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September 18, 2014

Campbell's *Crossing the [First] Threshold* Stage of the Monomyth, as Explained by Christopher Vogler


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 18, 2014 04:32 PM

Readers' Comments:

Tyler Sommers and Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
20 October 2014

In the section his “Crossing the [First] Threshold” chapter titled “The Crossing,” Christopher Vogler suggests that sometimes the hero or heroine must simply take a “leap of faith in to the unknown.” What does this mean, and why must it happen, according to Vogler? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

In Volger’s text he states that “we must take a leap of faith into the unknown or else the adventure will never really begin.” (Volger 129) This mean signifies that we have reached the border of the two worlds. In Siddhartha, the “crossing of the first threshold” would be when Siddhartha decided to join the Samanas and thathe told his father that he was going to leave in order to join the Samanas. “In the evening after the hour of contemplation, Siddhartha said to Govinda: Tomorrow morning my friend, Siddhartha is going to join the Samanas. He is going to become a Samana.” (Hesse 9) When Siddhartha actually left would be crossing another threshold. “As with benumbed legs, he slowly left the still sleeping town at daybreak.” (Hesse 12) In Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Harry leaves the ordinary world when Hagrid comes and gets him from his ordinary world and takes Harry to the wizard world.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers and Bronwen Burke at October 20, 2014 11:11 AM

Aaron Virelli, Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
15 October 2014
group work

Question: 2. What does Christopher Vogler mean, in his chapter on the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage, when he claims that internal “events might trigger a Threshold Crossing”? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: when crossing the threshold, the main character decides to say living normal life or strive to learn new things. “Do I go on living my life as I always have, or will I risk everything in the effort to grow and change,”(Vogler 128) In a real life experience you see with when kids are going to college. When deciding if you will stay home and just live normal life or go out into the world with all new things and change and grow through interaction is a call to adventure you might be passing up. Something internally persuades the hero to make the choice. In Siddhartha, he decides to go out on a limb asking his father to go out and further his knowledge as a human because he feels like he has taken all he can from his home life. This is a hard question to ask knowing that his father is very particular. With his father saying yes it allows him to cross into another life of knowledge. In Pan’s Labyrinth, Ofelia has to decide if she wants to complete the three tasks to go back to the underworld with her father, or live in our world. Our world is not good for her. The captain is a very mean man who beats and tortures people. Her mother is pregnant, and the baby is making her very sick. Ofelia is from the underworld, and she decides to complete the task (Cross the Threshold) to return to the underworld as Princess Moanna.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 20, 2014 11:19 AM

Joanna Ozog, Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
20 October 2014

Group 2 Question:
What does Christopher Vogler mean, in his chapter on the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage, when he claims that internal “events might trigger a Threshold Crossing”? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer:
According to Volger, crossing the first threshold is an act of the will in which the hero commits wholeheartedly to the adventure. An example of something that we’ve read as a class is found in Siddhartha, when he makes the decision to tell his father that he was going to become a Samana. Another more modern day example is found in Tangled, when Rapunzel finally decides to run away after years of torment.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 20, 2014 11:53 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth, Matthew Basin, and Jonah Robertson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
20 October 2014

QUESTION #1:
Why, according to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Crossing the
[First] Threshold” stage, do heroes typically NOT “just accept the advice
and gifts of their Mentors and charge into the adventure”? How does this
sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What
works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your
response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to
support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The heroes do not accept the advice or gifts of their mentors until situation gives them a reason to do so. In The Christmas Carol, Scrooge does not want to listen to the first ghost but until he sees Tiny Tim with the second ghost seeing the poverty and struggles of the Cratchit household. In the example from Vogler, there is that moment wherein Beverly Hills Cop Axel Foley sees his old friend murdered (Vogler 128).

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 20, 2014 11:58 AM

Bryce Veller, Claudia Pierre, Jake Gates
ENG220CL- Journeys in Narratives
Dr.Hobbs
20 October 14

Question: In the section his “Crossing the [First] Threshold ”chapter titled “The Crossing,”Christopher Vogler suggests that instead of a “brief fade-out” or “curtain, ”audiences today experience “A noticeable shift of energy at the Threshold Crossing. ”What does this mean, and why must it happen, according to Vogler?How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs?
Answer: A noticeable shift of energy for one scene to the next is extremely important to get the message or event across to the audience. A shift, a change in setting at the threshold is needed to let the audience experience a change in the plot, from a song or drastic picture or image to help with the transition in the story. Ex: If there was no evident progression in a movie, it would start to bore people, editors and play writers enter these motifs into the story to add suspense and excitement into the story to keep the train rolling.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at October 20, 2014 12:02 PM

Ashlee English & Thomas Meseroll
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
14 October 2014
QUESTION:
6. In the section his “Crossing the [First] Threshold” chapter titled “The Crossing,” Christopher Vogler suggests that sometimes the hero or heroine must simply take a “leap of faith in to the unknown.” What does this mean, and why must it happen, according to Vogler? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
“We must take a leap of faith into the unknown or else the adventure will never really begin” (Vogler 129). As Vogler stated previously, the ordinary world is mundane thus causing the hero to crave an adventure, or be forced into one. However, the mundane is comfortable and safe as such taking a leap of faith takes the hero out of his/her comfort zone. In Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha, the hero crosses the first threshold when he leaves his Brahmin caste to seek enlightenment. This act is a leap of faith because there is no guarantee that Siddhartha will achieve enlightenment. Another, example of a leap of faith is seen “Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade” when Indian Jones is facing the three challenges to find the Holy Grail. On his second challenge, Indiana comes to the edge of a cliff with no way to pass to the other side, and has to step off into the void with the “faith” that things will turn out ok, as such is quite literal example of a “leap of faith.”

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 20, 2014 12:16 PM

Leroy Pianka
Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
20 October 2014

Group 5
According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage, the “task for heroes at this point is often to figure out some way around or through” the Threshold Guardian. What does Vogler mean when he says that sometimes “the guardians of the First Threshold simply need to be acknowledged”? How does this sometimes work/occur in
anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
When Mr. Vogler says, “the guardians of the First Threshold simply need to be acknowledged,” he is saying that sometimes it is easier to just confront the guardian and recognize their power because it is an easier path. In the story of “A Christmas Carol,” Ebenezer Scrooge does not want to confront the spirits. However, once he awakens on Christmas morning, he realizes that he just needed to acknowledge the significance of the Christmas Spirit. In the movie, “The Matrix Reloaded” Seraph is the guardian of the Oracle. Neo must fight Seraph before he is allowed to see the Oracle. There was no actual winner of the fight; Neo just had to show that he was worthy to see the Oracle.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at October 20, 2014 12:21 PM

James Sierra, Maria Aguiler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
17 October 2014

Question 4:
According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage, the “task for heroes at this point is often to figure out some way around or through” the Threshold Guardian. What does Vogler mean when he says that the Guardian’s threat is often “just an illusion”? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The Guardian’s threat being “just and illusion”, means that the threat the Hero perceives may actually be just a step in the direction he or she needs in order to achieve their objective. Threshold Guardians in Vogler’s words “seem to be enemies may be turned into valuable allies (Vogler 129).” An example of this may be when Luke meets Yoda for the first time. Luke gets annoyed with Yoda because he believes the creature he has encountered and is supposed to be showing him the way to Yoda is wasting his time.

Posted by: James Sierra at October 21, 2014 12:28 AM


Sharrad Forbes & Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
20 October 2014

Question:
In the section his “Crossing the [First] Threshold” chapter titled “The Crossing,” what does Christopher Vogler mean by the “leap of faith” concept, and why must it sometimes happen? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
By “leap of faith” Vogler refers to the “special courage” that characters have when making an irrevocable decision. For example, the jump between two worlds must happen or else “the adventure will never begin” (Vogler 129). Shown in the “Painted Bird” by Kosinski, where “the boy” “lived in Marta’s hut, expecting his parents to come for him any day, any hour” (Kosinski 19). After, Marta’s hut is destroyed “the boy” builds up the courage to move on and “find people” he “had to go to the village” (Kosinski 23) to survive. Once he chose to move on he could never go back, signifying him crossing the threshold and beginning his journey.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 21, 2014 10:49 AM

Zachary Sabo, Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
20 October 2014


Question 3:
According to Christopher Volger, what archetype usually shows up for the “Crossing the [First] Threshold stage? What is its function here, and how does it work? How does this sometimes work/ occur in anything we have read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen as a film where this occurs?

Answer:
As suggested by the name, crossing the first threshold introduces the (Threshold) Guardians into the plot line. The Threshold Guardians serve to “test the hero at any point in a story” or as a “part of the training of any hero” (Vogler 129). Denied by his father, Siddhartha protests the rejection of becoming a Samana and starting his journey by standing perfectly still until his father paid attention to his point of view (Hesse 10-12). However, very low risk and non-substantial, this initial threshold of leaving home became invaluable for Siddhartha, by showing his father what he learned at home while also showing his maturity and his necessity to grow. In this form, Siddhartha’s father became the initial Threshold Guardian who seeks to test the hero to determine his worthiness to begin the quest. In Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, the Dursleys serve as Harry’s threshold guardian preventing him from leaving at the request of the letter’s to Hogwarts. Not until the appearance of Hagrid was Harry able to overcome the Dursleys and begin his adventure into a literal magical world.

Work Cited

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing Company, 1971. Print.Nat

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 21, 2014 09:30 PM

Kendra Hinton, Blake Bromen, Josh Natonio
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
20 October 2014

Question: 4.
According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage, the “task for heroes at this point is often to figure out some way around or through” the Threshold Guardian. What does Vogler mean when he says that the Guardian’s threat is often “just an illusion”? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
Vogler meaning of Threshold Guardian is the solution to ignore them or push them to strive for the faith. The Threshold Guardian is too absorbed or their “hostile energy” must be too reflected back to them due to their action. However, this action is to overcome the Threshold. A Threshold Guardian either can be an enemy or allied. For example, The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy encounters many Threshold Guardian. One Threshold example is Professor Marvel, who try to persuade Dorothy to return home (Kansas), but instead she enter the supernatural world.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton Blake Bromen Josh Natonio at October 21, 2014 10:53 PM

James Sierra, Maria Aguiler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
17 October 2014

Question 4:
According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage, the “task for heroes at this point is often to figure out some way around or through” the Threshold Guardian. What does Vogler mean when he says that the Guardian’s threat is often “just an illusion”? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The Guardian’s threat being “just and illusion”, means that the threat the Hero perceives may actually be just a step in the direction he or she needs in order to achieve their objective. Threshold Guardians in Vogler’s words “seem to be enemies may be turned into valuable allies (Vogler 129).” An example of this may be when Luke meets Yoda for the first time. Luke gets annoyed with Yoda because he believes the creature he has encountered and is supposed to be showing him the way to Yoda is wasting his time.

Posted by: James Sierra at October 22, 2014 11:41 AM

Caitlin Christian & Jazlynn Rosario
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. Hobbs
22 October 2014

Group #3:
Question:

According to Christopher Vogler, what archetype usually shows up for the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage? What is its function here and how does it work? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class thus far? What works have you read (or seen, as a film) Where this occurs? Explain your response. Use quoted passage from the text.
Answer:
The archetype, which Vogler recognizes as the crossing stage within a story, is the Threshold Guardian archetype. This archetype states in a story this occurs, “to block the hero’s way in order to test the hero.” (Vogler 129) This is also part of the training of any hero when encountering an adventure. In the story of The Christmas Carol, Scrooge sees the ghost throughout his adventure, which represents his past, present, and future. This representation is guiding Scrooge to his extra ordinary world. A film representation of this archetype is Harry Potter when fluffy; the three-headed dog blocks the chambers entrance. Fluffy blocks an actual door rather than a theoretical door, making him a guardian of the story.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian & Jazlynn Rosario at October 22, 2014 09:31 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Kyle VanBuren
Ashley G.
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative CA01
23 October 2013

Question:
Why, according to Christopher Vogler, in his discussion of the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage, do heroes typically NOT “just accept the advice and gifts of their Mentors and charge into the adventure”? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your
response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The reason why heroes typically don’t just accept the advice and gifts of their Mentors is because there is often some sort of final commitment brought about some external force which changes the intensity of the story. “Often their final commitment is brought about through some sort of external force which changed the course or intensity of the story” (Vogler 128). This occurred in Siddhartha. He refused to take the knowledge of the Buddha and follow him because he has a new quest to learn from himself.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at October 23, 2014 08:26 PM

do-over Summer Taylor Tashanna Harris
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
24 October 2014

Question #5: According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “Crossing the [First]
Threshold” stage, the “task for heroes at this point is often to figure out some
way around or through” the Threshold Guardian. What does Vogler mean
when he says that sometimes “the guardians of the First Threshold simply
need to be acknowledged”? How does this sometimes work/occur in
anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen,
as a film) where this occurs?

Answer: Vogler explains this by saying, "They occupy a difficult niche and it wouldn't be polite to pass through their territory without recognizing their power and their important role of keeping the gate" (Vogler 129). Vogler also explains this by saying its like tipping a doorman or a toll booth. One example of this that we have read in class is when Siddhartha is crossing the river the first time and meets the ferryman briefly. He does not stay, but the ferryman will become an important person in the story later on. An example of this from outside our reading is in the movie Clash of Titans. The heroes have to pass over the river Styx, and in turn have to pay the ferryman here. The ferryman is the threshold guardian to the underworld, but they only acknowledge him by "tipping" him.

Posted by: summer taylor and Tashanna Harris at October 24, 2014 09:22 AM

Hanna Kataria, Bryan Hess
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
9 April 2015

Crossing the First Threshold: Everything is Illuminated

According to Vogler, Crossing the First Threshold is “an act of the will in which the hero commits whole heartedly to the adventure” (Vogler 127). It is where the hero has no point of return and sets out on to the adventure. In Everything is Illuminated, there are two main characters or two heroes in the story. The first one is Jonathan, which his Crossing of the first threshold is him going to the Ukraine and getting off the plane into the Ukraine. At that moment, everything had changed, and he could not return, and not continue with adventure. The other Hero in the story is Alex, the translator for Jonathan. His crossing the threshold was him helping and agreeing to help find Augustine for and with Jonathan. He did not want to help him, but he did help because he was interested in Augustine.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria; Bryan Hess at April 9, 2015 11:45 PM

Burke & Brianna

- In the section his “Crossing the [First] Threshold” chapter titled “The Crossing,” Christopher Vogler suggests that instead of a “brief fade-out” or “curtain,” audiences today experience “a noticeable shift of energy at the Threshold Crossing.” What does this mean, and why must it happen, according to Vogler? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far?

1) This “noticeable shift” is a leap into the unknown. Neither the hero nor the viewer have any clue on what can or will happen. It must happen to show that the new world, and the hero’s journey are completely different than their usually lifestyle. In older films, this is demonstrated with a “fade out/Fade in” effect. In The Wizard of Oz, this is demonstrated by the world of color as Dorothy appears in the land of Oz. In Star Wars, this shift in energy is in Mos eisley when we see all of the new characters and faces, and a completely different dynamic of Luke’s old(er) life. Of the works we’ve read in class, this is when Marty appears to Scrooge at night. The atmosphere of the setting changes, and we can tell that a new stage of scrooge’s life is about to set in. Volger claims that “we must take a leap of faith into the unknown, otherwise out adventure will never really begin.”

Posted by: Burke & Brianna at March 2, 2016 10:53 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu and Thomas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
2 March 2016

In in his chapter on the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage, What does Christopher Vogler mean by the “Rough Landing” concept, and why must it happen sometimes. How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

By Vogler's concept of the Rough Landing, we see that the crash landing into the Special World may be physical where they are thrown into the new world or may be figuratively thrown into the extraordinary world. This rough landing has to happen to break the hero’s misinterpretation of what this new world and its journey will bring, but when he/she finally cross the threshold, it breaks the “frustration, exhaustion, or disorientation that the passage to the Special World may bring” (Vogler 130). In this instant, the hero realizes that it is not what they first perceived and that they could make it through the journey.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at March 2, 2016 11:04 AM

Emily Buckley & Jessica McKinney
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 March 2016

Question: According to Christopher Vogler, in his chapter on the “Crossing the [First] Threshold” stage, the “task for heroes at this point is often to figure out some way around or through” the Threshold Guardian. What does Vogler mean when he says that the Guardian’s threat is often “just an illusion”? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response

Answer: In this chapter Vogler says sometimes threshold guardians are often an illusion. He means that the threshold guardian is not actually opposing the hero, but they are actually trying to help the hero overcome something in himself ; for example, giving them self-confidence. Vogler says, “Threshold Guardians are part of the training of any hero… the solution is simply to ignore them or push through them with faith.” (Vogler 129) The dog in “The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly” would be an example of how the threshold guardian would be an illusion. The dog is not actually opposed to Sprout, but he is doing his job. Sprout has to push through him with faith, which builds her faith in herself. In addition, Vogler talks about how the threshold guardian can still be a kind of a friend for the hero, the dog is an example of this as well because he still watches over her.

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Jessica McKinney at March 2, 2016 11:15 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
2 March 2016

Question: In the section his “Crossing the [First] Threshold” chapter titled “The Crossing,” Christopher Vogler suggests that sometimes the hero or heroine must simply “take a leap of faith” into the unknown what does this mean and why does this happen, according to Vogler? How does this sometimes work/occur in anything we’ve read, as a class, thus far? What works have YOU read (or seen, as a film) where this occurs? Explain your response.

Answer: When Vogler talks about taking a leap of faith, he is talking about overcoming fear and taking action and trusting, finding the courage to make the crossing into the special world, but with the caveat that there is now no turning back. Voguer writes, “special courage is called making the leap of faith…like jumping out of an airplane, the act is irrevocable” (Vogler 130). In the Matrix, Neo has the option to take one pill or the other, to go back to the dream world or to awake in the real world. Once he took the pill there was no going back, and it was a leap of faith because he did not know what would have happened to him, but he trusted Morpheus and took the leap of faith.

Posted by: Andre and Charish at March 2, 2016 11:28 AM

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