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September 10, 2014

Campbell's *Mentor Archetype,* as Explained by Christopher Vogler


Image Source: http://www.thewritingnut.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Mentor-704x1024.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 10, 2014 09:15 AM

Readers' Comments:

Caitlin Christian
Jonah E Robertson
ENG 220 CL
12 September 2014

Question 4: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gift giving” & “gifts in mythology” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?
Answer:
In A Christmas Carol, the mentors described are the spirits and the guidance that is given to Scrooge. The spirit’s advice was the gift they gave to Scrooge. The Christmas’ shown to Scrooge are in order to make change and growth occur in his life. A gift can also be described as a benefit saved for another time. In Vogler the text describes gift giving as, “that of a “donor” or provider: one who temporarily aids the hero, usually by giving some gift.” (Vogler 40)

Posted by: Caitlin Christian & Jonah Robertson at September 12, 2014 12:04 PM

Bryce Veller, Matt Basin
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220CL-Journey in Narratives
September/11/2014

QUESTION
Explain Volger’s discussion of “dramatic funtions” of motivation.
ANSWER
The mentor archetype is a dramatic function of the hero because the mentor serves as a function, not a rigid character type, but one with several different jobs that he might perform in the story to help the hero-overcome fears. For the Mentor is there to show or motivate the hero into taking actions and commit to it.
In the Christmas Carol, the Ghost of Xmas Future helps to push Scrooge into realizing what road he is really following down, that if he does not change his ways he will end up making the vision of the future come true.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 12, 2014 12:07 PM

Group 8:

Anet Milian
Olivia Ago-Stallworth

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
12 September 2014

Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “the hero’s conscience” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]

Answer:
In Volger’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “the hero’s conscience” in the mentor archetype, he describes the mentor as someone who serves to remind the hero of the two opposing sides of decision making. This particular function is relevant to A Christmas Carol because Jacob Marley and the three spirits are Scrooge’s Mentor. They help guide and show Scrooge the opposing results of his actions.

Work Cited
Dickens, C. (1991). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications.


Posted by: Anet Milian at September 12, 2014 12:08 PM

Peter Bellini, James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
12 September 2014

Question 3:
In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.”
(A) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “teaching” in the Mentor archetype.
Answer:
The dramatic function of the Mentor can best be describes as a guide to the main character. An example would be Yoda from Star Wars. The mentor’s role can also be one of learning as much as teaching.

(B) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol?
Answer:
The mentor is in part the focus of the story. All of the ghosts in the story contribute to teaching and guiding Scrooge to change his ways. Just as Obiwan was a good mentor to Luke, Senator Palpatine was a mentor to Anakin with evil intentions.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 12, 2014 12:13 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Abrar Nooh
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative CA01
13 September 2014

Question #4:
In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gift-giving” & “gifts in mythology” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetypes used in A Christmas Carol you’ll have to identify the mentors to know?

Answer:
The dramatic function of gift giving and gifts in mythology is to provide the hero with a tool to aid him in his journey. That tool could be a magical weapon, a key or even a clue (Vogler 40). What this particular function have to do with the story A Christmas Carol,I is that if it weren’t for Scrooges mentors, Scrooge would have lived the same fate that his friend Jacob. His mentors, Jacob and the other ghost, have him the gift of showing him his Christmas past, present, and future in order to aid him through his journey of life.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 13, 2014 10:18 AM

Leroy Pianka
Joanna Ozog
Doug Ross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 September 2014

Group 1
QUESTION:
In your own word, Explain Where Mentor archetypes are frequently found, according to Christopher Vogler, and what are the origins of the “Mentor” and “Enthusiasm”? What does the concept of enthusiasm have to do with the Mentor archetype, and why might this be important for the reader?

ANSWER:
Mentor archetypes are found in dreams, myths, and stories. (Vogler 39) Most times, the mentor is found in the part of the story when the hero is looking for guidance. The word Mentor comes to us from “The Odyssey.” (Vogler 39) In the story of “The Odyssey,” the character’s name is his function. “Enthusiasm” comes from the Greek “En Theos,” Meaning God-inspired, having a god in you, or being in the presence of a god. (Vogler) The relationship between enthusiasm and the mentor archetype allows the mentor to be perceived as all knowing. This is important to the reader because it allows the reader to see the hero as “normal.”

Works Cited
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey. Ed. Paul Norlen. Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Novel.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 13, 2014 10:15 PM

Aaron virelli Kyle Vanburen
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative
12, September 2014

Question: a) in your own words, explain Voglers discussion of the “psychological function” of the mentor archetype.
b) what does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/ used in a Christmas Carol?


Answer: Vogler in his book has a discussion on the psychological function of a mentor archetype in a movie paly or novel. Furthermore he states “ mentors are often former hero’s who have survived life’s early trials and are now passing on the gift of there knowledge and wisdom.” (Vogler 40)For example, in the moment where spider man is talking to his uncle Ben he says, “with great power comes great responsibility.” This relates to Christmas Carol because the mentor Scrooge has is his good friend Jacob Marley in ghost form. He comes to him in the night to teach and protect him from the mistakes Jacob made. The 3 other ghost hold mentor qualities about right and wrong. Through the mentor like qualities passed along towards the end Scrooge himself finds himself being a mentor to others.

Posted by: aaron virelli at September 14, 2014 06:15 PM

Summer Taylor, Erin Gaylord, Tashanna Harris
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
15 September 2014

QUESTION #1:
(a.) In your own words, explain where Mentor archetypes are frequently found, according to Christopher Vogler, and what are the origins of the word "Mentor" and "Enthusiasm"? What does the concept of enthusiasm have to do with the Mentor archetype, and why might this be important to the reader?

ANSWER:
According to Vogler, mentor archetypes can be found in poems, books, movies, and just about anywhere. The word "mentor" comes from the Odyssey. The man that advises and guides the hero Telemachus home, is named Mentor. Vogler says that mentors often are wise and inspired by God's word. Enthusiasm comes from the Greek word en theos; which literally translates as being inspired by God, or having God in them. Enthusiasm is an important concept that goes hang in hand with that of the Mentor archetype. Mentors need to be enthused (in the old, and new sense of the word)in order to get their pupils excited about learning something new. This concept of the enthused mentor is important to readers and people who watch movies as well. It is important to have the reader/ watcher excited about what the hero character is going to learn and to stress importance on the things that he is learning. Another thing that normally happens during this exciting learning process is an upbeat montage. Many times when a movie is showing a hero learning a new talent, (The dancing in Footloose, and Daniels's Karate in The Karate Kid are great examples)the movie does not show tons of painstaking details, and rather shows a montage of the hero- always accompanied with upbeat music of course. This upbeat music is supposed to get the viewer excited about the training.

Posted by: Summer Taylor, Erin Gaylord, Tashanna Harris at September 15, 2014 10:13 AM

Ashlee English & Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
12 September 2014.
The Mentor

QUESTION # 6: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gifts should be earned” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?
ANSWER:
“Nothing in the world is worth having or worth doing unless it means effort, pain, difficulty… I have never in my life envied a human being who led an easy life. I have envied a great many people who led difficult lives and led them well.” (Theodore Roosevelt)
The above quote adequately demonstrates the dramatic function of gifts should be earned. Especially in the case of the hero archetype, illustrated by Campbell; for a hero to receive some reward/ spiritual boon he or she has to go through trials and come out victorious. Volger agrees with Campbell and reciprocate this view, and by so doing the hero learns sacrifice and or commitment under the patronage of the mentor.
In A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, the mentor archetype would best suit Mr. Fezziwig in the case of Scrooge. Scrooge is Fezziwig’s apprentice as such; Fezziwig became the guiding force to shape Scrooge into the perceptive businessperson he is (although he is shrewd and stingy). In addition to his mentor role, Fezziwig also held the stead as a father figure to Scrooge and Dick Williams (another apprentice of Fezziwig) “Yo ho, my boys!... Christmas Ebenezer” (Dickens 24) thus guiding Scrooge as a father would guide his son.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 15, 2014 10:43 AM

Maria Aguilera and Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 September 2014

Question #5:
In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gifts in mythology” & “Perseus” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?
Answer:
a) Vogler explains that “Gifts in Mythology” is a major function in mythology for the mentor. The mentors give gifts to the hero so that he/she could better protect their society. The idealistic hero in Greek society was Perseus. He was receiving many gifts from the Gods to the point where they weighed him down, but in the end, they helped him in his quest as a hero.
b) This relates to “A Christmas Carol” in how the Spirits are the mentors who help Scrooge better himself. They allow Scrooge to have foresight and look into his future and see his fate. The Spirits give Scrooge the gift to redeem himself. They give him the gift of charity and learning there is more to life than just material objects. They gave Scrooge a second chance to save his soul.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 17, 2014 11:58 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 1, 2014 10:19 AM

Kelsey Williams and Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
30 January 2015

Question 3. In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “teaching” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you will have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer: (a.) Mentors resemble the parental part of a psyche where the “mentor represents the Self” (Volger 40) that is wiser and nobler. Specifically, educating the Hero concerning “the ropes” (Volger 40) or how to efficiently handle circumstances thrown at the Hero. (b). In the case of A Christmas Carol, Jacob Marley is the first mentor. Marley taught Scrooge through showing him the error of his ways, representing the wisdom he gained from wearing the chain he “forged in life” (Dickens 22). The three spirits who assisted him throughout the novella are mentors as well. These Christmas mentors teach Scrooge about the errors of his past and present, showing him the result his current path will bring him too. After their guidance, Scrooge became “as good a man, as the good old city knew,” (Dickens 91).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield at January 31, 2015 12:00 AM

Hanna Kataria, Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
31 January 2015
Group 3

A Christmas Carol

Question #6: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gifts should be earned” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer: In “The Writer’s Journey” written by Vogler, he discusses the Mentor and their dramatic function of the gifts that should be earned by the Hero. To begin with, the Mentor is a teacher to the Hero. The duty of a Mentor is to teach the Hero, for them to receive the gift “by learning, sacrifice, or commitment” (Vogler 41). In the “Christmas Carol”, the Hero is Scrooge, and the Mentor is all three of the ghost or spirits that visit Scrooge. These Mentors were there to teach and guide Scrooge so that he could change his ways. Their insight and guiding were the gifts that Scrooge received. The outcome of Scrooge receiving the lessons from the Mentors was that he had an awakening, and he changed his behavior and looked at life. He ended up appreciating life, he was nicer to people, happy and was charitable. Scrooge at one point states , “I will not shut out the lessons that” the spirits taught (Dickens 62). The Spirits were able to make Scrooge a changed man through their gifts of lessons and teachings.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria; Bryan Hess at January 31, 2015 09:13 PM

T.J. Pagliaro, Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 January 2015

Question 8: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “the hero’s conscience” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer: According to Vogler’s discussion of a “Hero’s conscience”, the hero should attain morality. The hero must remember to be humble to his or her self. Vogler discusses that the Hero’s conscience plays a vital role in the characters and heroic characters. The hero may rebel over a nagging conscience (Vogler 32). This function has to with A Christmas Carol by each of the three Spirits including Jacob Marley as the mentors to Scrooge by making him realize and teaching him what his fate is in the end.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 1, 2015 02:23 PM

Maggie Izquierdo and William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Literature CA02
1 February 2015


Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gift-giving” & “gifts in mythology” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?


Answer: Volger explains that an important function of being a mentor archetype is “gift-giving” to the hero archetype. This gift ends up being lifesaving. It does not matter the form the gift whether it is physical or nonphysical. In mythology, “gift-giving” plays an important role. The heroes are given gifts from their Mentors, the gods. Volger gives the example of Hercules and Perseus being given many gifts from different gods (Vogler 40-41).
In Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” all three spirits are mentors to Scrooge because they give the gift of lessons. The chief mentor is the Ghost of the Future. Once Scrooge sees his reality, his own grave, he changes his character for good (Dickens 62).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo and William Pereira at February 1, 2015 11:12 PM

Rachel Andrews & Chrissy Castro

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02

30 January 2015


Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “mentor as inventor” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer: The Mentor archetype has many “dramatic functions” one of them, according to Vogler is the “mentor as inventor”. When a mentor is an inventor, they often gift the hero something they themselves have created, such as a magic item or an actual invention. Most often though mentor’s give advice. No matter whether the gift is a physical object or abstract the gift given is key to saving the hero’s life. The mentors in a Christmas Carol offer advice and a glimpse into Scrooge's life. Scrooge is anti-hero/protagonist; he drives the story and makes the most decisions. All the Spirits are mentors, they show him the way and how his actions will affect others, they tell him that he has to change or else. While they do not offer him any physical objects, they do offer him advice. It could be argued that Marley was the chief mentor, he offered advice and gifted Scrooge the spirits to help him, or a dispatcher, he let the evil be known to the Hero and sent him on the start of his journey.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews & Chrissy Castro at February 2, 2015 10:43 AM

Tyler Sedam, Matthew Lemonis, and Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Narrative CA02
2 February 2015

Question: In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Mentor archetype. What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in "A Christmas Carol"?

Answer: According to Vogler, the psychological function of the Mentor archetype is to act as a guide and protector of the hero, to provide knowledge and advice, and to help motivate the hero to go on, and continue, the journey (Vogler 40). The Mentor acts as a parent to the hero and represents what the hero could be become if they go on the journey (Vogler 40). In Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," each of the ghosts that visit Scrooge could be said to be a mentor to him. As a mentor will act as a parent to the hero, wanting to protect and improve the hero, as well as lead him or her on the right path, the ghosts remind Scrooge of how he used to be in order to change him for the better, as a parent would. Each ghost provides motivation and knowledge for Scrooge to change back into his old, kinder self, and that is purpose of the mentor.

Posted by: Tyler Sedam, Matthew Lemonis, and Wyatt Burttschell at February 2, 2015 12:48 PM

Sergio Velazquez Marie Dustin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 January 2015

Q: 1 In your own words, explain where Mentor archetypes are frequently found, according to Christopher Vogler, and what are the origins of the word “Mentor” and “Enthusiasm”? What does the concept of enthusiasm have to do with the Mentor archetype, and why might this be important for the reader?
The word mentor come from the Greek goddess Athena posing as a mortal named Mentor, she gave great insight on the journey and was necessary for the hero to find his way home. Enthusiasm means to be god inspired. The mentors, job is to provide motivations and direction for the protagonist of the story, so these two words are not mutually exclusive they bolster each other. This is important to the reader because he or she must understand, how the mentor helps drive the story.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at February 2, 2015 01:41 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl, Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL journeys into Narrative CA01
January 27, 2016

Question 13: What does Vogler mean by “fallen mentor” (2) has this particular variety of mentor appeared in any films and texts you have been assigned so far? If so, which work, which character, and why?
Answer: Vogler was referring to the way they were aging or approaching their death. This refers to the films we’ve seen from class because, in the Lion King Mufasa is Simba’s mentor as Simba is growing up, up until his father’s death when he is basically growing up on his own until he meets Timon and Pumba, who help him become the lion that he became to be. In Star Wars, the character that refers to this the most is Obi-Wan, because he helps Luke Skywalker become the person that he became to be, up until Luke met Yoda. In the Christmas Carol, Marley is the character that helps Scrooge see who he really is, with all that he’s been doing by taking him on an adventure of different scenes of Scrooge’s life to make him see how he needs to change himself, to become a better happier person during Christmas.

Question 14: what does Vogler mean by “continuing Mentors” (2) has this particular variety of mentor appeared in any of the films and texts you have been assigned so far? If so, which work, which character, and why?
Answer: In the Christmas Carol, Marley was the one who would always tell Scrooge when/where to meet his spirits, and what he needed to do to change to make things better. In Star Wars, Yoda would tell Luke what and where he always needed to be. In the Lion King, Rafiki was the one who by the end of the movie who was the one who ended up telling Simba what he needed to do in order to what his father Mufasa always intended on doing, even though it meant he would need to face his fear and go back and challenge his uncle Scar to defeat him and become king.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 27, 2016 11:23 AM

Emily Buckley and Andre Gilbert
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 January 2016

Question 18: Vogler points out that there are a variety of mentor incarnations in different narratives. He discusses several in his chapter (1.) What does he mean by “Inner Mentors” and (2.) has this particular variety of mentor appeared in any of the films and/or texts you have been assigned so far? If so, which work, which character, and why?

Answer: The hero “has internalized the archetype and it now lives within him as an inner code of behavior.” (Vogler 47) The force would be an example of this type of mentor because it is the energy of all living things.

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Andre Gilbert at January 28, 2016 12:28 PM

Emily Buckley and Andre Gilbert
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 January 2016

Question 17: Vogler points out that there are a variety of mentor incarnations in different narratives. He discusses several in his chapter (1.) What does he mean by “Shaman” Mentors, or, “Mentor[s] as Shaman” and (2.) has this particular variety of mentor appeared in any of the films and/or texts you have been assigned so far? If so, which work, which character, and why?

Answer: Shamans are the healers, “the medicine man or woman, of the tribal culture” (Vogler 46). They guide the hero through life. Obi Wan would be considered a mentor as a shaman because he guides Luke through his quest to become a Jedi and helps him get in touch with the force he steers him away from fear and anger.

Question 18: Vogler points out that there are a variety of mentor incarnations in different narratives. He discusses several in his chapter (1.) What does he mean by “Inner Mentors” and (2.) has this particular variety of mentor appeared in any of the films and/or texts you have been assigned so far? If so, which work, which character, and why?

Answer: The hero “has internalized the archetype and it now lives within him as an inner code of behavior.” (Vogler 47) The force would be an example of this type of mentor because it is the energy of all living things.

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Andre Gilbert at January 28, 2016 04:31 PM

Charis Lavoie and Burke Tomaselli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 January 2016
Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “teaching” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?
Answer: A) To learn one must be taught, but this teaching goes both ways. Just as a teacher in a school setting teaches their children how to add and subtract, they in turn also learn from their students about the world today.
B) The concept of “teaching” within A Christmas Carol comes from the lessons taught by the Ghosts that have visited Scrooge throughout the story. With the help of each of them, Scrooge overcomes the ways of his past in order to grow and become the person we see him as towards the end. Teaching and demonstrating is the entire premise of the plot for A Christmas Carol, which is the entire purpose of ghosts as a collective.

Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gift-giving” & “gifts in mythology” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?
Answer: A) Gift-giving is when someone gives the hero a gift that will aid him or her in their journey; this can be due to the hero helping out this passerby or just to help them.
B) Scrooge was visited by the three ghosts so he could change his ways. This, in a sense, was a form of gift-giving because of this he is able to avoid the same fate as Marley.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie and Burke Tomaselli at January 28, 2016 10:04 PM

Jessica McKinney
Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 January 2016

Question #8: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “the hero’s conscience” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer: A.) The dramatic function of “the hero’s conscience” is the mentor constantly reminding the hero of their responsibilities of doing the right thing. B.) The ghosts/ spirits are the mentor in the Christmas Carol to Scrooge, which shows different stages of Scrooge life. The last Ghost, The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come showed Scrooge what would happen if he was to continue not to have a purpose or meaning in his life of being cruel to others around him. This ghost was Scrooge conscience; Christmas Yet to Come helped Scrooge open his eyes to change his outlook on life to want to do better.

Question #9: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “motivation” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer: A.) Volger’s discussion on the dramatic function of motivation means the mentor in the story gives the hero the drive and the ambition that the hero can’t do or see for themselves. Also, the mentor acts as a shadow by consulting the hero to push through when the hero becomes afraid or reluctant. B.) The mentor archetype, motivation relates to the Christmas Carol from Scrooge being led by the spirits/ ghosts. The ghost motivates Scrooge to change his life around from his current attitude towards the world to live a better life.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 28, 2016 10:23 PM

Jessica McKinney
Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 January 2016

Question #8: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “the hero’s conscience” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer: A.) The dramatic function of “the hero’s conscience” is the mentor constantly reminding the hero of their responsibilities of doing the right thing. B.) The ghosts/ spirits are the mentor in the Christmas Carol to Scrooge, which shows different stages of Scrooge life. The last Ghost, The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come showed Scrooge what would happen if he was to continue not to have a purpose or meaning in his life of being cruel to others around him. This ghost was Scrooge conscience; Christmas Yet to Come helped Scrooge open his eyes to change his outlook on life to want to do better.

Question #9: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “motivation” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer: A.) Volger’s discussion on the dramatic function of motivation means the mentor in the story gives the hero the drive and the ambition that the hero can’t do or see for themselves. Also, the mentor acts as a shadow by consulting the hero to push through when the hero becomes afraid or reluctant. B.) The mentor archetype, motivation relates to the Christmas Carol from Scrooge being led by the spirits/ ghosts. The ghost motivates Scrooge to change his life around from his current attitude towards the world to live a better life.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 28, 2016 10:23 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
January 2016

Archetypes

Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the “hero’s conscience” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer: In “The Writer’s Journey,” Vogler described the “dramatic function” of the “hero’s conscious” as a moral guide leading the hero into the direction that they should be heading to develop the character of the hero. He also states that on some occasion that the hero is reluctant to adhere to the mentor’s word playing the role of the hero’s conscience and pushes them away. For instance in the story of Little Red Riding Hood, Mother, playing the voice of conscience told Red not to stop for anyone but go directly to Grandma’s house to deliver the basket of goodies. Being Red, she allowed herself to get distracted and strayed from Mother’s words and caused Grandma’s and her life to end. Like this in the Christmas Carol Marley played the role of the hero’s conscience. Being the dead for years, Scrooge care not for no one. One day during the Christmas season the ghost of Marley visited Scrooge leading him in the direction into which his journey would flow. Although Scrooge saw and heard Marley’s words, he refused to believe and as a result, his journey became more difficult and painful for him.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 28, 2016 10:42 PM

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