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September 11, 2014

Campbell's *Guardian Archetype,* as Explained by Christopher Vogler


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 11, 2014 08:23 PM

Readers' Comments:

Nathanael Jones, Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
15 September 2014

Group 4

Question #4:
(a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the [Threshold] Guardian archetype as it exists in Hesse’s Siddhartha, the readings, thus far. Who or what are the “inner demons” of a/the HERO in Hess’es Siddhartha?
(b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the actual meaning of “neurosis” (Look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the Hero in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in order to locate accurately this variety threshold guardian.

Answer:
The threshold guardian holds a pivotal role in the story preventing the hero from moving forward on their journey until they have been defeated. However, the threshold guardian also serves as a physical representation of the hero’s inner insecurity that the hero must overcome to continue (Vogler 50). On the journey to enlightenment, Siddhartha (the central hero within Hesse’s Siddhartha) needs to show himself the extent of his knowledge. The first guardian overcome by Siddhartha most resembles the father, “‘Will you go on standing and waiting until it is day, noon, evening?’ ‘I will stand and wait’” (Hesse 11). This quotation depicts the physical trial Siddhartha completed to prove to his father that he is mature enough to leave home, even though his age might say otherwise. Proving his psychological maturity, Siddhartha faces one of the elder Samanas using the supernatural like powers of his mind to overcome the elder, proving that he is once again mature enough to leave (Hesse 23). Following the lines of the outreaching plot of finding enlightenment, the guardians reflect Siddhartha’s inner demons of proving his level of maturity and enlightenment to others on his travels, manifesting in one or multiple characters.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 15, 2014 11:37 AM

Douglas Ross
Caitlin Christian
ENG 220 CL
15 September 2014

Question #3
(a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the [Threshold] Guardian archetype as it exists in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Who or what are the “inner demons” of a/the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the actual meaning of “neurosis” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, in order to locate accurately this variety threshold guardian.

Answer:
The inner demons of scrooge are his anger for the Christmas spirit and his struggle to go on the journey the ghosts want to take him on. A threshold guardian is often a smaller villain, but it can also represent someone who wants to test the hero’s skills. One major threshold guardian for Scrooge was his old partner Marley, who came to test Scrooge and attempt to convince him to change his ways so he will not suffer the same fate as Marley has.

Posted by: Doug Ross & Caitlin Christian at September 15, 2014 12:07 PM

Matthew Basin and Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220CL-On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformational in Narrative
15 Sept. 2014

Question:
In his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler explains that characters functioning with this archetype can be “signals of new power.” (a.) In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol,how has the HERO, if at all, recognized a “Threshold Guardian not as [a] threating [enemy], but as [a] useful [Ally]”? In other words, how has a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN who, at first, appeared “to be attacking” the HERO, in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, helped the hero by doing him/her “a huge favor”? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: The Threshold Guardians were all three the ghosts because they helped Scrooge realize why he was brought back to the past, present and future. I think Jacobs ghost did Scrooge a big favor by showing a vision of what he will be if he keeps acting mean and unhelpful to others. Scrooge was learning a lesson from Jacob and the three ghosts because it showed him that if he changed the way he acted, his life would have a better outcome.

“Without their visits," said the Ghost, "you cannot hope to shun the path I tread. Expect the first to-morrow, when the bell tolls one (Dickens 35).”

Works Cited:
"A Christmas Carol (Dickens, 1843)." - Wikisource, the Free Online Library. Web. 15 Sept. 2014. http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Christmas_Carol_(Dickens,_1843)


Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 15, 2014 12:10 PM

DO OVER
Nuri Salahuddin and Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
15 September 2014

Question:
In several paragraphs of his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler discusses about six ways (there may be more) that a HERO can “deal with [the] apparent obstacles” presented to him/her by a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN. (a.) Identify each of these possible reactions, and (b.) explain which of them, if any, were used by the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer:
a) Six ways that a hero can “deal with [the] apparent obstacles” presented to him by the [threshold] guardian are: “they can run, attack the opponent head on, use craft or deceit to get by, bride or appease to the Guardian, making an Ally of a presumed enemy, or entering into his spirit and taking on a different appearance.” (Vogler 50)
b) In A Christmas Carol, the hero is Bob Cratchit, and Scrooge was his guardian. Scrooge acted as a Guardian for Cratchit because he was like a barrier to him earning money and fully supporting his family.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 15, 2014 12:17 PM

Leroy Pianka
Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
15 September 2014

Group 1
QUESTION: In Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far, what puzzles or tests are presented to the HERO of the narrative by the narrative’s [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN/s?

ANSWER:
In Chapter 1 of Siddhartha, we learn that Siddhartha’s father plays the role of the Guardian. Siddhartha learns at a very early age that his father and the elders can no longer teach him anything because “not one who had entirely reached it-the heavenly world-not one who had completely quenched the eternal thirst.” (Hesse 8) Because they could not reach the heavenly world, Siddhartha felt he needed to join the Samana. To join the Samana, Siddhartha would have to ask his father’s permission. The test presented to Siddhartha would be that, Siddhartha would have to stand and wait patiently for his father to accept that Siddhartha would be leaving on his path. Siddhartha stood throughout the night without going to sleep or speaking until his father gave him permission to follow his path. “The first light of day entered the room. The Brahmin saw that Siddhartha’s knees trembled slightly, but there was no trembling in Siddhartha’s face; his eyes looked far away. Then the father realized that Siddhartha could no longer remain with him at home-that he had already left him.” (Hesse 12)

Works Cited
Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books, 1971. Novel.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 15, 2014 12:24 PM

Claudia Pierre, Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
15 September 2014

QUESTION:
In his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler states that when “heroes confront [a threshold guardian], they must solve a puzzle or pass a test.” (a.) In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, what puzzles or tests are presented to the HERO of the narrative by the narrative’s [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN/s? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

ANSWER:
In the Christmas Carol, the puzzle/test that was presented to the hero which is Ebenezer Scrooge was his first encounter with the Ghost of Christmas Past. Scrooge needed to meet with the Ghost of Christmas Past because it was required for him to know the bad that he did in his past in order for him to move forward as a changed person. “Leave me! Take me back. Haunt me no longer!” In the struggle, if that can be called a struggle in which the Ghost with no visible resistance on its own part was undisturbed by any effort of its adversary, Scrooge observed that its light was boring high and bright; and dimly connecting that with its influence over him, he seized the extinguisher-cap, and by a sudden action pressed it down upon its head”. (Dickens 30)

After the first encounter with the Ghost of Christmas Past, he was not dragged along with the ghost that came after, instead he knew what was going on, and actively went along with the ghost.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 15, 2014 08:52 PM

Erin Gaylord & Kyle VanBuren
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 September 2014

Group Question #6:

Vogler states that In his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher when “heroes confront [a threshold guardian], they must solve a puzzle or pass a test.”

a.) In Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far, what puzzles or tests are presented to the HERO of the narrative by the narrative’s [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN/s?

(b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARADIAN in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far.

Answer:

Siddhartha was tested when he left to become a Samana. Siddhartha wanted “to become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure, and sorrow...” (Hesse 14). He gave away his clothes, he fasted, and he learned the ways of the Samanas (Hesse 13).

In this novel, the Samana’s are one form of guardians for Siddhartha. They provide the obstacles for him, and he has to learn their way of life before he leaves if he chooses to.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 16, 2014 05:12 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Kendra Hinton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative
16 September 2014

Question #2:
In this chapter on the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler outlines a possible “symbiotic relationship between” that archetype and “a villain.” (a) In your own words, explain this possible relationship” as it exists in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far. (b) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the meaning of “symbiotic” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the villain behind the threshold guardians in Hesse’s Siddhartha, and then discuss their possible symbiotic relationship.

Answer:
In the book Siddhartha, the symbolic relationship between the archetype and villain is between him and his father. At first his father was hesitant to let him join the Buddhist community and he was holding him back for a while, but eventually his father gave in. Without his father giving in, Siddhartha wouldn’t have been able to start his journey because he would never defy his father. This is shown in the following quote, “ It is not seemly for Brahmins to utter forceful and angry words, but there is displeasure in my heart. I would not like to hear you make this request a second time” (Hesse 10).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 16, 2014 09:54 PM

James Sierra, Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
14 September 2014

Question 2:
In his chapter on the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler outlines a possible “symbiotic relationship between” that archetype and “a villain.”
(a.) In your own words, explain this possible relationship” as it exists in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far.
Answer:
Siddhartha’s father is the threshold Guardian figure. Siddhartha is raised by him, and also must confront him in order to get his blessing to leave on his journey of knowledge. They would also be a symbiotic relationship as father and son live together, and help each other out in life.

(b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the meaning of “symbiotic” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the villain behind the threshold guardian/s in Hesse’s Siddhartha, and then discuss their possible symbiotic relationship.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 16, 2014 10:33 PM

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Posted by: China and Hong Kong Information at September 17, 2014 09:06 AM

Joanna Ozog, Jake Gates
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
15 September 2014

Group 1 Question:
In this chapter on the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler outlines a possible “symbiotic relationship between” that archetype and “a villain.” (a.) In your own words, explain this possible relationship” as it exists in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the meaning of “symbiotic” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the villain behind the threshold guardian/s in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, and then discuss their possible symbiotic relationship.


Answer:
Jacob Marley is the threshold guardian and Scrooge is the villain in A Christmas Carol. Marley warns Scrooge about the three ghosts that will visit him. Jacob Marley, when he showed his face upon Scrooge’s doorknocker, became the door to Scrooge’s journey. He gains peace of mind from helping Scrooge and, even though he was reluctant, Scrooge gains a better life and a better life after death.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at September 17, 2014 10:38 AM

Tashanna Harris and Nathanael Jones
Dr.Hobb
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
18 September 2014

Question #6
Identify the Herald in Siddhartha. Explain Voglers discussion of dramatic function of Herald archetype, how this plays out in Hesse's Siddhartha.

Answer:
The Herald in Siddhartha is Govinda, Govinda is the one telling Siddhartha to go out and learn more about himself. Govinda tells Siddhartha in words of motivation that "we are not going in circles, we are going upwards. The path is a spiral, we have already climbed many steps" (Hesse 18). Govinda wants Siddhartha to gain knowledge from his trip as much as Siddhartha lacks in himself he still wants to gain knowledge to be better off.

Posted by: Tashanna.harris at September 18, 2014 09:30 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 1, 2014 10:22 AM

T.J. Pagliaro, Tyler Sedam, and Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 February 2015

Question 9: In his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler explains that characters functioning with this archetype can be “signals of new power.” (a.) In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, how has the HERO, if at all, recognized a “Threshold Guardian not as [a] threating [enemy], but as [a] useful [Ally]”? In other words, how has a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN who, at first, appeared “to be attacking” the HERO, in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, helped the hero by doing him/her “a huge favor”? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: Throughout “A Christmas Carol”, Marley’s ghost seems like he could be attacking Scrooge, but eventually ends up doing Scrooge a favor by sending each of the Three Spirits to him as a lesson to change himself. Each of the Spirits act as a “guardian” by bringing Scrooge to a specific event either in his past, present, future. Scrooge realizes that the threshold guardians, which are the Three Spirits, are considered his allies and not a potential threat to his fate. In both Staves IV and V, Scrooge mentions that he will honor Christmas in his heart and try to keep it all year. Dickens writes, “The Spirits of all Three will strive within me” Scrooge shouted (Dickens 62). This passage explains that he will live in the Past, Present, and Future. He will also not deny any lesson that the Spirits have taught him.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 2, 2015 02:23 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield and Marie Destin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
2 February 2015

(a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the [Threshold] Guardian archetype as it exists in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Who or what are the “inner demons” of a/the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the actual meaning of “neurosis” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, in order to locate accurately this variety threshold guardian.

Scrooge is the hero in the Christmas Carol because he is the protagonist and he is also the character on a (internal) journey. In The Christmas Carol, the final spirit functions as the threshold guardian. Scrooge must prove to the last spirit that he has learned his lesson and accepted the Christmas spirit. Scrooge says to the spirit " “I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future." (Dickens 84).


Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield and Marie Destin at February 2, 2015 03:00 PM

Bobbi Ausmus and Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
2 February 2015


Question 11: In the final part of his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler explains that “Threshold Guardians [can] take on a fantastic array of forms” and then goes on to identify many such examples. (a.) Which of these, if any, were used as representations of a [Threshold] Guardian in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol? If none of Vogler’s examples were used, what “guises” were used, instead? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the meaning of “guise” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify both a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN/s in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, and a/the HERO it attempted to test/delay.

Answer: The “fantastic array of forms” that are Threshold Guardians in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol would be the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Future, also Scrooge’s attitude. Each spirit represents a threshold because Scrooge must accomplish what the ghosts deems fit, to return to bed and receive his next visitor. Only until Scrooge “read upon the stone of the neglected grave his own name” (Dickens 82) does the anti-hero mourn, “the man I was” (Dickens 84).

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus & Kelsey Williams at February 3, 2015 03:39 PM

Hanna Kataria, Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 February 2015
Group 3

A Christmas Carol

Question #5: In his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler states that when “heroes confront [a threshold guardian], they must solve a puzzle or pass a test.”(a.) In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, what puzzles or tests are presented to the HERO of the narrative by the narrative’s [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN/s? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARADIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: Vogler states that one the “primary dramatic function[s] of the Threshold Guardian” is by testing the hero. The way in which the guardian does so is by having the hero “solve a puzzle or pass a test” (Vogler 50). In A Christmas Carol, the hero is Scrooge, and the Threshold Guardian would be Jacob Marley. Marley would be the threshold guardian because he gave Scrooge the biggest puzzle to try to solve. Scrooge’s gravesite was the puzzle that Marley had presented to Scrooge to show the future. If Scrooge did not change his personality or behavior, he would end up alone, dead, with no one caring at all about him. At that moment when Scrooge saw his own grave, he fell to his knees and cried to the Spirit (Dickens 62). He then had to figure out the puzzle of the grave; and how to change the future so that it is not like what he was. This was Scrooge's turning point, which helped him change his whole personality and attitude towards everyone and life. If Marley, the Threshold Guardian, did not present Scrooge the puzzle, he would not have changed.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria; Celina Tahsini at February 3, 2015 06:48 PM

Matthew Lemonis, Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
2 February 2015

Question: In several paragraphs of his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler discusses about six ways (there may be more) that a HERO can “deal with [the] apparent obstacles” presented to him/her by a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN. (a.) Identify each of these possible reactions, and (b.) explain which of them, if any, were used by the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: The six ways heroes can deal with apparent obstacles, are turn around and run, attack the opponent head on, use craft or deceit to get by, bribe or appease the guardian or make an ally of the presumed enemy. In the Christmas carol, scrooge was at first afraid of the presumed enemy, the sprits, but then realizes he can make an ally of the presumed enemy. At first scrooges, life was all about making money and very self-centered, but when the spirits came into the story, they helped him change his life for the better.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis, Joe Marrah at February 3, 2015 08:05 PM

Bryan Hess and William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
4 February 2015

Question: (#1) In his chapter on the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler outlines a possible “symbiotic relationship between” that archetype and “a villain.” (a.) In your own words, explain this possible relationship” as it exists in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the meaning of “symbiotic” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the villain behind the threshold guardian/s in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, and then discuss their possible symbiotic relationship
Answer: The definition of “symbiotic” is essentially a type of relationship in which two parties depend on each other. Villains in narratives typically have a symbiotic relationship with the guardians in said narrative. The relationship can be explained in a simple way, A stronger force (usually the villain) tolerates a lesser force (the guardian) if it means that the lesser force can guard something that the stronger force holds with some degree of importance. We can apply said concept to almost any narrative including A Christmas Carol. Ebenezer Scrooge, the villain of the story, has a symbiotic relationship with the Spirits of Christmas, the guardians of the story. What the spirits are guarding is the metaphorical door to reality. That is to say, that the Spirits will not let Scrooge back into reality until he learns something from the various periods of time.

Posted by: Bryan Hess and William Pereira at February 4, 2015 02:42 AM

Chrissy Castro & Jasmine
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA02
02 February 2015

Question: In several paragraphs of his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler discusses about six ways (there may be more) that a HERO can “deal with [the] apparent obstacles” presented to him/her by a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN. (a.) Identify each of these possible reactions, and (b.) explain which of them, if any, were used by the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: The hero in A Christmas Carol is Scrooge; though he is more like the anti-hero. He goes through the obstacles, and the story was told about him. The spirits, including Marley, were the Threshold Guardians.
A.) To deal with the obstacles a threshold guardian presents, “He can turn and run, attack the opponent head-on, use craft or deceit to get by, bribe or appease the Guardian, or make an ally of a presumed enemy” (Vogler 50). The hero can also try to “get into the opponent's skin” (Vogler 50).
B.) At first, Scrooge didn’t want to deal with the obstacles so, in turn, he would have chosen to turn and run. However, he was forced to attack the opponent head-on because Marley didn’t want Scrooge to end up the way he did. The spirits gave Scrooge no choice other than to watch his past, present and future.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at February 4, 2015 10:47 AM

Duane Daye and Nicholas Gaydos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 February 2015

Question: In your own words, explain Volger’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the [Threshold] Guardian archetype as it exists in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Who or what are the “inner demons” of a/the hero in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the actual meaning of “neurosis” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, in order to locate accurately this variety threshold guardian.

Answer: (a.) The “psychological function” of the [Threshold] Guardian is an archetype that often aren’t the main villain of the story but form “a symbiotic relationship between a villain and a threshold Guardian” (Volger 49). Often the threshold guardian is a weaker less powerful force than the main villain but serve a purpose towards the villain. The threshold guardian in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol is Jacob Marley, who forces him into an adventure to sub guardians: the three spirits. (b.) “Neurosis” definition is a relatively mild mental illness that is not caused by organic disease, involving symptoms of stress (depression, anxiety, obsessive behavior, hypochondria) but not a radical loss of touch with reality. Greed is the “inner demon” which holds him back. Marley and the three spirits try change this factor about him so that he could change overall for the character of the hero, Scrooge.

Posted by: Duane Daye at February 4, 2015 12:23 PM

Rachel Andrews & Cody Jean-Baptiste

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02

2 February 2015

Question: In his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler states that when “heroes confront [a threshold guardian], they must solve a puzzle or pass a test.”(a.) In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, what puzzles or tests are presented to the HERO of the narrative by the narrative’s [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN/s? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: In Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” Ebenezer Scrooge is the hero, or more aptly the protagonist. As the hero, Scrooge is forced into a journey where he meets a few Threshold Guardians. Once the hero leaves their own world and enters another there are lots of tests and challenges they must overcome. Most of these challenges and tests take place as the Hero ventures through some sort of doorway, or threshold. The Guardian who guides them through the puzzle is a Threshold Guardian. In “A Christmas Carol”, the Spirits test Scrooge to see if his reactions to situations are different than they used to be; they are testing his emotions. The first Threshold Guardian is Marley’s ghost. He is a literal Threshold Guardian because Scrooge sees his face on the doorknob of his house. The other two spirits are also threshold guardians. Marley tells Scrooge three spirits will visit him and he must travel with each to get to the next and eventually end his journey.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews & Cody Jean-Baptise at February 4, 2015 12:43 PM

Hatim Shami and Sergio Velazquez
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 February 2015

Question: In his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler explains that characters functioning with this archetype can be “signals of new power.” (a.) In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, how has the HERO, if at all, recognized a “Threshold Guardian not as [a] threating [enemy], but as [a] useful [Ally]”? In other words, how has a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN who, at first, appeared “to be attacking” the HERO, in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, helped the hero by doing him/her “a huge favor”? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: Scrooge has been thru three different types of Ghosts In “A Christmas Carol” by “Dickens’. Everyone knows Scrooge as the Greedy and mean person. Scrooge never cared about being happy nor his family nor even Christmas. His nephew tried to invite him out for dinner, but he always refuses those invitations. Marley’s Ghost appeared to Scrooge and warned him that there are three other ghosts coming to him after; he also warned him to change his miserable life before it is too late. The Ghost of Christmas Past appeared and showed him all his childhood life as a careless child, which made him understand how greedy he became later. Ghost of Christmas Present appears and shows him how beautiful and valuable this life is by taking him to a tour around the country and Fred’s home. Everyone was enjoying his or her lives including his nephew. It is Ghost of Christmas Yet to come turn, and he showed him where Tiny Tim is dead. He also showed him that the Cratchist is broke and when he is dead. After all that, he woke up realized how greedy and mean he was with people so, he bought that big turkey to send to the Cratchist, visited his nephew, and donated to poor people. His spirit was changed and, that is when we can realize how those Ghosts were guardian to him. It was more as a favor they did to him to make him change to the best.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 4, 2015 01:13 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Literature CA02
1 February 2015

Q) 9. In his discussion of one the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler explains that characteristics functioning with this archetype can be “Threshold Guardian as a threatening [enemy], but as [a] useful [Alley]”? In other words, how has a/the threshold guardian who at first appeared “to be attacking” the HERO, in Dickens a Christmas carol, helped the hero doing him /her “huge favor”? (b.) Before beginning, you need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the Hero and at the threshold Guardian in Dickens the Christmas character.
In the beginning of a Christmas Carol, the first ghost Marley scares Scrooge just by his nature, and tells Scrooge all that he must accomplishes if he wishes to not have a doomed existence. He gives Scrooge no choice in the matter. Even though Marley is seen to Scrooge as very threatening Marley give Scrooge the task he must face to, help him live the rest of his live happy and escape the torments of walking this world forever.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at February 4, 2015 01:59 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative

Question 3: In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the [Threshold] Guardian archetype as it exists in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Who or what are the “inner demons” of a/the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the actual meaning of “neurosis” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, in order to locate accurately this variety threshold guardian.

Answer: Vogler explains in “Psychological Functions: Neuroses” that the hero at some point in his/her life that has created who they are. These could have possibly had been fulfilling experiences that make the hero better or tragic ones that could have set them on a path of dispart. Vogler describes these events as, “Bad weather, bad luck, prejudice” and in some way they impact the hero life and journey itself (Vogler 50). In “the Christmas Carol,” Scrooges neuroses was his past. Events that he encountered in his past were negative and created an abrasive persona which no one like nor was willing to embrace. Therefore the guardian, the Ghost of Christmas Past, showed him his origin story which should have opened Scrooge’s eyes. This experience should have shifted his behavior and mentality, but Scrooge so embedded within his ego rejecting the first sign and continued within his ways. This proves Vogler's point where he states, “the inner demons rise to their full force…but to test is you are really determined to accept the challenge of change” (Vogler 50). Scrooge failed the challenge. He refused to change himself to become better and alter his future.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 29, 2016 11:26 AM

Emily Buckley
Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
31 January 2016

Question 7: In several paragraphs of his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler discusses about six ways (there may be more) that a HERO can “deal with [the] apparent obstacles” presented to him/her by a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN. (a.) Identify each of these possible reactions, and (b.) explain which of them, if any, were used by the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: The six ways a hero can deal with an obstacle is to around and run away, attack the opponent head-on, use craft or deceit to get by, bribe or appease the guardian, make them into an ally, or get into the skin of the guardian. In A Christmas Carol, the hero of the journey is Scrooge, and the guardians are the spirits/ghosts. Scrooge had to overcome each of them to continue his journey. One example was when Scrooge met the second spirit he said, “conduct me where you will. I went forth last night on compulsion, and I learnt a lesson which is working now. To-night, if you have aught to teach me, let me profit by it.” (Dickens 33) This shows that he wanted to appease the guardian and make him a sort of ally.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 31, 2016 08:06 PM

Brianna and Andre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
29 January 2016

Question: In his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler states that when “heroes confront [a threshold guardian], they must solve a puzzle or pass a test.”(a.) In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, what puzzles or tests are presented to the HERO of the narrative by the narrative’s [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN/s? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARADIAN in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer: In Dicken’s A Christmas Carol, the spirits showed Scrooge different perspectives in his life, his Christmas past, present and future. They were each hurdle along his journey, Vogler explains that “testing of the hero is the primary dramatic function of the Threshold Guardian” (Vogler 50). In A Christmas Carol, Scrooge is visited by Marley, who warns Scrooge, “You will be haunted by Three Spirits” (Dickens 16). The ghost explains that if Scrooge wants to escape Marley's predicament, Scrooge will have to pass the three tests provided by the Three Spirits, and Marley warns Scrooge that, “without their visits, you cannot hope to shun the path I tread” (Dickens 16). Each ghost will take Scrooge from his present into a new realm of time, and at each point the Threshold Guardians are represented by the Three Spirits, who according to Vogler, "challenge and test heroes on the path" (Vogler 50).

Posted by: Brianna and Andre at January 31, 2016 11:34 PM

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