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January 07, 2014

Calls & Responses to _The Epic of Son-Jara/Sundiata/Sun-Jata_


CAPTION: "African King" by Raymond Gray
Image Source: http://www.prisonerlife.com/prisonart/Gray/African%20King%20-%20Gray.jpg

Students,

. . .

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 7, 2014 08:31 PM

Readers' Comments:

12 November 2008

As provided by Group One's thorough presentation of the Epic of Son-Jara here are the quiz AND group discussion questions, all of which are fair game for the final exam. As part of your class participation grade, enter the answer to your group's discussion question in the comment box below as directed in the class meeting.

Son-Jara Discussion Questions

 

1.      It was mentioned in the initial presentation that good leadership is proclaimed in Son-Jara. Give as many examples as you can from the text that clearly show or imply qualities of a good leader, or leadership characteristic.

2.      Find in the text as many examples as you can that may link the Epic of Son-Jara to fairy tales. Discuss in what way such links may be important.

3.      Define the role and significance of the griot in West African culture. What is a griot? What does the griot do? How is the performance of a griot different than reading the epic?

4.       After reading the Epic of Son-Jara and hearing the initial presentation, what theme or main idea is most enlightening to you? What is one thing that you will remember about the work? Give at least one example from the text that supports your opinion.

5.      Discuss how going into exile and moving from place to place is significant for Son-Jara. Does he get enlightened in any way during the course of his exile? Give examples from the text.

6.      How is African spiritualism expressed in the epic? Give examples from the text that outline or imply cultural traits.

7.      How does Son-Jara fit within Campbell’s monomyth guide? Give examples from the epic and define to what stage of the monomyth they correspond.

8.      A central problem in the epic is the conflict between Son-Jara and his half brother Dankaran Tuman. What episodes or symbols can you find in the text that mimic or imply this conflict?

9.      How is oral tradition important and in the same time problematic in relationship to the Epic of Son-Jara? Support your answer with examples from the text.

10.   As we discussed in the initial presentation, Son-Jara was “the best of both worlds.” What does that mean and what evidence can you provide from the text to support your answer?

 

Reading Check Quiz Questions for The Epic of Son-Jara

 

1.      Where did Son-Jara rule?

2.      Magan Jata Konde's sister becomes a ______, and every night murders one man from the seven quarters in Du to vindicate herself.

a)wild boar  b)wild buffalo  c)lioness  d)snake

 

3.      The wild buffalo can be slain provided that the brothers sacrifice seven portions of goat and offer ________ to an old woman west of Du.

a)gold  b)nuts  c)lambskin  d)rice

 

4.      With what animal is Son-Jara associated?

5.      True/False: Saman Berete is the first wife of Fata Magan the Handsome

6.      The "Prologue in Paradise," which opens the epic, refers to which important biblical figure?

a)Jesus  b)Muhammad  c)Aunt Jemima d)Adam

 

7.      Why did Fata Magan marry the ugly Buffalo Woman?

8.      True/False: Sugulun Kòndè and Son-Jara’s mother, the Buffalo Woman are rivals

9.      The emergence of literacy and education in Mali corresponded to the spread of ________ in West Africa.

a)feminism  b)Buddhism   c)Islam  d)colonialism  

 

10.   Who is Fata Magan the handsome?

11.   Son-Jara is also known as____.  
a)Siddhartha  b)Sundiata  c)Sumerian  d)Senegal

12.   When The-Leader-of-the-People's son is born, his aunt protests at being excluded from the naming ceremony, and as a result ____.

a)her children lose their wealth and inheritance and become common slaves
b)
she is executed for disrespecting the clan leader
c)
she makes peace with her brother, and receives the highest honor in the ceremony
d)
her breasts are removed with a knife


13.   The Epic of Son-Jara is the national epic of the Manding people who were part of the pre-colonial empire of ________ at the time the epic was written.

a)
Great Britain b)Nigeria  c)Mali  d)Cameroon

14.   The "Prologue in Paradise," which opens the epic, refers to which important biblical figure?

a)Jesus  b)Muhammad  c)Aunt Jemima d)Adam

15.   Why was Son-Jara nicknamed the Lion-Born-of-the-Cat upon his birth?

 

16.   To which figure from the Koran, as well as the Jewish and Christian Bibles, is Son-Jara assimilated in some versions of the invocation of the epic?

a)Adam  b)Noah  c)Abraham  d)Abel  e)Joseph f)George W.

 

17.   What is it about Son-Jara that causes his mother so much grief?

a)He refuses to collect a baobab leaf for her couscous sauce.  
b)He doesn't walk for nine years.
c)His sacrificial ram is defeated by his brothers.  
d)His actions alienate her jinn.  
e)He refuses to make his hajj.

 

18.   What animal points to which of the six young maidens is to be taken by the Tarawere brothers?

 

19.   Why does Fata Magan offer the Tarawere brothers a token inherited from his ancestor Bilal and his sister Nakana Tiliba?

a)to obtain Sugulun from them  
b)to thank them for slaying the buffalo  
c)to demonstrate his hospitality  
d)to pacify his wife, who is envious of his sister's beauty
e)
to emphasize his wealth

 

20.   Son-Jara competes with ____ for succession to the throne.

a)
his father  b)his brother  c)first cousins 
d)illegitimate children from his father's other wives

 

21.   What foreign presence is closely associated with the rise of the ancient empire of Mali?

a)the Christian crusades b)the spread of Islam   c)the European slave trade  
d)Greek colonial rule   e)Roman imperial rule

 

22.   Magan Jata Kòndè of Du drags off his sister Du Kamisa and slashes off her breasts to emphasize her bareness. In response, she rips off the lid to her calabash and displays the contents, and then transforms into what creature?

a)a great snake  b)a mosquito  c)a red bull d)a wild buffalo e)a dangerous monkey

 

23.   According to the prologue, the main difference between men and women can be summed up as ____.

a)truth versus pretty words  b)hunting versus gathering 
c)combat versus domestication  d) submission versus dominance

 

24.   What is a griot?

25.   What is it about Son-Jara that causes his mother so much grief?

a)He refuses to collect a baobab leaf for her couscous sauce.  
b)He doesn't walk for nine years.
c)His sacrificial ram is defeated by his brothers.  
d)His actions alienate her jinn.   e)He refuses to make his hajj.

26.   True/False: Son-Jara demonstrated his physical power shortly after his birth

 

27.   How was Sugulun Kòndè, the mother of Son-Jara , also known as in the epic?

28.   In order to stunt Son-Jara's development and prevent him from walking, ____.

a)a toothless dog is sacrificed 
b)a black and white ram are set to battle each other, and the white ram is defeated 
c)a genie is conjured from a nutshell to curse the infant 
d)the infant is fed soup made of the baobab leaf

29.   True/False: According to the story, the Tarawere brothers were to take the maiden between whose legs a black cat will passes several times.

 

30.   True/False: Jeli, bard, and griot describe the same thing.

31.   Magan Jata Kòndè of Du drags off his sister Du Kamisa and slashes off her breasts to emphasize her bareness. In response, she rips off the lid to her calabash and displays the contents, and then transforms into what creature?

32.   Son-Jara competes with ____ for succession to the throne.

a)
his father  b)his brother  c)first cousins 
d)illegitimate children from his father's other wives

33.   True/False: The "Prologue in Paradise," which opens the epic, refers to Muhammad.

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*FROM*: 9 November 2008

ENG 225 Students:

As you know, listed on our itinerary is our next common text is The Epic of Son-Jara (see the TOC in Volume C for the page numbers). Although a student group will be presenting on this topic over the next two class meetings, you are still expected to read the text and be prepared for discussion and reading-checks. As usual, you are always expected to enter your typed responses to the discussion questions on the English-Blog--our commonplace online journal for reading responses--and on www.turnitin.com (if specifically directed by me) whether it counts as a quiz score or as a part of your class participation score (again, refer to our syllabus).

Each group will be giving their own quizzes but I reserve the right to give my own (even to the presenters) if I suspect that more incentive is needed to get you to do your homework assignments, i.e. your readings.

The Epic of Son-Jara is very different from anything we have read thus far for this course and some of you may find it more difficult than Shakespeare. With that in mind, please examine the following outline of the introduction and text of the entire epic as provided online by West Texas A&M University's Dr. Doug Werden in his course, "ENGL 2371: Masterpieces of the World" HERE. Below the outline, find a character analysis for each character in the epic and some questions that I would consider to be fair game for the final exam (in addition to whatever discussion questions and quiz questions the group comes up with).

An interesting film of a performance of the epic's first six minutes can be found HERE: .">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQP4gM5Na54. (YouTube would not let me embed this particular video on the page--sorry.) Here, the epic's title goes by the name of "Sundiata," and alternate rendition of the name "Son-Jara."

Here's a short two-minute video synopsis of Sundiata (an alternate spelling/pronunciation of Son-Jara), the Lion King of Mali as presented by a second-grade teacher to her second-grade class. So, for those of you in college who think this is difficult . . . (NOTE: Crank the volume for this one)

Here's yet another summary of Sundiata reduced to a stick-figure minimalist rendition:

I. Introduction

1. History:

* First king/hero of the Mande people, West Africa (akin to David or Abraham in the Israelite history)
* founded Manding empire around 1235
* An important historical figure: No written records from the period.
* Earliest reference: 15th century account of an Arab historian.

2. Epic: A National narrative

* long narrative poem in elevated style
* characters of high position
* Central heroic figure of national regard
* a collection of stories to create a national hero and national identities.
* Vast setting. (international).
* deeds of valor
* poet is "objective"

3. An epic of the Manding Peoples

* Celebration of person and exploits of Son-Jara
* Factual Recollection of the beginning of the Manding people
* Source of societal values
* Even today, bards still honor Son-Jara for his heroic deeds and for his wisdom in governing.

4. Oral Tradition

* griot (French) : Mande bards storytellers and historians.
* Incorporates three genre
o Narrative framework. Establish tradition of Son-Jara's life.
o Praise poetry
o Songs.
o Call and response

5. Theme

1449-50
1582-8

II. Characters

a) Son-Jara (or Sundiata or Sun-jata): The hero of the epic.
Also called Magan Konate, king or lord of the Konate tribe.

b) Fata Magan the Handsome: father of Son-Jara, settles Kamalen (the center of the future Manding Kingdom created by Son-Jara).

c) Ishmael: Father of the Arabic peoples.

d) Bilal:

* Said to be a companion of Mohammed.
* Said to be Mohammed's second convert.
* Father of the Manding People.
* Son-Jara is a descendant of Bilal.

e) Sugulun Konde (called "the Konde woman" and Sugulun-of-the-Warts): the ugly maid, mother of Son-Jara.

f) Saman Berete ("the Berete woman"): gives birth to Dankaran Tuman just before Sugulun Konde births Son-Jara. However, announces the birth to the father AFTER Son-Jara's birth is announced.

g) Dankaran Tuman: Older than Son-Jara. Cheated out of the family birthright.

III. Summary: The origin and rise to power of the national hero Son-Jara.

Episode 1

* Invocation states the purpose of the poem: Sing the praises of "Adam Ben Adam". For the Mande people, this was Son-Jara.
* Account of creation using Genesis. (Remember, this came from Islamic influences.)
* Origins of Manding Peoples are tied to Genesis.

Episode 2

* Introduction to Fata Magan, Son-Jara's father. A descendant of Bilal.

Episode 3

* Origins of Son-Jara's mother

Episode 4

* Son-Jara's father marries his mother: Fata Magan marries Sugulun Kòndè.
* Son-Jara born with a hairy body. Named "lion thief" or "Lion-Born-of-the-Cat".
* Although not the firstborn, his mother is first to deliver the news to his father. Son-Jara is declared the firstborn and heir.
* Berete (mother of rightful heir) Tries to Get Power for Her Son:
- Son-Jara crawls for his first nine years because his is cursed by holy man of Berete.
- Two rams battle. Black one representing Son-Jara and white one representing Dankaran Tuman. Black one wins. Rams killed to hide the omen.
- Holy man says that a Toothless dog must be sacrificed so "Son-Jara should not rise" (1216).
* Son-Jara's dog rips Danakran Tuman's dog to pieces.
* Sugulun Konde threatens Son-Jara with death

Episode 5

* Son-Jara and his family are exiled.
* Not accepted anywhere.
* Finally, Son-Jara joins the 9 Queens of Darkness
* Son-Jara's half brother (Dankaran Tuman) loses the kingdom.
* Son-Jara's mother dies.

Episode 6

* Son-Jara comes out of exile.
* Son-Jara recaptures his father's kingdom.
* Son-Jara is repulsed three times and founds three cities.
* Son-Jara's sisters learns of the secret sacrifices.

Episode 7

* Son-Jara establishes his rule.
* Son-Jara begins to expand his empire.

SOURCE: http://homedirs.wtamu.edu/~dwerden/ENGL2371/Son-JaraSum&Chara.html

Want a run-down of each character from The Epic of Son-Jara? Have a look at this one provided by Dr. John Rothfork of Northern Arizona University's "English 203: Literature of the NonWestern World" course HERE:

Bilal: An Etheopian slave who lived in Mecca at the time of Mohammad. He became a friend and companion of the Prophet Mohammed & consequently the patriarch of African Muslims. Son-Jara’s father (and therefore Son-Jara as well) is a descendent of Bilal, suggesting both his authority & perhaps a sense of magic or power.

Dankaran Tuman: Son-Jara’s half brother; the son of Fata Magan and Saman Barete. Dankaran Tuman is actually born before Son-Jara (on the same day), but a mix up in announcements causes him to be declared the younger son. He becomes Son-Jara’s chief rival for control of the Manden, and he participates in Son-Jara’s exile.

Dan Mansa Wulanba & Dan Mansa Wulandin: Two brothers from the Manden who, with the help of a magic weapon, kill Du Kamisa, who has transformed herself into a buffalo to terrorize the people of her ungrateful Nephew, Magan Jata Kòndè of Du.

Du Kamisa: The Aunt of Magan Jata Kòndè who transforms herself into a buffalo after her nephew cuts off her breasts and banishes her from his kingdom.

Doka the Cat: Son-Jara’s bard. Sumamuru wants Doka the Cat as his own bard, but Doka protests that he can only serve one master, Son-Jara. So Sumamuru commits a grave insult to Son-Jara by injuring Doka so that he cannot leave.

Fa-Koli: The nephew of Sumamuru who defects to Son-Jara when his uncle, who has a hundred wives already, steals his only wife.

Fata Magan the Handsome: Son Jara’s father and the first King of the Manden.

Jeli: The Manding name for a bard, or storyteller. The French word, griot, is also used to describe the same thing.

Kala Jula Sangoyi: The first jeli, or griot, to tell the story of Son-Jara.

Magan Jata Kòndè: The ruler of the Twelve Towns. He mistreats his aunt, Du Kamisa, who turns into a buffalo. When his realm is rescued by the bravery of the Dan Mansa brothers, he gives them Sugulun Kòndè to take with them to the Manden.

The Manden: The central kingdom of the epic. Land that Son Jara rules and builds into the capital of the Mali Empire.

Mèma: The land where Son-Jara lives in exile from the Manden. In several particulars, Mèma resembles Medina, where the prophet Mohammed lived in exile while he prepard to overtake Mecca.

Nakana Tiliba: The principal Queen of Darkness.

Saman Berete: The first wife of Fata Magan the Handsome; mother of Dankaran Tuman. Saman Berete is responsible for the curse the prevents Son-Jara from walking for nine years and for his subsequent exile to Mèma.

Son-Jara Keita: The Epic Hero, son of Fata Magan the Handsome and Sugulun Kòndè; the builder and first great king of the Mali Empire. Also called Nare Magen Kònate.

Sugulun Kòndè: Son-Jara’s mother. She is brought to the Manden by Dan Mansa Wulanba and Dan Mansa Wulandin after they kill the Buffalo that has been menacing the Twelve Towns.

Sugulun Kulunkan: Son-Jara’s sister. Sugulun Kulunkan spies on Sumamuru by pretending to come to him as one of his wives.

Sumamuru: The Blacksmith King. Sumamuru is an evil sorcerer-king who conquers the Manden from Dankaran Tuman while Son-Jara is in exile in Mèma. Sumamuru, rather than Dankaran Tuman, becomes Son-Jara’s principal enemy in the latter part of the narrative. In order to gain control of the Manden, Son-Jara must raise an army and lead an assault on the Blacksmith King who has usurped the land. Also called Susu Mountain Sumamuru.

The 9 Queens of Darkness: Surogate mothers to Son-Jara. Possessing 9 times the power of one mother, they teach him the magic that allows Son-Jara to master his world. "They have slain the 99 Master-of-Shadow" (1918). I wonder if they look somethng like the beautiful mask below?

SOURCE: http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~jgr6/203/unit10/jara_characters.html

Here are some decent study questions on The Epic of Son-Jara as provided online by Dr. David Siar of Winston-Salem State University's "English 2301 World Literature I" course HERE. Should the group assigned to present this work to the class NOT show up or NOT give a worthy performance, I may draw from these for an in-class reading-check/quiz. See his other links for useful study-aids.

1) Name at least one genre for which this text can qualify.

2) Identify the following:

Magan Jata Konde of Du

Bemba

The Tarawere Brothers

Nare Magan Konate

Fata Magan the Handsome

Du Kamisa

Fa-Digi Sisoko Saman Berete

Sugulun Konde

Sumamuru

Jinn

Griot

Doka the Cat

Dan Karan Tuman

3) Why does Du Kamisa turn herself into a buffalo?

4) What is the function of the Tarawere brothers in the narrative?

5) What problem arises in the Fata Magan household after the birth of Son Jara?

6) Why does the Berete woman want to be rid of Son Jara?

7) How does Son Jara become crippled? How does he become "uncrippled"?

8) After Son Jara has been exiled, who helps him?

9) Who challenges Son Jara's half-brother for the crown?

10) Which of Son Jara's family members helps him to win the war against Sumamuru? How does she help?

11) Why does Sumamuru's nephew defect to Son Jara's side?

12) According to your editor, what is ideological about this text?

13) Which of the following are true of the people of the Manden?

They value the role of the griot.

They sacrifice animals.

They observe the laws of primogeniture.

They are Muslims.

They are polygamous.

They are a patriarchal culture.

They believe that their ancestral history should be preserved.

They believe in divination.

SOURCE: http://www.davidsiar.org/WorldLit/SonJara.html

W. W. Norton and Co., the publishers of our textbooks, has their own introduction to The Epic of Son-Jara with the points they consider important highlighted in blue, along with sample quizzes at their website HERE: http://www.wwnorton.com/college/english/nawol/s13_overview.htm#text

Also, see Dr. Rebecca A. Wall's study guide for The Epic of Son-Jara from her own "ENGL2301: World Literature I" course from Winston-Salem State University HERE: ">http://myweb.wssu.edu/wallr/ENG2301/eng2301sonjara.htm

See you in class,

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at November 13, 2008 02:51 PM

Kamille G
3. Define the role and significance of the griot in West African culture. What is a griot? What does the griot do? How is the performance of the griot different than reading the epic?
The roles of the griots are to act as storytellers and historians that retell the history of the West African culture through songs, music and dance. They basically allow the present day people to become knowledgeable of past events and people, like Son-Jara, who were an important part of the history of the African culture. A griot is a French word which stands for Mande bards storytellers and historians. The performance of the griot differs from reading the epic in many ways, in that it involves the listener in the retelling of the story, through the call and response technique it utilizes. This allows the listeners and storytellers to interact with one another, unlike when reading the epic. In addition, the performance of the griot involves the use of music through the use of the instruments such as “balophones” (line 1786, pg.2444), and dance which does not occur when reading the epic.

Kamille G
English 225 Sec.1
13/10/08

-------------------------

Nicole T.

3. Find in the text as many examples as you can that may link The Epic of Son-Jara to fairy tales?

There are many places in the text that point out types of fairy tales that portray Son-Jara or the other characters in the epic. “Simbon, Lion-Born-of-Cat” (line 32, page 2416). This line establishes a connection between Son-Jara being a lion and can be seen in the Lion King. This is a classical movie that everyone knows and both tales are similar.

Another example was “The little of lady transformed herself and became a wild buffalo” (line 448-449, page 2421). The idea of the lady transforming into some sort of animal is similar to many fairy tales such as Cinderella, and Sleeping Beauty. The witch in sleeping beauty turns into a dragon and the prince turns into a frog in the other fairy tales.

Overall there seems to be the same theme in this story as well as many fairy tales. There is always someone (such as Cinderella) that starts off with nothing and ends up having everything. In this case Son-Jara was born poor and disabled and grew up to be very powerful and rule an empire. Most fairy tales end with a very happy ending of characters having nothing and in the end having everything. This theme could be described as going from ‘Rags to Riches”.

Therefore, if you look very closely there will always be some sort of fairy tale in all literature stories. It may not be so obvious at first but the deeper you read into the stories the more connections will be made.

Posted by: Kamille G at November 13, 2008 06:45 PM

Shayne Tavares
Eng 225 12:30-1:20
11/12/08


7. How does Son-Jara fit within Campbell’s monomyth guide ? Give examples from the epic and define to what stage of the monomyth they correspond.

Answer:
Son-Jara fits within Campbell’s monomyth guide by going through the stages of him taking the steps to claim his destiny as king. In the 1st stage, prior to Son-Jara’s birth he is called to be king. Refusal of the call would be when Fata Magan’s first wife denies Son- Jara of what fate proclaims. Supernatural aid comes from Sugulun Konde who happens to be Son-Jara’s mother. Crossing the threshold would be the removal of both Sugulun and Son- Jara from the village where he was born. Entering into a new village of unknown customs is considered to be the “Belly of the Whale”.
Within the 2nd stage, road of trials could be the initial introduction of Son-Jara into the new village to prove his worthiness. The young maiden of the village which happens to be the king’s daughter falls in love with Son-Jara. The atonement part of the journey occurs with the death of his mother Sugulun Konde. The ultimate boon is Son-Jara coming from exile to reclaim the throne of his father. In the 3rd stage of the monomyth, Son-Jara returns from many years in exile and now is able to regain throne as king. He is able to establish his rule as well as expand his empire.

Posted by: S.Tavares at November 13, 2008 10:37 PM

Alex Slavin

English 225

Dr. Hobbs

Question Response

4. After reading the Epic of Son-Jara and hearing the initial presentation, what theme or main idea is most enlightening to you? What is one thing that you will remember about the work?

- The theme or main idea that most enlightened me was the rise of Mali and how the rise of Mali was the foundation for the spread of Islam into West Africa. It is said that, "The Republic of Mali. Maninka realm: That's the meaning of Mali" (line 20, p. 2415). Mali was the foundation for what West Africa believes in today. One thing that I will remember is because the establishment of Mali, it created a very powerful empire is Africa and it brought together a variety of different ethnic groups and almost became as one.

Posted by: Alex Slavin at November 13, 2008 11:21 PM

Define the role and significance of the griot in West African culture. What is a griot? What does the griot do? How is the performance of a griot different than reading the epic?

The Griot is the storyteller and the instructor. The griot performance is diffcult from the reading because it is a live performance with singing and dancing which involves the lister.The griot is also more like an historian.

Posted by: John Daniel at November 14, 2008 10:04 AM

Paola S
ENG 225
1.It was mentioned in the initial presentation that good leadership is proclaimed in Son-Jara. Give as many examples as you can from the text that clearly show or imply qualities of a good leader, or leadership characteristic.
A// He was called Biribira which defines him as a strong warrior and as an obstacle to his adversaries. He was also called Kirikisa which demonstrated his leadership to others and that he cared for his people. Spear-of-Access was another name given to him which states that a leader must show physical strength; therefore Son-Jara was viewed as a physically strong leader. Spear-of-Service was another name given to Son-Jara which has to do with him serving others and being a strong adversary.

Posted by: Paola S at November 14, 2008 11:17 AM

Jonathan Till
11-13-08
Eng 225

2.) Find as many examples as you can that may link the Epic of Son-Jara to fairy tales. Discuss in what ways such links may be important.

Early on in the Epic, Son-Jara was called, in line 32 “Lion-born-of-the-cat”. This is seen again in Disney’s classic, the Lion King, which is a modern day version of the fairy tale genre. Another example is when the little old lady transformed into a buffalo, which is like the witch turning herself into a dragon in Sleeping Beauty. Finally, Son-Jara’s rise from weakness to strength mirrors the story of King Arthur, who like Son-Jara, was not born to be king yet rose to greatness.

Posted by: Jonathan T. at November 14, 2008 11:25 AM

Quinten Jones
ENG 225 CA01
November 14, 2008

7. How does Son-Jara fit within Campbell’s monomyth guide? Give examples from the epic and define to what stage of the monomyth they correspond.

The call to adventure what when Son-Jara was in the womb; people were saying it was his destiny to be born to the certain parents and that he would be king. The supernatural aid is from the mom because she was something of a sorceress. The crossing of the first threshold was when he and his mom were exiled. The belly of the whale is Son-Jara and his mother searching for a town to live in with no luck. The road of trials was when he had to undergo certain tasks before he would be allowed in a certain city. The meeting of the goddess was when he meets his new wife. Atonement with the father is actually with the mother when she dies. Apotheosis is when he starts getting over the death of his mother. The ultimate boon is when he becomes king. Rescue from without is when a rival kingdom sends wild dogs to attack and they end up fighting it out a little. The freedom to live is after he is successful in his attack and all that’s left is to rule the kingdom.

Posted by: Quinten J at November 14, 2008 11:51 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at November 16, 2008 09:43 AM

Anna Riss
Engl 225.01
11-24-08

4. Son-Jara:
Explain in a paragraph why the Tarawere brothers were told to reject “half of 12 cities”?

Posted by: Anna R at November 24, 2008 03:19 PM

3. Son-Jara- The epic of Son-Jara is the national epic of the Manding people. These so called “Manding people” inhabit what part of the world?

Posted by: alex.slavin at November 25, 2008 01:43 PM

The Epic of Son- Jara- Explain in a paragraph why Son-Jara was a hero? What did he portray that no other hero of his time did?

Posted by: Nichole T. at November 26, 2008 03:17 AM

If Son-Jara did not have to go through his journey to becoming King and previously bestowed those rights, would the story be comprised the same or could other problems arise to interfere with Son-Jara being King.

Posted by: S.Tavares at November 28, 2008 03:52 PM

How is Son-Jara cursed and why is he exiled? Under what circumstances does he return?

Posted by: Joseph S. at November 29, 2008 12:30 PM

Son Jara
In Episode 6 how is Son Jara repulsed three times and what three cities does Son Jara find?

Posted by: Walter P at November 30, 2008 11:40 PM

Son-Jara
Why do Son-Jara and his family keep having to move from place to place?

Posted by: Paola S at December 1, 2008 12:31 AM

Myron Kirchner
ENG-225
Extra credit exam questions

The Epic of Son Jara
Compare and contrast the Epic of Son Jara with Disney’s the Lion King. Why Son jara is called the Lion King of Mali?

Posted by: Myron Kirchner at December 1, 2008 02:58 AM

Son-Jara is similar to other epics except for a few major differences. What is significant about it?

Posted by: Quinten J at December 1, 2008 08:14 AM

3. San Jara - In the story the epic of San-Jara explain what would happen when two hunters went to fight the buffalo.

Posted by: John Daniel at December 1, 2008 10:55 AM

In the epic, describe the character of Son-Jara. Detail some of his relationships including those between him and Dankaran Tuman as well as Dankaran Tuman's mother, thus explore who is considered to be Son-Jara's true enemy, Dankaran Tuman or Dankaran Tuman's mother? Use quotations to detail your answer.

Posted by: Neal Carter at December 1, 2008 12:22 PM

Epic of Son-Jara:
1.) What do you think is the significance for the Malinese people of the Epic?

Posted by: Jonathan T. at December 1, 2008 12:26 PM

Describe the character of Unferth, who is he, what is his role in the epic? In what manner does he relate to Beowulf, why is he angry with Beowulf and how come he is allowed to relate to Beowulf in that manner? Cite how many times does he appear in Beowulf? Use quotations to detail your answer.

Posted by: Neal Carter at December 1, 2008 12:29 PM

Strahil S

Engl 225.01

12-01-08

3. Discuss the significance of Son-Jara as an epic story and as cultural tradition.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Strahil at December 3, 2008 07:50 AM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
9 April 2014

QUESTION:
What are the two things that cutting the buffalo’s tail do for them?

ANSWER:
Cutting the tail of the buffalo had two benefits. The first thing that was beneficial of cutting the buffalo’s tale was that there was gold and silver in its tail hairs. The second reason it was beneficial to cut the buffalo’s tale was having the proof of killing a buffalo and having the proof of it by having the buffalo’s tail in your hands. “Cutting off the buffalo’s tail accomplished two things for them. It was laden with gold and silver in its tail hairs. The second thing was that anybody who would deny that they killed it, since it was a buffalo; they knew that the tail could not be cut from a live one. As soon as they showed the tail, people would know that the business was finished.”(Pushner, 1530).

Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at April 8, 2014 11:28 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
8 April 2014

QUESTION FOR PAGE 1525:
What magical object of Do Kamissas was the cause for Sogolon’s ugly appearance?

ANSWER:
Do Kamissa’s magical object was the far-seeing mask. She stated that she “put the mask on her face before she was old enough to wear it” (Puchner 1525). Do Kamissa said that the far-seeing mask was the cause for Sologon’s cut tear-duct and her bald head, hump on her back, and twisted feet.

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at April 8, 2014 11:48 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 April 2014

QUESTION:
(pg 1526) Why does the Do Kamissa want the Sharifu to marry her sister so desperately?

ANSWER:
Do Kamissa was the cause of her sister being so hideous because of the curse that she placed on her. If her sister never marries, then she blames herself because of how she made her sister ugly and thus not attractive to any suitors.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at April 9, 2014 12:45 AM

In the Epic of Sunjata “Sunjata: A West Africain Epic”, what is the significance of kill the buffalo. What does Abu Kassimu mean when he tells his little brother “I know what dalilu you have”? (1528)

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at April 9, 2014 01:18 AM

Henry Adu
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in narrative CA02
8 April 2014

Question
What did the brothers do to get rid of the sorceress and why did they need to do it in the first place?

Answer:
The two brothers came up with the idea to leave her on the other side of the river waiting for them to come back with a tree so she could cross it when the river flooded. Of course, they never came back for her and she was unable to follow them which was their plan in the first place. “When we see a river in flood, when we get to it, we will leave her there. We will cross the river and go on. If she waits there long enough, she will go back because she would not be able to cross”. (Puchner 677) The reason they did this it’s because she caused a lot of problems for them and made the other women in the nearby village upset at them for not marrying one of the village girls. “We rejected all those beautiful conde women. Eh! The old woman has really caused problem for us. Eh! The old woman!.... “if do not get another wife here, they will say we are too proud, that we look too high”. (Puchner 670)

Posted by: Henry Adu at April 9, 2014 09:17 AM

Henry Adu
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in narrative CA02
8 April 2014

Question
What did the brothers do to get rid of the sorceress and why did they need to do it in the first place?

Answer:
The two brothers came up with the idea to leave her on the other side of the river waiting for them to come back with a tree so she could cross it when the river flooded. Of course, they never came back for her and she was unable to follow them which was their plan in the first place. “When we see a river in flood, when we get to it, we will leave her there. We will cross the river and go on. If she waits there long enough, she will go back because she would not be able to cross”. (Puchner 677) The reason they did this it’s because she caused a lot of problems for them and made the other women in the nearby village upset at them for not marrying one of the village girls. “We rejected all those beautiful conde women. Eh! The old woman has really caused problem for us. Eh! The old woman!.... “if do not get another wife here, they will say we are too proud, that we look too high”. (Puchner 670)

Posted by: Henry Adu at April 9, 2014 09:17 AM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL A Journey in Narrative
9 April 2014

Question: Pg. 1522
Why are the Sharifu children given away to have Koranic lessons?

Answer: Pg. 1522
This is done for their protection as the Shaifu are considered Muslim Elite because it is believed they are descendant from Muhammad.


Puchner, Martin. Sunjata: A West African Epic. Trans. Foster, Benjamin R. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at April 9, 2014 10:16 AM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 April 2014

Sunjata Question (page 1519)

Question:
Although the Epic of Sunjata seems like a very misogynistic text, is there an element of both egalitarianism and perhaps even an esteem held for women with regard to how Mande men view the Mande women?

Answer:
After reading only the first three pages of Sunjata, it is evident that it is a misogynistic text where women and girls are pawned off like cattle or horses as prizes for the male heroes. This becomes most evident when Maghan Konfara tells the hunters before they leave that if they sleigh the buffalo woman that has been tormenting the Conde’ people, that they will be offered a prize. He goes on to describe these prized objects wherein it says, “Maghan Konfara said, ‘You Sharifu,’/He said, ‘The Conde’ foresee that anybody who kills this buffalo,/That they will present three sets of girls to that person./Any one you choose will be your wife” (56-59). Obviously, these women are being objectified and dehumanized as they have absolutely no say in whom or when they should marry. Yet, at a closer reading of the text, it seems that as far as the important knowledge and abilities of dalilu amongst the Mande people - described by the footnote of the text as magic or secret power (Puchner 1518) – there seems to be an equal ability of dalilu, if not more so, amongst the women of the Mande people because it is a woman, Do’ Kamissa, who has used dalilu to transform herself into a buffalo to torment the people and her power cannot be stopped. The two hunters can’t just kill her with brute force, they have to treat her with the utmost respect where they greet her with the honorable title of mother and say, “Greetings mother” (70). In other words, they have to try to win her over in order to sleigh her, and so it is only through the sole decision of the buffalo woman that they can conquer her dalilu.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at April 9, 2014 11:27 AM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9th April 2014

Question:
What is a griot?

Answer:
A griot is someone in West Africa that tells folk tales, it can also be a story or even a song and even a poem. A griot exists so they can pass it on from generation to generation. If not then what they have to say will get lost in history.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at April 9, 2014 12:04 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 April 2014

QUESTION (page 1519): What did the Conde foresee if the buffalo were to be killed?

ANSWER: The Conde said that if anybody who killed the buffalo would be granted with 3 girls, and they can choose one as their wife. “The Conde foresee that anybody who kills this buffalo,/ That they will present three sets of girls to that person. Any one you choose will be your wife./ When you go, you will kill the buffalo./ When they bring the young girls to you,/ You should present me with a wife.” (Conrad, 1519 lines 57-62)

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at April 9, 2014 12:25 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
9 April 2014

QUESTION Page 1519
1. In Sunjata: A West African Epic of the Mande People, what will the Condé offer to Sharifu if he kills the Buffalo Woman? In what ways does the Buffalo Woman resemble the Arab kamalenw’s mother?

ANSWER:
If the Sharifu kills the Buffalo Woman, the Condé will present to him “three set of girls [. . .] any one [he chooses] will be [his] wife” (Puchner 1519). On the other hand, when the Arab kamalenw meet the Buffalo Woman, they call her mother. She resembles her mother because of the way she abuses them. The way she walks (Puchner 1519).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at April 9, 2014 12:34 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
9 April 2014

Question:
What two things did killing the buffalo accomplish for them?

Answer:
The buffalo’s tail was laden with gold and silver in its tail hairs, and the second thing was proving that they killed it. Buffalo's could not have their tail cut from them when alive. As soon as they showed the tail, people would know that it had been killed.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at April 9, 2014 12:44 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 April 2014

Question:
Page 1520: What is the plot significance, if any, of the old woman being the buffalo everyone is afraid of? How does the incident with the termites relate to this? How do the two men know that the old woman is the buffalo before it is explicitly said?

Answer:
On the previous page, the reader learns that the people of surrounding towns are being attacked by a magic buffalo (Puchner 1519). When hunting for this buffalo, Abdu Karimi and Abdu Kassimu come across a cantankerous old woman who swore at them for calling her ‘mother’ (Puchner 1519). The two men wrestle her hoe away from her, dig up termites, and run away which angers the woman further and causing her to give chase. Buffalos, when angered, will charge at the offending creature and will not stop until the opposing creature is punished in some way. Buffalos are also really quick to anger. The old woman has a nasty temper as seen in her determination to chase down the two men who stole her hoe and termites (Puchner 1520). The reader learns on the following page for certain that the old woman is the buffalo everyone is afraid of and what special powers she has, but on page 1520 the two men only think she is the buffalo. It can be argued that the old buffalo woman is extremely vengeful so she may seek punishment upon the two men who angered her. The termites stolen could be a symbol for how the buffalo woman views people who are below her, as a boost for her own ego. And the fact that she uses a hoe to dig them up could mean that she is reaping all the undesirable people of society (killing them). The two men learn that she is the buffalo because she followed them without a regard for wherever she really needed to be just so she could retrieve her hoe and termites.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 9, 2014 01:02 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9th April 2014

Question (1518): Maghan Konfara has everything a mansa wanted except for what?

Answer: Maghan Konfara is the mansa of Manden, which means he is the king of Manden (Puchner, 1518). It is said that he has power, wealth, popularity, and he has dalilu, a magic or secret power. The one thing Maghan Konfara does not have is a child (Puchner, 1518). The mansa craves a child, but has no wife.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at April 9, 2014 01:05 PM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
9 April 2014

Question:
Why was Donsamogo Diarra so cautious about the Arab kamalenw to going into the bush?
Answer:
The Buffalo Woman was hiding in the bush. The Buffalo Woman was known for killing her sisters, causing family to lose their children, caused many men to lose their wives, and she is known for making widows out of many women (Puchner 1521). Donsamogo Diarra did not want their country; Do ni Kiri, to be cursed because a Sharif died on his watch/hand (Puchner 1522).

Posted by: Natalie White at April 9, 2014 01:05 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys of Transformation In Narrative Literature 220CL
9.4.2014
Question for Page #1517
Pg #1517.
On page 1517, what details can you give about Sunjata’s father? Example; what is his name, where does he come from, etc?

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at April 9, 2014 01:06 PM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
9 April 2014

Question:
Why was Donsamogo Diarra so cautious about the Arab kamalenw to going into the bush?

Answer:
The Buffalo Woman was hiding in the bush. The Buffalo Woman was known for killing her sisters, causing family to lose their children, caused many men to lose their wives, and she is known for making widows out of many women (Puchner 1521). Donsamogo Diarra did not want their country; Do ni Kiri, to be cursed because a Sharif died on his watch/hand (Puchner 1522).

Posted by: Natalie White at April 9, 2014 01:06 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 April 2014

QUESTION:
Why is Abdu hesitant to leave the old woman behind?

ANSWER:
Abdu is hesitant to leave the old woman behind, because she may be the buffalo that was prophesied to them by the genie;"Big brother. The thing that the female genie told us. Let us be careful because she said this is the buffalo. The way the old woman looks... If we do not leave her behind, them we can believe that this is the buffalo we were told about" (Puchner), to evaluate whether or not the old woman is the buffalo they decide to walk forward quickly and she if she follows.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at April 9, 2014 01:22 PM

Marssiel Mena
Professor Dr.B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 March 2014
Question: page 1532 What significance does the black cat have in the story?
Answer:
In the story, Ma Do Kamissa told them "a little black cat will go from in front of her and pass behind her... that is the girl I'm talking about" (Puchner 1532). Ma do Kamissa is using the black cat to show him the one was taken and given to them.

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at April 9, 2014 01:23 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys to Narrative
08 April 2014
Question #5: With what animal is Do Kamissa associated?
Answer:
Do Kamissa is being associated with the buffalo that kills people in more than six different cities. The twelve towns of Do, the four towns of Kiri and the six towns across the river. Every hunter who attempted to kill the buffalo died. The buffalo would attack people after listening to a bird that lived near the swamp. The bird would make a noise that sounded like “tume-tume”. The bird would make this noise if it heard anyone near or attempting to enter the swamp. There were other animals that would do evil things with her like the wild cat, the three squirrels and the leopard. These other animals attacked the chickens and cattle. The buffalo attacked people and destroyed many families. The husbands to woman were killed, leaving them to live as widows. The men lost their wives and the children were left alone without anyone leading their family. Do Kamissa attacked the people of Do ni Kiri and put her brother to shame. Ma Sogolon felt his sister destroyed the his people and has been trying to have her killed. When she transformed herself into a buffalo the people of Conde began to suffer.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at April 9, 2014 01:41 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
April 9, 2014

Question from Page 1526:
The Buffalo woman, Do Kamissa, speaks to the hunters and gives them something. What is it and what does she want them to do with it?

Answer:
The hunters speak with Do Kamissa who they say resembles their mother. After an exchange of words, Do Kamissa offers her sister, Sogolon Wulen Conde to the hunters. She explains that her sister is ugly but must be married, if not she will be cursed for it "If she does not get married, it will be my curse. She said I was the cause of all that. If my sister does not get married, I take the blame for it" (p. 1526).

Posted by: Jose Parra at April 9, 2014 01:57 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. B. Hobbs
ENG 220: Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 April 2014

Question: Why was the entry about choosing a wife so important? Also, why is it important to know that it was Sunjata’s mother that was chosen?

Answer:
Everyone in the town found Danmansa Wulanba and Danmansa Wulanni to be heroes. Then, all twenty-two towns gathered after the burial of the buffalo. They were to bring three age sets of girls as options for wives for the two heroes (Puchner 1530). “Everybody was wishing for them to marry their daughter,” (Puchner 1531). It was important that it focused on Sunjata’s mother because he “united them all into one and called the place Manden,” (Puchner 1532). Danmansa Wulanba was originally the one who wanted her yet he insisted his little brother was more knowledgeable and that he should marry her. He claims that “the God who made it possible for you to kill the buffalo, has made me unable to take this woman,” (Puchner 1533).

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at April 9, 2014 02:18 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 April 2014

Question Epic Sunjiata
What were some of the actions of the buffalo and how did it affect men and women?

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at April 9, 2014 02:28 PM

Jesse Robinson
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
9 April 2014

QUESTION:
Look up African praise poems. What are the praise names given to Son-Jara on page 1517, and what do they mean?

ANSWER:
Nare Magan Konate (line 1), Sorcerer-Seizing-Sorcerer (line 2), and Biribiriba (line 13) are praise names attributed to Son-Jara in the poem. Nara Magan Konate refers to the heritage and royalty of Son-Jara (footnote 2). Sorcerer-Seizing-Sorcerer suggests Son-Jara has supernatural powers (footnote 3). Biribiriba intends to make known Son-Jara’s strength (footnote 7).

Posted by: Jesse Robinson at April 9, 2014 02:34 PM

Jack Constant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng.220Cl CA01 Journey Into Narrative
9 April 2014

Pg. 1532 question: How did Sunjata reject the elder brother Danmansa Wulanba? What does this tell you about this character, along with the black cat being around her?

Answer: She rejected him by, "Ejecting two porcupine quills from her chest and they stuck in him" (Puchner, 1532). This tells the reader that she is a sorcerer. The black cat could symbolize a "witch" type characteristic, which can be put into the same category as a sorcerer.

Posted by: jonathan constant at April 9, 2014 02:55 PM

QUESTION:
what is all over the body when Sunjata pushes the door open?

ANSWER:
According to the text there are flies all over the body when he pushed open the door.

Posted by: becca orden at April 10, 2014 02:06 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL CA01
10 April 2014

QUESTION:
what is all over the body when Sunjata pushes the door open?

ANSWER:
According to the text there are flies all over the body when he pushed open the door.

Posted by: becca orden at April 10, 2014 02:07 PM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
10 April 2014

Question: The Childhood of Sunjata page 1540:
Who made Sunjata a person and what did they make Sunjata into?

Answer:
God made Sunjata into a person and he first made him a human fetus. Wherein it says, “God made him into a person, made him into a human fetus and he was born” (Puchner 1540).

Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at April 10, 2014 05:52 PM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
8 February 2014
Question:
What was the third rule regarding the death of the Buffalo? Why was it perceived to be difficult?
Answer:
The third rule regarding the buffalo was that the carcass must not be taken to the town (Putchner 1527). It was perceived to be difficult because according to lines 392-394 “We may not be able to convince your people about that. We have no power to fight them off, to take the carcass from them.”

Posted by: Michael Adamson at April 10, 2014 08:08 PM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
10 February 2014
Question:
Who tried to kill Sunjata? Who really dies?
Answer:
Dankaran Tuman and his mother try to have Sunjata killed. According to lines 1185-1190 “Dankaran Tuman told his mother the bad thing of now off our neck, he is dead.” Instead of killing Sunjata, Dankaran Tuman killed an apprentice hunter.

Posted by: Michael Adamson at April 10, 2014 08:11 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 April 2014

Question:
(Pg. 1544) Step-Brother Rivalry and Nine Sorceresses of Manden. What did Simbon do once he got back into town with the three antelope?

Answer: Simbon brought the antelope to the nine sorceresses, there “they butchered them, They roasted some of it, they boiled some of it. “ (Puchner 1544).
Work Cited:
Puchner, Martin. Sunjanta: A west African Epic Of The Mande Peoples. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at April 10, 2014 09:14 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 April 2014

QUESTION Page 1543
1. In Step-Brother Rivalry and Nine Sorceresses of Manden, what was the reason why Jelimusoni Diawara and the rest of sorceresses wanted to kill Sunjata? What did Sunjata wanted Jelimusoni Diawara to tell them?

ANSWER:
The reason why Jelimusoni Diawara and the rest of sorceresses want to kill Sunjata is because Dankaran Turman, Sunjata’s brother, will give then “the big bull for [his] father’s legacy” (Puchner 1543). In addition, Sunjata wanted Jelimusoni Diawara to tell the sorceresses that in spare of his life, he will give them “three male antelope” (Puchner 1543).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at April 10, 2014 09:56 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 April 2014

QUESTION:
(pg 1537) What is Sogolon Conde’s attitude toward those who mock her appearance?

ANSWER:
When Sogolon’s headscarf falls off, she is revealed to be bald and is teased by people who sing about her, calling her “the heron-head” (Puchner 1537). She reacts by asking them to admit that they are teasing her, and proudly announces that she has arrived.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at April 11, 2014 01:48 AM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 April 2014

Question (Mistaken Murder and the question of exile) page 1545: What were the youth, compelled to stay instead of continuing what they were doing, when Sunjata would sing?


Answer:
The youth " as he sang in a low voice [...], could not continue on their way," they were mezmorized by him and wanted to listen to the stories he was singing (Puncher 1545).

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at April 11, 2014 09:57 AM

Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 April 2014

Question: What stage of the Hero’s journey would apply to the chapter, Step-Brother Rivalry and Nine Sorceresses of Manden in the Epic of Sunjata?

Answer: The chapter, “Step-Brother Rivalry and Nine Sorceresses of Mande” in Sunjata is the crossing of the threshold for the hero, Sunjata. In the previous chapter, he was in the only world that he knew, which was the world of laying on the ground lame, in other words, his ordinary world. When Sunjata saw how they treated his mother by not giving her the baobab leaves, it was his herald to have the courage to walk, which made him aware of supernatural aid in his favor. Once he was able to walk and prove himself as strong and courageous, he was again challenged, this time to cross the threshold to the world of hunting, which is evidenced by one of his threshold guardians, Jelimusoni Diawara (who becomes an ally) where she says, “Hunting in the bush is very important to you,/But if you go we will kill you./You are no match for us (1043-45). This statement by Jelimusoni Diawara alludes to the crossing of the first threshold, and in the following pages, Sunjata defeats the nine guardians by bringing back the three antelopes (Puchner 1543-1544).

Posted by: Mariana Convery at April 11, 2014 10:52 AM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
11 APRIL 2014

Question:
Consider page 1539 in the Epic of Sunjata, following the news of Sogolon’s pregnancy, how did Maghan Konfara’s co-wives react.

Answer:
On page 1539 we learn about Sogolon’s relationship with Maghan Konfara’s. Sogolon says that, “If you were not among the husbands of the world, I would have gone to the other world unmarried” (Puchner 1539), implying that she is married to Maghan Konfara’s. Sologolon came to Maghan Konfara’s as a virgin and was conceived by him. However his co-wives grew jealous and plotted on kill baby Sunjata before his birth, “Make miscarriage medicine, anything that will spoil the belly once it touches it” (Puchner 1539).

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at April 11, 2014 12:07 PM

Jacklyn O'Brien
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL: Journeys in Narrative
11 April 2014


Question Page 1541:
What was the MATERIAL of the second staff that Simbon asked Ma Sogolon Conde to get for him?

Answer:
Simbon requested an Iron Staff, after the ebony staff broke.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at April 11, 2014 12:30 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11th April 2014
Question:
How is African spiritualism expressed in the epic?
Answer:
African spiritualism is expressed in this epic because other than it takes part in Africa it also resembles and has traditions that are native to that land. San jara uses many rituals during the story and it shows spiritualism. This shows spiritualism because he believes in a higher up power to pray, give thanks, and sacrifice something.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at April 11, 2014 12:35 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrtive CA02
11 April 2014

Question page #1541:
Why do the women, specifically Ma Sogolon Wulen Condè, put down Sunjata?

Answer:
He was birthed and God made him a person, they were jealous of him and used sorcery to confine him to the ground. He is called the lame son, and he is curious as to why they are putting him down and he asks his mother this. She simply tells him not to worry.

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at April 11, 2014 12:47 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
11 April 2014

QUESTION (page 1535): In the “New Sorceress Wife for the Mansa of Konfara” section what is the purpose of the task Simbon gave the Mande people?

ANSWER: In this section, Simbon gave the task of bringing the new wife for the Mansa of Konfara. As Simbon said, “The people of Do ni Kiri honored us,/ And the woman they gave us,/ Because of the way you foresaw things,/ And because of your forthrightness,/ And because of the way you help travelers,/ We did not accept any other woman. That is the one we have brought to you (Puchner, 1535 lines 725-731).”

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at April 11, 2014 01:13 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 April 2014

QUESTION:
What happened when Sumaworo would kill?

ANSWER:
Once Sumaworo would kill everyone, he would tell everyone to look among the bodies, to find if the Condé woman's son was among them; "When Sumaworo would kill. He would tell his people to search among the bodies to find out if the Condé woman's son was among them" (Puchner 1553).

Posted by: Diana Berthil at April 11, 2014 01:28 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys of Transformation In Narrative Literature 220CL
11.4.2014
Question for Page #1538
PAGE #1538.
On page 1538, what did Simbon, say, and who did he say it to?
ANSWER.
Simbon tells Sologon “We have received a protective spear.” (Puchner 1538).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at April 11, 2014 01:35 PM

Brittany C. Davis
April 4th 2014
PG. 1538
Question: Who shot breast milk out of her breast, in hopes to splash it on Simbon? What was the significants of this?
Answer:
Sogolon was the one who sprayed breast milk from her breast in hopes to scold Simbon.
“She shot out her scalding breast milk, trying to splash it on Simbon to blister his skin”

Posted by: Brittany Davis at April 11, 2014 01:36 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
April 11, 2014

Question:
In A New Sorceress Wife for the Mansa of Konfara, a certain group of people tried to poison Sogolon, Sunjiata's mother, into having a miscarriage. Who were they and why?

Answer:
In this chapter Sogolon Conde has been presented to her new husband. At first sight the co-wives or Maghan Konfara other wives, resented her due to her appearance. They secretly met under a baobob tree outside of the town where they discussed the idea of poisoning her "They said make miscarriage medicine, anything that will spoil the belly once it touches it. Everyone must make their own. When the belly wanted to expand, they would come and say, Younger sister. They would say this is the medicine for pregnant women here in Manden" (p. 1539).

Posted by: Jose Parra at April 11, 2014 01:38 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys to Narrative
11 April 2014
Question p.1548: What was Sunjata’s first response to the attacks of the seven young men?
Answer:
Sunjata realizes men have planned to attack him when he finds the dead body of a boy. The boy was the son of Dankaran Tuman. Sunjata yells for his mother, “Mother, Mother! Come here!” He explained to his mother that he was going to seek revenge and kill the men who killed the boy. He states he has never done anything wrong and the acts of his brother’s plan to kill will be avenged. When the mother, Ma Sogolon Conde, stepped into the doorway, Sonjata says, “The one you see lying here, I went to the bush and forgot about him. My brother’s men beat him to death with their clubs. You see this? I will kill for this young man. I know this is Dunkaran Tuman’s boy, but he died my death. I will prove to them that I am not the one who died.” His mother knew Sunjata was furious and planned to kill. She made a call to Jelimusoni Diawara. She notified him of Sunjata’s anger and new mission to kill. Jelimusoni Diawara called out to Simbon and ask him to consider the thought of his mother. Jelimusoni Diawara said, “Simbon, won’t you think of your mother? Simbon! Won’t you think of me? Won’t you leave this to God? Don’t you realize that the finger has poked out its own eye?” She explained the cause of exile after pinning Simbon down. He struggled to get away over and over but he was unable to break away. Ma Sogolon Conde stated to Sunjata the trouble going on in the homeland. She said, “My son Sunjata, you have no problem except for your popularity. If they have started murdering people over you, should we not go away?” Immediately, the all thought of his father’s homeland. They knew the homeland could not be sold but it could be pawned.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at April 11, 2014 01:42 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
13 April 2014

QUESTION Page 1557
1. In Sunjata: Kolonkan Finds Meat for Guests from Manden, who took the internal organs of the roan antelope and the bushbuck and why?

ANSWER:
Kolonkan took the internal organs of these animals; Sunjata says, “This was done by our little sister, Kolonkan” (Puchner 1557). This was because Ma Soolon Wulen Conde asked her to find meat to cook and serve it to the guests from Manden that were hungry (Puchner 1557).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at April 13, 2014 06:09 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
10 April 2014

Question P. 1540: What tree did the Mande woman gather under after they were told the son was born?

Answer: The woman gathered under a baobab tree. “When the Mande woman were told about it, They gathered together again under the Mande baobab tree” (Puchner 1540)
Bibliography
"Sunjata: A West African Epic of the Mande Peoples." Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology World Liturature. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. 1514-1576.


Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at April 13, 2014 08:27 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in narrative CA02
13 April 2014

Question (page 1555)
What is the significance of dado to Kolonkan and Ma so’olon Wulen Conde? How do they end up relating to the dado seller?


Answer
Dado is a traditional part of the women’s diet and it represents something that is familiar, and it is important to them. In the passage, Kolonkan stated “ Since we arrived here, we have not seen dado, we have not seen anyone who sells it, I have just seen it and tasted it, because it is something we always used to have” (Puchner 1540). Kolonkan and her family ended up being the people the dado sellers have been looking for originally, “ Aaah! You are the people we have come for! Our road has been good, let us go to your house.” The passage does not give more information than this, but an endnote mentions that the vendors are looking for Sunjata, so that he can return to Manden.

Posted by: Henry Adu at April 13, 2014 10:23 PM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
13 April 2014

QUESTION Page 1556:
Who did Sogolon call and why?

ANSWER:
Sogolon called Kolonkan to look for some meat/food for the people who came back from Manden who are hungry. Sogolon said to Kolonkan, “Go and look on the meat-drying rack” to see if there was any meet left for the “people who came back from Manden are hungry” (Puchner 1556).

Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at April 13, 2014 10:25 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in narrative CA02
9 April 2014

Question (page 1542)
What does the passage state was the reason Sunjata was able to walk? How does Sunjata get back at those who mocked at his mum?

Answer
The passage states that “It was rivalry that caused Sunjata to walk, because of the humiliation to his mother. The father is everybody’s, the mother is personal.” Sunjata is able to disprove those who doubted him by showing immense strength and bring back baobab tree to his mum’s yard. He then says “Now everyone will come here for baobab leaves.”

Posted by: Henry Adu at April 13, 2014 10:42 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
14 April 2014
QUESTION:
What army did Sunjata join? What would happen to the prisoners that Sunjata captured?
ANSWER:
Sunjata joined the army of Kuntunya (Puncher, 1552). Sunjata and the army of Kuntunya would march and they would find people to hold prisoner, and they would capture the people and hold them prisoner. When he would capture one prisoner, that one prisoner would be for just him. If he would capture five prisoners, only two of the captives would be for him. When he would capture ten prisoners, four of the prisoners would be for him (Puncher, 1552). “The Kuntunya mansa would take six of the captives” (Puncher, 1552).

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at April 13, 2014 10:51 PM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
13 APRIL 2014

Question:
Refer to page 1558, in The Epic of Sunjata. Following the death of Ma Sogolon Conde, Manden is sent to request a plot for her burial but is denied. Why is this?

Answer:
In The Epic of Sunjata, page 1558, we see Ma Sogolon disgraced by Manden Bori, “You have shamed me in front of the Mande people” (Puchner 1558). Sogolon subsequently dies following a few departing remarks. After her death, Sunjata instructs Manden Bori to request a plot for her burial. Manden meets with Faran Tunkara, the mansa of Nema. However Faran Tunkara was unhappy with the idea that he could get Sunjata as one of his slaves. Because of this he denied Manden Bori the land so that he could get Sunjata to confront him, “He wanted to start a quarrel so he could detain Sunjata” (Puchner 1558).

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at April 13, 2014 11:46 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 April 2014

QUESTION:
(pg 1558) Why is Faran Tunkara upset when the messengers from Manden arrive?

ANSWER:
Tunkara is unhappy when the messengers arrive because “from the time Sunjata arrived, up to that day, he did not engage in any battle that was lost by the people of Kuntaya” (Puchner 1558). In other words, when Sunjata arrived, he arrived on his own, and not due to Tunkara’s own campaign.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at April 14, 2014 01:15 AM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
14 April 2014

QUESTION:
On page 1555 in _Sunjata: A West African Epic of the Mende Peoples_, how does Kolonkan react when she finds what she is looking for in the market?

ANSWER:
Kolonkan feels overjoyed when she finds the dado she had been searching to obtain. However, she is so excited that she found the dado that she forgot her manners. When she reaches the merchants selling the dado, she “grabs the dado and puts it in her mouth without stopping to greet the merchants” (Puchner 1555). The two merchants are angry with Kolonkan, call her “impolite,” and tell her “if you don’t great us first, don’t touch our merchandise without asking us” (Puchner 1555).

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at April 14, 2014 01:27 AM

Henry Adu
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in narrative CA02
9 April 2014

Question (page 1542)
What does the passage state was the reason Sunjata was able to walk? How does Sunjata get back at those who mocked at his mum?

Answer
The passage states that “It was rivalry that caused Sunjata to walk, because of the humiliation to his mother. The father is everybody’s, the mother is personal.” Sunjata is able to disprove those who doubted him by showing immense strength and bring back baobab tree to his mum’s yard. He then says “Now everyone will come here for baobab leaves.”

Posted by: Henry Adu at April 14, 2014 10:34 AM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 April 2014

Question:
(Pg. 1562): Fakoli Reveals His Power: What did the message from Sumaworo say?

Answer: The message from Sumaworo said that “the Mande people must be told, that he has been expecting them for a long time.” (Puchner 1562). The message also included that “it had been a long time since their mansa arrived”, “he had not seen any messenger,” and “that since Sunjata was now there, he wanted to see those people.” (Puchner 1562).
Work Cited:
Puchner, Martin. Sunjanta: A west African Epic Of The Mande Peoples. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at April 14, 2014 11:19 AM

Jacklyn O'Brien
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL: Journeys in Narrative
14 April 2014

Question Page 1555:
What did Kolonkan do that she was called "Impolite?"

ANSWER:
Kolonkan did not stop to greet the dado seller and instead immediately reached for dado and put some in her mouth.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at April 14, 2014 11:28 AM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
14 April 2014

Question: Is “The Burial of Sogolon and Departure from Nema” part of the road of trials phase where the hero meets allies and enemies?

Answer: Sunjata has been summoned by the Mande people and begins his journey on the road of trials stage, which is where he finds his allies and enemies. In the chapter preceding "The Burial," “Kolonkan Finds Meat for Guests from Manden” it represents who Sunjata’s allies are, namely, his brothers and sisters. According to Vogler, each ally has something to contribute, and in Sunjata, it is in the form of dalilu. So at the end of the chapter, the reader is informed that, “Everyone has his own dalilu./That is why it is good for children of the same mother to be in harmony” (1625-26). So this chapter points to the stage in the story where each person’s own dalilu will contribute to Sunjata’s journey to become king of the Mande. When Sunjata wants to bury his mother, the enemy seems to be Faran Tunkara, but in the end he just wants recognition and respect, and so becomes an ally of Sunjata as well (Puchner 1558).

Posted by: Mariana Convery at April 14, 2014 11:36 AM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14th April 2014

Question:
Does San-Jara get enlightenment in any way during the course of his exile?

Answer:
San jara does get enlightenment because you can already see how much he changes. Before he u never have a chance in defeating summaru but know he has a fighting chance. He is now a better person and leader because of him not being able to leave. He learned from his experiences and capitalized.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at April 14, 2014 11:49 AM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL A Journey in Narrative
14 April 2014

Question: Page 1556 - Who is Kolonkan and whats does she makes her happy in the “ Kolonkan Finds meat for Guests From Manden”?

Answer: Page 1556 - Kolonkan is Sunjata’s sister and when the travelers come from Manden it is said about her that she “ was very happy. She had long since reached the age of marriage, And she knew that these people would not leave her behind. When she would arrive in Manden. She would be married”.(Pucher 1156) Kolonkan is excited at the prospect of marriage and going away.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at April 14, 2014 11:53 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys of Transformation In Narrative Literature 220CL
14.4.2014
Question for Page #1561
PAGE #1561
On page 1561, what does a man’s funeral consist of? Who is “the woman?”
ANSWER.
“The woman’s funeral was conducted as if she were a man. Cows were killed, muskets were fired, the special drum was beaten.” (Puchner 1561). The woman being buried is the jeli’s, the storyteller’s, mother.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at April 14, 2014 12:12 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
14 April 2014

QUESTION (1551): In the “A Visit to Soso” section, what did Ma Sogolon Conde ask the children to do and why?

ANSWER: Ma Sogolon Conde asked the children to go and get her dry cow dung, because she had bought some cotton which she wanted to spin while lighting her conversation. Ma Sogolon Conde said, “That the children of Soso should go and collect a pile of dried cow dung,/ That she had brought a small amount of cotton./ That she would like to spin at night,/ So that she could light her lantern of conversation./ They brought the cow dung to light the lantern of conversation (Punchner, 1551 lines 1354-1358).”

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at April 14, 2014 12:52 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 April 2014


Question page #1557: What has happened to the bushbuck and antelope that Kolonkan hunts for her guests?

answer: Later when they return to the bodies to extract the meat from the bodies, they discover that their internal organs have been removed.
The game had no meat due to the curse set upon Kolonkan

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at April 14, 2014 12:58 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 March 2014
Departure for exile page 1549
Question:
Why must Sunjata accept to flee from his step brother?
Answer:
Sunjata must accept to flee from his step brother because, " he nor Dankaran Tuman can understand the special circumstances [...], he will eventually take over the leadership of maden," but this can only happen if you accepts to flee from his step brother (Puchner 1549).

Posted by: marssiel mena at April 14, 2014 01:13 PM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
14 April 2014

Question:
Where did Sologon take Sunjata and his siblings for protection?

Answer:
Sologon took her children to see the king, Maghan Konfara, in Sosa, who is the great sorceer (Puchner 1550). Sologon wanted her children to be taught to be hunters and she figured their former master would be great for the job. She wanted her children to kill their own game (Puchner 1550).

Posted by: Natalie White at April 14, 2014 01:17 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
14 April 2014
Question:
Why did Sanjata and his younger siblings need to cross the river in the middle of the night?
Answer:
Sonjata’s mother had them cross the river at night in order to get to Soso (Puchner, 1550). They had to go to Soso in for protection (Puchner, 1550). In Soso, Sunjata and his younger siblings are going to learn to be hunters so they can kill their own game (Puchner, 1550).

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at April 14, 2014 01:23 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys to Narrative
14 April 2014
Question p.1562: What was the message the Mande people received and how did the people respond?
Answer:
As a new leader of the Mande people, Sunjata receives a message of war against the people of Soso. The message was from Sumawaro, the leader of Soso and uncle to Fakoli. The message stated Soso and Sumawaro had been expecting the Mande people for a long time. He requested to see the people of Mande because Sunjata was now the leader. He requested to see them on the fourteenth day of the new month at Dakajalan.
Fakoli, a shorter man of the village entered the council hall like all the taller men of the village. Sunjata requested a meeting in the council hall immediately after receiving the message from Soso. Fakoli heard of the message from Sumawaro who was related to Fakoli and his mother. This relation led Fakoli to request a dismissal from the village to enter Soso and meet with Sumawaro. After being laughed at by Manden Bori for being too short, Fakoli proved his powers as being stronger than any tall man in the village. This proof allowed for Fakoli to be excused from the invasion on Soso as he met with Sumawaro. Fakoli said, “As soon as I get to the council hall, I will ask the Mande people, if they will give me leave so I can go to Soso. Let them come and fight against me and my uncle (Conrad 1562).”
When Sunjata responded to the message he had the Mande people signal with the beat of the drum. This message led the village to the council hall. As a new leader, Sunjata and request the people of Mande perform a series of sacrifices in preparation to the war against Soso. After Manden Bori and Fakoli argue over the power Fakoli possessed, Manden Bori also refused to allow Fakoli to leave Mande for Soso. Fakoli refused to be humiliated as a short powerless man and proved himself to the council hall by forcing his power on everyone. Sunajata agreed with Fakoli and explained to Manden Bori that Fakoli needed to be excused. This led to Fakoli’s leave from Mande and arrival in Soso to meet with Sumawaro where he was accepted after being examined.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at April 14, 2014 01:24 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 April 2014

QUESTION:
Why did the Maghan Konfara, not accept any other woman from the Dò ni Kiri people?

ANSWER:
The Maghan Konfara, did not accept any other woman from the Dò ni Kiri people, because Simbon had foreseen and prophesied everything and it had come to; "And because of your righteousness, and because of the way you help travelers, we did not accept any other woman" (Puchner 1535).

Posted by: Diana Berthil at April 14, 2014 01:29 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
April 14, 2014

Question:
In the chapter A Visit to Soso, Sumaworo is told by his own perosnal oracle that "The man who will eventually take Soso and Manden away from him not only has been born but has grown up into a hunter and will be identifiable as the one who violates Sumaworo's taboo". Who might this man be?
Answer:
The man who will eventually take Soso and Manden away from Sumaworo is Sunjata. The oracle said to Sumaworo that the man was born and has become a hunter. Sologon Conde goes to Sumaworo and asks to train and protect Sunjata and his siblings "I have brought Sunjata and his younger siblings, To come and put them under your protection. You should train them to be hunters, People who can kill their own game" (p. 1550). With her asking for Sumaworo to train Sunjata, it forshadows the future with Sunjata defeating Sumaworo.

Posted by: Jose Parra at April 14, 2014 01:32 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
14 April 2014

Two questions and answers are present in this post.

QUESTION:
In the previous pages, Simbon receives another wife as a reward for killing the buffalo woman, but this new wife is a sorceress and attempts to take Simbon’s power. How does she attempt to do this and why?

ANSWER:
Simbon’s new wife, Condé, is crippled with twisted feet and must be carried to her new husband, but in the process of being carried by the other wives, her head scarf falls off and reveals that she is bald (Puchner 1536). The other wives start to sing about Condé being a heron-head, which offends her. I think she found this offensive because herons are bald and thought of as ugly because of it. In her anger at being insulted, Condé sends a sorcerer’s dart from her eye to Simbon’s eye to take his power, but it fails (Puchner 1537). Condé is showing here how willing she is to fight her new husband to free herself from this fate. It is pretty obvious that she came against her will and does not love her new husband.

QUESTION:
Condé has attempted to harm Simbon three times to no avail. Why is she unable to harm him and will she be able to harm him in the future? Explain.

ANSWER:
Simbon is a powerful sorcerer compared to Condé, as he uses an elephant tail whisk instead of a horse (Puchner 1535). As far as the reader know Sogolon Condé does not have a whisk to use magic with. She had sent the dart from her eye, scalding breast milk from her breasts, and through a spear from apparently nowhere. Since Condé did not use a whisk to cast her magic, I am led to believe that she only had a limited amount of magic power. This is supported by the phrase, “Sogolon had used up her sorcery (Puchner 1538).” If Sogolon Condé had used up her sorcery then she may never be able to cast magic again and therefore would need to find other means to harm her husband, if that is truly what she wants to do, though she follows the traditional actions to show she is willing to be with her husband now (Puchner 1539).

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 14, 2014 01:35 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. B. L. Hobbs
ENG 220: Journeys in Narrative CA01
14 April 2014

Question: Fakoli Reveals His Power. Sunjata laughs at Fakoli every time he enters the council hall. Why is this? How does Fakoli change Sunjata’s mind and how does he react afterwards? What does this say about the both of them?

Answer: Sunjata laughs at Fakoli because his short. Sunjata said, “[w]henever the tall men enter the council hall they must duck their heads. Fakoli is only one and a half arm-spans tall, but when he enters he also ducks his head. This is what makes me laugh,” (Puchner 1563). Fakoli proclaims that the short Mande people can do things that the tall cannot (Puchner 1563). He sat in the middle of the council floor, waved his hand and grunted. In doing so, he “raised the roof from the house,” (Puchner 1563). Sunjata admitted that he was wrong and that Fakoli could do things tall men could not. “You spoke the truth,” Manden Bori said. “They were fair about crediting one another with the truth,” (Puchner 1563). From this passage one can conclude that even though they may think differently, when they are proven wrong they will admit to it. In doing so, both men show maturity.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at April 14, 2014 01:55 PM

Wilfred Ras
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL
April 11, 2014
Homework
QUESTION #1518:
Manghan Konfara had everything he could plausibly have, however, what did he not have and why?

ANSWER:
Manghan Konfara had power, wealth, and popularity. One thing he was lacking was a child. He wanted a child badly, but did not get it. All of his friends were having kids at this point, however he was the only one that was not getting any luck. He also mentioned how it is hard to get a child when you’re as wealthy as him. The cause of all of this was his frustration. He became constantly frustrated and all of Manden became frustrated.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at April 14, 2014 02:51 PM

Wilfred Ras
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL
April 11, 2014
Homework
QUESTION #1541:
Why did they ask the mother of Sunjata to wake him up and make him walk?

ANSWER:
In this page they mention, “It is one thing to give birth to a son, and another thing for him to survive” When his mother was on the look for Baobab leaves, they asked her why does she not wake up her lazy son and make him walk and look for the leaves with her. They did not know that Sunjata overheard them. Sunjata was confused but at the same time wanted to prove to them that he will walk.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at April 14, 2014 03:07 PM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. Lee. B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
14 April 2014

Question Page 1570:
What did Fakoli do as soon as he got back to Manden? Explain.

Answer:
When Fakoli got back to Manden, he “stood at the door of the council hall” (Puchner 1570) he told Simbon that Sumaworo has taken his wife from him.

Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at April 14, 2014 04:27 PM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 the proverbial road: journey of transformation in narrative
15 April 2014

Sunjata: the search for a wife of destiny

Pg. 1523
Question: What did the buffalo women say Do’ Kamissa, and will she do for him?
Answer:
The buffalo women says “ you have out done me, and no one can get better of people like you, she continues to state your polite, and how he was brought up well”. (Puncher, 1523) The buffalo women states no matter what he was faced with he completed each task, and now she will cooperate with him and give herself unto him.

Posted by: re-chia jackson at April 15, 2014 01:06 PM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 the proverbial road: journey of transformation in narrative
15 April 2014

Sunjata: step-brother rivalry and nine sorceresses
Pg. 1542
Question:
The brother rivalry was between whom, and cause who to walk? How did God bless this person? What did he do with his iron staff?
Answer:
The brother rivalry was between Simbon and Sunjata. When their mother mentioned hoe Simbon had started to walk this made Sunjata put of effort into impressing his parents and he begin to walk also. After this incident “God gave Sunjata feet, then Sunjata took his bow” (Puncher, 1542) Sunjata took his iron staff and made a bow out of it.

Posted by: re-chia jackson at April 15, 2014 01:07 PM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 the proverbial road: journey of transformation in narrative
15 April 2014

Sunjata: Departure for exile
Pg. 1549
Question: what special item did Sogolon Conde’ give to Sansamba Sagado and for what reason?
Answer:
A sliver bracelet was given to Somono, as a type of currency for when he wants to cross the river in future times.

Posted by: re-chia jackson at April 15, 2014 01:07 PM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 the proverbial road: journey of transformation in narrative
15 April 2014

Sunjata: Trading insults and swearing oaths
Pg.1571
Question: What did Manden make the town people do concerning his new shoes he created?
Answer:
He called the town’s people to come and try to guess the name of his new shoes he created out of human skin. Once they guessed it wrong with names like “Finfirinya shoes”, “Dulubiri”. (Puncher, 1571) He would respond be saying the name of my shoes are “take the air”. (Puncher, 1571)

Posted by: re-chia jackson at April 15, 2014 01:08 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02\
15 April 2014

Question page# 1573:
Why was Sumaworo so shocked after Simbon and Sunjata had used the tobacco from Soso and Manden?

Answer:
The snuff provided by Sumaworo was poisoned and "anybody who took that snuff would immediately fall over. It was Poison!" (1573).

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at April 15, 2014 01:42 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
15 April 2014

QUESTION Page 1567
1. In Sunjata: Fakoli Finds Trouble in Soso, What did Sumaworo have to sacrifice? What was insulting to Keleya Kondon?

ANSWER:
Sumaworo had to sacrifice “three hundred dishes, thirty dishes, and three dishes” (Puchner 1567). In addition, it was insulting to Keleya Kondon when Fakoli and Sumaworo said, “The Soso women and the Mande woman, we will soon see how they cook “(Puchner 1567).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at April 15, 2014 07:15 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
15 April 2014

QUESTION (1569): In the “Fakoli Finds Trouble in Soso” section, what did Fakoli do when the messenger went to get him for Sumaworo?

ANSWER: Fakoli refused once again, the messenger goes back to Sumaworo. Fakoli puts on his gear, ties his headband around his head, and gets ready for a “fall out.” The text states, “Fakoli put on his hat with three hundred bird’s heads./ He put his axe on his shoulder,/ He tied his headband around his head,/ Because he knew there was going to be a falling-out (Puchner, 1569 lines 2127-2131).”

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at April 15, 2014 08:52 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in narrative CA02
15 April 2014

Question (page 1564)
What is Fakoli’s dilemma and why does he have to leave Manden?

Answer
Fakoli’s dilemma is that he does not want to fight against his uncle, and he will rather wait for them to attack him and have a good reason to fight back. According to the passage, Fakoli states “My mother and Sumaworo, they are children of Toure. For me to participate in Manden’s attack on my uncle, I would be shamed by that.” (Puchner 1896). He leaves Manden so that he can go help his uncle who is about to be attacked. “If Fakoli says he is going to help his mother’s kinsmen, leave him alone, and let him go

Posted by: Henry Adu at April 15, 2014 09:54 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
16 April 2014
QUESTION:
What two men stood side-by-side with Sunjata? What happens between Sunjata and Sumaworo?
ANSWER:
The two people on each side of Sunjata are Fakoli who was on Sunjata’s one side, and Turama’an who was on Sunjata is other side (Puncher, 1575). “Sumaworo’s men were flanking him” (Puncher, 1575). Sumaworo tries to jump the ravine as Sunjata and his two men did, and his horse falls into the ravine (Puncher, 1575). Sunjata asks what the matter with Sumaworo is, and Sumaworo just wants Sunjata to kill him where he stands (Puncher, 1575). Sunjata does not want to kill Sumaworo and he does not want his shirt of human skin (Puncher, 1575).

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at April 15, 2014 11:36 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
16 April 2014

QUESTION:
Why does Fakoli prepare himself?

ANSWER:
Fakoli prepares himself to leave, “because he knew there was going to be a falling-out” (Puchner 159); Fakoli determines this after deliberately refusing to go to his uncle Sumaworo and being called by him three times from his messengers.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at April 16, 2014 01:49 AM

Jacklyn O'Brien
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL: Journeys in narrative
16 April 2014

Question:
What would happen to a person if they were to take the "snuff"

Answer:
They would immediately fall over, it was poison!

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at April 16, 2014 11:35 AM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative
16 April 2014

Question: Page 1568

According to the scandalmongers How many wives do Sumaworo and Fakoli have and how many dishes do their wives make for them.

Answer: Page 1568

Sumaworo has “three hundred wives and thirty wives and three wives”(Pg 1568) and Fakoli has “only one wife”. Both Sumaworo and Fakoli have produced “three hundred dishes and thirty dishes and three dishes”.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at April 16, 2014 12:05 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys of Transformation In Narrative Literature 220CL
16.4.2014
Question for Page #1574
PAGE #1574
On page 1574, find the quote, “The dalilu you brought.” (Puchner 1574). Research and explain, in your own words, what “dalilu” is, and what its importance to the text is.
ANSWER.
The word dalilu can be defined, according to West African oral tradition, as magic, with the connotation being negative, such as occult powers/black magic according to Western understanding. To a more general meaning, it can mean talent, or even supernatural like talents. In the text Sumaworo tells Sunjata (I believe), that “I [Sumaworo] summoned you [Sunjata], Since the Mande peoplebrought back their mansa. You would not be here without dalilu.” (Puchner 1574). In the text, Sumaworo is telling Sunjata that if it were not for his dalilu, or his supernatural talents, he would be of no use, and would not be along his people.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at April 16, 2014 12:18 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 April 2014

QUESTION:
According to the passage, Manden Bori always laughs at and ridicules Fakoli whenever he enters the council hall. Why does Manden Bori do this? What is Fakoli’s relationship to Manden Bori?

ANSWER:
In the pages leading up to this section, the readers learn that Fakoli is the nephew of Soumaoro, who is the main antagonist in the story and Manden Bori is Sundjata’s half-brother and best friend. Pretty much, Manden Bori and Fakoli are enemies as seen in Manden Bori laughing at Fakoli often (Puchner 1562). It can also be learned from the passage that Fakoli had been in the city of Mande to seek some sort of an answer because he says he must ask the people in the council hall to leave them and then challenge them to fight him and his uncle. It is unclear what exactly Fakoli was doing there in the first place as it may have been included in the omitted episode. Whatever the reason for being present, Fakoli is ridiculed by Manden Bori because of the absurdity of the action (Puchner 1562). Let it be said again, Fakoli is an enemy to Sundjata so it would be only natural for Manden Bori to laugh at him repeatedly for showing up for any kind of help. One could imagine Bori thinking something along the lines of, “Why would we help you? You’re the enemy! We don’t help enemies, get lost! It’s silly for you to show up expecting anything from us.”

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 16, 2014 12:51 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
16th April 2014

Question:
How is oral tradition important and in the same time problematic in The Epic of San-Jara?

Answer:
Oral tradition is important in the epic of San-Jara because they have to uphold their traditions. If they do not do it then their traditions will get lost in history and will never be practiced again. At the same time, some of their traditions that are practice in this story are very bad and should not be practiced because they will break some taboos of other traditions or cultures.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at April 16, 2014 12:52 PM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 April 2014

Question: Is Fakoli playing the role of mentor/goddess in “Fakoli Finds Trouble in Soso”?

Answer: It seems that throughout many of the texts that we have read, the women, especially mothers, play the role as mentors, goddesses (or the great mother) and peacemakers collectively. For instance, in Gilgamesh, at almost every threshold and stage, there is a female who mentors and guides Gilgamesh. In this chapter of Sunjata, it seems that Fakoli himself has taken on the role of mentor/goddess (great mother) when he says, “That is why I decided to be here in place of my mother. / That is the reason I came. /I have come to him through the will of God” (1995-97). Fakoli, in this role as the great mother, makes peace and gains his ally, Sumaworo, in the name of his mother.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at April 16, 2014 12:53 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. B. L. Hobbs
ENG 220: Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 April 2014

Question: Trading Insults and Swearing Oaths. In this passage, Simbon says that “People may refuse peanuts but not ones that have been placed right in front of them.” What does this mean and how is it relevant to the passage?
Answer: In a sense, the quote means that people may refuse to do things, take things, or work for things, unless everything is handed to them. This entire passage is about the trading of insults. Sumaworo had issued a challenge and in turn Sunjata and Simbon have come to answer. In the words of Sumaworo to Sunjata, “I have become hot ashes surrounding Manden and Soso, and if a toddler walks in it, I will burn him, up to his thighs. But here you are,” (Puchner 1574). The quote is relevant to the passage because Sujanata knows that Sumaworo is “not a son of this place” and in turn must drive his uncle out of the land (Puchner 1574). The answer to the task will not be easy or placed right in front of Sunjata. He must fight.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at April 16, 2014 12:54 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
16 April 2014

QUESTION:
(pg 1570) Why does Fakoli change his mind about taking his wife back from his uncle?

ANSWER:
He does not want her back until his battle with his uncle has settled, and “will not take her back until he has done it in gunsmoke” (Puchner 1570).

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at April 16, 2014 01:07 PM

Brittany C. Davis
The Epic of Son-Jara
April 16 2014
Page: 1574

Q: On Page 1574, whom is the respected elder that Sumoworo is speaking about?

Answer: Sunjata is the respected elder, and is refer to as the expected elder by Sumoworo.

"You are the respected elder" pf 1574

Posted by: Brittany Davis at April 16, 2014 01:14 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
16 March 2014
Fakoli Finds Trouble in SOSO pg 1566
Question: What is Sumaworo so pleased about?
Answer: In the passage, Sumaworo says "[...], I appretaite his words, I am well pleased, I am glad," he says this to Fakoli (Puchner 1566). He says this to fakoli becuase he is happy or pleased that he will be fighting the war with him and that they will be fighting together.

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at April 16, 2014 01:17 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
16 April 2014

Question: What are the shoes of Sumaworo called?

Answer: It was suggested that the shoes are called 'Finfirinya shoes' and 'Dulubiri' but they are both turned down (Puchner 1571). They ask Sumaworo himself what the shoes are called. The shoes of Sumaworo are called 'Take the air, Take the Ground from the Cheif' according to Sumaworo (Puchner 1571).

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at April 16, 2014 01:26 PM

Natalie white
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
16 April 2014

Question:
What was made out of human skin?

Answer:
Sumowaro sewed hats, shoes, trousers, and shirts out of human skin of the Mande people and the Soso people.

Posted by: Natalie white at April 16, 2014 01:26 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys to Narrative
16 April 2014
Question p.1576: Who killed Sumaworo in The Battle of Dakajalan and how is the death translated in The West African Epic by David C. Conrad?
Answer:
At the end of The Battle of Dakajalan, Sumaworo is expected to be killed by Sunjata because he is the hero of the epic. Instead, Sumaworo pleads to be killed instantly in battle immediately after being defeated by Sunjata. Sumaworo was trapped in a ravine with his horse because it could not jump across. Sumaworo refused to be killed in the town where he will experience humiliation in front of all the people. Sumaworo stripped himself naked and asked Sunjata not to put him to shame. After Sunjata faces Sumaworo in defeat, Sumaworo cries, “Sunjata, kill me here, do not carry me to the town. Do not bring such shame to me (Conrad 1575).” Sunjata decides to return home to Mande with his men after excusing Sumaworo from death. “I am not going to finish you off,” Sunjata said (Conrad 1575). He refused the clothing Sumaworo offered him because they were made of the death of Sunjata’s ancestors.
As the men returned home, Fakoli decides to return to Sumaworo. In fact, Fakoli is responsible for the death of Sumaworo in the David C. Conrad translation of the epic. “They had gone some distance, when Fakoli made a decision, turned and went back (Conrad 1575).” Fakoli returned to Sumaworo and striked his head with an axe. Fakoli was angry with Sumaworo for taking his wife away from him. After striking him in the head with an axe he began to leave the site where Sumaworo laid. Fakoli decided to stop the leave and return to Sumaworo because he was still angry with him. This time he striked Sumaworo in the leg, breaking his leg. As he began to leave the site where Sumaworo laid Fakoli decided he was not finished with Sumaworo and returned to strike him in the arm. By this time, Fakoli striked Sumaworo’s head, leg and arm. He broke both Sumaworo’s leg and arm after striking him with his axe. Fakoli sought revenge in this translation and exclaimed the defense he made in songs. Fakoli said, “This will be sung about in Sunjata’s praise song (Conrad 1576).” He began to sing, “Head-breaking Mari Jata. It was Fakoli who broke it (Conrad 1576).” Fakoli sang songs to the men reminding them that it was him who returned to kill Sumaworo, not Sunjata. After striking Sumaworo’s head, Fakoli sang a song after striking his leg. “This will be sung in Sunjata’s praise song. That is why it was sung. Leg-breaking Mari Jata. It was fakoli who did that (Conrad 1576).” After returning to strike Sumarworo’s arm, Fakoli sang another song. “This will be sung about in Sunjata’s praise song. Arm-breaking Mari Jata. Aheh! It was not Jata who broke it! It was Fakoli who broke it (Conrad 1576).”
Once, Fakoli was finished with Sumaworo he returned home with his men. The defeat brought laughter to Mande where Soso was being laughed at because their leader had been defeated. The people of Soso ventured off to the part of Africa closer to the Atlantic Ocean after the defeat. The Mali Empire experienced reformation and organization because of Sunjata, becoming unified.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at April 16, 2014 01:32 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
16 April 2014

Question P. 1572: Whom is Sunjata talking to and what does he refer to him as?

Answer: Sunjata is talking to Sumaworo and he refers to him as father in line 2239 where Sunjata says “Father Sumaworo, good morning.” (Puchner 1572)
Bibliography
"Sunjata: A West African Epic of the Mande Peoples." Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology World Liturature. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. 1514-1576.


Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at April 16, 2014 02:35 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at April 17, 2014 01:52 PM

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