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September 18, 2014

Campbell's *Ally Archetype,* as Explained by Christopher Vogler


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at September 18, 2014 03:11 PM

Readers' Comments:

Anet Milian
Matt Basin
Caitlin Christian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
29 September 2013

Group 5

Question #13: In his discussion of “Modern Allies,” Christopher Vogler maintains that Ally archetypes “in fiction suggest alternate paths for problem-solving and help to round out the personalities of heroes, allowing expression of fear, humor, or ignorance that might not be appropriate for the hero.” How is this function of the Ally performed in Charles Dicken’s novel A Christmas Carol, if at all?
Answer: In Charles Dickens novel A Christmas Carol, the allies can be described as Jacob Marley and the Ghost. Jacob Marley serves to show Scrooge that his hostile attitude and life style is unacceptable. Jacob Marley tries to warn/ scare him that if he doesn’t change his ways, then he would share the same fate as him. Also, the Ghost help Scrooge understand how his ways affect others and himself and how he could change his fate. At the end of the novel, Scrooge’s personality is completely changed. Jacob Marley and the Ghost are partially responsible for Scrooges enlightenment.
Work Cited
Dickens, C. (1991). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 29, 2014 12:09 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA02
29 September 2014


Question 4:


According to Christoplers Vogler, Heroes “on a great epic journey may acquire whole ship-loads of allies.” Is this also true in Herman Hesse’s novel Siddhartha? If so, who or what compose the “team of adventurers”? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


When we look at Siddhartha, and the journey he went on it is quite obvious that he didn’t go at it alone. Siddhartha had education given to him by his father, help from his friend Govinda, Guidance from the exalted Gotama, advice from the Ferryman, as well as experiencing bliss with Kamala and becoming a slave to his wants with Kamaswami. While the lessons taught by these people did not always overlap with each other in a timely fashion or even share a common goal, they did guide Siddhartha to his ultimate fate. These lessons eventually steer him to a complete, whole life and realize the reality of human nature. “It is not possible for any person to see how far another one has already progressed on his path; in the robber and dice-gambler, the Buddha is waiting; in the Brahman, the robber is waiting. In deep meditation, there is the possibility to put time out of existence, to see all life which was, is, and will be as if it was simultaneous, and there everything is good, everything is perfect, everything is Brahman.” (Hesse Ch. 12) The whole of the lesson Siddhartha experiences eventually bring about the true lesson that there is always room for radical change. Siddhartha had experienced what it was like to become a gambler from a holy man, and he felt what is was to become a gambler to a ferryman. This lesson brings about the realization that in all good, there can be a shadow evil, and all evil can become good.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 29, 2014 01:30 PM

Caitlin Christian
29 September 2014
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative

Question #5: According to Christopher Vogler, Allies are sometimes “audience characters” that perform the function of seeing “the Special World of the story with fresh eyes as we, the readers, would do if we were there” and consequently, “ask the questions we would be asking.” How is this function performed, if at all, by an ally archetype in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol? Explain your response.
Answer:
Vogler describes allies as helpful to the reader because their purpose is, “to bring out human feelings or reveal important questions in the plot.” In Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol, Scrooge comes across many allies whom help the reader realize how much Scrooge needs to change. These allies reveal Scrooges history and his habits of his current lifestyle. Jacob Marley and the ghosts that Scrooge encountered are helpful allies whose purpose is to create change. The reader was shown the type of person Scrooge is and what will become of him without correction. Scrooges’ fate was up to him; the reader was able to see the many paths Scrooge could have taken in order to change the course of his life.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 29, 2014 02:17 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
1 October 2014

Ally Question #14: In his discussion of “Modern Allies,” Christopher Vogler maintains that Ally archetypes “in fiction suggest alternate paths for problem solving and help to round out the personalities of heros,, allowing expression of fear, humor, or ignorance that might not be appropriate for the hero.” How is this function of the ally performed in Herman Hesse’s novel Siddhartha, if at all? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The most prominent trickster that Siddhartha came across on his path was Kamala. When Siddhartha first arrives in town and meets her, he instantly feels a connection to Kamala. He had not been with a woman before, and Kamala was able to teach him how. By her doing this for him, it makes her a trickster because she is altering his status quo and everything he knew about that. “You have learned my art well, Siddhartha.”(Hesse 73) She also has a son with him, which completely changes Siddhartha’s life. He had not been planning to have a son, and the status quo for his life had been to continue on his own to gain more knowledge, and this obviously has to change with a son, which shows how Kamala is the trickster in the novel.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 30, 2014 07:08 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
29 September 2014

QUESTION #6:
According to Christopher Volger, Allies are sometimes “audience character[s]” that perform the function of seeing “the Special World of the story with fresh eyes as we [,the readers,] would do if we were there” and, consequently, “ask the questions we would be asking.” How is this function performed, if at all, by an Ally archetype in Hesse’s novel Siddhartha? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of you answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Govinda is an Ally that looks at the Special World with fresh eyes when Siddhartha told
he that he was going to inform his dad about him becoming a Samana. In the morning, Govinda was informed of Siddhartha departure to join the Samanas. Govinda was a little nervous about what Siddhartha's father would say. "'Oh Siddhartha, ' he cried, 'will your father permit it (Hesse 9)?'"

Work Cited
Hesse, Hermann. Siddartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 30, 2014 09:00 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
30 Sep 2014

Question 1:
Why, according to Christopher Volger, is it both/either “useful” and/or “convenient” for a Hero archetype to have an Ally archetype on his/her team? How are these “mundane” tasks of the Ally performed, if at all, in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
It is useful and convenient to have an Ally archetype for a Hero to have on his or her team because they Ally can serve many functions to the Hero. They can serve as a companion, sparring partner, or conscience. An Ally can be useful as to send on errands for you, carry messages and can also be convenient by being there if they need someone to talk to or help guide someone of the right path. In A Christmas Carol, Jacob Marley, the Ally, comes back to help Scrooge show him what his life would be like if he changed his ways and thoughts on life. Jacob plays a hug role in Scrooge changing is ways and thoughts towards the end. If Scrooge did not have Jacob, he would have never changed his thoughts.

“It’s useful to have someone to send on errands, to carry messages, to scout locations. It’s convenient to have someone for the hero to talk to, to bring out human feelings, or reveal important questions in the plot (Vogler 71).”
“Allies do many mundane tasks but also serve the important function of humanizing the hero’s, adding extra dimensions to their personalities, or challenging them to be more open and balanced (Vogler 71).”

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 30, 2014 11:12 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
30 September 2014

Question #10: Ally-
According to Christopher Vogler, Allies sometimes play the role of "helpful servant." Do any of the Ally archetypes in Hermann Hesse's novel Siddhartha play the role of "helpful servant"?

Answer:
Vasudeva, the ferryman, ends up guiding Siddhartha to enlightenment. Physically, Vasudeva serves Siddhartha by transporting him across the river, but he also serves as a spiritual guide that teaches Siddhartha how to live in a state of serenity by learning from the river.
In a way, Siddhartha relies on Vasudeva to save his life when he is in his depressed state. "You have heard it laugh, he said. But you have not heard everything. Let us listen together, there is more that you will hear" (Hesse 104).

*Quote found using the Barnes and Noble Classics edition of Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 30, 2014 11:18 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
1 October 2014

Question #12:
a. What, according to Christopher Vogler, is the “psychological function” of the Ally archetype?
b. Do Ally archetypes in Herman Hesse’s novel Siddhartha perform this function?

Answer:
“The Ally in dreams and fiction might represent the unexpressed or unused parts of the personality that must be brought into action to do their jobs” (Volger 75). Serving to fill the holes where a hero lacks in ability or skill, the Ally character appears to specialize in all things the hero lacks. Kamala, Siddhartha’s wife, friend, companion, and mentor plays the role of Ally in this context by representing the worldly side of Siddhartha. Where Siddhartha concerns himself with enlightenment, Kamala focuses on earthly pleasures such as, material objects, money, sex, and love. “He must have clothes, fine clothes, and shoes, fine shoes, and plenty of money in his purse and presents for Kamala,” whereas Siddhartha appeared in just his Samana attire, Kamala wanted extravagance, a side of Siddhartha that was not explored until Kamala (Hesse 54). Throughout the story Siddhartha’s allies serve to represent the stages of life Siddhartha goes through, expressing the sides of Siddhartha not yet explored. However, the psychological function, according to Volger, is only a mask in this story where Siddhartha eventually does explore this undiscovered side only for it not to fulfill his inner desires.

Work Cited:

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing Company, 1971. Print

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 1, 2014 08:41 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
30 September 2014

Question: according to Christopher Vogler, “allies need not be human.” For instance, they could be spirits, gods, animals, ghosts, or aspects of hero’s own mind. Do any no human allies exist in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha?

Answer: In the Book Siddhartha Written by Hermann Hesse had one major non-human character that was the river. Siddhartha confided and loved it as himself in this river and believed that it would help him find his most peaceful point of his life. The river is an ally to him because it is helping him better himself through being around it through the current of the river and the sound of his voice he knows that is what he needs.(Hesse107).

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 1, 2014 08:58 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
10 October 2014

QUESTION # 11:
(a.) What, according to Christopher Vogler, is the "psychological function" of the Ally archetype, and (b.) do Ally archetypes in Charles Dicken's novel A Christmas Carol perform this function, if at all?

ANSWER:
Vogler says that many times the psychological function of an Ally is to almost be a foil to the hero and display characteristics that the hero may lack. In A Christmas Carol, Bob Cratchit can be classified as and Ally of Scrooge. While Scrooge is stingy and always in a bad mood Bob Cratchit always gives thanks for what he has. "Mr. Scrooge!" said Bob; "I'll give you Mr. Scrooge, the Founder of the Feast!"
"The Founder of the Feast indeed!" cried Mrs. Cratchit, reddening. "I wish I had him here. I'd give him a piece of my mind to feast upon, and I hope he'd have a good appetite for it."
"My dear," said Bob, "the children; Christmas Day (Dickens 27.)"

Posted by: summer taylor at October 1, 2014 09:41 AM

Joshua Natonio
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
1 October 2014

QUESTION #9:
According to Christopher Vogler, Allies sometimes play the role of “helpful servant.” Do any of Ally archetypes in Charles Dickens’ novel A Christmas Carol play the role of “helpful servant?” Explain your response.

ANSWER:
According to Vogler, a “helpful servant” is “a stock character in tales of romance who helps the hero achieve his or her goal by carrying love letters and messages or providing disguises hideaways, escape routes, and alibis” (Vogler 75). In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge has multiple allies accompanying him throughout the narrative, but there are two characters that most closely epitomize the “helpful servant” archetype. Both Bob Cratchit and Scrooge’s nephew Fred exhibit attribute that would categorize them as “helpful servant” allies.

When Scrooge is visited by the Ghost of Christmas Present, the spirit brings Scrooge to the homes of both Bob Cratchit and his nephew. Bob Cratchit is a fiercely loyal employee and despite what his wife’s dislike for Scrooge, he toasts Scrooge as “The Founder of the Feast indeed!” (Dickens 41). When Scrooge and the apparition visit Fred, Scrooge’s nephew, a similar scene is displayed. Scrooge’s niece and her sisters exclaim their disdain for Scrooge, for which Scrooge’s nephew retorts “I am sorry for him: I couldn’t be angry with him if I tried” (Dickens 45). Both Bob Cratchit and Scrooge’s Nephew Fred are loyal to Scrooge when they provide excuses for his disposition, and attempt to sway their peers' opinions. Although they do not always feel appreciated by Scrooge or agree with his miserly mentality, they stand up for Scrooge when his name is besmirched.

WORKS CITED:
Dickens, Charles. Christmas Stories Including A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. New York, NY: Dover Publications, Inc., 2013. 41-47. Print.


Vogler, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure For Writers Studio City, CA: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Third Edition. 35. Print.

Posted by: Joshua Natonio at October 1, 2014 10:24 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 225CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
1 October 2014

QUESTION #10:
According to Christopher Vogler, Allies sometimes play the role of “helpful servant.” Do any of the Ally archetypes in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha play the role of “helpful servant”? Explain your response.

ANSWER:
The character Vasudeva plays the role of “helpful servant” as well as Mentor to Siddhartha. Vasudeva helps Siddhartha when he leaves the life of riches and material things. Vasudeva offers him a place to stay, “Now, you shall live with me” (Hesse 95).

Vasudeva guides Siddhartha on the path to enlightenment in a subtle way, “I can’t tell you that other thing, oh friend. You’ll learn it” (Hesse 95)/ Always by his side, watching, listening, he allows Siddhartha to find comfort in himself, and a deeper understanding of the world.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 1, 2014 10:38 AM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
September 1 2014

Question #7-A: According to Christopher Vogler, "Allies need not be human." For instance they could be spirits, gods, animals, ghosts, or aspects of the hero's own mind. Do any non-human allies in Charles Dickins's novel A Christmas Carol? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
It could be argued that in A Christmas Carol all of Scrooge's allies are inhuman. Marley is the most human of them, and even he is a ghost. The "Three Spirits" (Dickins 15) are even less human, appearing as fantastical apparitions. While the three spirits do not appear as allies at first, especially because Marley tells Scrooge that he "will be haunted" (Dickins 15) by the spirits. Haunting has a rather negative connotation to it, so the reader could assume that the spirits are evil, but that is not the case. The spirits, while they are indeed haunting Scrooge, are doing so for his benefit. They are trying to teach him a lesson, making them mentors, but they are also helping him along and acting as his friends, even when it does not seem like it, and that is what makes them allies.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 1, 2014 10:45 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
30 September 2014

Question 14:
In his discussion of “Modern Allies,” Christopher Vogler maintains that Ally Archetypes “in fiction suggest alternate paths for problem-solving and help to round out the personalities of heroes,, allowing expression of fear, humor, or ignorance that might not be appropriate for the hero.” How is this function of the Ally performed in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha, if at all? Explain your response.

Answer:
The Ally Archetype that stands out in my mind the most is the merchant. Kamaswami introduces Siddhartha to the world of business. In becoming a good business man, Siddhartha becomes a different person. He no longer is kind to strangers, starts gambling a lot, and becomes impatient and angry. As described in the book, “Slowly the disease of the soul, which rich people have, grabbed hold of him (Hesse 51).” It takes Siddhartha a while to realize that he has strayed quite a bit from his intended path of enlightenment.

Posted by: James Sierra at October 1, 2014 10:46 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
30 September 2014.

QUESTION # 13: In his discussion of “Modern Allies,” Christopher Vogler maintains that Ally archetypes “in fiction suggest alternate paths for problem solving and help to round out the personalities of heroes, allowing expression of fear, humor, or ignorance that may not be appropriate for the hero.” How is this the function of the Ally preformed in Charles Dickens’ novel A Christmas Carol, if at all? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
An ally defined by Volger is the aid to the Hero, who brings him ‘back to earth’ so to speak and endows him with human qualities, balancing and adding dimensions to the Hero’s personality. In the novella A Christmas Carol, the ally archetype is not restricted to one character but many characters throughout the story. Scrooge, although the hero he is far from endowed with human traits, as such, individuals including his nephew along with the four apparitions try to humanize him.
“A merry Christmas, uncle!... Good afternoon!” (Dickens 3-4) In this discourse, Scrooge’s nephew tries to evoke the spirit of Christmas in his uncle; as such, he is an ally by endowing him with the emotion of being jovial. Similarly, the ghosts of Christmas present, past and future enables Scrooge to unlock his inner morals, feelings, and emotions that he buried long ago. “To hear Scrooge expending all the earnestness of his nature… that’s all,” (Dickens 21-22) the above quote speaks to the increase in the level of human emotion we see from Scrooge from the beginning of the story. Consequently, all Scrooge’s encounters with apparitions were humanizing events, resulting in the reformed Scrooge.

Works Cited
Dickens, C. (1843). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 1, 2014 11:09 AM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 1, 2014 12:48 PM

Maggie Izquierdo and William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Literature CA02
13 February 2015

Question: Why, according to Christopher Vogler, is it both/either “useful” and/or “convenient” for a Hero achetype to have an Ally archetype on his/her team? How are these “mundane” tasks of the Ally performed, if at all, in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Vogler says the Ally archetype is necessary because he/she serves as a companion, comic relief, or sparring partner to the Hero archetype. The Ally is someone to talk to and/or relate to throughout the journey the Hero takes. The Ally helps humanize the Hero and reveal the Hero’s true personality by challenging him/her to be more open and balanced (Vogler 71).

In Siddhartha Govinda is recognized as the Ally to Siddhartha, the Hero. “At his side lived Govinda, his shadow; he travelled along the same path, made the same endeavors” (Hesse 16). This shows that he does whatever Siddhartha says to do. He is there for Siddhartha to perform the “mundane” tasks of talking and being a companion throughout his journey, allowing him to relate to Siddhartha. With Govinda being the Ally, Siddhartha’s perspective and beliefs are better understood. Govinda helps bring out Siddhartha’s inner enlightenment.

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at February 11, 2015 02:19 PM

T.J. Pagliaro, Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 February 2015

Question 8: According to Christopher Vogler, Allies need to be human.” For instance, they could be spirits, gods, animals, ghosts, or aspects of the hero’s own mind. Do any non-human Allies exist in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In Hesse’s Siddhartha, the non-human Allies may include Siddhartha’s own passion or energy of his own ways of life. In Chapter 12, Govinda contemplates on what he sees in Siddhartha and discovers that Siddhartha’s wisdom is helping him live through hardships. Also, Siddhartha’s own doctrine he creates is an Ally because he leads himself towards different challenges but uses his teachings as a guide to get himself out of these challenges. Hesse writes, “Siddhartha has become aware of knowledge just as one feels life in one’s heart” (Hesse 142). Hesse also writes, “Knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom” (Hesse 142). These passages explain that not only Govinda could be an Ally, but Siddhartha’s own knowledge.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 11, 2015 02:19 PM

Nicholas Gaydos
Bryan Hess
Eng-220CL
2/11/15
Question 4

4. According to Christopher Vogler, heroes “on great epic journeys acquire whole ship loads of Allies.” Is this also true in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha? If so, who or what compose the “team of adventurers Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Govinda – Although they do eventually part ways Govinda is a longtime friend who begins this journey with Saddhartha. Govinda is Saddhartha’s first and main.

Kamala – Kamala teaches Siddhartha the beauty of physical love and really opens his eyes to a completely new world he did not previously know.

Kamaswami – By working for Kamaswami who teaches him business, Siddhartha realizes he wants something different for himself. In this way, Kamaswami is the ally who shows Saddhartha what he does not want to do.

The Samanas – Saddhartha and Govinda are the first drawn to the Samanas who introduce the duo to the spiritual.

Posted by: nicholas gaydos/bryan hess at February 11, 2015 02:22 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
12 February 2015

Question: According to Christopher Vogler, Allies need not to be human. “For instance, they could be spirits, gods, animals, ghosts, or aspects of the hero’s own mind. Do any non-human allies exist in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha?

Answer: I believe that Siddhartha finds the river he encounters as a non-human ally because it shows him what is important in life and which corners he should avoid. That is not communicated directly in words but through an indirect form of communication. For instance, the river does not tell him to live his life a certain way but gives him guidance in a path he should take. Thus, not forcing Siddhartha but letting him choose his path (Hesse 67).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 12, 2015 10:15 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
13 February 2015

Question: (#14) In his discussion of “Modern Allies,” Christopher Vogler maintains that Ally archetypes “in fiction suggest alternate paths for problem-solving and help to round out the personalities of heroes, allowing expression of fear, humor, or ignorance that might not be appropriate for the hero.” How is this function of the Ally performed in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha, if at all? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: This function is most often performed Siddhartha’s ally, Govinda. Govinda portrays ignorance at several key points of the story. For example, when Govinda meets Siddhartha in the final chapter and sleeps with him in his hut. He fails to grasp the relatively simple concepts that wisdom cannot be passed done and that anyone and anything is capable of being either the best of his ability, the worst of his ability, and everything in between. Govinda in response to such simple concepts called Siddhartha a, “strange man who expressed strange thoughts” (Hesse, 149). While Siddhartha is portrayed as ignorant to a certain degree in the novel, he doesn’t quite have such a trait in spades like Govinda.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 13, 2015 03:57 AM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 February 2015

Question 1: Why, according to Christopher Vogler, is it both/either “useful” and/or “convenient” for a Hero archetype to have an Ally archetype on his/her team? How are these “mundane” tasks of the Ally performed, if at all, in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol? Explain your response.

Answer: According to Vogler, it is both useful and convenient for the Hero archetype to have an Ally archetype because the Ally acts as a person who can serve a variety of necessary functions, such as companion, sparring partner, conscience, or comic relief. Vogler states that, “It’s useful to have someone send on errands, to carry messages, to scout locations.” (Vogler 71) This passage make the Ally act as a definite role model to the Hero. They think of others before themselves and realize the Allies play a significant role within the Hero’s journey. Another point Vogler mentions is that “It’s convenient to have someone for the hero to talk to, to bring out human feelings or reveal important questions in the plot of the journey” (Vogler 71). This passage is key because Sam from the Lord of the Rings acts as Frodo’s Ally. Along the way, Sam does mundane tasks in order to serve Frodo. He humanizes, adds extra dimensions to his personality, or even challenging him to be more open and balanced. A prime example would be when Golem manipulates Frodo. Sam is the Ally who attempts to change the mind of Frodo because he knows that Golem is full of lies. Within the A Christmas Carol, Dickens says when Marley comes to warn Scrooge about the Three Spirits, “It is required of every man… that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide; and if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death” (Dickens 13). This passage references Marley acting as an Ally by sending him a message that Scrooge will be haunted by three Spirits. He conveys his message by trying to make Scrooge understand to take every haunting seriously or his fate will end in death according to the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 13, 2015 10:36 AM

Chrissy Castro & Hatim Shami
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative
02 February 2015

Question: Why, according to Christopher Volger, is both/either “useful” and/or “convenient” for a hero archetype to have an Ally archetype on his/her team? How are these “mundane” tasks of the ally preformed, if at all, in Charles Dickens’ novel A Christmas Carol? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: According to Volger, allies are useful because the heroes have someone to, “send on errands, to carry messages, to scout locations” (Volger 71). The convenience is so the hero “has someone to talk to, to bring out human feelings or revel important questions in the plot” (Volger 71). The four spirits kind of give off an ally vibe. Marley sends the message that is Scrooge doesn’t change, Scrooge’s fate would be like his own. The other three spirits are there to relay messages as well as make Scrooge feel something. Scrooge also talks to them throughout his journey.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro & Hatim Shami at February 13, 2015 10:46 AM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in a Narrative CA02
13 February 2015

Question: (a.)What, according to Christopher Vogler, is the “Psychological function” of the Alley archetype, and (b.) do Ally archetypes in Charles Dickens’ novel A Christmas Carol perform this function, if at all? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: According to Vogler, the psychological function of the ally, “might represent the unexpressed and unused parts of the personality that must be brought into action to do their jobs” (Vogler 75). In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, the ghost of Christmas past reminded him of what he used to be like; this maybe a loose interpretation of the psychological function.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at February 13, 2015 11:17 AM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
220 CL Journeys of Narrative CA02
11 February 2015

Question: 7. According to Christopher Vogler “Allies need not be human.” For instance, they could be spirits, gods, animals, ghost, or aspects of the hero’s own mind. Do any non-human Allies exist in Charles Dickens’ novel A Christmas Carol? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of the answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Dickens uses spirit and ghost allies throughout the entire story to help guide Scrooge on his journey. He is first visited by Marley’s ghost and then by three spirits. All of the visitations help mold and shape him on his journey. “The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. Oh Jacob Marley! Heaven, and the Christmas Time be praised for this! (Dickens 63)

Posted by: Will Pereira at February 13, 2015 12:23 PM

Duane Daye and Richard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 February 2015

Question: According to Christopher Vogler, Allies sometimes play the role of “helpful servant.” Do any of the Ally Archetypes in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha play the role of “helpful servant?” Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The ally that plays the role of the “helpful servant” would be Kamala because “allies occasionally step up to the higher function of guiding the hero in spiritual or emotional matters.” [Volger 25] Kamala helps out Siddhartha throughout the story by showing him the art of physical compassion and shows him around the city. Also another one that is a “helpful servant” Govinda because he also serves the purpose on helping out the main character in the story.

Posted by: Duane Daye at February 13, 2015 12:26 PM

Rachel Andrews

Dr Hobbs

ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA02

13 Febuary 2015

Question:In his discussion of “Modern Allies”, Christopher Vogler maintains that Ally archetype “in fiction suggest alternate paths for problem-solving and help to round out the personalities of the heroes, allowing expression of fear, humor, or ignorance that might be appropriate for the hero.” How is this function of the Ally performed in Charles Dickens’s novel A Christmas Carol, if at all? Explain your response.

Answer: A great example of a Modern Ally in Charles Dickens’s novel ‘A Christmas Carol’ is the First of the three spirits. This spirit guides Scrooge through the past, showing him all of the memories from his youth, whether they be good or bad. This is the first chance the reader has at a glimpse of a different side of Scrooge. When the spirit took him to his childhood town Scrooge’s, “cold eye[s] glisten[ed], and his heart leap[t] up” (Dickens 6), portraying a radically different Ebenezer than the audience was used to. Scrooge sobbed when he saw himself “neglected by friends” (Dickens 6), he talked about his favorite Christmas memory his “voice between laughing and crying” (Dickens 8). The First spirit brought all of these emotions out in Scrooge; he helped round out Scrooges personality and aided him in bringing these emotions forth.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews at February 13, 2015 12:27 PM

Duane Daye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
13 February 2015

Question: According to Christopher Volger, Allies are sometimes “audience character[s]” that perform the function of seeing “the special World of the story with fresh eyes as we [, the readers] would do if we were there” and, consequently, “ask the questions we would be asking.” How is this function performed, if at all, by an Ally archetype in Charles Dickens’ novel A Christmas Carol? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: I believe that Jacob Marley is the ally “audience character” in the Story A Christmas Carol because he is a character that watches the Hero throughout the entire story. Jacob sends the hero on a journey and basically watches over Scrooge through the whole story. Scrooge and Jacob have a conversation that I believe in implies that Marley sees everything, “You see that toothpick” is asked by Scrooge and Marley goes on to say he does even though he is not looking at it. I believe this is much like Marley saying that he can see things without truly looking or being there, therefore implying that he has been watching Scrooge and will continue to watch Scrooge through the entire journey.

Posted by: Duane Daye at February 13, 2015 01:15 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield and Rachel Andrews
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
11 February 2015

According to Christopher Vogler, Allies need not be human. For instance, they could be spirits, gods, animals, ghosts, or aspects of the hero's own mind. Do any non-human characters exist in Charles Dickens novel A Christmas Carol? Explain your response.

The second spirit functions as an ally. He serves to humanize Scrooge and bring out human feelings in him. Vogler writes, "In stories, Allies remind us of these under-utilized parts and bring to mind actual friends or relation­ ships that may be helpful to us in the journey of our lives" (Vogler 75).

Posted by: jeffrey Wingfield and Rachel Andrews at February 13, 2015 01:31 PM

Marie Destin &Bobbi Ausmus & Cody Jean –Baspite

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01

11 February 2015

Question: In the text of The Christmas Carol , the person who fits to be the ally will have to be Scrooge’s nephew because he defend Scrooge throughout the story . In the text , it is shown “ ‘Don’t be cross, uncle’, said the nephew; ‘What else can I be’ returned the uncle, ‘when I live in such a world of fools as this?’ “ (Dickins, 3).

Posted by: Marie Destin&Bobbi Ausmus &Cody Jean Baspite at February 13, 2015 03:12 PM

Celina Tahsini, Joe Marrah
Dr. HobbsENG
220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 February 2015

Question #5

Answer: The River is where Siddhartha hears a sound which played a major role in Siddhartha's mindset. Siddhartha hears "Om" which translates as "Perfect One" or Perfection"*(). It's the moment Siddhartha sees life through fresh eyes. So pertaining to the Ally archetype, The River is recognized as the ally since it not only inspired Siddhartha but it completely transformed his mindset and lifestyle (Hesse 92).

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 13, 2015 03:43 PM

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