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September 10, 2014

Campbell's *Hero Archetype,* as Explained by Christopher Vogler


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 10, 2014 08:26 AM

Readers' Comments:

Blake Bromen & Erin Gaylord
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
10 September 14

Question #5: In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “audience identification” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer: When an author is writing a story or narrative, the author needs to make the hero someone that the audience can relate to and have similar desires as the audience. The combination of qualities that the hero has that allows them to relate to them and that shows the audience that the hero is unique. (Vogler 30-31) (b.) Scrooge is thought as more of a villain in A Christmas Carol, this function makes the audience of A Christmas Carol want Scrooge to change and come to love Christmas.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 10, 2014 11:20 AM

Caitlin Christian, Ashlee English, Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
8 September 2014

Question Group 5:
Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: In the stave, besides just being a creepy old dude with chains, what role does Jacob Marley really play in the story? For example, with his “warning,” is he trying to prevent Scrooge from going on the journey he is about to embark upon? Or, with his “warning,” is he trying to “encourage” (you may define “encourage” in a way that seems appropriate) Scrooge to embark upon the journey? In other words, is he an enabler (helper) or a hinderer for Scrooge, at this point in the story? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
“I am here to-night to warn you, that you have a chance and hope of escaping my fate.” (Dickens 15)
Jacob Marley plays the role of the enabler who warns Scrooge. Marley comes forward to show that Scrooge needs an intervention in order to change his fate. Marley shares that he wants Scrooge to go on this journey so that he does not end up the same as him. Marley is a point of information and guidance to Scrooge. Marley knows more than Scrooge, sharing that he knows his suffering will be greater because of the length of his chain. Marley is also a point of encouragement to take the journey seriously and listen to every Spirit and story shown to him. Marley knows from experience and wants to make sure Scrooge does not make the same mistakes he did on his journey.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian, Ashlee English, Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 10, 2014 12:07 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth and Matt Basin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 September 2014

QUESTION #10:
In addition to “psychological functions,’’ any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a) In your own words, explain Volger’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “character flaws” in the Hero archetype. (b). What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens.

ANSWER:
The hero is challenged by many things like weaknesses, guilt, or drama of the past because that could alter the character from being who they really are. In A Christmas Carol, the hero was evaluating his life and was what he could have possibly have chosen before he was like the way he was. He could have chosen a life that could have been better for him than money. If he chose something other than money, he could have been happier, giving, and less mean to everyone.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 10, 2014 12:12 PM


Anet Milian
Joanna Ozog

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
10 September 2013

Question: In addition to “psychological functions” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of dealing with Death” in the hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens.

Answer:
The dramatic function of dealing with death in the hero archetype serves to show us how heroes always accept the possibility of sacrifice. For example, according to Volger, a hero may die and be reborn, proving that death can be transcended. In a Christmas Carol, the character Scrooge can also be seen a s hero. After he has been visited by the three spirits, he came to the realization that past actions were unacceptable. He became willing to sacrifice his old lifestyle in order to achieve his true calling and become a better person not only for himself, but for those around him. A hero always grows, acts, and makes a sacrifice. I believe that by the end of the story, Scrooge has fulfilled some of these heroic components.
Work Cited
Dickens, C. (1991). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 10, 2014 12:14 PM

LEROY PIANKA
BRITNEY POLYCARPE
We begin to want to live the hero characters actions and move he make in the stories. By the actions, the hero makes as an audience we begin to leave in the mindset of his every move.
Which leads to the character to Scoorge character in the Christmas carol. He actions might be disliked but, as an audience or a reader you can relate to some of his qualities .In other words Scoorge is a basically a simple human being and is not your typical hero “superman” . Scoorge has universal qualities and emotions that we all could have experienced which makes him a unique hero and goes back to what Volger is stating in his texts you do not need to look or be like your typical hero in a story.

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 10, 2014 12:29 PM

Nathanael Jones, Josh Natonio, Abrar Nooh
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
10 September 2014

Group 6
Question 6:
In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Volger’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “growth” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
Volger defines one of the ways to identify the “hero” of the story by stating that the character who overcomes the most obstacles or the one who changes the most takes the function of the hero (Volger 31). In the context for a story, typically the hero will then be the most dynamic character who goes through the biggest change. For A Christmas Carol, Scrooge takes the role of the most dynamic character, changing from the grouchy, cynical old man to a revived compassionate person with a positive hindsight on life. “But what did Scrooge care? It was the very thing he liked. To edge his way along the crowded paths of life, warning all human sympathy to keep its distance, was what the knowing ones call ‘nuts’ to Scrooge” (Dickens 2). Scrooge started with being an old man in the background not wanting any human interaction, none the less emotional interaction, everything to him was strictly business. However, by the end of the story Scrooge was described as becoming “a good friend,” “a good master,” and “a good man” better than “the good old world” knew, taking to heart what the spirits taught him and becoming the alternate self from the beginning of the story (Dickens 68). The transition Scrooge undertook reflects the “growth” archetype Volger describes for heroes.

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 10, 2014 05:27 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
10 September 2014
Question #2
(a.) Explain Vogler’s claim that each of the various archetypes emanate, or, operate as facets of the hero’s own personality.
Text source: “A Writers Journey”, By: Christopher Vogler, and “A Christmas Carol,” By: Charles Dickens
The word facet describes the hero or writers personality. This could be either a good or ill personality (Vogler 24). The word emanate, means to give off or project outwards (Vogler 25). With relation to “A Christmas Carol,” Scrooge in the beginning is cold, bitter, and miserable towards everybody. Especially Bob Crachet due to the fact that he works for Scrooge. In the text, “External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No warmth could warm, nor wintry weather could chill him. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty” (Dickens 2). Scrooge emanates those feeling towards everyone else. In simpler words, Scrooge wants everybody else to feel miserable because that is the way he feels. With reference to the Archetypes as Emanations of the Hero, Scrooge would be, “The Higher Self” (Vogler 25). Scrooge is a rich banker who is very controlling towards Bob Crachet and everybody else.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 11, 2014 02:00 PM

James Sierra, Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
10 September 2014

Hero Type:
Question 7:
In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) in your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “action” in the Hero archetype. (b) What does this particular function have to do, if anything with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
(a) The hero is usually the focus of the story. He is usually the one that makes things happen, and who the story revolves around.
(b) The function applies to Dickens’ A Christmas Story, in the fact that the main character, Scrooge, is the hero of the story. The story follows, and describes Scrooge’s journey in becoming a better person.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 11, 2014 08:38 PM

Jazlynn Rosario and Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journey in Narrative CA02
11 September 2014

Group Question #8:
In addition to "psychological functions," any given archetype also performs a "dramatic function" of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler's discussion of the "dramatic function" demonstrating "sacrifice" in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
Scrooge sacrificed his old and grumpy ways to make everyone around him like him. He also sacrificed his money for the poor little boy, Bob Cratchit, and Tiny Tim. Scrooge sacrificed a lot in order to become a happier old man and to live the rest of his days happy.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 11, 2014 09:35 PM

Jonah Robertson and Sharrad Forbes
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
11 September 2014

Question:
(a): In your own words, explain Vogler's claim that archetypes, such as the hero archetype, are best understood as functions, rather than roles. You'll first have to define, and be clear on, the meanings of both "role" and "function" to fully understand the difference. (b): What does this have to do with any of the archetypes used, particularly the hero archetype, in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
A role is something that stays static, or doesn't change, while a function is fluid and can evolve over time, or even shift to other functions at various times (Vogler 24). Heroes, according to Vogler, are more a function than a role, and this is exemplified by the fact that often times a hero will portray other roles throughout their tale. Scrooge in A Christmas Carol, for example, starts off the tale almost as a Shadow, refusing to donate to the poor (Dickens 5-6) and just being generally unpleasant. By the end of the tale though, he is most undoubtedly a hero. This wouldn't be possible is he was simply given a role, because he is given the function of a hero, he has the fluidity to shift in his function throughout the story.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 11, 2014 09:45 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
11 September 2014

Question #4:
(A)In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of a Hero Archetype. You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, the meaning of both “hero,” As understood by the ancient Greeks, and “ego,”as understood by Sigmund Freud, to fully understand this concept. (B) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
The psychological function of the Hero archetype is the egos challenge to face the internal teachers, monsters and helpers and to take these parts and incorporate them as one and balance them, thus becoming a complete human being. This is explained in this quote in the book, “The Psychological task we all face is to interrogate these separate parts into one complete, balanced entity” (Vogler 30).

What this has to do with the Hero archetype in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens, is the fact that he goes through that psychological challenge and it does not start to get resolve until those three ghosts appeared. Those ghosts represented his ego trying to balance out those internal challenges to reach a balanced life.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 11, 2014 10:16 PM

Jake Gates
Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys In Narrative CA02
10 September 2014


QUESTION:
(a.) In your own words, explains Vogler’s claim that each of the various archetypes emanate, or, operate as facets of the hero’s own personality. You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, the meanings of both “emanate” and “facet” to fully understand this concept. (b.) What does this have to do with the hero archetype used in The Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

ANSWER:
The various archetypes emanate, or, operate as facets of the hero’s own personality, because each person represents a different personality of a hero, and they are also supposed to simply be human beings. The nature of an archetypes are supposed to break down each character, but in every story there cannot be a hero. “The other characters represent possibilities for the hero, for good or ill. A hero sometimes proceeds through the story gathering and incorporating the energy and traits of the other characters.”

The hero archetype used in the Christmas Carol, are the ghost trying to help him grow as an individual so he can learn from the past mistakes that he made. Bob Cratchit is the shadow that Scrooge is trying to follow.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 12, 2014 12:14 AM

Tyler Sommers and Aaron Virelli
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative

11 September 2014

Question # 3

(a.) In your own words, explain Volger’s rational/dismissal of other well-known archetypes in literature, that are not included in his list of eight “most common and useful” ones. Also, what driving questions can be used to help identify the nature of any archetype in a narrative, including the hero archetype? Why might this be important for the reader?

Answer

Volger’s rational is based off of his main eight archetypes by saying that all other archetypes derive from the main eight. With that being said some of the other archetypes would not be important if they did not fall under one of the eight main categories. When it comes to the hero, hearing words of wisdom from another character, such as a mentor, it will help him learn how to carry himself as a leader. This is important for the reader because it gives clear direction for the reader to understand where the story’s direction is heading and who the protagonist and antagonist.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers and Aaron Virelli at September 12, 2014 09:10 AM

Thomas Meseroll,
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220cl Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 September 2014

QUESTION # 3:
(a.) In your own words, explain Vogler's rational/dismissal of other well-known archetypes in literature, that are not included in his list of the eight "most common and useful" ones. Also, what driving questions can be used to help identify the nature of any archetype in a narrative, including the hero archetype? Why might this be important for the reader?

ANSWER:
a.) Vogler dismisses all other archetypes stating "they are only variants and refinements" (Vogler 24) of the most common eight archetypes. Vogler tells us that all archetypes found in stories are modified forms of the main eight, deriving their base or origin from them, or even a blending of two or more.

b.) The driving questions used to help identify the nature of an archetype are "What psychological function or part of the personality does it represent?" (Vogler 26) and "What is the dramatic function of the story?" (Vogler 26).

Posted by: Thomas Meseroll at September 12, 2014 10:11 AM

Do-Over
Kyle VanBuren
Ashley Gross
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
10 September 2014
Question #2
(a.) Explain Vogler’s claim that each of the various archetypes emanate, or, operate as facets of the hero’s own personality.
Text source: “A Writers Journey”, By: Christopher Vogler, and “A Christmas Carol,” By: Charles Dickens
The word facet describes the hero or writers personality. This could be either a good or ill personality (Vogler 24). The word emanate, means to give off or project outwards (Vogler 25). With relation to “A Christmas Carol,” Scrooge in the beginning is cold, bitter, and miserable towards everybody. Especially Bob Crachet due to the fact that he works for Scrooge. In the text, “External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No warmth could warm, nor wintry weather could chill him. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty” (Dickens 2). Scrooge emanates those feeling towards everyone else. In simpler words, Scrooge wants everybody else to feel miserable because that is the way he feels. With reference to the Archetypes as Emanations of the Hero, Scrooge would be, “The Higher Self” (Vogler 25). Scrooge is a rich banker who is very controlling towards Bob Crachet and everybody else.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren and Ashley Gross at September 12, 2014 10:55 AM

Thomas Meseroll, Bryce Veller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220cl Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 September 2014

QUESTION # 3:
(a.) In your own words, explain Vogler's rational/dismissal of other well-known archetypes in literature, that are not included in his list of the eight "most common and useful" ones. Also, what driving questions can be used to help identify the nature of any archetype in a narrative, including the hero archetype? Why might this be important for the reader?

ANSWER:
a.) Vogler dismisses all other archetypes stating "they are only variants and refinements" (Vogler 24) of the most common eight archetypes. Vogler tells us that all archetypes found in stories are modified forms of the main eight, deriving their base or origin from them, or even a blending of two or more.

b.) The driving questions used to help identify the nature of an archetype are "What psychological function or part of the personality does it represent?" (Vogler 26) and "What is the dramatic function of the story?" (Vogler 26).

Posted by: Do Over Thomas Meseroll, Bryce Veller at September 12, 2014 11:54 AM

Nuri Salahuddin and Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
12 September 2014

Question:
In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a) In your own words, explain Volger’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “mentor as inventor” in the Mentor archetype. (b) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer:
a) Christopher Volger states that the mentor is the one who aids the hero. The mentor gives specific tools and advice to the hero, depending on which quest the hero is on to help the hero complete their goal. “The best advice is worthless if you don’t take it.” (Vogler 42).
b) In a Christmas Carol, the three Christmas ghosts served as mentors for Scrooge. All three of the ghosts let Scrooge see his past, present and future to open up his eyes to what he has become, and to help him change himself for the better. ““Without their visits,” said the Ghost, “you cannot hope to shun the path I tread.”” (Dickens 15).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 12, 2014 12:08 PM

Maria Aguilera and Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 September 2014

Question #5:
In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gifts in mythology” & “Perseus” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer:
a) Vogler explains that “Gifts in Mythology” is a major function in mythology for the mentor. The mentors give gifts to the hero so that he/she could better protect their society. The idealistic hero in Greek society was Perseus. He was receiving many gifts from the Gods to the point where they weighed him down, but in the end, they helped him in his quest as a hero.
b) This relates to “A Christmas Carol” in how the Spirits are the mentors who help Scrooge better himself. They allow Scrooge to have foresight and look into his future and see his fate. The Spirits give Scrooge the gift to redeem himself. They give him the gift of charity and learning there is more to life than just material objects. They gave Scrooge a second chance to save his soul.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 13, 2014 09:38 PM

Blake Bromen & Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
12 September 14

Question #3:
In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “teaching” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer:
The teacher/ mentor is the gateway into the journey of the main character/hero. The mentor teaches the hero a lesson that will benefit him or her throughout their journey. (Vogler 40) From the Penguin Group 2008 issue of A Christmas Carol. This archetype is shown through the three spirits guiding Scrooge throughout his journey. The ghost of Christmas past for example is a mentor to Scrooge, by showing him his journey to where he is today, and showing him what he has become. (Dickens 37-56) He needs to know what caused the change in his life, so he can better himself in the future.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 15, 2014 10:27 AM

(Initially posted in A Christmas Carol blog)
Blake Bromen & Erin Gaylord
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
10 September 14

Question #5: In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “audience identification” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer: When an author is writing a story or narrative, the author needs to make the hero someone that the audience can relate with and have similar desires as the audience. The combination of qualities that the hero has that allows them to relate to them and that shows the audience that the hero is unique. (Vogler 30-31) (b.) Scrooge is thought as more of a villain in A Christmas Carol, this function makes the audience of A Christmas Carol want Scrooge to change and come to love Christmas.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 15, 2014 10:43 AM

Kendra Hinton and Zachary Sabo
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
14 September 2014

Question #5:
In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gifts in mythology” & “Perseus” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer:
A.Gifts in Mythology is defined as a gift giving. The hero receives a gift or has a trait on wisdom of knowledge. Persus is someone who is shower with gifts. He is a typical hero, he is providing for by gods, by his mentor’s adventure.
B.The spirits were Scrooge mentors, which help him gain knowledge and growth

Posted by: Kendra Hinton and Zachary Sabo at September 16, 2014 10:24 PM

Kendra Hinton, Tashanna Harris
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
10 September 2014

Question #7:
In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “action” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
A.)A dramatic function is to identify with the hero to see the same point of view as he or she the world through their story line. Example villain turns into a hero.
B.)Scrooge was a villain that reaches a turning point in his life and became a hero. Self-expression the beginning of the story Scrooge was a miserable old man and an ego build off wealth. Towards the ending of the story Scrooge, demonstrate growth and wisdom.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton and Tashanna Harris at September 16, 2014 10:25 PM

Blake Bromen and Abrar Nooh
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
14 September 14

Question 3:
(a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the [Threshold] Guardian archetype as it exists in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Who or what are the “inner demons” of a/the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the actual meaning of “neurosis” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, in order to locate accurately this variety threshold guardian.

Answer:
The Threshold Guardian is the gatekeeper to the special/mystical world. A Threshold Guardian is a protector that only allows the righteous to enter the spiritual world. (Vogler 49) You can argue that Scrooge was in essence a hero in the fact that he bettered himself along his journey, and his inner demons were the three spirits (past, present, and future). We believe that Marley’s ghost is the Threshold Guardian because he is the face Scrooge meets before his trip/ journey before he crosses over to the spiritual world and his encounters with the three ghosts. (Dickens 15)

*A Christmas Carol references are from the Penguin Group 2008 issue of A Christmas Carol

Posted by: Blake Bromen & Abrar Nooh at September 16, 2014 11:27 PM

Kendra Hinton and Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
17 September 2014

Question #8:
Identify accurately the SHAPESHIFTER in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Shapeshifter archetype, and how this plays out in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer:
Scrooge is the Shapeshifter. He is a good repetition of a powerful archetype and understands that the three spirits was there to be helpful in his life. In the beginning of the book Scrooge was unstable, but as the three spirits enter his life he was shifting back and forth until he encounter a change throughout the story, bringing doubt, because you would not think Scrooge would be a hero at the end of the story.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton and Blake Bromen at September 17, 2014 09:56 PM

Rebeccah Braun and Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 September 2014

Question #4:
In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Hero archetype. You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, that meanings of both “hero,” as understand by the ancient Greeks, and “ego,” as understood by Sigmund Freud, to fully understand this concept. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
When a character “…is able to transcend the bounds and illusions of the ego…” (Vogler 30) is what Vogler defines as the psychological function of the Hero archetype. To understand this, he explains that the term “hero” originates from the Greek and means to “protect and serve” (Vogler 29), and are usually self-sacrificing. The hero will give up his own wants and needs to protect and help his society in any means. An ego is an ideology created by Sigmund Freud and is part of the personality that diverges from the normality of society and stands out. Vogler explains that the hero is entirely ego at the beginning of the story, and the hero archetype represents how the character overcomes his ego and becomes the selfless hero identity.

In A Christmas Carol, it is hard to decipher who the villain is at the beginning since little is explained about other characters besides Scrooge. At the beginning of the book, Scrooge can only be seen as the protagonist not as a hero, however, after the three Spirits of Christmas visit him he undergoes a change and becomes a hero. When relating the psychological function to the story Scrooge can be said to be the unbeknownst hero. As Vogler stated the hero has to overcome his ego, in Scrooge's case this would be his stinginess. His bleak personality and his despise of Christmas sets him apart from the rest of his society. After the spirits visit him, he overcomes his ego by becoming happier and more charitable. He starts donating money, buy things and giving back to his community in hopes to change not only his future but the people’s around him as well. That allows Scrooge to follow Vogler’s hero archetype.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 17, 2014 11:57 PM

Tashanna Harris and Nathanael Jones
Dr.Hobb
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
18 September 2014

Question #6
Identify the Herald in Siddhartha. Explain Voglers discussion of dramatic function of Herald archetype, how this plays out in Hesse's Siddhartha.

Answer:
The Herald in Siddhartha is Govinda, Govinda is the one telling Siddhartha to go out and learn more about himself. Govinda tells Siddhartha in words of motivation that "we are not going in circles, we are going upwards. The path is a spiral, we have already climbed many steps" (Hesse 18). Govinda wants Siddhartha to gain knowledge from his trip as much as Siddhartha lacks in himself he still wants to gain knowledge to be better off.

Posted by: Tashanna.harris at September 18, 2014 09:29 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 1, 2014 10:18 AM

Wyatt Burttschell/ Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys into Narrative
29 January 2015

Question: In your own words, explain Vogler’s claim that each of the various archetypes emanate, or, operate as facets of the hero’s own personality. You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, the meanings of both “emanate” and “facet” to fully understand this concept. (b.) What does this have to do with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer: Volger describes the basic qualities and characteristics often found in a hero. The idea of different archetypes that emanate or operate as facets to the hero’s own personality may refer to the common patterns and heroic behaviors that emerge throughout the narrative. Vogler claims that a hero must relate to the audience. There are several facets, or common characteristics, found in the hero’s personality, which allow the audience the ability to identify. In the Christmas Carol Scrooge emanates flaws and experiences growth on his journey. The general audience is able to relate and identify with Scrooge who has experienced regret and remorse for his past actions. The complex nature of Scrooge’s personality allows a wide audience the ability to relate and empathize with his heroic journey.

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell/ Matthew Lemmons at January 29, 2015 02:52 PM

Group 1: Kelsey Williams and Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
30 January 2015

Question: 1.(a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s claim that archetypes, such as the hero archetype, are best understood as “functions,” rather than “roles.” You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, the meanings of both “role” and “function” to fully understand the difference. (b.) What does this have to do with any of the archetypes used, particularly the hero archetype, in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer: 1. (a). Archetypes, which are personality patterns that occur across centuries, are better as ‘functions’ (Volger 24). Archetypal ‘roles’ cement characters into a particular archetype. Archetypal ‘functions’ “can be thought of as masks” (Volger 24) which are adjustable for the progression of the story (Volger 24). For instance, a character may cross paths with the hero as an ally, to become a mentor or villain. (b) In A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge transforms from the Anti-Hero archetypal function of not being “likeable or admirable” (Volger 35). Due to his journey with the four spirits, Scrooge fits into the general Hero function through “new knowledge and wisdom” gained by the end of Dickens’ novel.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield at January 30, 2015 12:05 AM

Richard Bennet and Duane Daye
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220cl Journeys in narrative ca02
26 January 2015

Question: In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Hero
archetype. You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, the meanings of both “hero,” as understood by the ancient Greeks, and “ego,” as understood by Sigmund Freud, to fully understand this concept. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?
Answer: The hero as understood by the greeks and Freud is one that goes on a journey to find the self. In Volger's text “The ego, the Hero thinking she is separate from all these parts of herself, must incorporate them to become the Self”(Volger, 30). In the Christmas Carol, Dickens show the journey of Scrooge from ghost to ghost.

Posted by: Richard Bennet, Duane Daye at January 30, 2015 02:23 AM

Rachel Andrews & Chrissy Castro

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02

29 January 2015

Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “action” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer: Many times in modern films and novels, the Hero is not necessarily the one to save the day. We often see the Hero “rescued by the timely arrival of some outside force” (Vogler 31) who assists the Hero is finishing their task or quest. Vogler believes this is a flaw in the Hero archetype. According to him, the Hero needs to be in charge of their own fate and be fully active. The action a Hero should take must be dangerous and require the most responsibility from themselves.

In A Christmas Story, Scrooge doesn’t seem to have the qualities of a hero. The story begins with Scrooge being very bitter and cruel. It isn’t until the Ghosts of past, present and future come into play that he changes. They are the outside force for which Vogler believes is the flaw in the hero archetype. If it weren’t for the Ghost of Marley and past present and future, Scrooge probably wouldn’t have found the errors in his ways and may have continued on that path until his death.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews & Chrissy Castro at January 30, 2015 11:11 AM

Joe Marrah and Tyler Sedam
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Narrative CA02
30 January 2015

Question: 11. Vogler points out that there are a variety of hero incarnations in different narratives. He discusses, at least six. (1.) What does he mean by the “Willing and Unwilling Heroes” and (2.) has this particular variety of hero appeared in any of the films and/or texts you have been assigned so far? If so, which work, which character, and why?

Answer: A willing hero is someone who inspires himself or herself to go out and tackle his or her problems. They do not back down from problems and are self-motivated to embrace the adventure. Willing heroes are more than ready to get away from their current situation.
Harry Potter- He was a willing hero because he wanted to leave his relatives home and explore adventure.
Luke- He was aa willing hero because he was self-motivated to become a Jedi knight and that ended up with him being the hero that he was.
Neo the matrix- He was a willing hero because he was intrigued by the message that was given to him and he went on an adventure of that.

An unwilling hero is the complete opposite. Normally they tend to be fine with their current situation and do not want to be forced to do something else. Often an unwilling hero will need something or someone to inspire them to go on an adventure.

Scrooge- He was a very unwilling hero because he was by the three spirits and forced to go on his adventures.
Simba- Simba had to be persuaded to go on his adventure. After being banished from his home he came back and took control.

Posted by: Joe Marrah Tyler Sedam at January 30, 2015 11:26 AM

Celina Tahsini, Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Narrative
29 January 2015

Question: In addition to "psychological functions" any given archetype also performs a "dramatic function" of a some variety. A) In your own words, explain Vogler's discussion of the "dramatic function" of dealing with death. B) What does this particular function have to do with a hero archetype used in a Christmas Carol?

Answer:
A) Vogler’s discussion on the dramatic function of dealing with death has to do with Hero’s in general. The Hero in every story deals with death, either with a “threat of death or [a] symbolic death” (Vogler 32). The Hero showcases how they deal with death, which can be shown in many different ways and in which they may or may not succeed (live or die). The Hero will deal with sacrifice, either by placing their life on the line or by losing someone close to them. Mahatma Gandhi is a great example of a hero dealing with death in history.
B) In a "Christmas Carol", the hero archetype is relatable when Scrooge fears death in Stave 4. When Scrooge encounters The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in Stave 4, they both visit a gravesite which shows Scrooge his death laying in his grave in the future, and Scrooge becomes terrified (Dickens 82). As a result to the reality of death foreshadowed in his visit with the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, Scrooge deals with the "threat of death" as mentioned in Vogler's discussion (Vogler 32). The "threat of death" explains Scrooge's relentless begging of the Spirit to change his future (Dickens 84). Scrooge understands this a change he needs to make to his lifestyle, and has to begin to honor the Christmas holiday. At the grave site, Scrooge begs and says, "Your nature intercedes for me, and pities me. Assure me that I yet may change these shadows you have shown me, by an altered life" (Dickens 84). In relation to Vogler's discussion, the "threat of death" explains Scrooge's realization that his life must be completely altered in order to avoid the future death the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come showed him.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at January 30, 2015 12:18 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste and Marie Destin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
30 January 2015


Questions: In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “audience identification” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answers: (a.) According to Vogler’s thoughts of the Hero archetype, he explains, “The dramatic purpose of the Hero is to give the audience a window into the story (Vogler 30).” In the passage, he explains how the hero in a story is way of getting to know the world in which the story is based. Vogler also explains how the reader is to “identify with the hero to merge with him and see the world through his eyes (Vogler 30).” (b.) The “audience identification” in relation to A Christmas Carol used the character of Scrooge throughout his journey with each of the three Christmas ghosts. The concept is also utilized early on the story when Scrooge is speaking at Marley’s funeral in which we, the readers, experience the pain Scrooge goes through when thinking about the deceased.

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at January 30, 2015 01:29 PM

Bobbi, Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL on the Proverbial Road: Journeys in a Narrative CA02
30 January 2015

Q:3) In your own words, explain rational /dismissal of other well-known archetypes in literature, that are not included in his list of the eight “most common and useful ”ones. Also what is driving questions can be used help identify the nature of archetype in a narrative, including the hero archetype? Why might this be important for the reader?
We will rationally dismiss other archetypes but placing them in a sub division of archetypes, and making the hero archetype the main branch in which they all come from. By, doing this all other archetypes are disenfranchised, kind of like religions with a main religions and several subsets that branch off. The main question to ask the protagonist would be, what the main characters end goal is, what he or she hopes to accomplish. This will be important to discern, if the character have good intentions or not.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at January 30, 2015 01:32 PM

William Pereira and Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
29 January 2015

Group 5

Question: 10. In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “character flaws” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
A) Voglers explanation of character flaws is in essence the humanity of the characters. Its what makes the character relatable to the audience. Not only does it hold value to the audience but it gives the author somewhere to go. The way a character turns flaws and faults into gifts and triumphs. Vogler calls it the "character arc". The missing piece if he hero is usually the essence of the story. Vogler explains "Interesting flaws humanize a character. We recognize buts of ourselves in a Hero who is challenged to overcome inner doubts, errors in thinking, guilt or trauma from the past, or fear of the future."(Vogler 33) He goes on to explain that "Flaws also give a character somewhere to go- the so called "character arc" in which a character develops from condition A to condition Z through a series of step." (Vogler 33) D

B)Dickens tells the entire story of "The Christmas Carol" with character flaws. The entire story is about Scrooges journey from greed to giving. Scrooge is an incredible flawed hero, but Dickens takes us on the timeless tale of every human being around Christmas time.

Posted by: William Pereira and Maggie Izquierdo at January 30, 2015 01:42 PM

REDO T.J. Pagliaro, Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Narrative CA02
28 January 2015

Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “growth” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer: Volger’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “growth” in the Hero archetype describes the function as a learning process or lesson. It is difficult to grasp which character is the protagonist, however, the reader discovers the one who acquires knowledge or grows the most in the course of the story is considered the Hero. This is related to A Christmas Carol because Scrooge eventually becomes a hero by venturing through different obstacles of the night while being haunted by the three Spirits and learns knowledge about his Past, Present, and Future. He also develops a wiser sense of self once he realizes what his destiny is to be, as told by the third Spirit: Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. Scrooge then realizes in the end he is a hero for his actions after his sinister night.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 1, 2015 02:21 PM

Hatim Shami, Adam Alexander
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
28 January 2015

"The Hero"
Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “dealing with death” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
a)Vogler’s discussion of the hero archetype and the “dramatic function” of dealing with death discuss different death related situations the Hero of the story deals with. Vogler discusses the “threat of death” or “symbolic death” which explains how the Hero will cope with risking someone valuable or even risking his or her life (Vogler 32).
b)In a “Christmas Carol,” Scrooge is shocked to see his future self in a grave. This threat of death causes Scrooge to realize his future is in his hands, and he must change his attitude in order to avoid the devastating ending to his life story (Dickens 82). In Vogler’s discussion, it states, “At the heart of every story is a confrontation with death” (Vogler 32). As Scrooge confronted with the threat of death, he is terrified of what may occur as the Ghost of Christmas Yet to come showed Scrooge his future death, and this causes Scrooge to want to change his lifestyle and attitude (Dickens 84).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 1, 2015 10:43 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 January 2016

Question 3: (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s rational/dismissal of other well-known archetypes in literature, that are not included in his list of the eight “most common and useful” ones. Also, what driving questions can be used help identify the nature of any archetype in a narrative, including the hero archetype? Why might this be important for the reader?

Answer: Vogler dismisses the archetypes that are specific such as ‘the wolf’ or ‘the hunter.’ He sticks to the most basic archetypes that can cover a wide variety of characters. There are two basic questions to help identify the nature of any archetype in a narrative they are as follows :
“1. What psychological function or part of the personality does it represent? and 2 ) What is its dramatic function in a story?” (Vogler 27) This may be important for the reader to identify what the character represents, so that they could predict what the characters are going to do.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 28, 2016 04:10 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 January 2016

Question 5: In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “audience identification” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer: The dramatic function of audience identification is to let audience escape the real world and become a part of the hero. Every hero has some quality or characteristic that the audience can relate to and, therefore, become a part of. The hero archetype of A Christmas Carol is the character Ebenezer Scrooge. The audience could relate to this character because of his greed, meanness, or other ways he acts. They might know someone similar to him or see part of themselves in him. They could even relate to through his experiences or how he changed throughout his journey.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 28, 2016 05:48 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 January 2016

Question #4: (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Hero archetype. You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, the meanings of both “hero,” as understood by the ancient Greeks, and “ego,” as understood by Sigmund Freud, to fully understand this concept. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer: A.) The psychological function of the Hero archetype is finding the actual identity of oneself. The people around the hero are used as guidance and helpers to teach lessons to the hero. The hero’s ego which is believing that they are original and are separated from others is important when understanding the psychological function. B.) This particular function relates to the hero character Scrooge in the Christmas Carol. Scrooge had a big ego from being so self-centered in the beginning to learning and benefitting from others around him in the end. The spirits showing Scrooge his life from the past, present, and future was a wakeup call to Scrooge, which later helped him identify himself.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 28, 2016 10:54 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
28 January 2016

Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “dealing with death” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer: (a.) Vogler discusses the dramatic function of death as being essential to every story, explaining that “at the heart of every story is a confrontation with death” (Vogler 32). The death of the hero can also be symbolic, “they may die (perhaps only symbolically) and be reborn, proving that death can be transcended,” enabling the hero to become a hero as a result of the transformation role that dealing with death facilitates (Vogler 32). (b.) The hero in A Christmas Story, by Charles Dickens, is Scrooge, but the dramatic function of dealing with death became the catalyst that transformed Scrooge into the hero, and he admitted that,
“The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!” (Dickens 48) It was at this moment that Scrooge was reborn.

Posted by: Hero9_Andre Gilbert at January 29, 2016 01:07 AM

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