« Calls & Responses to _The Epic of Son-Jara/Sundiata/Sun-Jata_ | Main | The Hero's Journey and More - Exploring Recurring Tropes in Narrative »

March 05, 2014

"Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night" by Dylan Thomas


CAPTION: "Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night" by Dylan Thomas.
Image Source: http://brucemctague.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/do-not-go-gentle-into.jpg

Students,

. . .

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

----------------------------------------

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at March 5, 2014 01:17 PM

Readers' Comments:

Wilfred Ras
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL
5 March 2014

Question:
Whom is the speaker of the poem addressing?

Answer:
The speaker of this poem was addressing his own father. He was addressing him and telling him to “Rage. Rage against the dying of the light”. He is telling his dad not to just give up and give in. Fight it. Fight the disease, or fight whatever it is that is killing them. I also feel that this poem was written for people who have people in their lives that are passing away.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at March 5, 2014 02:41 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 March 2014

Question:
Whose eyes could “blaze like meteors” even though they are near death?
Answer:
The eyes that could “blaze like meteors” even though they are near death are those eyes of Grace Men. This poem is about a man and his love for his father, the father is dying, and the man is asking his father to fight and not go gently. The quote in the poem is “Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.” (Thomas).
Work Cited
Thomas, Dylan. “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night.”

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at March 6, 2014 08:46 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys of Transformation In Narrative Literature 220CL
6.3.2014
Based on “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” – Dylan Thomas
QUESTION.
What should old age do according to the speaker.
ANSWER.
According to the speaker “old age should burn and rave at close of day.”

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 6, 2014 12:30 PM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
6 March 2014

Question:
Which of the following is not used to refer to death in the poem?
a) Good Night
b) Dying of the Light
c) Close of Day
d) Forked Lightning
Answer:
Close of day is not used to refer to death in the poem. Good night is used in the poem in the first stanza “Do not go gentle into that good night.” Dying of the light is used in the first stanza as well, “Rage, rage against the dying of the light.” Forked lighting appears in the second stanza, “Because their words had forked no lightning they.”

Posted by: Michael Adamson at March 6, 2014 06:50 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
5 March 2014

Question:
What kind of men cries because their deeds are frail?

Answer:
Good men cry because their deeds are frail (Thomas).

Works Cited
Thomas, Dylan. "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night." n.d. Poem.


Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at March 6, 2014 07:26 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives
6 March 2014

QUESTION #2:
What type of men does the speaker say know that “dark is right”?

ANSWER:
The type of men the speaker is referring to are wise men.

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at March 6, 2014 08:02 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
7 March 2014

QUESTION #3
What should old age do according to the speaker?

ANSWER:
According to the poem “Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night” by Dylan Thomas, “old age should burn and rave at close of day [. . .] rage against the dying of the light” (Thomas).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at March 6, 2014 08:31 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
7 March 2014
QUESTION #18:
What effect is created by the repetition of the lines “Do not go gentle into the night” and “Rage rage against the dying of the light”?
ANSWER:
Repeating the words shows that the child does not want his father to stop fighting for his life. Since it is his father, he cares about him dearly, and when you care about someone, you do not want him or her to die. Therefore, he says the words repeatedly to continuously remind his father to fight for his life and does not want his father to go gentle into the night. With it being repeated so much, it makes a reader realize how important the father is, the importance of fighting for your live, and that an individual will always want someone they care about to live on so asking them to rage on against death would be understandable.

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at March 6, 2014 10:23 PM

Re-Chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
6 March 6, 2014
Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night


Question #1
1. Whose eyes could blaze like meteors eye though they are near death?
Answer:
Dylan Thomas wrote this poem for his dying father as an reference to “Grave men, near death”. (Thomas) His father’s eyes blazed like meteors to his near death. In the poem he states the “grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight. Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay”. (Thomas)

Posted by: re-chia jackson at March 6, 2014 10:37 PM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
6 March 2014

QUESTION #8:
What kind of men cries because their deeds are frail?

ANSWER:
In Dylan Thomas poem, “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” good men cries because their deeds are frail. In the third stanza, Thomas mentions “Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay.”

Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at March 6, 2014 11:56 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
7 March 2014

QUESTION #2:
What type of men does the speaker say know that “dark is right”?

ANSWER:
The speaker says that “wise men at their end know dark is right” (Thomas). By this, he means that men nearing the end of their lives, as old people are generally considered wise, know when it is their time to go and pass on.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at March 7, 2014 12:11 AM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
5 March 2014

Question: #7
What kind of men have “caught and sang the sun in flight”?

Answer:
In “Dylan Thomas’s” poem, Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night, in line ten “Thomas” speaks of those who “caught and sang the sun in flight”. He calls them the wild men, these men are those who do not give into death easily.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at March 7, 2014 12:16 AM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 March 2014

QUESTION:
# 10. Explain why “wild” men grieve.

ANSWER:
In Thomas’ poem, stanza 4, lines 10-12, he writes; “Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, and learn too late, they grieved it on its way, do no go gentle into that good night” (Thomas). This stanza interprets as, wild men grieving because they wasted their time and lives wondering about the day in their minds and worrying senseless about the passing of time- “who caught and sang the sun in flight” (Thomas), only to realize that the days have passed them by completely wasted, without them getting a chance to enjoy it; “and learn too late, they grieved it on it way” (Thomas).

Posted by: Diana Berthil at March 7, 2014 01:41 AM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
7 March 2014

QUESTION:
Find an example of a simile in the poem. Explain the comparison that is being made.

ANSWER:
The simile made in the poem is, “blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay” (Thomas, 14). He is saying that even though a person is about to die, the fight shouldn’t stop. One shouldn’t just let death take him. Blind eyes (dying people) can still fight against death and be happy.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at March 7, 2014 10:25 AM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
5 March 2014

Question 13:
Describe the speaker’s attitude towards the death in the poem. Cite details from the poem in your description.

Answer:
Dylan Thomas wrote the poem “Do Not Go Gentle into the Good Night” for his dying father. The attitude that I am sensing from this piece is that he does not want people to simply give up although some think it’s necessary to accept the fact that they’re dying. The attitude is even present in the title, he does not want his father to give in and just die, he wants his father to fight and stay with him as long as he can. “Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright. Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light. In this little piece of the poem, I got the sense that he believes his father is a good man, but he wants to remind him that a good man would do what he can to stay with his family and children and that he needs to “rage” and fight against him going to heaven.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at March 7, 2014 11:34 AM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
7 March 2014

QUESTION #9:
Explain Why “good” men are reluctant to die.

ANSWER:
Good men are reluctant to die because they didn’t have enough time to make an impact on the world with their good deeds. If they could only have more time, “Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,” (Line 8) In other words, the good deeds might not be so frail if they had more time to make a real impact upon the world. So they don’t feel ready yet to make the transition so that they can have more time and so they too, “Rage, rage against the dying of the light” (9).

Posted by: Mariana Convery at March 7, 2014 11:54 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
7 March 2014

Question:
Do the lines “Do not go gentle into that good night” and “Rage, rage against the dying of the light” suggest different moods? Explain your answer.

Answer:
In “Do not go gentle into that good night” by Dylan Thomas, the repeated lines of “Do not go gentle into that good night” and “Rage, rage against the dying of the light” can suggest different moods based upon how they are read. The first line when read softly can sound like the narrator is pleading with the listener (not the reader). If this line is read loudly and forcefully, as it was in the video we watched in class, then it could sound like the narrator is on the verge of distraught tears or is angry about the listener being on his deathbed (since it is stated later that the poem is directed at a father). The second line always sounds angry to me with the repetition of the word “rage.” There is also a sad undertone to that line with the imagery of light dying, while the first line seems a bit happier or at least more hopeful with the use of the words “gentle” and “good night.” I could also be said that these two lines are meant to be like a pep-talk where they need to sound harsh to get the point across that the narrator does not want to lose his or her father to the “good night/dying light.”

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 7, 2014 12:17 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
7th March 2014

Question 6:
What does the speaker want to hear?

Answer:
In the poem, the speaker is talking to his father. His father is unfortunately dying, and he is telling his father that he should not go down without a fight. He tells his father that all great men die with a fight, so he should do the same. He is telling his father not to go to the light, which all wise, good, wild, and grave men die with a fight. What the speaker wants to hear from his father is that he is not going to die, but if he is going to die and it cannot be avoidable, then he should die with a good fight.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at March 7, 2014 12:22 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
7 March 2014

QUESTION #6: What does the speaker want to hear?

ANSWER: The speaker wants to hear his father to fight against with his death. When the speaker of “Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night” states , “Old age should burn and rave at the close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of that light (Handout, Dylan Thomas)” he is expressing that death should not be something we easily give up, we should fight it. Also, when it says, ““rage, rage against the dying of the light (Handout, Dylan Thomas)” the light can be a metaphor for death and old age.

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at March 7, 2014 12:26 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
7 March 2014

Question: Whom is the speaker of the poem addressing?

Answer: The speaker of the poem is addressing his dying father. In the last stanza of the poem he says, "And you, my father," clearly starting that he is speaking to his father (Thomas).

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at March 7, 2014 12:39 PM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
3 March 2014

Question #5 - Whom is the speaker of the peom addressing?

The speaker of the poem is addressing his dying father. Asking him to not simply die with out a fight. To not welcome death but to stave it of as long as possible.At the same time I believe that the poem could not be argument to fight against death wholly but to fight death in the pursuit of living a life worth living. That one show not embrace death if they have not yet lived.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at March 7, 2014 12:53 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
7 March 2014

Question: 13
Describe the speaker’s attitude towards death in the poem. Cite details from the poem in your description.
Answer:
The speaker’s attitude in the poem “Do not go Gentle into that good Night” shows a strong desire to fight death until the very end and not give up in the last minutes of life. The vocabulary used by the speaker emphasizes a battle that should be fought against death, instead of surrendering peacefully. Examples of the words that show this is in the poem are “rage against the dying of the light” and “Do not go gentle into that good night”. Other words used throughout the poem that shows this plea for resistance to death are: burn, rave, blaze, and fierce. The speaker views death as something that is not to be welcomed, but fought against even though it is inevitable. This effort to fight death even though it is hopeless is seen in the second verse when it says “Though wise men at their end know dark is right, Because their words had forked their lightning they Do not go gentle into that good night.” In the final verse, it becomes clear that the speaker is telling his father to not give up his battle against death when he says “bless me now with your fierce tears, I pray”.

Posted by: Henry Adu at March 7, 2014 12:58 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3/17/14


Question #1:
Whose eyes could "blaze like meteors" even though they are near death?

Answer:
The author is speaking to his father here in this quote. "And you, my father, there on the sad height" (Thomas 16). He wants his father to go out with a fight against death, even though they are so close to death. His father is strong and the author admires this quality in him, that in the face of death he is still strong and attempting to fight back.

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at March 7, 2014 12:58 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. B. L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
7 March 2014

Question #11: Explain what “wise” men realize before they die.
Answer:
“Though wise men at their end know dark is right/ Because their words had forked no lightning they/ Do not go gentle into that good night” (Thomas). Most people in their old age know when their time has come. Perhaps once someone gets to that point their life, they just know when its their time to go. They, however, “do not go gentle,” meaning without a fight which is what the last line of the stanza insinuates. Even good and grave men “rage against the dying of the light,” (Thomas). Though the end is near, one should not give in so easily.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at March 7, 2014 12:58 PM

Brittany C. Davis
03/07/2014
ENG220
Poem
Q: Which of the following is not used to refer to death in the poem?
After reading this poem, “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night,” by Dylan Thomas, it was brought to my attention that this poem is being said to his father about passing away. The entire poem refers to his father passing, and almost every sentence speaks on death, or uses death as a metaphor. The one phrase that did not strike me as death, was “forked lightning.” The reason I think this is due to how it is used in the poem. “Because their words had forked no lightning…” (Dylan Thomas), what this says to me is, because they have cause no noise, or stir, they do not pass [away]. Lightning is used in this concept as a way of bring light into darkness, and since the poem is about passing away into “night” or “darkness” lightning does the very opposite, a therefore does mean death.

Posted by: Brittany Davis at March 7, 2014 01:11 PM

Marssiel Mena

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02

7 March 2014​

Question#20: Find an example of oxymoron in the poem, and explain the oxymoron.

Answer:
In the poem I found the oxymoron "Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight," this is an oxymoron because blind and sight together are contradicting (Thomas). This oxymoron means that they can see but blindly because they do not know what is to come they only know what they can see now.

Posted by: marssiel mena at March 7, 2014 01:12 PM

Jack Constant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journey into Narrative CA01
7 March 2014

Question: Find an example of personification in the poem.

Answer: When the author says rage, rage against the dying of the light, the light could take humor form or have human traits. Another could be when he says the men sang the sun in flight. The deeds might have danced in a green bay.

Posted by: jonathan constant at March 7, 2014 01:19 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey of Transformation in a Narrative
March 7, 2014


Question #7: What kind of men have "caught and sang the sun in flight"?
Answer:
The poem itself is about death (that good night), and not letting death take you easily or basically clinging on to life (rage, rage against the dying of the light). In the poem, the line that states men who have "caught and sang the sun flight" is used to describe the kind of people who captured the world in imagination. The sun represents beauty and flight represents a person lifespan. So basically all together it means people who have celebrated their life from birth to death and have captured the beauty in the world during their lifespan.

Posted by: Jose Parra at March 7, 2014 01:26 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Narrative to Journeys
7 March 2014
Question #4: Which of the following is not used to refer to death in the poem?
Answer:
In “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” by Dylan Thomas, there are a lot of references to death. There is one reference that does not refer to death in the beginning of the poem. “Do not go gentle into that good night” refers to the night in which the old man must consider sleep. This statement in the poem does not refer to death because it is simply referring to the how gentle and good the night can be for an old man. In the poem it is the only phrase used with positive words such as gentle and good. The old man needs to consider the end of the day and the beginning of darkness to be able to feel the presence of the night. The night is good because it is the period in which the old man has been waiting all day to experience. The night is another part of time the old man must wait to go through but it is considered a good part of the time.
Unlike, the forked lightning which means the day feels like a lie to the old man the good night is pleasing and he feels okay to pass through the night. Forked lightning words are lies and he describes the night to have no forked lightning words. This means the night is not a lie and is good. The night is considered right to the wise men. “Though wise men at their end know dark is right, because their words had forked no lightning they do not go gentle into that good night.”
The phrase “dying of the light” refers to the angry feeling the old man has about the day ending. This means the light dies and the darkness begins. It is referring to death while the “good night” is the part of the night that is already dark and not referring to death. It is the beginning of a new time period that the old man must undergo. “Do not go gentle into that good night, old age should burn and rave at close of day; rage, rage against the dying of the light.”
When Thomas uses the phrase “close of day” he is referring to the time after daylight when the evening begins and the night becomes dark. “Old age should burn and rave at close of day,” this statement is meant to express the old man’s feelings about his old age after the ending of another day. His old age is burning and he feels as if the day has driven him crazy into another night. The “close of day” refers to death because the old man feels as if his life is coming to an end after another day. The “good night” is the time in which he will consider fighting for his life through another night. It is good because it may not be as hard for him to pass the time as it would be for him during the day time. “Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, and learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, do not go gentle into that good night.”

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at March 7, 2014 01:27 PM

Alexander Hoschak
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
07 March 2014

Question:
Explain why wild men grieve.

Answer:
In the poem is says that wild men grieve because they realized too late that they will be dying.

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak at March 7, 2014 01:56 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
6 March 2014

Question #6
What does the speaker want to hear?

ANSWER:
On the poem "Do not go gentle into that good night" written by Dylan Thomas, is about the speaker talking to an unknown person, which is only recognized at the end of the poem by being the speaker's father.

When the speaker says "do not go gentle into that good night" that means that people should not accept death as something certain. Even though it is impossible not to die, the speaker embraces the fact that people should fight with all forces to try avoiding death, which is many times stated by him as "night" meaning darkness or "dying of the light".

At the end of the poem it is able to see that the speaker is not worried about what his dying father will tell him. Either if he is going to bless him or curse him. His only concern is making sure that his father dies by fighting it with all his powers (even if they are limited).

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at March 7, 2014 02:09 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 9, 2014 07:37 PM

Google
My Blog

Creative Commons License
This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Some rights reserved. 2006.