing him the future, he was able to see the results of his actions, and that challenged himself and his selfishness. Scrooge in the beginning did refuse to want to see what he did not “wish to see” (Dickens 28). Because he did not want to feel the guilt and see his past, present, and future.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria; Tyler Sedam at February 10, 2015 08:45 PM

Richard Bennet and Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys to Narrative CA02
9 February 2015

Question: In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shadow archetype. (b.) How is this energy represented in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol? Finally, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In Volger's text the shadow represents the repressed feeling of the hero (Volger, 65). The shadow . In dickens Christmas Carol, the shadow is the Ghost of Christmas future. The ghost shows him that no one really cared for him. That hit Scrooge deeply. Scrooge didn't want to be remember like that.

Posted by: Richard Bennet and Celina Tahsini at February 11, 2015 07:13 AM

William Pereira and Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
9 February 2015

9. (a.) In your own words, explain what Vogler means by the “Mask of the Shadow.” (b.) What masks are used/worn, and by what characters, in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol? Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The Mask of the Shadow is the dark side of the character. It is the things we don’t like about ourselves, and the evils of human nature. The shadows are usually dedicated to the defeat of the hero. Vogler explain the mask as "The Shadow can combine in power ways with other archetypes. Like the other archetypes. The Shadow is a function or mask which can be worn by any character." (Vogler 66)
B. The mask in The Christmas Carol is worn by his past. His passion and his love of money came back to haunt him. He loved money and wealth more then he did any person. The spirits helped him overcome his Shadow. Dickens explains Scrooge as "a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scaping, clutching, covetous old sinner! Hard and sharp as a splint, from which no steel had ever struck out a generous fire; secret self-contained, and solitary as an oyster"(Dickens 2)

Posted by: Will Pereira at February 11, 2015 12:08 PM

Bryan Hess, Maggie Izquierdo, and T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
11 February 2015

Question: (#1) In his chapter on the Shadow, Christopher Vogler says that this archetype represents “the unexpressed, unrealized, or rejected aspects of something.” (a.) Before beginning, you will need to correctly identify the Shadow. (b.) In your own words, explain what aspects of the shadow archetype in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol are ones that the Hero rejects. Then, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The shadow is an archetype that represents the repressed or rejected characteristics within the hero archetype. For example, look to Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol; we see that Scrooge is his own shadow. His repressed and rejected feelings being those of the kindness that he reveals within the fifth stave. The reader sees that these are being repressed when we look to the events in the Second Stave when we see that Scrooge wasn’t always such a cold hearted man. When the Spirit of Christmas Past shows Scrooge his former self, the reader witnesses, “Scrooge expending all the earnestness of his nature…” (Dickens, 21). We see Scrooge experiencing kindness and joy when he receives presents as a child, we see him appreciating kindness when he works for Fezziwig, so on and so forth. These are all feelings that Scrooge has repressed over the years for one reason or another.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 11, 2015 01:08 PM

Adam, Jefrey, Sergio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2/10/2015
2. In his chapter on the Shadow, Christopher Vogler says that this archetype represents “the unexpressed, unrealized, or rejected aspects of something.” (a.) Before beginning, you will need to correctly identify the Shadow. (b.) In your own words, explain what aspects of the shadow archetype in Hess’s Siddhartha are ones that the Hero rejects. Then, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
We have identified that, the shadow of this story will be Govinda, Siddhartha longtime confidant and a person who travels with him, threw out his trials and tribulations. Govinda is believed to fulfill the function of shadow for a myriad of reasons. In the beginning of the story Govinda self-proclaims himself as Siddarth’s shadow, and wants to learn from him, in addition to being a literal shadow, and he goes on to say, “And in days to come, when Siddhartha would become a god, when he would join the glorious, then Govinda wanted to follow him as his friend, his companion, his servant, his spear-carrier, his shadow!” (Hesse3) Siddhartha expresses a need to have no teacher and he rejects even Budda and goes on his travels to learn from the world. Govinda actually stays with Budda, so that he may learn from him, and this is where they go on separate journeys and even though one is not openly rejected, they separation implies rejection, this is expressed on the 13th page, (* “Govinda realized that his friend had left him, and he started to weep."Siddhartha!" he exclaimed lamentingly.Siddhartha kindly spoke to him: "Don't forget, Govinda, that you are now one of the Samanas of the Buddha! You have renounced your home and your parents, renounced your birth and possessions, renounced your freewill, and renounced all friendship.) So with this evidence we find Govinda to satisfy the role as Shadow.

Posted by: Sergio at February 11, 2015 01:59 PM

Burke & Andre

16. In his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the Shadow, Christopher Vogler explains that characters functioning with this archetype can be “signals of new power.” (a.) In Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far, how has the HERO, if at all, recognized a “Threshold Guardian not as [a] threating [enemy], but as [a] useful [Ally]”? In other words, how has a/the Shadow who, at first, appeared “to be attacking” the HERO, in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far, helped the hero by doing him/her “a huge favor”?

- In Hesse’s Siddhartha, the hero can be identified as Siddhartha, while the shadow can be identified as himself as well. He is equally as destructive to himself and his journey.

- The Hero, Siddhartha, has had a lasting relationship with the threshold guardian, Kamala. He met with her initially to learn how to love. She instructs him on how to grow and change as an individual in order to achieve what he would like to. Not only does she change him as a person, she helps him with her connections by introducing him to the merchant. Kamala is introduced as a challenger, pushing Siddhartha to his personal limits, but we eventually learn this was to help him grow. “You aren’t satisfied with Siddhartha as he is, with oil in his hair, but without clothes, without shoes, without money? Laughing, Kamala exclaimed: ‘no my dear, he doesn’t satisfy me yet. Clothes are what he must have, pretty clothes, and shoes, pretty shoes, and lots of money in is pouch, and gifts for Kamala.’” (pg46, Hesse.)

Posted by: Burke & Andre at February 8, 2016 11:05 AM

Emily Buckley & Jessica McKinney
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 February 2016

Question 14. In his discussion on the subject, Volger claims that, like “the other archetype, Shadows can express positive as well as negative aspects.” (a.) ” What possible “positive” aspects could there be to the shadows functioning in Hesse’s Siddhartha, if any? (b.) Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Volger mostly talks about the negative aspects, but he mentions “The Shadow can also shelter positive qualities that are in hiding or that we have rejected for some reason.” (Vogler 65) Siddhartha is his own shadow in a way; because he keeps pushing himself to find what he is, thirsting for, he brings himself down to despair to the point that he is ready to kill himself. “He wished passionately for oblivion, to be at rest, to be dead.” (Hesse 91) He is also the positive aspect as well because he discovers peace within himself. Once he regained his consciousness, he accepted what he had originally rejected. Scrooge is similar to Siddhartha in which he is the shadow within himself, both positive and negative. Scrooge represents the evil in the story even though he is the hero of the story. At the end of the story, Scrooge also discovers the positive within himself; however, he reaches this discovery by his journey pushed by the ghosts. They both accept what they had originally denied.

Posted by: Emily Buckley &Jessica McKinney at February 8, 2016 11:21 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journey in Narrative
9 February 2016

Question 4: Shadows, says Vogler, can take three different manifestations: villains, antagonists, or enemies. They are not exactly the same. (a.) In your own words, explain how they are differentiated, according to Vogler. Then, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words. (b.) Which one of these types of shadow is present in Hesse’s Siddhartha, and why? Is more than one present?

Answer: Vogler states in his text that, "Villains and enemies are usually dedicated to the death, destruction, or defeat of the hero, while the antagonists may not be quite so hostile. They may be Allies who are after the same goal but who disagree with the hero's tactics." (Vogler 65) By his definition, the villain and the enemy seek only one task, to rid themselves of the hero by any means, but as for the antagonist his intentions are not to seek harm, but to rather aid the hero in his quest but by achieving this his, the antagonist, way. In “Siddhartha,” Siddhartha represents the shadow of his own journey. He is his own enemy as well as antagonist. Siddhartha proves to be his own enemy/villain though his attempts of taking his own life. At one point, trying to drown himself. He says it himself, "That was the deed which he longed to commit, to destroy the form which he hated!" (Hesse 88-89) Seeing that living became a burden, he wished to die and almost achieved it. Also he nearly ended his journey and would not have attained the wisdom he attained. On the other hand within “A Christmas Carol,” there are several characters who play the role of the shadow. One being Marley, who leans more towards the antagonist role of the shadow because he was Scrooges ally and doesn’t like what Scrooge has become and wants him to change. Therefore he presented him a quest in which to change. Other characters who exhibited the role of antagonist were The ghosts of Christmas Past and The Ghost of Christmas Present. They also did not agree with Scrooge's tactics and show him what he had done in the past and was continuing to do in the present to give him insight on why he should change but he did not get the message and therefore was visited by one more ghost who took the role as villain as well as antagonist. This last spirit was The ghost of Christmas future. In the story, he portrayed a more hostile character. He showed scrooge his end, his death, in order to persuade him to change. Seeing his death and the way he was treated after he died truly persuaded Scrooge to change. In the end the antagonist goal was achieved but could have been thwarted if Scrooge had continued on his path resulting in the achievement of the Villain.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 9, 2016 06:27 PM

Charis Lavoie and Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
08 February 2016
Question 18: In the final part of his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the Shadow, Christopher Vogler explains that “Threshold Guardians [can] take on a fantastic array of forms” and then goes on to identify many such examples. (a.) Which of these, if any, were used as representations of a Shadow in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far? If none of Vogler’s examples were used, what “guises” were used, instead? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the meaning of “guise” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify both a/the Shadow/s in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far, and a/the HERO it attempted to test/delay.
Answer: In both A Christmas Carol and Siddhartha, Scrooge and Siddhartha are their own shadows. Scrooge’s shadow came about due to his experiences in life that he must overcome. The ghosts, or spirits, are there to help Scrooge see his wrongdoings so that he may change his ways. Siddhartha is trying to find balance within himself and the world.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 9, 2016 08:41 PM

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