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January 01, 2014

Meshing with Gilgamesh and Knowing Noah


Image Source: http://www.zindamagazine.com/html/archives/2007/03.04.07/pix/gilgamesh.jpg

Students,

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 1, 2014 05:33 PM

Readers' Comments:

Welcome ENG 225 students and lovers of ancient literature,

We begin this semester's course, Survey of World Literature I, with our reading of The Epic of Gilgamesh, a very, very OLD artifact indeed.

Before Superman, before Hercules, before Samson, before Achilles, and before Beowulf, there was "Gilgamesh," King of Uruk--an ancient leader with more legends than Remus and Romulus, the found of Rome or first American president, George Washington and his fabled chopped cherry tree. Stories that attach heroic, often unbelievable, deeds to the founders and heros of nations is a custom as old as time itself. Gilgamesh is, arguably, one of the oldest known examples of a literary work.

According to scholars such as the late Joseph Campbell, in myth, there is often a kernel of truth--that is, if we stop perceiving the word "myth" as synonymous with the word "lie" and begin, instead, to understand myth as an easy-to-remember marker for a larger, symbolic, and underlying set of "truths." Very often, the fantasitcal format of myth seems to be crying out: "don't take me literally" but "look deeper to find the wisdom I am trying to share."

In our experience with The Epic of Gilgamesh, what bits of wisdom can we, as denizens of the 21st century, take away from a tale first composed somewhere in region that is now Iraq, AT LEAST, two thousand years B.C.E.?

In the comment box below, please write a paragraph or two relating what you and your group partner(s) discussed in class about our course reading. In your response, please be sure to remind the reader of your question by including it somewhere in your response. If you are in my ENG 225 course this semester, remember that you must leave your name (first name, last initial) so that I can credit you for doing the assignment. The comment box will be switched off after the assignment deadline.

29 Aug. 2008 – Eng 225.01 – In-Class Reading-Check For Previous Readings

1. True or False?: According to the editors of The Norton Anthology, the biblical story of Noah and the Great Flood was the primary influence for part of the story of Gilgamesh (Book A, page 10).

2. Short Answer: For most works of literature, “meaning” is established by context. For example, we understand—at least—something about epics like Beowulf because we know about the people who probably first invented the story, the language they used, where they lived, and something about their culture. Why then, according to the editors of The Norton Anthology, do scholars have difficulty ascertaining the contextual meaning of Gilgamesh? (Book A, page 10).

3. Choose the Correct Answer: Who is the companion of Gilgamesh? (Book A, page 10).
(a) Oedipus (b) Achilles (c) Enkidu (d) Medea

4. True or False?: Gilgamesh was written in Sanskrit, one of the original three languages, along with Ancient Greek and Latin, that make up the Indo-European language group. (Book A, page 10).

5. Short Answer: What title does the character Gilgamesh hold? What is his relationship to the city of Uruk? (Book A, page 11).

6. Choose the Correct Answer: Gilgamesh…
(a) had a father who was a god (b) was himself part-god, part-man (c) all of the above (d) none of the above

1 Sept. 2008 – Eng 225.01 – In-Class Reading-Check For Previous Readings

[1] Vocabulary Check: What Is “Lapis Lazuli”?
[2] Short Answer: Who Is Ishtar?
[3] Explain Briefly Why Gilgamesh’s Cheeks Become “So Starved,” His Face “Drawn,” And His “Face Burned With Heat And Cold.”
[4] Vocabulary Check: What Is An “Acolyte”?
[5] Short Answer: Who Is Utnapisthim?
[6] Explain Briefly How Enkidu Is “Introduced” Into Civilization.
[7] Vocabulary Check: What Is “Carnelian”?
[8] Short Answer: Who Is Humbaba?
[9] Explain Briefly Why Gilgamesh Visits Utnapisthim.


Remember that any information/questions given to you as a reading-check, lecture, or group activity is fair game for the mid-term examination and the final examination. Please keep a running, hardcopy list of questions (and their answers) in your own journal so that you will have material to review as we approach examination time.

*Some recommended study guides for The Epic of Gilgamesh:

Fajardo-Acosta, Fidel. “The Epic of Gilgamesh (c. 2000 B.C.).” World Literature Website. Creighton University. 2001. 29 August 2008 http://fajardo-acosta.com/worldlit/gilgamesh/>.

Kallet, Lisa. “The Epic of Gilgamesh: Study Guide.” Course website for CC319: History of the Ancient Mediterranean. University of Texas. 29 August 2008 http://www.utexas.edu/courses/clubmed/gilgamsh.html>.

For those of you who still have NOT purchased the required texts for this course, a full-text version of The Epic of Gilgamesh can be found here:

http://www.ancienttexts.org/library/mesopotamian/gilgamesh/

See you in our next class meeting,

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 1, 2008 04:54 PM

2) Close your eyes for a moment and think of YOUR perception of a king, the supreme ruler of a nation-state. In your opinion, how is a king supposed to behave? What is appropriate and inappropriate? Be prepared to discuss Gilgamesh’s style of ruler ship. Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)
A// A king is supposed to behave in a respectful manner, since he is representing a whole community. He is in charge of making the people feel secure. Furthermore, it’s his responsibility to make the laws, and make sure they are carried out. In addition a king must pay attention to the needs of the community.
Appropriate behavior from a king would consist in being charitable, taking in consideration collective needs, being respectful to others, and being a visible ruler. Inappropriate behavior usually involves a ruler who is disrespectful, arrogant, vicious, envious, and who utilizes the community to satisfy his desires.
Gilgamesh was the ruler of Uruk. The villagers of Uruk disliked Gilgamesh very much, because of his arrogance. Because of Gilgamesh’s selfish ways the village people pleaded to the gods to create someone equal to Gilgamesh. The people of Uruk were disgusted by Gilgamesh since he would use them to satisfy his pleasures (e.g. would have intimate relations with the brides before the groom did so).
Source: www.sparknotes.com tablet 2
(Didn’t have a book)

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I believe that The Epic of Gilgamesh is primary a man’s story because it portrays a lot of war, fighting and killing of both animals and humans. “Gilgamesh listened to the word of his companion, he took the axe in this hand, he drew the sword from his belt, and he struck Humbaba with a thrust of the sword to the neck, and Enkidu his comrade struck the second blow” (pp.23). The man function of women in the story was strictly for men. Men could do and say whatever they wanted to women. Women were looked upon and treated with lesser respect than men. Women’s bodies were more of a sex symbol than anything else. The trapper stated “Now women, make your breasts bare; have no shame, do not delay but welcome his love” (pp.25). This statement goes to show that women had to do what was asked to them even if they wanted to or not. Another example is when women have to ask permission to do something. “My father, give me the Bull of Heaven to destroy Gilgamesh” (pp. 14).
However, there were a lot of great Goddesses that ruled many lands along with the God’s but women strictly in that story and time period were used for meat and not taking very seriously.

Posted by: Nichole T. at September 1, 2008 09:00 PM

9. What is the attitude of The Epic of Gilgamesh toward Nature ( forests, animals, wild life, etc)? What is the attitude toward the destruction and neglect of nature (as for example in the cutting down of Humbaba’s cedar forest and Enkidu’s abandonment of his former life in another forest)? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)

The attitude of Nature in The Epic of Gilgamesh is depicted as a separate world to that of humans; first shown in the creation of Enkidu as a half best man. “A man unlike any other is roaming now in the pastures.” Once again when Gilgamesh tells the trapper to make Enkidu lay with a prostitute, this would ensure that nature rejects him.
Humbaba was the protector of the cedar forest and for Gilgamesh to grab Humbaba’s attention he and Enkidu cut down trees. “Who is this that has violated my woods and cut down my cedar?” Even Gilgamesh travels through the forest and goes through a change, both mind and body. Which could imply that the forest contains some mystic force to it, hence a different world.

Posted by: Daniel L. at September 1, 2008 11:42 PM

Kamille G 1/09/08

The Epic of Gilgamesh

The Epic of Gilgamesh can be classified as primarily a man’s story predominantly because of the warlike nature of the main events that took place in the epic. The characters of “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” were always engaging in some type of battle with each other, an act that is considered to be very masculine in its nature, in order to earn the right to something or for self-praise. Gilgamesh and Enkidu, for instance, engaged in a fight with Humbaba and killed him in the process, just so that they could obtain cedar trees in the forest to build a gate. On a second occasion, Enkidu and Gilgamesh took part in a fight with the Bull of Heaven, sent by Ishtar after Gilgamesh refused to marry her, which they eventually kill. One would expect a woman’s story to center around a more peaceful and nurturing setting, and not a warlike one as in this epic. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, the main role of the women was to make wild men become civilized. Enkidu, for instance, who was originally part man and part beast was transformed into a tame man with “… the thoughts of a man in his heart.” after he laid down for six days and seven nights with a harlot (pg 15).
In this Epic, women are portrayed mainly as being submissive, possessions of men, and sex objects that are mainly there to seduce wild men into becoming human by teaching them “… the woman’s art…” (pg 14). Enkidu, for example, is seduced by Shamhat, a harlot, who made herself naked in Enkidu’s presence in an attempt to lure him to lay down with her, so that Enkidu could become humanized. The men, on the other hand, are portrayed as the dominant partners and the rulers of women. The men seem to have power over the women and can order them to engage in sexual advances with any man. The harlot which seduced Enkidu, for instance, was instructed by the trapper to “...make your breasts bare...” and “Let him see you naked, let him possess your body.” which the woman had not refused to do. (pg 14). The role and portrayal of men and women in “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” is most likely a representation of the men and women of the time in which the epic was written.


Kamille G

Posted by: Kamille Garness at September 1, 2008 11:46 PM

#8: How is nature represented in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Is the world depicted as a place of safety and harmony, or a place of precariousness and uncertainty? In this version of the world, what problems could one possibly face? What views about the natural world emerge from the story?

In The Epic of Gilgamesh, nature is represented as a giver of life and shelter, along with an entity that cannot be predicted. Throughout the story, nature is seen as uncertain and precarious. Gilgamesh does not know what to expect when he gets to the cedar forest when he has to fight Humaba. (p. 19) Also, he goes on many journeys through forests and across the land which he doesn't know what to expect. The land was also used as a resource. Gilgamesh and Urshanabi used the forest as a resource to build a boat. (p. 34) Nature also struck in the case of the flood. This story would lead one to believe that nature needs to be worshiped since it can be seen as an ultimate provider of resources. Also it shows that nature has to be feared because it can be punishing.

Posted by: Matt M. at September 2, 2008 01:44 AM

I found the course reading to be pretty interesting. It mentions names of gods, heroes, and even enemies that I had once heard before, but never knew the legends behind them. I found it ironic near the end that Gilgamesh was told something like "'if he is able he will cross the sea but if not he will return to the forest' and in his rage he destroyed the part on the ferryman's boat that prevents him from being able to cross the sea." What I really didn't understand was how he finally crossed the sea; did it say that Gilgamesh himself, became the mast so that the ship could sail?


In my experience with The Epic of Gilgamesh, what bits of wisdom can I, as a denizen of the 21st century, take away from a tale first composed somewhere in a region that is now Iraq, AT LEAST, two thousand years B.C.E.?

According to this tale, human can be given various things, both good and bad, but eventually, no matter what we do we cannot live forever on Earth. Eventually everyone, even the strong and the weak, will die. Also to be truly remembered, you have to do something great.

Posted by: Quinten J at September 2, 2008 07:49 AM

6. In The Epic of Gilgamesh, there are mortal men and there are Immortal gods. Based on your understanding of the text, how are the gods of ancient Uruk and its environs viewed? What are their functions? Do they intervene in human affairs? If so, how and to what extent? Be prepared to find specific evidence from the text to support your claim/argument. Would this story work just as well without the inclusion of the gods? Why or why not?

The gods of ancient Uruk are viewed as the most powerful creatures of all. The mortal men are viewed as weak servants to the gods. They function as an apprentice to the gods. Gilgamesh sacrifices warriors whenever he feels like fighting and he will take what ever he feels from his people. The gods intervene by abusing the powers that they have gained. They story would not work as well with out gods because the power and strength are far superior to the humans that the humans depend on the gods to live. On pg. 11 it describes how Gilgamesh is a horrible ruler, arrogant and brutal, the people of Uruk complain of his oppression. On pg. 13 the way Gilgamesh is described is contradicted, when he was built he was made to be wise and he knew mysteries and secrets. He was given a prefect body and beauty. On pg. 30 it describes how Gilgamesh wept for his friend Enkidu. He roamed the plains and cried. He could not rest or be at peace. Another way the gods intervene with human affairs, is when Enkidu was killed and Gilgamesh cried for him, he obtained human characteristics and was becoming mortal.

Posted by: Alex Slavin at September 2, 2008 03:15 PM

Question 13

Enkidu is similar to Gilgamesh mainly to provide as a distraction. Gilgamesh is always so stifled that he acts out against his people, and having a reflection, a second “stormy heart” is what provides him with true companionship. Enkidu is first introduced as a wild man, but shortly after being tamed, his confidence seems lost. (pg. 16) After some time he regains enough courage to grapple with Gilgamesh, and they soon become friends. (pg. 16) However, on entering the Cedar Forest to fight with Humbaba, Enkidu loses his nerve, and Gilgamesh has to rile up his confidence. (pg. 22) After the fight, it seems that Enkidu has regained his confidence, taking on the Bull of Heaven by himself while waiting for Gilgamesh’s help. (pg. 25-26) Enkidu found confidence in his companion, but unfortunately the life that Gilgamesh had brought him also brought about his death due to a judgment from the gods. (pg. 26)

Posted by: JustinW at September 2, 2008 05:54 PM

My question was about the role and function of dreams in the narrative of Gilgamesh and whether or not they are an integral part to the story.

One of the first dreams that take place is when Gilgamesh dreams of a meteor. His mother tells him that this meteor represents a companion he will soon have. This dream foreshadowed his friendship with Enkidu.

During Enkidu and Gilgamesh's journey, Enkidu dreams of a mountain falling on him. This can be interpreted in two ways. It could represent a loss to Humbama or could represent Enkidu's journey to the underworld while Gilgamesh makes his way through the mountains. Enkidu also dreams of a bull which could represent the bull of heaven.

The dreams in Gilgamesh help foreshadow what else happens in the story and shows Gilgamesh's strength. For example, when Enkidu tells Gilgamesh that his dream represented their loss to Humbama, Gilgamesh reassures the Enkidu that they will win. This shows the difference in strength and heart with Gilgamesh. This could show that Enkidu's weak heart or determination could lead him to his death.

Posted by: Joseph S. at September 2, 2008 08:35 PM

Briana Brown
Professor Hobbs
Lit 225
September 2, 2008

In many narratives (and in real life), there is frequently a “sidekick” or helper character who is similar (but not equal) to the protagonist. Why is Enkidu said to be so similar to Gilgamesh (his equal his own reflection, his second self. Does Enkidu change throughout the course of his adventure? What sort of a man was he in the beginning? How does he change? What are the consequences of those changes?

Gilgamesh and Enkidu both share being somewhat made of man. Enkidu was made to be half man and half beast/animal, while Gilgamesh was created by the Gods to be two thirds God and one third man. They both shared the quality of massive strength, unlike any human being. By sharing similar assets, they also shared a bond together. It seemed that they were so close because they shared the same assets and wants. It was like they were the same person in two different bodies.
Enkidu does change throughout the adventures. In the beginning of the story he was a beastly man whom lived among the animals in the forest. He knew nothing of how real men live. After the prostitute taught him the ways of man and some other things that happened and meeting Gilgamesh, he became a hero just like his fellow brother. He became civilized and learned values and love (weather it was the things woman do, finding his brother, and values.)
If he had stayed a beast of the forest he might not have died from an illness. I believe fate was already determined for him and it was planned for his destiny. He did not have a choice or a say. If he was never brought out of the forest, he would have lived in the forest till the end of his life and would have never met the people he did, become what he did (a hero), or find his equal.

Posted by: briana brown at September 2, 2008 10:03 PM

3. In The Epic of Gilgamesh, what sort of ruler is Gilgamesh? Is he liked or disliked by his people? Connect your answer to Enkidu. What is the meaning of the figure of Enkidu? Why is he said to have come into being? For what purpose? Does Enkidu succeed in that purpose? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument.
Answer: Within The Epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh was considered to be an unkind ruler by his people. He was considered to be a tyrant amongst the people and not many of the citizens within the city liked Gilgamesh because of his uncaring attitude. Enkidu who was created by the gods, purpose was to bring a challenge to Gilgamesh. Although Enkidu lost to Gilgamesh to a battle, Enkindu was able to help change Gilgamesh into a better person. Enkidu was able to humble Gilgamesh and change his perspective of live and the treatment of others.

Shayne T.
Eng 225 12:30 - 1:20

Posted by: Shayne Tavares at September 2, 2008 10:14 PM

Kaitlin M. Eng 225

Response to question 4: Close your eyes for a moment and think of YOUR perception of a hero, a type of person frequently known for their “noble qualities.” Based on what we have learned in our selected readings from The Epic of Gilgamesh, how would you define a hero in ancient Sumerian culture? Is Gilgamesh excessive in his behavior, or is he only acting as would be expected of a hero (and a king)? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)


In ancient Sumerian culture I would describe a hero as a man who is marked by bravery and courage, a man who is physically stronger than everyone else, one who is determined to find the answers, one who has a thirst for power and wisdom and a person that is in constant search of glory and honor. Also, the ancient Sumerian hero undergoes a transformation. For example, in the beginning of the Epic of Gilgamesh, the hero Gilgamesh is a wild almost savage beast. However, towards the end of the epic, Gilgamesh has undergone a change and is no longer concerned with killing everything in site but rather, he is concerned with only his survival.
Gilgamesh is excessive in his behavior. He uses his brute strength to kill everything. He has an unfair advantage over everyone because of his superior strength. Instead of using that attribute in moderation, he uses it in excess to the point where it is almost absurd. An ancient Sumerian hero would have brute strength, but use it in moderation. Gilgamesh’s quest for glory is also an example of his excessive behavior. He went out of his way to kill Humbaba. Gilgamesh wanted the people of the city to honor and respect him. During the fight with Humbaba Gilgamesh even says, “Afterwards we can search out the glory and the glamour” (Gilgamesh 23). This shows that while in the midst of fighting, glory is on his mind. He is seeking it in excess.

Posted by: Kaitlin M. at September 2, 2008 11:39 PM

Eng 255
MWF 12:30-1:20

11. Is the character of Gilgamesh transformed in the course of his journeys? Is he a different sort of man at the end, after his return home? If so, how? According to your interpretation of The Epic of Gilgamesh, what is the best way of life? That of Gilgamesh? That of Enkidu? That of Utnapishtim?

Yes, the character of Gilgamesh is definitely transformed in the course of his journeys. He is a different sort of man at the end after his return home compared to the man he was before he undertook his endeavors. With Gilgamesh being young and oppressing his people of Uruk so harshly, the people called out to the sky god Anu for help. In response the sky god creates Enkidu, who is most responsible for the transformation of Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh being the king of Uruk claimed the right to have sexual intercourse with every new bride one day following her wedding. When Enkidu was about to witness Gilgamesh’s claim, he stood in front of Gilgamesh to block his way and they end up fighting furiously.


The best way of life according to The Epic of Gilgamesh is that of Utnapishtim because he is immortal unlike Gilgamesh. This is another way in which Gilgamesh transformed throughout his journey because he became more concerned with learning how to become immortal and he seemed desperate to acquire immortality as he was not so concerned with becoming immortal before his journeys.

Posted by: Brandon M. at September 2, 2008 11:49 PM

My question basically asked what roles did the gods played in the story. (#7) I thought that the gods played an extremely significant role in the story. The gods were all powerful, they did things their own way whether it was to help, teach lessons and cause awareness or to cause problems. The gods were a third party influence and controled in an indirect way, which directly affected the mortal race.Although many of the people looked up to certain gods and treated them with high amounts of respect, they still did what they wanted to do.

Posted by: K.F at September 3, 2008 12:20 AM

Gilgamesh did in fact change throughout the epic. At the start of the Epic, Gilgamesh was a tyrannical king, ravishing the women of Uruk, taking whomever he chose to his bed. “His lust leaves no virgin to her lover” . He was an absolutist in the extreme, epitomizing the motto of Louis XIV; “The State? I am the State!” However, after all the events of his journey, from the death of Enkidu to his talk with Utnapishtim, Gilgamesh became more reflective, more inwardly focused.
I think that the best way of life is that of Utnapishtim. It is not just that he has immortality, but the wise and reflective nature that his experiences. Also, Utnapishtim had the courage to obey the gods, while Gilgamesh refused Ishtar and brought down the wrath of the heavens against himelf and his friend Enkidu. Utnapishtim knows of the futility of fighting the fate of all mortals; that we are from dust and to dust we shall return.

Posted by: J Till at September 3, 2008 12:51 AM

In The Epic of Gilgamesh, there are mortal men and there are immortal gods. Based on your understanding if the text, how are gods of ancient Uruk and its environs viewed? What are their functions? Do they intervene in human affairs? If so, how and to what extent? Would this story work just as well without the inclusion of the gods? Why or why not?


I think the Gods are seen as enemies of the mortals. They resemble a child in way because of the way they behave. These Gods live by their own laws, and they expect everyone to obey them. Unlike our God, who is supposed to help and protect us, the Gods in this epic actually hurt the mortals. Angering these Gods is considered a death sentence. The Gods intervene a number of times in the story. They send the Bull of Heaven to kill Gilgamesh because he refused to marry Ishtar, and because he splayed the giant Humbaba with help from Enkidu. Gilgamesh’s best friend was also a creation of the Gods that did not turn out they way they wanted it to. The Gods also punish Gilgamesh by infection his best friend Enkidu with a fatal illness. The only good deed that the Gods accomplish in this story is that they saved Utnapisthim from the Great Flood because he obeyed them. I don’t the epic would be an epic without the Gods because without them Enkidu would have never died, and then Gilgamesh would have to take the long journey to find immortality. In fact Enkidu would have never existed, and there would not have been any epic battles throughout the story.

Posted by: Myron Kirchner at September 3, 2008 02:03 AM

4. Close your eyes for a moment and think of your perception of a hero, a type of person frequently known for their “noble qualities.” Based on what we have learned in our selected readings from The Epic of Gilgamesh, how would you define a hero in the ancient Sumerian culture? Is Gilgamesh excessive in his behavior, or is he only acting as would be expected of a hero (and a king)? I think that Gilgamesh is excessive in his behavior because in the story it says that he was not liked by his people and I also think that he had the characteristics of a hero but the things that he did were not to be heroic but they were just for glory and glamour. Page 23 says Gilgamesh is seeking glory and glamour by trapping and killing the bird Humbaba.

Posted by: John Daniel at September 3, 2008 10:55 AM

Question 9.

The Epic's attitude toward nature seems a bit scattered to me. While Enkidu is raised in nature with wild animals and while he even is half animal himself, Gilgamesh goes around killing everything in sight and wearing animal skin on his body. Gilgamesh and Enkidu weren't supposed to get along in first place, however, they become best friends and companions who go into the cedar forest in order to kill the giant Humbaba. While they are looking for him, they start cutting down Humbaba's cedar forest so they could catch his attention.

Also, when the Great Flood came, Utinapishtim built a boat and brought one of each kind of animals onto this boat in order to keep nature and the wild life going. Utinapishtim is also the same guy, Gilgamesh goes to in order to find out the secret to eternal life.

Posted by: Anna R. at September 3, 2008 10:58 AM

Eng 225
CA-01
Dreams
10. Enkidu has multiple dreams of mountains falling on him. These dreams that Enkidu have represent defeat of Humamba and the journey to the underworld and Gilgamesh travels through the mountains. Gilgamesh has dreams of a meteor and his mother tells him that it represents a companion that he will have soon. The companion that he soon has ends up being Enkidu. Enkidu dreams about a bull which could either represent Humbama or the Bull of Heaven. The purpose or theme of these dreams is foreshadowing. Foreshadowing represents how Gilgamesh looked over or was better Enkidu. The dreams could also represent how Enkidu might have felt miniscule at times.

Posted by: Walter P at September 3, 2008 11:00 AM

David G.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 225.01 Survey of World Literature I
3 September 2008

In "The Epic of Gilgamesh", what sort of ruler is Gilgamesh? Is he liked or disliked by his people? Connect your answer to Enkidu. What is the meaning of the figure of Enkidu? Why is he said to have come into being? For what purpose? Does Enkidu succeed in that purpose? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)

Gilgamesh was a tyrantical ruler. He was not liked by his people, and many people made this known. This is shown in a quote from the text from a common man, "Gilgamesh sounds the tocsin for his amusement, his arrogance has no bounds by day or night.(Sandars 60)" The Men were sick of the way that Gilgamesh treated both them and their wives. He treated the wives even worse than the men, this is also explained in a qoute from the text. This quote is a man describing what Gilgamesh does to newlywed women, "His lust leaves no virgin to her lover. (Sandars 60)"

Enkidu was created by the gods to oppose Gilgamesh. They realized that Gilgamesh was too powerful, and he must have someone to oppose him. The God's may have meant for Enkidu to destroy Gilgamesh, but it turned out somewhat different. After Gilgamesh beat Enkidu in a grapling match, they became friends. This is described in a quote from the text, "So Enkidu and Gilgamesh embraced and their friendship was sealed. (Sandars 67)" Although Enkidu did not destroy Gilgamesh he humbled him in a different way, he humbled him through friendship. This was the first time that Gilgamesh had felt compassion for another, this brought him down to earth. When Enkidu dies Gilgamesh becomes depressed, the previous cocky Gilgamesh would have never been affected by someone else.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are for the NEXT assignment for this particular entry. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline ABOVE will not get credit for that assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 3, 2008 12:16 PM


Image Source: ">http://www.redicecreations.com/specialreports/2005/10oct/deluge.jpg

3 September 2008

ENG 225 Students,

Please answer in full--about 1 paragraph or more--your own spin on the answer your group discussed in-class today. It should also list the page numbers as in-text citations for any "evidence" you use to make your case. Quoting briefly from the text directly in places is always good and makes a stronger case (not just: I heard someone in class say this or Dr. Hobbs said it). This will be the norm from now on, I won't remind you for every class. If you are not yet signed up for turnitin.com, you will have trouble with this assignment and get behind on your grades. Put your response in the comment box for this entry above.

*As with most assignments for this course, items posted on the English-Blog, unless otherwise noted, must also be posted in the proper folder on turnitin.com in order to get credit. This assignment is no exception*

If you need a reminder of what the discussion questions were, please find them reprinted below:

3 September 2008 – ENG 225.01 - Group Activity Questions for “The Flood” accounts in Genesis 6-9 and The Epic of Gilgamesh

1.Discuss the similarities and differences between how the protagonists in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh learned about the impending deluge. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

2. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “reasons for the deluge” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

3. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “vehicles” and their “construction materials” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

4. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “cargo” of the protagonists in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

5. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “dwelling place of the deities” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

6. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “rainfall’s time span” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

7. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “thanksgiving sacrifices and the reaction of the deities” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

8. Discuss the similarities and differences between how the protagonists in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh checked to see if the floodwaters had receded. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

9. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “thanksgiving sacrifices” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

10. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “the reaction/response of the deities after the deluge” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

11. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “immortality” of the protagonists in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

12. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “protagonists’ spouses” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

Until we meet again,

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 3, 2008 04:27 PM

10. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “the reaction/response of the deities after the deluge” in the “flood story” of Noah and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh.

In the story of Gilgamesh, the gods who created the flood were attempting to get rid of all mankind. The god Ishtar was ashamed that people were murdered during the flood. The god Enlil was upset that when the flood had occurred that mortal men had survived. Gilgamesh did not know that a flood was coming, he over heard that it was which gave him time to prepare for the worst. In the story of Noah, a flood happened because man had become evil and it was a way of cleansing and making the earth pure again. God had watched over the animals and Noah, he was more prepared for the coming of the flood because god was the one who informed him. A big similarity between the two stories is that after the flood, both Noah and Gilgamesh responded to the gods of mankind and understood that the need for man is essential. On pg. 35 it talks about the uproar of mankind and how it has become intolerable. On pg. 36 it talks about what Gilgamesh will bring with him on the boat during the flood. He will bring his family and one of each of an animal. On. Pg 36 it describes that boat that will be built but it not referred to as an ark. On pg. 60, god is describing the ark to Noah and the dimensions of the ark to survive the flood. On pg. 61, Noah is taking his three sons and his family, but he will take two of each type of animal. Gilgamesh and Noah were given the chance to start a new world.

Posted by: Alex Slavin at September 3, 2008 05:08 PM

4. Close your eyes for a moment and think of your perception of a hero, a type of person frequently known for their “noble qualities.” Based on what we have learned in our selected readings from The Epic of Gilgamesh, how would you define a hero in the ancient Sumerian culture? Is Gilgamesh excessive in his behavior, or is he only acting as would be expected of a hero (and a king)?
I think that Gilgamesh is excessive in his behavior because in the story it says that he was not liked by his people and I also think that he had the characteristics of a hero but the things that he did were just for glory and glamour. Page 23 says Gilgamesh is seeking glory and glamour by trapping and killing the bird Humbaba.

Posted by: John Daniel at September 3, 2008 10:22 PM

3. Discuss the similarities and differences between the vehicles and their materials in the flood story of Noah in Genesis and the flood story of utnapishtim in the older the epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts.
In both stories there were boats but in Noah’s story it was call an ark and in Gilgamesh story it was just a boat. In Noah’s story the ark was built more like an ark but in Gilgamesh story the boat looked more like a house in on the house shaped boat there were only one kind of each animal but on Noah’s ark there were a male and a female of each animal. In Gilgamesh story they used cedar wood to build the boat but in Noah’s story they used gopher wood to build the ark.

Posted by: John Daniel at September 3, 2008 10:38 PM

1. Discuss the similarities and differences between how the protagonists in the "flood story" of Noah in Genesis and the "flood story" of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh learned about the impending deluge. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

On page 35 of part five in Gilgamesh, it says that "Ea because of his oath warned me in a dream. He whispered their words to my house of reeds...tear down your house and build a boat, abandon possessions and look for life." Utnapishtim was told by the god Ea in a dream, what was going to happen.
In the story of Noah, it says on page 60, "And God said unto Noah, The end of all flesh is come before me...I will destroy them with the earth." It doesn't say what form God took, but it seems that God just came face to face with Noah and tells him that everyone is going to die except for you and your family.

Posted by: Quinten J at September 4, 2008 11:40 AM


Kamille G 4/09/08

9. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “thanksgiving sacrifices” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.

One of the most apparent similarities between the “thanksgiving sacrifices” of the “flood story” of Noah, and “the flood” story of Utnapishtim was the odor that these sacrifices gave off when they were burnt. In both the flood story of Noah and Utnapishtim, the thanksgiving sacrifices emitted a “sweet savour” (pg. 37 line 26 and pg. 62 line 25). One of the differences between the sacrifices of the flood story of Utnapishtim and Noah was that in Noah’s story animals were sacrificed, while in Utnapishtim’s story a type of drink was sacrificed, as well as different kinds of wood. In Noah’s story, for instance, Noah “took every clean beast, and … clean fowl…” and gave them up as sacrifices. (pg. 62 line 24). In Utnapishtim’s story, on the other hand, Utnapishtim “made a sacrifice and poured out libation….” and set “seven cauldrons”, as well as “heaped up wood and cane and cedar and myrtle.” (pg. 37 line 24,25 and 26 ). In addition, another difference between the “thanksgiving sacrifices” in the two stories is the location in which these sacrifices were burnt. In Noah’s story the sacrifices were burnt “on an altar” (pg.62 line 25); whereas, in Utnapishtim’s story the sacrifices were “poured out … on the mountain top.” (pg.37 line 24). Despite these major differences, the basic idea of sacrificing something to the god or gods, for permitting Noah and Utnapishtim and their families to survive the flood was evident in both stories.

Kamille G

Posted by: Kamille Garness at September 4, 2008 04:54 PM

9. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “thanksgiving sacrifices” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)


Engl 225
CA01
Sept 4th, 2008

Question 9.
In both, the epic of Gilgamesh as well as the one of Noah, ships or boats were used as vehicles. Both characters took animals and their family with them in order to keep the world going and give nature a future. The first difference here is that Utnapishtim only took one animal of each kind, while Noah took a male and a female of each. Both ships are made out of wood while Utnapishtim had to tear down his house and was given these instructions by Ea: “let her beam equal her length, let her deck be roofed like the vault that covers the abyss; then take up into the boat the seed of all living creatures” (36). On the other hand, Noah received instructions from god himself to build a boat out of gopher wood. “the length of the ark shall be three hundred cupits, the breath of it fifty cupits, and the height of it thirty cupits. A window shalt thou make to the ark, and in a cupit shalt thou finish it above […]” (60).

Posted by: Anna R. at September 4, 2008 05:23 PM

8) Discuss the similarities and differences between how the protagonists in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh checked to see if the floodwaters had receded. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)


The similarities with both stories are that they both used birds to check if the water has receded. The differences are the Noah used two birds, a dove and raven, while Gilgamesh used three birds, a dove, raven and a swallow. In Noah, the dove returned with an olive branch. In Gilgamesh, the raven never returned, telling Gilgamesh that it has found land.

Posted by: Matthew Chong at September 4, 2008 07:25 PM

8. Discuss the similarities and differences between how the protagonists in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh checked to see if the floodwaters had receded. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

There are several similarities between Utnapishtim and Noah in regards to how they discovered if the floodwater was receding. Both Noah and Utnapishtim use birds to detect whether or not the floodwater had receeded. They also use a couple of the same birds, a raven and dove. The following quote describes how Noah released his birds, "8:8 Then he sent out a dove from him, to see if the water was abated from the face of the land; 8:9 but the dove found no resting place for the sole of her foot, so she returned to him into the ark; for the water was on the surface of all the land. Then he put out his hand and took her, and brought her into the ark to himself.8:10 So he waited yet another seven days; and again he sent out the dove from the ark.8:11 And the dove came to him toward evening; and behold, in her beak was a freshly picked olive leaf. So Noah knew that the water was abated from the land.8:12 Then he waited yet another seven days, and sent out the dove; but she did not return to him again.(Genesis 8-12)" This next quote is going to describe how Utnapishtum released his birds, "When the seventh day dawned I loosed a dove and let her go. She flew away, but finding no resting place she returned. Then I loosed a swallow, and she flew away but finding resting place she returned. I loosed a raven, she saw that the waters had retreated, she ate, she flew around, she cawed, and she did not come back. (Sandars 108)"

There are also several differences in their accounts, as is shown in the above quotes. Utnapishtum uses three birds, and Noah only uses two. Also, Noah sends his dove multiple times before it does not come back. Utnapishtum sends a raven that does not come back.

Posted by: David G. at September 4, 2008 08:16 PM

ENG 225

9. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “thanksgiving sacrifices” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

It is truly amazing to see the relations between Gilgamesh and Noah in the book of Genesis. Two stories with such immense similarities but at the same time such different cultures and ideals.

In Gilgamesh, the way of sacrificing the animals are different than the story of Noah. Gilgamesh uses a mixture of wood, cane, cedar, and myrtle (Norton 37). All of these substances are mixed into seven cauldrons. I think that the number 7 has symbolism in reference to the number of days Gilgamesh spent during the great flood. The main thing that is intriguring is the reference of a "sweet savor" smelt from the Gods or God above. This similarity is very interesting when comparing these two stories.

In the story from Genesis, the reason for the flood is much different. God was displeased with mankind in this story while in Gilgamesh, the Gods were displeased with how "noisy" humans had become. Noah takes clean and fowl animals and sacrifices them on an altar, much different than the story of Gilgamesh. This God also identifies the scent as a "sweet savor" and after smelling it decides to never kill mankind again.(Norton 67)

Posted by: Joseph S. at September 4, 2008 08:45 PM

12. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “protagonists’ spouses” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh.

In both The Epic of Gilgamesh and Genesis, the wives do not do much. It is understood that in both stories they are used to repopulate after the flood. In Genesis, Noah's wife is hardly even mentioned. All that is said of her is that she was on the ark with the rest of the family. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, the character of Utnapishtim's wife is developed a little more. Her task is to bake a loaf of bread for every day that Gilgamesh is asleep and put it next to his head, that way when he wakes up he will know how long he had slept for. This is all that she really does in the story, however it is more than Noah's wife did.

Posted by: Matt M. at September 4, 2008 09:27 PM

Kaitlin McKenna
Eng 225

Response to question 7: Discuss the similarities and differences between the “thanksgiving sacrifices and the reaction of the deities” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

At the end of both of the flood stories Noah and Utnampishtam make a sacrifice. In Noah’s story, Noah sacrifices one of every kind of clean animal on an altar that he made. Utnampishtim , however, does not sacrifice and animal but he sacrifices myrtle and cedar. Nor does Utnampishtam build an altar. He sacrifices the myrtle and cedar in a cauldron. In both stories, the deities smell the sacrifice and respond. In Noah’s flood story, God is pleased with the sacrifice and proclaims that he will “not again curse the ground of man, even though the inclination of the heart of man is evil from childhood. And I will not again destroy every living thing as I just did.” (Genesis ln 21). The deities are also pleased with Utnampishtam’s sacrifice. The gods “smelled sweet aromas and they gathered like flies over the sacrifice” (Gilgamesh 37). Both the deities smell the sacrifice and are then drawn to it. The deities are pleased in each story.

Posted by: Kaitlin M. at September 4, 2008 10:01 PM

Paola Silvestri

5) Discuss the similarities and differences between the “dwelling place of the deities” in the “flood story “of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts.
A: In the Epic of Gilgamesh there is a polytheistic view; on the other hand, in Genesis there is a monotheistic view.

In the Epic of Gilgamesh the gods dwell in a mountain in the Land of Cedars, where mortals are forbidden. This land is guarded by Humbaba (pg.19). In Genesis God’s dwelling place is in heaven. Heaven also has guardians, known as angels.

The gods in the Epic of Gilgamesh decided to cast a flood on earth because of the uproar of mankind (pg.35; lines 37-43). On the other hand, in Genesis God saw the wickedness of man, and so he decided to destroy all mankind, except for Noah and the ark (pg. 60; lines 1-7).

Ea, one of the gods, told Utnapishtim that there would be a flood, and that he should build an ark, and introduce one of every animal, and seeds of every living thing (pg.35, line 41; pg.36; line 2, 18-25). In Genesis it is God himself who tells Noah to build an ark. Both men were told to take their family on aboard, and animals (pg.60; lines 15-32). Another difference is that Utnapishtim was told to take only one of every animal.

When the flood was over Utnapishtim released a dove, which came back. Then Utnapishtim released a swallow, which also came back. At last, he released a raven which saw that the land was dry, and never came back (pg.37, line 19). In Genesis when the flood was over Noah released a dove, but it came back. So Noah waited for seven days and released the dove again, the dove came back with an olive branch, and this is how Noah knew that the flood was over (pg. 62; lines 1-9). The difference is that Utnapishtim released three different kinds of birds, while Noah only released a dove. In addition, Utnapishtim’s birds never came back, but Noah’s dove did. But they both released birds which is a similarity.

In the Epic of Gilgamesh Enlil, the god who casted the flood, was later thankful that Utnapishtim survived, since this meant that mankind would prevail. Enlil blessed Utnapishtim and his family. Utnapishtim and his wife were granted immortality (pg.38; lines 6-11). In Genesis when the flood is over God spoke to Noah and told him to bring forth his family, and all the animals. Noah built an alter and presented to God burnt offerings. God then promised to never flood the earth again, which is known as the covenant (pg.62; lines 17-25/ pg.63; lines 2-12). The similarities are that both Utnapishtim and Noah were in charge of multiplying the world.

Posted by: Paola S at September 4, 2008 10:09 PM

Kayla Fernandez
ENG225 CA01
Question # 11

• Discuss the similarities and differences between the "immortality" of the protagonist in the "flood story" of Noah in Genesis and the "flood story" of Uptnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence for your answer from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

In both stories the men could have been considered immortal. In the Gilgamesh story Uptnapishtim was literally granted immortality by the God of water. In the Noah story he was not technically granted immortality however Noah was extremely old and it could have been said that by God telling him about the flood and the boat he was granted immortality in a sense, but not literally. Noah and Upnapishtim were both implied to be good men in society since they were the only human beings that were to be saved and were to be the ones to populate the earth after the flood.

Posted by: KMF at September 4, 2008 11:01 PM

Discuss the similarities and differences between the “immortality” of the protagonists in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)


The differences between the immortality of Noah and Utnapishtim are rooted in the basic fact that Utnapishtim is immortal and Noah is not. After surviving the Great Flood that Enil had wrought upon the people of Shurrupak, the god Enil placed his hands upon Utnapishtim and declared “henceforth he and his wife shall live in the distance across the river.” Noah on the other hand, while “600 years old”, was never granted the gift of eternal life from God. There are however, several key similarities .The most obvious is that although both Utnapishtim and Noah were not immortal, their names have lasted for over a thousand years up until our present day. Also, both Utnapishtim and Noah had children that according to the stories repopulated the earth. In that way, they have immortality in their descendents.

Posted by: Jonathan T. at September 5, 2008 12:15 AM

Eng 225
12:30-1:20


7. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “thanksgiving sacrifices and the reaction of the deities” in the “flood story: of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh.
Several of the events of the flood in both Noah’s and Gilgamesh’s story are similar and in other ways very different. Specifically, both Utnapishtim from The Epic of Gilgamesh and Noah in the Genesis prepares a sacrifice to their God after the flood has ended. In the epic of Gilgamesh, it does not state what the sacrifice was exactly but we know that upon reaching shore after the flood Utnapishtim began to prepare the sacrifice which attracted the Gods (http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/MESO/GILG.HTM). In the Genesis, Noah first built an altar and offered “burnt offerings” of every clean beast and of every fowl and placed the burnt offerings on the altar and poured oil onto the offering along with sprinkled wine and strewed frankincense over everything. This attracted the lord (http://sacred-texts.com/bib/jub/jub20.htm).

As far as reactions of the deities, in both stories they were pleased. In The Epic of Gilgamesh some of the God’s were angry at fist that someone survived the flood but then they became pleased, accepted the sacrifice and even presented Utnapishtim with immortality. In the Genesis the Lord was also pleased as he made a covenant with Noah that there shall not be any more floods to destroy the earth.

Posted by: brandon mckoy at September 5, 2008 02:30 AM

Group #4
Discuss the similarities and differences between the “cargo” of the protagonists in the “flood story” of Noah is Genesis and the “flood story” of Unapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the text (e.g. page numbers, etc.)

Even though both stories run in a similar way, the major difference about what went on board. In Genesis Noah receives clear instructions to take pairs of animals. Moreover, it is distinguished between “clean” and “unclean” animals and a ratio 1:7 specified in favor of the “clean” (Genesis 6,19). Also in Genesis, stress is made on the fact that he has to take all necessary food for his family and livestock. In the story of Upnapishtim however, there is interestingly enough a space reserved for precious metals like silver and gold:
” Whatever I had I loaded on it:
whatever silver I had I loaded on it,
whatever gold I had I loaded on it.
All the living beings that I had I loaded on it,
I had all my kith and kin go up into the boat,
all the beasts and animals of the field
and the craftsmen I had go up.” (http://www.ancienttexts.org/library/mesopotamian/gilgamesh/tab11.htm)

It is also obvious from the text that some of the craftsmen joined Utnapishim and his family while in Genesis the chosen are Noah, his wife, three sons and their wives.

Posted by: Strahil S. at September 5, 2008 08:25 AM

Briana Brown
September 4, 2008
Prof Hobbs
Lit 225

6. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “rainfall’s time span” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers.

In both stories, Noah and Gilgamesh, the God/Gods reason for the rain was to kill human kind. They planned on flooding both places to where you needed a boat to stay afloat to survive. Both men built boats and did as they were told by the gods/ God. The time spans in the stories were each different. In the story of Noah, the flood lasted months and months with heavy storms (pg.62.). In the story of Gilgamesh the rain lasted six days and six nights (pg. 37.). The purpose in the stories is mostly the same, except that in one story the rain fell longer.

Posted by: briana brown at September 5, 2008 08:41 AM

Question 10
Discuss the similarities and differences between “the reaction/response of the deities after the deluge” in the flood story of Noah in Genesis and the flood story of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh.

The stories of the flood had a great many parallels in the motivation of the deities (God of the Bible and the gods of Gilgamesh) to destroy mankind and the creatures of the earth. The main similarity was cleansing the earth of all life. “And God looked upon the earth, and, behold, it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted his way upon the earth.” (pg. 60) And in the story of Gilgamesh, the sound of life on the earth was too unbearable for the gods, and all life (although referred to as mankind) is sentenced to die. (pg. 35) After the flood is over, both Noah and Utnapishtim give up offerings, and in both stories the smell is what attracts the God or gods to the offering and pleases them. (pg. 37, 62)
The difference in the attitudes of the deities is also interesting. While the gods of Utnapishtim cower in fear from the storm, (pg. 36) God is with Noah during the flood and watches over him. (pg. 60) Although God had originally decided to end all mankind, his eye was on Noah from the start, (pg. 60) but the gods of Utnapishtim were much less organized, destroying mankind on a whim, while life was saved by Ea behind the other gods backs. (pg. 35) Even though the gods in Gilgamesh are sorry for trying to exterminate mankind, (pg.37) only the God of the Bible promises to Noah and all mankind that he will never flood the earth again. (pg. 62)

Posted by: JustinW at September 5, 2008 09:38 AM

5. Discuss the similarities and differences between the “dwelling place of the deities” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh.

Answer: Within each of the stories about the flood, the “dwelling place of the deities”, has its share of similarities as well as its differences. In the biblical depiction of the “flood story” the dwelling place of God is within heaven a place of unknown description. In the Epic of Gilgamesh the dwelling place of the God Enlil who caused the flood lived somewhere within the mountains of the forest. (Page 16, Book A) In the “flood story” of Noah God’s dwelling place is not seen and there is no way of getting there directly. As for the Gods in the Gilgamesh Epic, the Gods dwelling places can be seen by others and is not considered to be a mystery. Both share the concept of not having any physical human interaction with followers and reveal themselves to the people when they see fit.

Source: Book A; Page 35

Posted by: S.Tavares at September 5, 2008 10:30 AM

There were many similarities and differences of Cargo that was in both the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim of the older version in The Epic of Gilgamesh. One of the main similarities was both people on the ships brought their family members and some sort of animals aboard with them. In the story of Noah stated on page 60 “But with thee will I establish my covenant; and thou shalt come into the ark, thou, and thy sons, and thy wife, and thy sons’ wives with thee. And every living thing of all flesh, two of every sort shalt thou bring onto the ark, to keep them alive with thee; they shall be male and female”. It is very clear that in both stories that not only were animals brought onto the ship, also animals were.
However, there were animals brought on to the ship, in the story of Gilgamesh not both a male and female animal were brought onto the ship. There was real evidence of what kind of animals were brought onto to the ship. However, he was asked to bring one animal of each onto the boat. Another major issue was that in Gilgamesh they were asked to bring god and in the story of Noah they were asked to bring enough food for everyone. For example “I loaded into her all that I had of gold and of living things, my family, my kin, the beast of the field both wild and tame, and all the craftsman” (pp. 36). It is clear that family was the most important thing that was on the ships.

Posted by: Nichole T. at September 5, 2008 10:30 AM

Walter Perkins
Eng 225
CA-01

The Reasons for Deluge

2. In both of these stories the reason for deluge was because the god’s were either agitated or angry with the people on earth. Also in both stories the characters that survived built a boat and brought animals on the boat with them. The exact reasoning for the gods causing these floods is different in these two stories. In the “Ark of Noah” the reason that the god created a flood was because he was angry with the “corruption on earth and the violence” (p.60). In Gilgamesh the gods decided as a council that they were annoyed by the people on earth. The gods agreed that the “uproar of mankind was intolerable and sleep is no longer possible by reason of babel” (p.35) so they created a flood to knock down the population and noise.

Posted by: Walter P at September 5, 2008 10:55 AM

Daniel L.
2008-09-03
ENG 225.01 Survey of World Literature I

1.Discuss the similarities and differences between how the protagonists in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh learned about the impending deluge. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answers from the texts (page numbers, line numbers, etc.)

The "flood story" in both Noah and Gilgamesh start in a world where the god(s) were angry of the people. In Giglamesh the gods become angry with all the noise, “the gods in council, “The uproar of mankind is intolerable and sleep is no longer possible by reason of the babel.” (pg. 35) Utnapishtim is warned by Ea in a dream, “Enlil did this, but Ea because of his oath warned me in a dream. “ (pg.35)
In the story of Noah it begins with a very angry God, “And the Lord said, I will destroy man whom I have created from face of the earth;” (pg. 60) However, unlike in Gilgamesh, Noah is warned about the flood directly from God. “And God said unto Noah, The end of all flesh is come before me;” (pg. 60)

~Daniel L

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John A.
Mon 9/8/2008 11:27 AM
ENG 225.01 Survey of World Literature I

Discuss the similarities and differences between the “protagonists’ spouses” in the “flood story” of Noah in Genesis and the “flood story” of Utnapishtim in the older The Epic of Gilgamesh. Be prepared to provide evidence of your answer from the texts.

To start off the main purpose of the spouse in both stories is help repopulate the world Page 62 second paragraph. In Noah’s story of the flood he starts off with three children already. chapter 6 second paragraph Shem, Ham, and Japheth. However in Utnapishtim’s account he has not had a child yet. Giving the spouse even more work to do in the future.
Over all the spouse in Noah’s story didn’t have much of a playing role, always in the background only credited for birthing children. His account doesn’t even say that she cooked for him. However in Utnapishtim’s story the spouse baked bread for her husband to let him know how many days he was asleep 38 chapter 6 first paragraph. Giving her the credit of at least being able to make bread and tell what time it was.

~John A.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 6, 2008 11:42 AM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
1/28/2014

Question #21:
What are the further stages in the civilizing of Enkidu? What is the particular motive for Enkidu’s leaving the shepherd’s camp? Why is this motive so strong?

Answer:
The Harlot was the one who takes on the role of civilizing Enkidu. In order to civilize Enkidu she leads him like a child into shepherd’s camp while clothing him. This is the representation of Enkidu becoming civil and a more domestic person.

Enkidu leaves the camp to go along with his friend Gilgamesh. Enkidu leaves to go with Gilgamesh because like the prostitute he was trying to tame Gilgamesh. He tries to calm him down and make him more human. He also leaves because he thinks that both of them can go on and accomplish greater things.

Enkidu’s motive for leaving the camp is very strong. He not only wants to live for the moment, but he also wants to see what is out there. After Enkidu is in the camp with the prostitute, he wants to help Gilgamesh and give back in a sense. He and Gilgamesh have many things in common. The first thing that they have in common is that they use to behave like animals and second is that after they calm down they acted more like humans.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at January 28, 2014 01:07 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Professor Hobbs
English 220CL Journey into Narratives CA 01
28 January 2014

Question #13:
Why does Enkidu start to weep? What is Gilgamesh’s reason for going to the Forest of Cedar and facing Humbaba?

ANSWER:
After a wrestling match between Gilgamesh and Enkidu, in which Gilgamesh emerged victorious, the two men “kissed each other and made friends” (Puchner 74). Shortly after, Gilgamesh proclaims Enkidu’s lack of family and his wild hair. Enkidu begins to cry, saying that “cries of sorry” have “cramped my muscles” (Puchner 48). One questions as to why he begins crying. My assumption is that he becomes overwhelmed with emotion upon realizing that he was raised as a beast and was without a proper family. As for Gilgamesh’s reasoning for facing Humbaba to “wipe out everything evil from the land,” he says he needs to cut a cedar tree “big enough to make whirlwinds” (Puchner 48). Gilgamesh really just wishes to “establish eternal fame” (Puchner 49).

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at January 28, 2014 01:29 PM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - Journeys in Narrative
January 29th, 2014


What does Ishtar borrow from her parents to try and destroy Gilgamesh? What is her motivation for this? Is her plan successful?


In the epic of Gilgamesh, the Goddess Ishtar pleads with her parents to give her the Bull of Heaven to destroy Gilgamesh. Her father is hesitant to give her the Bull, but she threatens to unleash the dead from hell to feast upon the living, he warns her that the Bull will bring drought to Uruk for seven years, but she assures him that she has provisions to sustain her people, so her father reluctantly gives her the bull. Ishtar wishes to destroy Gilgamesh because he refused to be her king claiming that she always finds a new lover and gets bored with them over time and ends up turning them into something terrible. His refusal infuriates her to the point she wants to destroy him. She sends the bull into Uruk, and it causes immediate destruction and death where Gilgamesh and his brother Enkidu go to battle with it. The battle was short, but Gilgamesh and his brother win after Gilgamesh thrusts his sword into the Bull Killing him and ripping out his heart, foiling Ishtar’s plans.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at January 28, 2014 02:42 PM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA 01
28 January 2014

QUESTION #9:
Why is Ishtar attracted to Gilgamesh? Why does Gilgamesh resist Ishtar? What is the role of Enkidu in the slaying of the Bull?

ANSWER:
Ishtar’s attraction to Gilgamesh is made known immediately after he has slain Humbaba. This heroic act exemplifies the sexual connotations of masculinity. Ishtar sees him as a beautiful man after he has bathed and changed, and as indicated on line 4 of Tablet VI, “put on his kingly diadem” (Simon 62); but only because he has become so sexy through his masculine act of killing and slaying a beast no man has slain before and so the reason for Ishtar’s plea wherein she says in line 8 of Tablet VI, “Give, oh give me of your lusciousness!” (Simon 62). With respect to “The Hero’s Journey,” Ishtar represents the temptress. By slaying Humbaba, a God’s guardian, Gilgamesh has now proven his three-quarters of divinity, so the Gods are trying to stop him from this greatness, and so Ishtar represents an obstacle towards his journey for eternal life.

Gilgamesh resists Ishtar because, again, she is the temptress and he knows it. He really has nothing to offer her as a human man, which is evidenced in his response when he says, “What shall I give you if I take you to wife?” (Simon 62). In other words, Gilgamesh knows what her role is as temptress, and based on her history with others like Dumuzi whose wing she broke, the lion she built ambush pits for, and many others, he realizes that she is going to be his fall, as Eve was the metaphoric fall of Adam. As to “The Hero’s Journey,” Gilgamesh resists Ishtar and, therefore, sends the Bull of Heaven to him; another threshold guardian to test his strength.

Enkidu’s role in slaying the Bull is that of ally and mentor/teacher to Gilgamesh. He does not actually kill the bull but helps Gilgamesh with the strategy of the killing. Enkidu is not the hero of the story; Gilgamesh is, so it must be Gilgamesh that, as indicated in line 135 of Tablet VI, “Thrust his dagger between neck, horn, and tendon!” (Simon 63). This act again represents another test that Gilgamesh must go through before he journeys on to meet Utanapishtim and Enkidu is simply there to aid him by teaching him how to position and hold the Bull for the kill.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at January 28, 2014 03:55 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG. 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02

QUESTION #24:
What is the pattern of the journey? What similarity is there in the various dreams?

ANSWER:
On Gilgamesh and Enkidu’s journey to the Forest of Cedar, there is a tremendous amount of foreshadowing. Through table IV, it has shown the pattern of their travels includes Gilgamesh continuing to have these dreams of foreshadowing for future events including their battle against Humbaba. Through the pattern of Gilgamesh and Enkidu, consistently traveling and then eating between leagues, and sleeping, the dreams continue for Gilgamesh. Each dream Gilgamesh has, Enkidu reassures him in the same way each time.
Gilgamesh has multiple dreams that are similar each time. Every time he awakes, he thinks Enkidu is waking him, and Enkidu continues to reassure and comfort Gilgamesh (Puchner 54). Enkidu reassures Gilgamesh by telling him that his dreams were just precious omens (Puchner 54). Through the similarities of Gilgamesh’s dreams, Enkidu is continuously reassuring him before their arrival to the Cedar Forest. He reassures Gilgamesh that the mountains in his dreams are just a symbol of Humbaba, and they will defeat Humbaba along with accomplishing a deed unheard of in the land (Puncher 54). Again, the dreams show similarities. The dreams are slightly fearful for Gilgamesh, but Enkidu listens in on the dreams and relays a cheerful interpretation of each dream repeating a similar pattern each time.

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at January 28, 2014 04:12 PM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
29 January 2014

Question #12:
Tablet 2. The taming of Enkidu
What are the further stages in the civilizing of Enkidu? What is the particular motive for Enkidu's leaving the shepherd's camp? Why is this motive so strong?
Endiku needs to learn how to be more human-like. When he was made he was meant to be more animalistic that human. It was important for him to be able to eat and drink what the shepards provided to him because that is how humans eat and drink. He needs to be more civilized because he needs to be able to compete with Giglamesh, who is part man. When Enkidu gets to Uruk and listens to what Giglamesh said, he produced human emotions as a response. This showed that he had been “tamed”.

Enkidu learns that Giglamesh disrespects newlyweds in Uruk by sleeping with the new bride before the groom does. This disturbs Enkidu and he decides to do something about it. He decides to go to Uruk with Shamhat to confront Giglamesh. He ends up stopping Giglamesh from taking another victim and they become friends, with Enkidu and Giglamesh acknowledging each other’s strengths.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at January 28, 2014 06:20 PM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 214 Journeys in Narrative 220CL
28 January 2014

12. Tablet 2. The taming of Enkidu
What are the further stages in the civilizing of Enkidu? What is the particular motive for Enkidu's leaving the shepherd's camp? Why is this motive so strong?

Answer:
The further stages in the civilizing of Enkidu are when the shepherds crowded around him and set the bread and beer before him. “He treated his hairy body with water, he anointed himself with oil, turned into a man, he put on clothing, became like a warrior” (Puchner 45) is another stage in the civilizing of Enkidu. The particular motive for Enkidu’s leaving the camp is that he found out that there was a wedding after stopping a traveling man. This motive is so strong because he finds out that Gilgamesh could take a new bride on her wedding night before her husband.

Posted by: Michael Adamson at January 28, 2014 07:07 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
29 January 2014

8. What positive and negative results of the exploit does Enkidu foresee? What are the auras of Humbaba?
The negative exploits foreseen by Enkidu are Enkidu thinks that Humbaba will almost deceive Gilgamesh into not killing him. He is worried that Humbaba will talk his way out of death when Gilgamesh is about to kill him. Enkidu is worried that the God’s will become mad at him and Gilgamesh. He urges Gilgamesh to kill Humbaba while he has the chance.
The positives Enkidu foresees is that Gilgamesh will be able to slay the nearly invincible Humbaba. He knows that Gilgamesh can kill Humbaba and they can both escape with their lives.
Humbaba is extremely strong, intimidating and is not at all afraid of Gilgamesh or Enkidu. He talks down to Gilgamesh and Enkidu, calling them “small fry’s” and says that Enkidu is an illegitimate man, even though he was made by the God’s.

Posted by: Henry Adu at January 28, 2014 08:30 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
28 January 2014

QUESTION #4
Why does Endiku start to weep? What is Gilgamesh’s reason for going to the Forest of the Cedar and facing Humbaba?

ANSWER:
Endiku starts weeping when Gilgamesh was speaking to the people about him, about the fact he has no parents and how lonely he was born. It is stated on page 47 when Gilgamesh says, “Endiku has neither a father nor mother, his hair was growing freely, he was born in the steppe” (Puchner). In addition, the story states, “tears filled his eyes, he was listless, his strength turned into weakness.” On the other hand, Gilgamesh’s reason for going to the Forest of Cedar and facing Humbaba is because he wants his name to be known as the man who killed the beast, the guardian of the forest of cedars, by establishing his name on the forest of cedars the land where Humbaba will die. Gilgamesh states, “If I fall on the way, I’ll establish my name, Gilgamesh who joined battle with fierce Humbaba… I must establish eternal fame…I will hunt him down in the forest of cedars, I will make the land hear mighty is the scion of Uruk” (Puchner 49).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at January 28, 2014 09:04 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CA02
27 January 2014

QUESTION #14:
How is the relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu further defined in this tablet?

ANSWER:
The relationship of Gilgamesh and Enkidu is defined in this tablet as one of being brothers, especially at the point where Gilgamesh’s mother accepts Enkidu into their family as her “adopted son”.
It is also shown that Gilgamesh trusts Enkidu to lead the way in their journey to Humbaba, where they could both face death. Gilgamesh’s mother also obviously trusts Enkidu because she entrusts the life of her son in his hands when she welcomes him into their family.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at January 28, 2014 09:37 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys to Narratives CA02
29 January 2014

Question #6:
What is the pattern of the journey? What similarity is there in the various dreams?

Answer:
The pattern of the journey comes from Gilgamesh in his sleep. He has fallen asleep for four to five nights and he wakes up in the middle of the night at the same time each night. He has developed a sleeping pattern of nightmares. Each night he is frightened a horrible dream. He wakes up startled in the middle of the night and asks Enkidu the same questions. Gilgamesh has a new nightmare each night and Enkidu tries to interpret the dream to him. Each day they reach Mount Lebanon and accomplish their extensive journey by night. Gilgamesh exclaims to the heavens for a new dream.

In each of Gilgamesh’s dreams he experiences a horrible plague. In his first nightmare, he was slightly afraid of his dream. He rushes to Enkidu to let him know about the dream. At the end of his second nightmare, he wakes up afraid, again. He immediately asked Enkidu the same questions. He describes his dream as a being defeated by a mountain and a young man rescues him. Enkidu tries to calm him down so that he can continue on the next day. Enkidu states it was the monster Humbaba. The third nightmare comes and Gilgamesh is terrified because the dream was about dangerous weather conditions. Enkidu tries to explain to Gilgamesh the nightmare was Humbaba who is angry with Gilgamesh. By the fourth dream, Gilgamesh is awakened by the nightmare because of a monster he dreamt about that terrified him. He wakes Enkidu who explains to him that the monster was another godlike monster Shamash.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at January 28, 2014 10:26 PM

Marssiel Mena
Professor Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey’s to Narrative CA02
29 January 2013
Tablet 2.The taming of Enkidu
In the story of Gilgamesh, the further stages in the civilizing of Enkidu include the shepherd’s feeding him bread and giving him beer to drink. Which was something Enkidu never drank or ate. Then, “he turned into a man, he put on clothing, became like a warrior” (Puchner 45). Later on that night, Enkidu meets a man going to the city of Uruk, who is angry with Gilgamesh being able to take away wives on their wedding night to have sex. After Gilgamesh is done with the wife, he gives them back to their husbands (Puchner 46). This is what leads Enkidu to leave the shepherd’s camp and go to Uruk. Taking someone’s wife is wrong and is not god-like. If it were not for this encounter with the man, Gilgamesh and Enkidu, would have not fought and then would have not become friends.

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at January 28, 2014 10:28 PM

Zachary Daley
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
1/28/2014

Question #1:
Tablet 1. The coming of Enkidu
What are the main points in the praise of Gilgamesh with which the poem begins? What is the problem in Uruk? Is enkidu the solution to the problem? Why is a prostitute the agent of the “capture” of enkidu? If he can speak, why couldn’t he be offered some other enticement besides sex?
Answer:
Gilgamesh is worshiped in the confines of Uruk; he is thought to be the all-powerful. He is a deity to them he is supposed to be all knowing and just the perfect human being. It is said that he has three features, two are God like, and one is human. Gilgamesh has built Uruk and is very proud of it. Then there is a place where the walls are stunning and made of copper. This place was called Eanna, Uruk was no Eanna, and Eanna was the place all other kingdoms strived to be like.
With Uruk needing some work done, and Gilgamesh needing a partner along comes Enkidu who is one with the beasts and is deity like. He is summoned by Aruru to become Gilgamesh’s partner. With two all-powerful beings any kind of work can be done. Nevertheless, before Enkidu can help Gilgamesh, he needs to be pointed in the right direction and be broken from his beasts.
In order to be broken from the beasts Enkidu must go to the river with a harlot and when all the beasts are approaching the water, they would have sex in order to make the beasts stay away from Enkidu. When they finish and he heads toward the beasts and the water, instead of being one with the beasts they start to shy away from Enkidu.
This was the only way that Enkidu could join Gilgamesh because Enkidu would always have something to do with the beasts and would not be able to help Gilgamesh with all of the duties.

Posted by: Zach Daley at January 28, 2014 10:33 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey's in Narrative CA02
28 January 2014

Question #20:
Why is a prostitute the agent of the "capture" of Endiku? If he can already speak, why couldn't he be offered some other enticement besides sex?

Answer:
The opening of tablet one has some sexual language and descriptive words suggesting the theme later on in the work. The "lustrous" treasury of hallowed... (Anonymous 12). The land and setting is larger than life and it is made to seem superficial and materialistic. When Endiku is introduced he is described with sexual adjectives as well, "he was made lush with head hair, like a woman."

Endiku was created somewhat disconnected from society as well as people. "He knew neither people nor inhabited land, he dressed as animals do. He fed on grass with gazelles, with beasts he jostled at the water hole, with wildlife he drank his fill of water (Anonymous 100-104). Endiku did not understand how other men interacted with one another initially and he was curious once exposed to the humans with all of their clothing and material objects.

Sex was the only necessary enticement in this situation because sexual desire is embedded in all human beings whether or not he or she is isolated from society. There was no connection between these two people and sexual desire is something that is powerful enough to cross language barriers as well as cultural differences. Using sexual desire to manipulate the "capture" of Endiku made it much more simpler to persuade him by speaking to him personally.

Posted by: DJ Menezes at January 28, 2014 10:43 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
28 January 2014

Question #4:
Tablet 2. The taming of Enkidu
Why does Enkidu start to weep? What is Gilgamesh’s reason for going to the Forest of Cedar and facing Humbaba?
ANSWER:
Enkidu weeps because he is overwhelmed with all the gifts that are being presented to him by the temple prostitute. Gilgamesh decides he wants to go to the Forest of Cedar because Enkidu has begun to describe Humbaba to him and he wants to fight Humbaba. Gilgamesh also talks about how he accepts death as long as he leaves an indelible mark in the land of the living.

Posted by: Becca Orden at January 28, 2014 11:54 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Prof. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (220CL)
28.1.2014
Question #9
9. Ishtar and the Bull of Heaven.
Why is Ishtar attracted to Gilgamesh? Why does Gilgamesh resist Ishtar? What is the role of Enkidu in the slaying of the Bull?
ANSWER:
“The princess Ishtar coveted Gilgamesh’s beauty” (Puchner, 62), when Gilgamesh freshens up after battle Ishtar seems to be attracted to his looks and tells him to be her husband.
Gilgamesh refuses Ishtar by expressing that she “crushes a warrior [...] You fell in love with the brightly coloured roller bird, then struck him and broke his wing, [...] You feel in love with the lion, perfect in strength, then you dug for him ambush pits, seven times seven.” (Puchner, 63). Gilgamesh lists every single one of Ishtar’s former lovers, who were condemned by her in the end.
The main role of Enkidu, not just in slaying Humbaba (the Bull of Heaven), is to serve as Gilgamesh’s equal. Enkidu is the one who pushes and keeps Gilgamesh focused on killing Humbaba so that Uruk may gain more land.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at January 29, 2014 12:10 AM

Diana Berthil
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL
1/28/14

# 25. Tablet 5. The combat with Humbaba
What is the previous relation between Enkidu and Humbaba? How is Gilgamesh aided in the slaying of Humbaba by Shamash and by Enkidu? What positive and negative results of the exploit does Enkidu foresee? What are the auras of Humbaba?

The previous relation between Enkidu and Humbaba is declared by Humbaba himself, in which he recollects brief encounters they with each other had when Enkidu was younger. Humbaba states that each encounter was from afar, for due to the insignificance of Enkidu as a person, Humbaba himself would never approach him.
“Come now, Enkidu, small-dry, who does not know his father, Spawn of a turtle of tortoise, who sucked no mother’s milk! I used to see you when you were younger but would not go near you…” (Puchner 59).

Gilgamesh is aided in the slaying of Humbaba by both Shamash and Enkidu, but in different ways. Enkidu aides Gilgamesh in actual combat and by encouraging him to continue to fight even when he sees the grotesque features that Humbaba transforms into. “Why, my friend, do you raise such unworthy objections?.. The time has come to pour the copper into the mold. Will you take another hour to blow the bellows, an hour more to let it cool? To launch the flood weapon, to wield the lash, retreat not a foot, you must not turn back, let your eyes see all, let your blow strike home!” (Puchner 59). Shamash sides Gilgamesh by sending a force of thirteen great winds against Humbaba; these winds incapacitate Humbaba and give Gilgamesh the chance to overpower him. “Shamash raised the great winds against Humbaba, south wind, north wind, east wind, west wind, moaning wind, blasting wind, lashing wind, contrary wind, dust storm, demon wind, freezing wind, storm wind, whirl wind: The thirteen winds blotted out Humbaba’s face. He could not charge forward, he could not retreat. Then Gilgamesh’s weapons defeated Humbaba.” (Puchner 59).

The positive and negative results of the exploit that Enkidu foresees is that on the positive side they will no longer have to deal with Humbaba who is the “guardian of the forest of cedars” and Gilgamesh will be able to establish a strong reputation; but the negative side includes the great gods becoming angry with them for what they have done.
“Humbaba is guardian of the forest of cedars, finish him off for the kill, put him out of existence, before Enlil the foremost hears of this! The great gods will become angry with us, Enlil in Nippur, Shamash in Larsa. Establish your reputation for all time: “Gilgamesh, who slew Humbaba”.” (Puchner 60).

The auras of Humbaba are his cedar trees, which Enkidu speaks of with their use to make an enormous gate. “You killed the guardian by your strength, who else could cut through this forest of trees? My friend, we have felled the lofty cedar, whose crown once pierced the sky…” (Puchner 61).

Posted by: Diana Berthil at January 29, 2014 02:07 AM

Jack Constant
Dr. Hobbs
English 220CL
January 27, 2014

Question: Tablet 4 The Journey to the Forest of Cedar. What is the pattern of the journey? What similarities is there in the various dreams?

Answer: The pattern of the journey happens when they travel twenty double leagues, thirty double leagues, and fifty double leagues. Each time they travel these distances they do the same thing. "At twenty double leagues they broke for some food, at thirty double leagues they stopped for the night, walking Fifty double leagues in a whole day, a walk of a month and a half days. They approach Mount Lebanon. Towards sunset they dug a well, they filled their water skin with water." (Norton 53). Along with this, Gilgamesh goes to the mountain and pours flour out for an offering (Norton 55). He asks the mountain to give him a propitious dream. Enkidu makes Gilgamesh a shelter for receiving dreams and there is always a gust of wind blowing as the door fastens. Gilgamesh then falls asleep and wakes up in the middle of the night having to tell Enkidu about his dream. Enkidu asks questions about why Gilgamesh has waken him up. Each time, Gilgamesh tells him about a different dream (Norton 55-58).
There are similarities to each dream Gilgamesh has. Each time Gilgamesh is pinned down, figurative and literally, and unable to move from immanent death, someone, Shamash, saves him. Each dream has very vivid disastrous story lines. In his first dream, Gilgamesh in on the mountain with his feet pinned by an enemy. He is pulled away at the last minuet by a handsome man and is given water and his feet back on the ground (Norton 55). In his second dream, the earth is thundering, darkness falls, lightning flashing, and fire shooting up. Then everything is tamed (Norton 57). In the third dream, Gilgamesh sees Anzu, a lion-headed monster-bird. Anzu was descending towards them. He was terrifying. Then Shamash comes and kills Anzu (Norton 57).

Posted by: jack constant at January 29, 2014 02:55 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL CA01
29 January 2014

Question 5, Tablet III: Preparations for the expedition to the Forest of Cedar.
"How is the relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu further defined in this tablet?"

In the first two tablets of The Epic of Gilgamesh, we see that Gilgamesh meets a wild man named Enkidu. The two seem destined to be together as Gilgamesh has dreams about Enkidu and Enkidu is told Gilgamesh is a stronger man and can take what he pleases. They fight and Enkidu loses and decides to join Gilgamesh on his journey.
In the third tablet, Enkidu and Gilgammesh attempt to appease the gods before they set out on their journey. They are close to one another during this span and when they explain their quest to Ninsun, a goddess and Gilgamesh’s mother, she summons the Sun god Shamash to protect her son. She the adopts Enkidu as a son saying, “…though you are no issue from my womb…I herewith take Enkidu, as my adopted child.”
With this action, Enkidu has become a true equal to Gilgamesh as his brother. Or at least he should be treated as such. Through the end of tablet III, Enkidu is mentioned to have to walk ahead of Gilgamesh as a scout of sorts and a body guard. Instead of his role not really changing from before being adopted, Enkidu should now be seen as a partner or equal stance to Gilgamesh, not a sidekick whose purpose is to shield Gilgamesh from harm.

Posted by: Craig Graves at January 29, 2014 02:58 AM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
28 January 2014

Question #13:
Why does Enkidu start to weep? What is Gilgamesh’s reason for going to the Forest of Cedar and facing Humbaba?

Answer:
Enkidu started to realize he was weaker than he thought. Enkidu was lacking the life he had recently been given and that got pointed out; he was not as worthy as what he thought. He treated his hairy body with water, He anointed himself with oil, turned into a man, He put on clothing, became like a warrior….” (Gilgamesh 45). Enkidu came from a poor place so for the moment, he felt like a king, and yet it was ripped away. “She took off her clothing, with one piece and she dressed him. (Gilgamesh 45).

The reason for Gilgamesh to go to the Forest of Cedar and facing Humbaba was to gain bravery and to develop confidence needed to live life and become successful. Enkidu says, “How shall the likes of us go to the forest of cedars, my friend? In order to safeguard the forest of cedars, Enlil has appointed him to terrify people.” (Gilgamesh 48). Gilgamesh replies, “Why, my friend, do you raise such unworthy objections? Who, my friend, can go up to heaven?” (Gilgamesh 49).

Work Citied:
Gilgamesh: The Epic of Gilgamesh. Trans. Foster, Benjamin R. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at January 29, 2014 09:14 AM

Joe Sears
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
29 January 2014

QUESTION #1:
What are the main points in the praise of Gilgamesh with which the poem begins? What is the problem in Uruk? Is Enkidu the solution to the problem? Why is a prostitute the agent of the “capture” of Enkidu? If he can already speak, why couldn’t he be offered some other enticement besides sex?

ANSWER:
When the poem begins Gilgamesh is praised profoundly as being perfect in strength, handsome and well proportioned, having no equal. He was also said to be unfair to the men and women of Uruk or “Lording it like a wild bull”. He was uncontrolled and apparently board. He had already discovered and overcame everything within his kingdom. There was no challenge for him and seems to be no equal to him.
The people of Uruk called upon Aruru to create an equal to Gilgamesh, in hopes Gilgamesh would become content within the kingdom. Enkidu was created, he became much like Gilgamesh in the steppe. He was a ruler amongst the animals and kept them safe from hunters. When Gilgamesh met Enkidu he found a friend and partner that seemed to balance him out. He found someone he was equal to and they became friends and there was peace throughout the land. Enkidu was the solution to Gilgamesh’s unsettled desires.
Enkidu was seduced by a prostitute named Shamhat. A woman was used because Enkidu was already used to men. Enkidu had experienced men trying to kill his friends (the animals). Enkidu had not yet experience a female.
Shamhat used sex to seduce Enkidu. Enkidu already had food and friends. The steppe was plentiful and Enkidu did not know of anything else, he was content and happy where he was. Shamhat used sex on Enkidu because Enkidu, at that point, had not experience the embrace of a women. Another reason is once Enkidu had sex he was no longer the same, he became slower and the beasts saw him as a man.

Posted by: Joe Sears at January 29, 2014 09:30 AM

Jacklyn O’Brien
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
28 January 2014

QUESTION #22
Why does Enkindu start to weep? What is Gilgamesh’s reason for going to the Forest of Cedar and facing Humbaba?

ANSWER:
Shortly after the gods decided to create Enkidu, Enkidu is then led towards the city of Uruk. On the way Enkidu and the temple prostitute (Enkidu’s leader to Uruk) stop at a shepherd’s camp. The herdsmen were so amazed by Enkidu’s beauty, strength, and structure; they were quick to serve him plates of food, and even his first beer. While staying at this camp Enkidu hears word of how Gilgamesh takes whatever he wants, and no one can stop him (Including brides on their wedding nights.) Enkidu is enraged and decides to travel to Uruk to challenge the all mighty Gilgamesh. The two heroes’ begin to wrestle, making the city shake. Gilgamesh eventually pins Enkidu down, and Enkidu quickly accepts Gilgamesh is the rightful king of Uruk. The two men then kiss and become best friends. As Gilgamesh starts talking to Enkidu, Enkidu’s eyes begin to fill with tears and his strength has turned to weakness. Enkidu starts to weep because he has lost his strength. Enkidu states “Cries of sorrow, my friend have cramped my muscles. Woe has entered my heart.” Gilgamesh responds by saying the two of them must defeat the evil monster Humbaba in the Forest of Cedar. Gilgamesh must cut down a cedar tree in exchange for immortality. Gilgamesh believes together him and Enkidu can defeat Humbaba, and will rid their land of something evil. In exchange their names will be glorified and they will live on forever.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at January 29, 2014 11:05 AM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 220
January 26, 2014

Question #11:
Why is a prostitute the agent of the “capture” of Enkidu? If he can already speak, why couldn’t he be offered some other enticement besides sex?

Answer:
In the story “The Epic of Gilgamesh”, we learn about King Gilgamesh, and his journey in search for everlasting life. “Gilgamesh was thought to be a priest-king of the city-state of Uruk in Southern Mesopotamia”, it is said that he probably ruled around 2700 B.C.E. and is remembered for building of Uruk’s monumental city walls. The meaning of the word Gilgamesh is, offspring is a hero. King Gilgamesh was two-thirds divine and one-third human, he was known for being a bad ruler, said to be brutal, arrogant and oppressive. Enkidu was “a blend of human and wild animal”. Beasts in the wild raised him and, as a result, he treated and protected them as his own. This posed as a threat to Gilgamesh as Enkidu would break his hunters traps to protect the beasts. Gilgamesh devised a plan to capture Enkidu by “attractions of urban life and civilization”. King Gilgamesh sends Shamhat, a prostitute, with one of his hunters and instructs her to seduce Enkidu. Enkidu makes love to Harlot for seven days, after which he is left weak, the harlot then convinces Enkidu to come to the city of Uruk. Enkidu a fierce beast himself struck terror in hunters and made it impossible for them to hunt. Gilgamesh knew however that the ways of man could be controlled using the right controlling agent. King Gilgamesh knew that Enkidu would not be able to resist to revealing prostitute, stating “His beast that grew up with him on the steppe will deny him”. As a man sex is a pleasure that can trick men into doing many things, Gilgamesh knew this and used it to bring Enkidu to the city.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at January 29, 2014 11:30 AM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
28 January 2014
Question #15:
What is the pattern of the Journey? What similarity is there in the various dreams?
Found in the book 'The Epic of Gilgamesh' was the Enkidu and Gilgamesh's journey to the cedar forest. The journey to the Forest of Cedar was a very interesting one. As I followed along their journey I noticed a very familiar pattern started to develop. The moments building up to each trip were carried out in a routine or same way every time. Before each , "Journey of a month and a half in three days," Gilgamesh and Enkidu ate and made their camp at the same specified time. They also dug wells to fill their waterskins, and poured out flour for an offering repeating the same words, "O mountain, bring me a propitious dream!"
The way in which Gilgamesh and Enkidu got ready for bed was also a repetitive routine which occurred nightly. Enkidu would make Gilgamesh a shelter for receiving dreams while a gust would be blowing. Next, Enkidu made Gilgamesh lie down in a circle of flour. Both Enkidu and Gilgamesh also took the same sleeping positoin each night. Gilgamesh would sit with his chin on his knees while Enkidu spread out like a net and lay down in the doorway. This pattern took place day and night from the beginning to the end of their journey to the cedar forest.
Each night he slept, Gilgamesh had a very disturbing dream. These dreams awoke him from his sleep every time. At first, Gilgamesh was unaware that he was having dreams and he thought someone tried to disturb his sleep. However, it was just his dreams which arose from the pattern of his journey. Enkidu and Gilgamesh were creating a setting which was conducive to dreaming. They also asked for dreams during each offering on the mountain. Enkidu claimed to be able to interrpret Gilgamesh's dreams and after each dream Enkidu gave a full detailed explaination of the dream, saying it was a favorable one.
All of Gilgamesh's dreams were similar in nature. They all contained an enemy present. This enemy always caused harm to Gilgamesh however, he was saved in each dream by an unknown hero. Gilgamesh's courage was weakened after each dream and he was filled with fear. Enkidu saw each dream from an alternate perspective and told Gilgamesh, "My friend, your dream is favorable." Endiku also gave a name to the hero found in the dreams and we saw that the same hero (Shamash) and the same enemy (Humbaba) was present in the dreams. Therefore, it is fair to conclude that each dream involved an enemy trying to cause harm to Gilgamesh and ended with him being saved by a hero/protector.

Posted by: Kent Wood at January 29, 2014 11:33 AM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
29 January 2014

QUESTION #16:
What is the previous relation between Enkidu and Humbaba? How is Gilgamesh aided in the slaying of Humbaba by Shamash and by Enkidu? What positive and negative results of the exploit does Enkidu foresee? What are the auras of Humbaba?

ANSWER:

Humbaba accuses Enkidu of being jealous, perhaps to separate the two heroes by ending their relationship. For many nights Gilgamesh wakes up scared having nightmares, but Enkidu interprets the dreams favorably. Gilgamesh kills Humbaba, “He could not charge forward, he could not retreat. Then Gilgamesh’s weapons defeated Humbaba (The Epic of Gilgamesh, Pg. 59 Lines 44-45).

Shamash aids Gilgamesh in the slaying of Humbaba when Shamash gives Gilgamesh all the winds of the world in order to defeat Humbaba. “Shamash raised the great winds against Humbaba…” (The Epic of Gilgamesh, Pg. 59 Lines 39-45). Also, Shamash supports Gilgamesh’s confidence, for example, when Gilgamesh was afraid to enter "The Land of Cedar", Shamash talks to him.

Enkidu aids Gilgamesh in the slaying of Humbaba when he inspires Gilgamesh with courage. Enkidu tells Gilgamesh to kill Humbaba and have no mercy before any other gods arrive and change his mind. Throughout tablet V, Enkidu always interrupts Gilgamesh after Humbaba spoke.

A positive result that Enkidu foresees is that he was Gilgamesh sidekick, he helps Gilgamesh throughout his journey, especially when it was time to kill Humbaba. A negative result that Enkidu foresees is that he had too much control over Gilgamesh; he would make the decisions and convince Gilgamesh of finishing his dirty work.

Humbaba had seven garments that spread terror and passed down to Gilgamesh. Humbaba was the guardian of the forest of cedars; Gilgamesh had no sympathy to kill him. Enkidu wanted him to “gain reputation as the one “who slew Humbaba”.”


Posted by: Paola Vasquez at January 29, 2014 11:44 AM

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at January 29, 2014 11:44 AM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
29 January 2014

Question #16.
What is the previous relation between Enkidu and Humbaba? How is Gilgamesh aided in the slaying of Humbaba by Shamash and by Enkidu? What are positive and negative results of the results of exploit does Enkidu foresee? What are the auras of Humbaba?
Answer:
In The epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh, and Enkidu was mighty warriors. Enkidu and Humbaba are enemies. Humbaba precedes to tell Enkidu “I might have lifted you up, dangled you from a twig at the entrance to my forest, I might have let cawing buzzard, screaming eagle, and vulture feed on your flesh”. (Gilgamesh 60) Humbaba is more of a bully to Enkidu he tries to place fear in Enkidu. By making the statements he did, so Enkidu could convince Gilgamesh to spare Humbabas life, but the comments Humbaba made toward his enemy Enkidu did not work, Enkidu proceeds to convince Gilgamesh to murder Humbaba.
Gilgamesh is aided in the slaying of Humbaba by Shamash the sun god and Enkidu his friend. Shamash helps Gilgamesh by “rising high winds from north, south, east and west, also blasting wind, lashing wind, contrary wind, dust storm, demon wind, freezing wind, storm wind, and whirlwind. These 13 winds blotted Humbaba in the face”. (Gilgamesh 59) With help from Shamash Gilgamesh has a huge advantage over Humbaba. Enkidu keeps Gilgamesh focus on achieving the mighty slaying of Humbaba. Humbaba will try to convince Gilgamesh to spare his life, praising him and telling Gilgamesh if he spares his life he will serve him no matter the command. Enkidu reminds Gilgamesh their reason for being there and to smite Humbaba.
Some of the positive things Enkidu encounter on this journey and gets to see his enemy killed, and stand up to him. By him completing this task builds his character, and strength towards and enemy and monster headed his way. He helps his friend complete the task of killing Humbaba and giving good advice and keeping Gilgamesh focus on the task. Enkidu encounters negative situations along the journey. When Humbaba tries to put fear in his heart if he proceeds to tell to Gilgamesh to kill him. Humbaba proceeds to tell him what he will do to Enkidu if he does not have Gilgamesh spare his life.
Humbaba auras are surround by forest. He is very rough, a monster. He has Cedar Mountains with the dwellings of gods.

Posted by: Re-chia Jackson at January 29, 2014 11:51 AM

Aly Strang
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Eng220 CL On The Proverbial Road
28 January 2014

Question #19:

Tablet 1. The coming of Enkidu.
What are the main points in the praise of Gilgamesh with which the poem begins? What is the problem in Uruk? Is Enkidu the solution to the problem? Why is a prostitute the agent of the "capture" of Enkidu? If he can already speak, why couldn't he be offered some other enticement besides sex?

Anwser:

In the beginning of the poem the narrator tells us about Gilgamesh in a past tense and praises for building Uruk “He built the walls of ramparted Uruk” (11) and about how wise he was “He knew the way, he was wise in all things” (2). Gilgamesh, who in reality was really terrifying and extremely powerful king. Gilgamesh is a part god and part man and rapes, fights and kills whenever he feels like doing so. The people of Uruk call on the gods for help; they do not believe a king should act this way towards his people. The goddess Aruru creates an equal to Gilgamesh, Enkidu who lived with the animals until a hunter sees him. When Gilgamesh hears about Enkidu he sends a prostitute to lure and capture the wild Enkidu. Once Enkidu sleeps with the prostitute for six days and seven nights, when he returns to the animals they run from him. Now he is in a way becoming tamed, Enkidu goes back to the prostitute, and she takes him to the city, Uruk.

Posted by: Aly Strang at January 29, 2014 11:56 AM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
27 January 2014

Question #23:
How is the relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu further defined in tablet three?

Answer:
Gilgamesh and Enkidu’s relationship has really grown stronger since all they can rely on is themselves. Knowing that Enkidu knows his way to the forests of cedar and he knows what is it like to be in that sort of battle, Gilgamesh put his pride aside really, to make it on their journey.

They go hand in hand to seek acceptance to go on their journey from Ninsun, the great queen. She gives them a prayer and grants their wish. The elders gave Gilgamesh a little speech stating not to only rely on his own strength but rely on someone, Enkidu, who has knowledge about where they are going and what lies ahead of them.

Gilgamesh and Enkidu never really seen eye to eye in tablets one and two, but giving the only option for them was to put their differences aside and stick together, they did what they had to do to make it back to Uruk’s haven.

Posted by: Natalie White at January 29, 2014 12:10 PM

Alexander Hoschak
29 Jan 2014
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative

Question:
7. Tablet 5. The Combat with Humbaba
What is the previous relation between Enkidu and Humbaba? How is Gilgamesh aided in the slaying of Humbaba by the Shamash and by Enkidu? What positive and negative results of the exploit does Enkidu foresee? What are the auras of Humbaba?

Answer:
The previous relationship between Enkidu and Humbaba is strained. In tablet V Humbaba accuses Enkidu of betrayal. Humbaba is very angry with them and vows to ruin Gilgamesh.
Enkidu aids Gilgamesh at first because Enkidu gives him some inspirational words. After talking with Enkidu, Gilgamesh feels a lot better and is willing to fight Humbaba. As the battle is happening, Gilgamesh sends out a desperate prayer to Shamash and his prayers are answered. Shamash sends 13 raging storms towards Humbaba.
Some negatives results are that Enkidu and Gilgamesh will be cursed. A positive is that they will be extremely famous for killing him.
Humbaba’s first aura was given to the fields, then his second was given to the rivers, the third was given to the reed-beds, his fourth to the lions, his fifth to the palace, his sixth to the forests, and his last to the Nungal.

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak at January 29, 2014 12:21 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL
1/29/14

Gilgamesh: Question 17
Enkidu interpreted Gilgamesh’s dreams during the nights before the fight with Humbaba. Enkidu explained the first dream Gilgamesh had as favorable. He says that the dream is precious and an omen and that the mountain Gilgamesh had seen was actually Humbaba. Enkidu explains that Shamash will help them catch and kill Humbaba. The second dream Gilgamesh had, Enkidu also had interpreted as favorable. He claims that Shamash will fight alongside Gilgamesh. The next night Gilgamesh has a third dream. This dream Enkidu explains that Humbaba is like a god with light flaring, but they will still be victorious over him with the help of Shamash. The fifth dream Enkidu says that the lion-headed monster-bird is Anzu, who is terrifying. He tells Gilgamesh that his appearance is horrible and his breath is death. In the last dream that Enkidu explained, he said the wild bull was no enemy at all, but instead the wild bull is actually Shamash. In addition, the man who gave Gilgamesh water in his dream was Lugalbanda.
There are seven auras of Humbaba. When Humbaba wears these auras, fear is brought upon anyone around him. Shamash explains that when Humbaba is wearing all seven, he is unable to be defeated.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at January 29, 2014 12:51 PM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
28 January 2014
Question #15:
What is the pattern of the Journey? What similarity is there in the various dreams?
Answer:
Found in the book 'The Epic of Gilgamesh' was the Enkidu and Gilgamesh's journey to the cedar forest. The journey to the Forest of Cedar was a very interesting one. As I followed along their journey I noticed a very familiar pattern started to develop. The moments building up to each trip were carried out in a routine or same way every time. Before each , "Journey of a month and a half in three days," Gilgamesh and Enkidu ate and made their camp at the same specified time. They also dug wells to fill their waterskins, and poured out flour for an offering repeating the same words, "O mountain, bring me a propitious dream!"
The way in which Gilgamesh and Enkidu got ready for bed was also a repetitive routine which occurred nightly. Enkidu would make Gilgamesh a shelter for receiving dreams while a gust would be blowing. Next, Enkidu made Gilgamesh lie down in a circle of flour. Both Enkidu and Gilgamesh also took the same sleeping positoin each night. Gilgamesh would sit with his chin on his knees while Enkidu spread out like a net and lay down in the doorway. This pattern took place day and night from the beginning to the end of their journey to the cedar forest.
Each night he slept, Gilgamesh had a very disturbing dream. These dreams awoke him from his sleep every time. At first, Gilgamesh was unaware that he was having dreams and he thought someone tried to disturb his sleep. However, it was just his dreams which arose from the pattern of his journey. Enkidu and Gilgamesh were creating a setting which was conducive to dreaming. They also asked for dreams during each offering on the mountain. Enkidu claimed to be able to interrpret Gilgamesh's dreams and after each dream Enkidu gave a full detailed explaination of the dream, saying it was a favorable one.
All of Gilgamesh's dreams were similar in nature. They all contained an enemy present. This enemy always caused harm to Gilgamesh however, he was saved in each dream by an unknown hero. Gilgamesh's courage was weakened after each dream and he was filled with fear. Enkidu saw each dream from an alternate perspective and told Gilgamesh, "My friend, your dream is favorable." Endiku also gave a name to the hero found in the dreams and we saw that the same hero (Shamash) and the same enemy (Humbaba) was present in the dreams. Therefore, it is fair to conclude that each dream involved an enemy trying to cause harm to Gilgamesh and ended with him being saved by a hero/protector.

Posted by: Kent Wood at January 29, 2014 01:49 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
28 January 2014

Question 18
Tablet 6 Ishtar and the Bull of Heaven
Why is Ishtar attracted to Gilgamesh? Why does Gilgamesh resist Ishtar? What is the role of Enkidu in the slaying of the Bull?

Ishtar seems to be attracted to Gilgamesh due to his power or wealth and significance but, it is much more than that. Ishtar had relations with the one who reigned before Gilgamesh and when she sees Gilgamesh she is reminded of this old fling and fancies it. Gilgamesh turns down Ishtar because he has noticed her history of seducing people of power. After being enraged that Gilgamesh refused to marry Ishtar, Ishtar asks her father to send down A Bull from Heaven. Ishtar's father listens and agrees to send the bull down. Gilgamesh and his companion Enkidu decide to fight the Bull together. The duo completed their mission and killed the Bull. Ishtar's father became furious when he knew these two defeated him and came to the conclusion that they would pay in some manner. The way Ishtar's father handled it was by killing Enkidu.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at January 29, 2014 02:00 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
28 January 2014

Question #20:
Why is a prostitute the agent of the “capture” of Enkidu? If he can already speak, why couldn’t he be offered some other enticement besides sex?

Awnser:
The hunter did not offer him a different enticement because the hunter is intimidated by Enkidu and is scared of him. Enkidu filled in all of the hunters holes, traps, and helped the wildlife escape (Gilgamesh 121). He was as mighty as Gilgamesh. This is where the hunter’s father comes in, and suggest he go to Gilgamesh and he would give him Shamhat the harlot who will help conquer Enkidu (Gilgamesh 127). This ploy works, and they copulate for six days and seven nights (Gilgamesh 186). Afterward Enkidu could not run as before but had gained reason and understanding, the animals he once befriended now run at the sight of him (Gilgamesh 193). Shamhat convinces him to come back to Uruk with here, so he does (Gilgamesh 201).

Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at January 29, 2014 02:23 PM

Charles Fowler
Dr. B. Hobbs
Eng 220CL Journey into Narratives
1/29/2014
Question 21.
What are the further stages in the civilizing of Enkidu? What is the particular motive for Enkidu’s leaving the shepherd’s camp? Why is this motive so strong?
Answer:
The stages of civilizing are the journey to finding your humanity. Where you start off in the wild and end up in civilization. In the further stages, Enkidu has almost found his humanity where he began to where clothes and was lead into a shepherd’s camp.

One of the reasons why Enkidu left the shepherd’s camp was that Enkidu desired something more where he and his friend Gilgamesh can accomplish something better. So basically he left the camp for his friend Gilgamesh.

For Enkidu to leave the camp he became highly motivated. He had the desire to want something more and bigger than his current situation after becoming civilized. He wanted to help his friend Gilgamesh in return for helping him.

Posted by: Charles Fowler at January 29, 2014 08:25 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 214 Journeys in Narrative CA01
30 January 2014

QUESTION #57 TABLET 6:
What do Gilgamesh and Enkidu do with the carcass of the dead bull?

ANSWER:
Gilgamesh and Enkidu do not specify what they did with the entire body after they killed the bull. Gilgamesh is amazed by the size of the bulls horns and how thick they are, in hi amazement he cuts them off the bulls head and fills them with oil. Gilgamesh then offers them in sacrifice to his father. After he does all of this he takes the horns and hangs them on the wall in his house as if they are a trophy (Puchner 64).

Posted by: Becca Orden at January 30, 2014 02:07 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
30 January 2014

QUESTION #61:
Why does Enkidu destroy the great pine door that he had made?

ANSWER:
Enkidu feels he wants to destroy the great pine door because he built that door (cedar gate). Enkidu would did not know his fate was death or Enkidu would not have build that door. He would not have carried the cedar for the door from the forest, nor would he have brought the cedar for the door to Nippur (Puchner 66). Enkidu is over-come with self-pity. He felt he build the cedar gate for the Gods and the Gods choose his fate to be death. That is why he wanted to destroyed the pine door. “I would have raised my axe, I would have chopped you down” (Puchner 66).

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at January 30, 2014 03:06 PM

Joe D. Sears
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CAO2

QUESTION #71:
When Gilgamesh awakens from his dream, he slays the pride of lions playing nearby. Why?

ANSWER:
In Tablet IX Gilgamesh states “I have grown afraid of death” and “I saw lions, I felt afraid” (Puchner 72). I believe those two statements to mean he is fearful of things he was never fearful to before. When he awoke from his dream and killed the nearby lions, he was happy to be alive and no longer fearful.

Posted by: Joe Sears at January 30, 2014 03:22 PM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
30 January 2014

QUESTION #67:
Who/What does Gilgamesh blame for the death of Enkidu?

ANSWER:
Based on the reading of Tablet VIII, it seems that Gilgamesh is blaming civilization and all its pleasures, luxuries and comforts for making Gilgamesh blind to the imminent death of his ally and friend, Enkidu, and ultimately his own death. This is evidenced by his lamenting many of the things that he once held dear wherein it says:

Oh, for the axe at my side, oh for the
safeguard by my hand,

Oh for the sword at my belt, oh for the
shield before me,

Oh for my best garment, oh for the raiment
that pleased me most!

An ill wind rose against me and snatched
it away! (40-43).

In the passage above, he is basically disgusted with himself for letting life’s pleasures trick him into this state of blindness, not having readied himself for the taste of death, and so he decided to give it all up to find the secrets to eternal life where he says on lines 69 through 71, “And, as for me, now that you are dead, I will let my hair grow/ matted,/I will put on a lion skin and roam the steppe!” (Puchner 72).

Although this assignment is prompted to answering the question based on Tablet VIII, the evidence later in Tablet XI substantiates the fact that it is luxury and possessions that will deter him from seeking everlasting life when Utanapishtim tells Gilgamesh the story of building the arc and that Ea said to him, “Forsake possessions and seek life,/Belongings reject and life save!” (Puchner 81). This allegory seems to coincide with the Buddha’s teachings of attachment and suffering, as well as Jesus's and many others, in other words, the underlying teaching of the monomyth.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at January 30, 2014 04:37 PM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
30 January 2014

Question:
Describe the world at the other end of the tunnel. What does this setting symbolize?
Answer:
The world at the other end of the tunnel was “lovely to see,” it was rich in fruit and foliage, and it was a “delight to behold” (Puchner 74). This setting symbolizes hope. Gilgamesh had been running through that tunnel for twelve hours. The tunnel was so dark that he could not see behind him (Puchner 74). When Gilgamesh reached the end of the tunnel, he began to see the light and then the trees of the gods (Puchner 74).

Posted by: Michael Adamson at January 30, 2014 07:02 PM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
31 January 2014

Question #73:
Why do you suppose that the gatekeeper allows Gilgamesh to go through the mountain?

Answer:
The gatekeepers allow Gilgamesh to go through the mountain because they think he will make through. When the gatekeepers see Gilgamesh coming one says, “This one has who has come to us, his body is flesh of a god” (Puchner 73). Since he is two thirds divine and one third human, according to one of the gatekeeper’s wives, he should be able to handle anything that comes his way (Puchner 73). The gatekeepers know this and think it will be safe enough for Gilgamesh to travel through the mountain.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at January 30, 2014 07:35 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
29 January 2014

Question 58:
Why does Enkidu toss a leg from the bull into the heavens? Is this action appropriate?

Answer:
Enkidu tosses the bull’s leg into the heavens because he wants to make a point to Ishtar that she cannot mistreat the town of Uruk. He wants her to know that she will not be able to get away with harming the people and the land in Uruk. “ At the bull’s snort, a pit opened up, one hundred men of Uruk fell into it” (Puchner 64) and then the bull did it two more times and more four hundred men fell through including Enkidu. However, he was able to pull himself out and he and Gilgamesh slayed the bull.
Enkidu’s action was inappropriate because it was immature and juvenile. He wanted to make a point but should have done it differently. I think the slaying of the bull was payback enough, he shouldn’t have thrown the bull’s leg at Ishtar.

Posted by: Henry Adu at January 30, 2014 08:29 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
31 January 2014
Question 63
Tablet 7 The Fall of Enkidu
What curses does Enkidu heap upon the “hunter” and the “harlot”?
Enkidu refers to the “hunter” as “the entrapping-man” and explains that he is the one who denying him the same amount of living as his friend Gilgamesh. The curses he heaps upon the hunter are: “May the hunter not get enough to make him a living, make his profit loss, cut down his take, may his income, his portion evaporate before you, any wildlife that enters his traps, make it go out the window!” (Tablet VII, P.67) Then Enkidu continues to make curses but, he then focuses on the “harlot”. The “harlot” is cursed with: immortality and he claims: “may you never make a home that you can enjoy, may you never caress a child of your own, and may you never be received among decent women. May beer sludge impregnate your lap, and may the drunkard bespatter your best clothes with vomit. May your swain prefer beauties, May he pinch you like potters clay. May you get no alabaster, May no table to be proud of be set in your house. May the nook you enjoy be at your doorstep, may the public crossroads be your dwelling, may vacant lots be your sleeping place, and may the shade of a wall be your place of business, may brambles and thorns flay your feet, may toper and sober slap your cheek. May riffraff of the street shove each other in brothel, may there be a brawl there. When you stroll with your cronies, may they catcall after you. May the builder not keep your roof in repair, may the screech owl roost in the ruins of your home. May a feast never be held where you live. May your purple finery be expropriated, may filthy underwear be what you are given.” (Tablet VII, P.67-68)

Posted by: Allie Clemons at January 30, 2014 10:22 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 January 2014

Question #75:
Describe the world at the other end of the tunnel. What does this setting symbolize?
Answer:
The world at the other end of the tunnel, when Gilgamesh first enters is complete darkness. Gilgamesh spends hours and hours in the dense darkness (Puchner 74). When Gilgamesh first enters the tunnel, the scorpion creature “warns him that has only twelve hours to get through the sun’s tunnel before the sun enters it at nightfall” (Puchner 73). The other end of the tunnel represents a heavenly grove, filled with bunches of grapes, fruit, trees, and light; a world of much unknown greatness (Puchner 74).
The other end of the tunnel symbolizes a world of much unknown. When Gilgamesh walks up to the scorpions, he is very scared. The author describes the fearful scene “When Gilgamesh saw their fearsomeness and terror, he covered his face. He took hold of himself and approached them.” (Puchner 73). After Gilgamesh spends many hours in the pure, dense darkness, the light begins to appear revealing the wonderful grove (Puchner 74).
Work Cited:
Puchner, Martin. Gilgamesh: The Epic of Gilgamesh. Trans. Foster, Benjamin R. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at January 30, 2014 10:38 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 January 2014

QUESTION:
# 56. Tablet 6. The Great Bull of Heaven
Which character actually kills the bull?

ANSWER:
It is Gilgamesh who actually kills the bull, “and Gilgamesh, like a strong, skillful slaughterer, thrust his dagger between neck, horn, and tendon!” (Puchner 65). Though it is Gilgamesh who commits the act of killing the bull, it was an overall group effort; it is Enkidu who handles the bull with great precision that allows Gilgamesh to accurately kill it, “Enkidu circled behind the Bull of Heaven, he grabbed it by the tuft of its tail, he set his feet on its . . .” (Puchner 65). The writer acknowledges this team effort by stating, “After they had killed the Bull of Heaven.” (Puchner 65); the use of the word they, assesses that it was not only the execution skills of Gilgamesh that defeats the bull, but the maneuvering skills of Enkidu as well.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at January 30, 2014 11:25 PM

Jonathan Cruz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA 02
30 January 2014

Question #70 Tablet 9. The Quest to the Land of the Faraway:
Afraid of the lions, why does Gilgamesh pray to the god Sin?

Answer:
It would be a good assumption that after Enkidu's death at the end of Tablet VII, Gilgamesh still seems to be reeling from the event as his mind soaks in the realization that death is possible as he wonders if he might "die too" and questions "Am I not like Enkidu?" (Puchner 72). Though he is afraid, he decides to not give up and "go on swiftly" (Puchner 72). Once he reached the mountain pass during the night he sees lions and becomes afraid of them and possibly sees them as a threat to his life. He prays to the moon, "Keep me safe," before he lay down to sleep (Puchner 72). The god associated with the moon is Sin, who if prayed to may illuminate darkness just as the moon itself does in the night sky. Gilgamesh prayed to Sin possibly for two reasons, the first reason to protect him and the second to illuminate the darkness in his heart (his fear) that he had due to the death of Enkidu. When he awakes, he is thankful for being alive and slays the lions thus giving the reader confirmation that Sin answered Gilgamesh's prayer.

Posted by: Jonathan Cruz at January 30, 2014 11:26 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (220CL)
30.1.2014
Question #69
69. The Death of Enkidu
Describe and explain why Gilgamesh changes his physical appearance: “Clad only in lion skin, I will roam the open country.”
ANSWER:
After the death of Enkidu, Gilgamesh seems to want to honour the memory of his companion by assimilating his appearance to that of Enkidu’s animal upbringing. “Like a lioness whose cubs are in a pitfall, he paced to and fro, back and forth, tearing out and hurling away the locks of his hair, ripping off and throwing away his fine clothes like something foul.” (Puchner 71). Even Gilgamesh’s reactions are anthropomorphic as he is described like a helpless lioness, desperate and wild.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at January 30, 2014 11:50 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
30 January 2013

QUESTION #50:
Why is Ishtar attracted to Gilgamesh? Why does Gilgamesh resist Ishtar? What is the role of Enkidu of the slaying of the Bull?

ANSWER:
After Gilgamesh cleaned his body from the filth that he had acquired from his adventures and put on clean clothes, Ishtar became aware of his handsome features. Ishtar then had a desire to be with Gilgamesh and stated that, “I shall be your wife,” and would give him many gifts for her desire to come into fruition (Puchner 62).
Gilgamesh rejects Ishtar’s proposal because she cannot stay faithful to any man that she has ever loved. He goes down a list of men that she has had a relationship with, like Ishullanu whom he said, that she turned him into a “scarecrow” because she did not like what he said to her (Puchner 63). Just as Gilgamesh predicted, Ishtar became aggravated with him. She ascended to heaven, where she would find the instrument to slay Gilgamesh for his transgression.
During the battle against the Bull of Heaven, Enkidu’s role was to aide Gilgamesh at vanquishing the beast because he had fought the Bull prior and learned its weakness. Enkidu explained to Gilgamesh that he would distract the Bull and ensnare it by, “grabbing its tail,” which would give Gilgamesh the chance to slay the beast (Puchner 65).

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at January 30, 2014 11:53 PM

Jack Constant
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
English 220CL Journey's in Narrative CA01
28 january 2014

Tablet 9: The Quest to the Land of the Faraway

Question: How long is Gilgamesh's journey through Mount Mashum?

Answer: After adding up all of the hours that Gilgamesh traveled, I came up with the answer of a little bit over a week. That is how long it took Gilgamesh to journey through Mount Manshum. He a consistent pattern for most of the journey. That is , "When he had gone two double hours, dense was the darkness, no light was there, it would not let him look behind him" (Puchner 74). This continue's on going up in numbers and ends at twelve.

Posted by: jack constant at January 31, 2014 12:06 AM

Jacklyn O’Brien
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
31 January 2014

QUESTION #53
What is the one condition upon which Anu allows Ishtar to the Bull?

ANSWER:
In tablet six we see Ishtar, the goddess of love and war, fall head over heels for Gilgamesh. Ishtar saw Gilgamesh in a fresh clean cloak, with a crown on his head, and knew it right then and there that she would want to marry him. Ishtar begins to beg Gilgamesh to marry her. Gilgamesh having heard all the terror stories of the other men Ishtar had “been in love with” was quick to deny her request. Gilgamesh responds “What would I get if I marry you? You are a brazier that goes out when it freezes. A flimsy door that keeps out neither wind nor draught. A palace that crushes a warrior. A mouse that gnaws through its housing…” (Puchner, 62).
Ishtar is embarrassed and enraged. She quickly runs to her father Anu (the god of the firmament) and mother and informs them “Gilgamesh has said outrageous things about me, Gilgamesh’s been spouting insults about me, insults and curses against me!” (Puchner 64) Ishtar demands they let her use the Bull of heaven to seek revenge and kill Gilgamesh. Anu seems to believe Gilgamesh has reasons to the things he has said, and is rather hesitant to setting free the Bull of Heaven. Anu convinces them that this is the only way. Before Anu hands over the bull he informs Ishtar that the bull will ruin the land of Uruk, and crops will be unable to grow for seven years. Anu would allow Ishtar to have the bull only if she had the resources and ability to take care of the people and animals after the bull has done its damage. Ishtar lies and makes a promise that she has everything she will need to save the people for the next seven years. She then lets free the Bull of Heaven on the town of Uruk.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at January 31, 2014 01:21 AM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
31 January 2014

QUESTION #67:
Who/What does Gilgamesh blame for the death of Enkidu?

ANSWER:
Gilgamesh most likely blames himself for the death of Enkidu, being that he weeps for him and laments his death (Puchner 70).
It is also likely that he blames all of Uruk, as he calls for them to lament for Enkidu as well (Puchner 71). Other evidence that he blames himself would be that he buries Enkidu himself and sees to it that a statue is built in his honor (Puchner 72).

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at January 31, 2014 01:45 AM

Rebecca Maldonado
Professor Hobbs
English 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA 01
30 January 2014

Question #55
As Enkidu grabs hold of the bull, what realization comes to his mind?

ANSWER:
In lines 91 to 92, Anu (a god) asks her father if she can set the Bull of Heaven free to destroy Gilgamesh after he insults her, even though she provoked it (Puchner 64). Once he is released, few hundred men fall into the pits that the bull creates, including Enkidu. He grabbed the bull by the horns as the beast “dung at him with the tuft of its tail” (Puchner 65). After this, Enkidu comes to the realization of how to defeat the bull. He tells Gilgamesh of the bulls strength and of how to defeat it: “Thrust your dagger between neck, horn, and tendon,” (Puchner 65). This method works as shown in lines 132-136.

Posted by: rebecca maldonado at January 31, 2014 07:55 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys in Narrative – CA01
30 January 2014

Question 51, Tablet 6: The Great Bull of Heaven
“Why does Gilgamesh refuse the advances of Ishtar?”

Answer:
While Gilgamesh is getting ready following returning from killing Humbaba, Ishtar, the goddess of love and war, appears and falls madly and instantly in love with him. She begs him to become her husband and she will ready him a chariot of gold and lapis with storm demons as the mules (Puchner 62). Ishtar is desperate for Gilgamesh to marry her and throws perfect farm animals into her bribe.
Gilgamesh is not interested in Ishtar or her gifts saying, “What would I get if I marry you?” (Puchner 62). Gilgamesh presents her with a laundry list of lovers she has been unfaithful to and her misbehavior when the relationship ends. Basically, he is calling her a vengeful prostitute because she just throws herself at someone to love and then leaves and punishes them on her own accord. Why should Gilgamesh waste his time with her if he knows she will just leave him eventually for someone else and make Gilgamesh’s life bad? He knows that since she has “fallen in love with him, she will treat him like them” (Puchner 63).

Posted by: Craig Graves at January 31, 2014 08:37 AM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
31 January 2014

Question #70:
Afraid of lions, why does Gilgamesh pray to the God Sin?

Answer:
After Enkidu’s passing in tablet VII, Gilgamesh has become afraid of death (Puchner 72). He says to himself that he should die too because he is just like Enkidu (Punchner 72). So when Gilgamesh sees the lions he looks up to the moon and prays for the god Sin to keep him safe throughout the night (Puchner 72). Gilgamesh prayed to the God Sin because, he wanted protection from the lions and he wanted Sin to take away his fear of the lions. When Gilgamesh awakens, he is happy to be alive, and was able to kill the lions with his sword (Puchner 73). The God had answered Gilgamesh’s prayers by protecting him and by eliminating the fear he had after Enkidu’s death.

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at January 31, 2014 10:01 AM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
31 January 2014

Question #66:
For how many days does Enkidu fall ill?

Answer:
Enkidu falls ill for twelve days then dies. Enkidu awoke from a nightmare about how he would wake up sick. The dream turned out to be true because the gods punished Enkidu for the killing of Humbaba. Gilgamesh also had a dream about how he was alone in the dark, and that is exactly what happened. Before Enkidu’s death, Gilgamesh said that he would kick down the doors if he knew that this would happen. Gilgamesh did not kick down the doors which resulted in his dream becoming true. After twelve suffering days, Enkidu died of an illness. The gods punished both Gilgamesh and Enkidu because one of them could live even though some gods were not in favor of this.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at January 31, 2014 11:44 AM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
31 January 2014

QUESTION #74:
How long is Gilgamesh’s journey through Mount Mashu?

ANSWER:
It took Gilgamesh about two weeks through his journey to Mount Mashu. The way I calculated how long it took him was by adding all the double hours mentioned in Tablet IV. For example, “When he had gone one double hour, / Dense was the darkness, no light was there, / It would not let him look behind him” (Puchner 73 Lines 45-76). The numbers continue to add up until twelve double hours.

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at January 31, 2014 12:05 PM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 January 2014

Question #51:
Why does Gilgamesh refuse the advances of Ishtar?

Answer:
In the epic of Gilgamesh, Ishtar approaches Gilgamesh to be her husband. Gilgamesh refuses her advances listing off the unfortunate tales of her previous husbands. Ishtar would claim to have loved each one of her husbands but in the end she would ultimately punish them in the why that would bring them the most pain, such as turning a shepherd into a wolf. For this reason Gilgamesh would not be with her ,because he asked Ishtar why he should fare any better than the ones before him.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at January 31, 2014 12:21 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narritive
January 31, 2014

Question #68 (Tablet 8):
Why does Gilgamesh react so violently after he speaks Enkidu's eulogy?

Answer:
When Enkidu dies, Gilgamesh remenices about all the adventures and good times him and Enkidu have had. Gilgamesh speaks within the privacy of his own home, this is Gilgamesh's version of a fitting eulogy. After the eulogy, Gilgamesh gets agressive and reacts violently. He bolts the door, pulls out his hair and grives over Enkidu's dead body. He does this beacause he blames himself over the death of his friend. Enkidu's death is a direct result of killing Humbaba, had he not bothered Humbaba.

Posted by: Jose Parra at January 31, 2014 12:25 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 January 2014

Question 65:
Describe some of the visions that Enkidu sees in his second dream, when we visits the Underworld.

Answer:
Enkidu awakes from a bad dream when he has fallen ill. In this dream, he says that there was a man with a face that resembled the lion-headed monster-bird Anzu. He told Gilgamesh that the creature had paws of a lion and talons of an eagle (Puchner 69). Enkidu explains how he tried to call out to Gilgamesh for help but he did not try to save him. He says that the creature took him down to the Underworld.
When explaining the Underworld to Gilgamesh, Enkidu says the dwellers are dressed like birds in feather garments and they see no daylight (Puchner 69). There are piles of crowns of kings who were once rulers of their land (Puchner 69). He continues to tell Gilgamesh that he had also seen priests, acolytes, and gods. He had seen King Etana, the god of the beasts, and Ereshkigal, the queen of the netherworld who was the jealous sister of Ishtar (Puchner 69). Enkidu tells how he saw Belet-seri, who was the bookkeeper of the Underworld. At the end of the dream, Belet-seri had looked at Enkidu and said, “Who brought this man?” (Puchner 69).

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at January 31, 2014 12:26 PM

Aly Strang
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Eng220 CL Journeys into Narrative CA2
30 January 2014

Question #52:
Ishtar asks her father for the Bull of Heaven to punish Gilgamesh. What does this bull represent?

Answer:

Ishtar asks her father to avenge her by punishing Gilgamesh with the bull, at first he says no and then he gives in to her threats (When Anu heard what Istar said, He placed the lead rope of the Bull of Heaven in her hand, Istar led the Bull of Heaven away.” (Puchner 107) The bull in the story represents something way more powerful and has more strength than anyone. The “bull’s snort” makes three hundred men fall into a pit. (Puchner 116)

Posted by: Aly Strang at January 31, 2014 12:43 PM

Alexander Hoschak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
31 January 2014

Question 72:
Why does the Scorpion-Man tell Gilgamesh that his journey is “impossible”?

Answer:
The Scorpion-Man tells Gilgamesh that this journey s impossible because he said that no humn can survive the darkness that they will experience when he is in there. And since Gilgamesh is one-third human (Puchner 73), he will not be able to make it through. (Puchner 74)

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak at January 31, 2014 12:50 PM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
30 January 2014

Question #6:
As Enkidu grabs ahold of the bull, what realization comes to his mind?

Answer:
After Gilgamesh refuses and turns down Princess Ishtar and her luscious words for him to become her husband, Ishtar was raging with fury and went to her father in tears (Puchner 64). She then asked her father for the bull of heaven so she can get revenge on Gilgamesh herself for refusing her offer and making insults to her. Her father then passed her the rope of which held the Bull of Heaven.

The city of Uruk bellowed and trembles. The Bull of Heaven was released and a pit opened up and hundreds of men fell into it, including Enkidu but luckily pulls himself out (Puchner 64-65). Enkidu grabs ahold of the Bull by the horn and immediately calls out for Gilgamesh, his partner, his friend. That is what comes to his mind; calling out for Gilgamesh, to fight the cull together. They kill the bull and Enkidu tore off the bull’s haunch and threw it at her (Puchner 65). After killing the Bull if Heaven, Gilgamesh had a party at his palace.

Posted by: Natalie White at January 31, 2014 12:55 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys to Narrative CA02
31 January 2014
Question #50:
Why is Ishtar attracted to Gilgamesh? Why does Gilgamesh resist Ishtar? What is the role of Enkidu in the slaying of the Bull?
ANSWER:
Gilgamesh was spotted by Ishtar while he was grooming himself and preparing himself to look like a king. She noticed his matted hair being washed out before changing in front of her into clean clothes. “When Gilgamesh places his crown on his head, a princess Ishtar raised her eyes to the beauty of Gilgamesh (Gilgamesh, Tablet VI).” Ishtar wants Gilgamesh for herself as another one of her lovers. She offers him gold and the highest class of living. “I will have harnessed for you a chariot of lapis lazuli and gold, (Gilgamesh, Tablet VI).” She goes on offering him the best cattle but Gilgamesh responds to offer in rejection.
After Ishtar pursued Gilgamesh, he turns away from her by resisting her. “What would I have to give you if I married you (Gilgamesh, Tablet VI)!” He goes on by telling her he has nothing to offer her and everything that he does have will never be good enough for her high standard of living. He also remind her of her past with sexual partners. He does not agree with her sexual lifestyle and criticizes each partner she has ever had a sexual relationship with in the past. Ishtar has been known to curse her ex-lovers. “See her now, I will recite the list of your lovers. Of the shoulder his hand, Tammuz, the lover of your earliest youth, for him you have ordained lamentations year upon year (Gilgamesh, Tablet VI)!” Gilgamesh prefers to live without her and her sexual favors because he does not want to be cursed like the lovers she has already has in the past.
Enkidu, Gilgamesh’s best friend fell into a pit that Ishtar cased open out of the heavens. By this point in the story, Ishtar is furious with Gilgamesh for rejecting her and speaking badly about her way of living. She used her father’s power to release the Bull of Heaven. She intended on trying to kill Gilgamesh. Immediately after falling into the pit, Enkidu breaks free and grabs the bull by the horns. He tried to defend Gilgamesh from being attacked. Gilgamesh and Enkidu killed the bull together. After killing the bull, Ishtar said, “Woe unto Gilgamesh who slandered me and killed the bull of heaven!” Enkidu heard the comment she made and swung the head of the bull at her. He screamed out a reply, “If I could only get at you I would do the same to you!” He does not think that a woman like Ishtar should speak badly about him. He wants to be a loyal friend and stop her from attacking or cursing him for rejecting her offer.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at January 31, 2014 01:08 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
31 January 2014

Question #63:
What curses does Enkidu heap upon the "hunter" and the "harlot"?

Answer:
When Enkidu falls ill he realizes that the proverbial path he has been traveling was leading to his demise. The hunter and the harlot exposed Enkidu to the material world and the luxurious aspects of life. Enkidu is the one to blame because of the choices he made, however, the hunter and the harlot are the ones who lead him to the water so to speak.

Enkidu curses the hunter by saying "May that hunter not get enough to make a living. Make his profit loss, cut down his take, may his income, his portion evaporate before you, Any wildlife that enters his traps, make it go out the window (Anonymous 52-5). This curse is self explanatory from the text itself, Enkidu curses the hunter so he will no longer make any profit or trap any animals to sell or eat.

After Enkidu "had cursed the hunter to his heart's content, he resolved to curse the harlot Shamhat (Anonymous 57-58). The curse upon the harlot is much more intense and detailed. Some of the harsher things mentioned in this curse on the harlot include "May you never make a home that you can enjoy, May you never caress a child of your own (Anonymous 62-3). He continues to wish horrible things upon the harlot such as a drunk man vomiting on her own clothes. Lines sixty through eighty-two contain the entire curse itself wishing awful things upon the harlot. He wishes that she will live on the street and a small nook being her doorstep, just some other terribly hurtful things.

Posted by: DJ Menezes at January 31, 2014 01:09 PM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
30 January 2014

Question #11:
What do Gilgamesh and Enkidu do with the carcass of the dead bull?

Answer:
In tablet six, of The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Princess Ishtar confronts Gilgamesh. She expresses to Gilgamesh all the things she would do for him if he were to take her as his wife but, to her surprise, Gilgamesh confronts her on her past relationships asking, "Which of your lovers lasted forever?” Ishtar is left feeling devastated and reverts back into the heavens, where she weeps to her parents, due to the unexpected testimony by Gilgamesh. She asks her father for his Bull of Heaven so that she can go and kill Gilgamesh. When the Bull of Heaven reached Uruk, "it dried up the groves, reedbeds, and marshes", his snorts created pits in which many men feel into. Upon his last snot, Enkidu fell jumped out and engaged him. Enkidu then approved Gilgamesh with a plan to defeat the great Bull. "After they had killed the Bull of Heaven, they ripped out its heart and set it before Shamash", Enkidu also tore off the bull's haunch and flung it at Ishtar.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at January 31, 2014 01:11 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
31 January 2014

Question #52:
Ishtar asks her father for the Bull of Heaven to punish Gilgamesh. What does the bull represent?

Awnser:
The Bull of Heaven represents 7 years of famine for the city of Uruk (Puchner 64). This happens because Ishtar is upset with Gilgamesh.

Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at January 31, 2014 02:09 PM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
29 January 2014


Question #69
Describe and explain why Gilgamesh changes his physical appearance: “Clad only in lion skin, I will roam the open country.”
Answer:
The death Enkidu’s has really effected Gilgamesh. He begins to rip and tear his clothes, and hair. He changes his appearances in the morning of Enkidu death. In the lines seventy-three it states “He slaughtered fatted cattle and sheep heaped them high for his friend, they carried off all the meat for the rulers of the netherworld”. (Puncher pg.72) He sacrifices an animal for the death of his friend to the queen Ishtar.

Posted by: Re-Chia Jackson at January 31, 2014 02:25 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
30 January 2014

Question #64
How does Shamash scold Enkidu, and what does he make Enkidu realize about his life?

ANSWER:
Throughout the Epic of Gilgamesh we are able to see the great importance of the sun god Shamash on Gilgamesh and Enkidu's journey to defeat Humbaba. If it wasn't for Shamash, it would be impossible for both to defeat Humbaba without the thirteen storms sent by Shamash that immobilized Humbaba.

After Enkidu falls ill due to a spell from Great Anu he gets angry because of the fact that he was taken away from his wilderness and now is dying. He curses against Shamhat (the prostitute) for leading him away from his previous lifestyle. This is when Shamash scolds Enkidu and tells him that if it wasn't for Shamhat he would never meet civilization, eat amazing food, and most important of all meet his great friend Gilgamesh.

Shamash makes Enkidu realize that it is worth dying for a friend and that his brotherhood with Gilgamesh was the most important event in his life.

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at January 31, 2014 02:28 PM

Wilfred Ras
ENG 220CL
Dr. Hobbs
January 31, 2014

Homework assignment question 53:

What is the one condition upon which Anu allows Ishtar to use the bull?

Answer:
Anu is the father of the princess Ishtar. Ishtar came up to Anu and complained. She complained that Gilgamesh has said really bad things about her. She mentioned that Gilgamesh was insulting her and put a curse on her. This is when Ishtar started to ask her father for the permission of “the bull”. The father Anu gave her the bull under one condition. The condition was that “let the farmer of the Urak raise seven years of hay. With this I had many ideas. I believe that he meant after making damage to Gilgamesh, she has to make sure that she fills in the whole. For example, if the community gets hurt and starts to fade away (Gilgamesh’s community) Ishtar is the one responsible.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at January 31, 2014 02:47 PM

Zachary Daley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
2/1/2014
Enkidu’s Last Dream
Question:
Describe some of the visions that Enkidu sees in his second dream, when he visits the underworld
Answer:
In Enkidu’s second dream, he sees visions of a man with a “somber face.” (Puchner 69) this I believe is the devil, because he has aspects of both animal and beast. He had a moment where he needed to be saved by Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh did not save him in the dream, which was foreshadowing for the near future because Enkidu ends up dying.

Posted by: Zach Daley at February 1, 2014 11:09 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
1 February 2014

Question #79
After Gilgamesh identifies himself, why does Siduri not believe him?

Answer:
After killing the bull Gilgamesh sets out on a journey to visit the tavern, as he approaches his destination Siduri keeps a close eye on him and wants to keep him away from her tavern. Siduri makes it as if Gilgamesh is not worthy of coming inside and questions if it is even him due to his grungy appearance. “If you are indeed Gilgamesh, who killed the guardian, who felled Humbaba who dwelt in the forest of cedars, who killed lions at the mountain passes, who seized and killed the bull that came down from heaven, why are your cheeks emaciated, your face cast down, your heart wretched, your features wasted, woe in your vitals, your face like a traveler’s from afar, your features weathered by cold and sun, why are you clad in a lion skin, roaming the steppe?”. Gilgamesh explains that he looks so distraught and sad because the death of his close friend Enkidu.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at February 1, 2014 11:09 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 February 2014

QUESTION #98 TABLET 11:
What is Gilgamesh’s plan to use the flower?

ANSWER:
Gilgamesh is told of this flower by Utanapishtim and he has great plans of what to use this plant for. Gilgamesh first talks about how he wants to how this plant is the cure for heartache and then goes on to talk about how he will test the plant on an old man (Puchner 88). Gilgamesh also speaks about naming the old man “Old Man Has Become Young-Again-Man” (Puchner 88) and how he will eat the plant himself and return to his old carefree youth.

Posted by: Becca Orden at February 2, 2014 12:57 AM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
31 January 2014

Question:
How does Gilgamesh repay Urshanabi?
Answer:
Unknowingly, Gilgamesh smashed the stone charms belonging to Ur-Shanbi that allowed for passage across the waters of death and into Utanapishtim (Puchner 78). In order to cross the waters of death without the stone charms, Gilgamesh has to repay Ur-Shanbi by going into the forest and cutting “twice sixty poles each five times twelve cubits long” (Puchner 78). In addition, Gilgamesh had to dress the poles and set them on handguards before bringing them to Ur-Shanbi.

Posted by: Michael Adamson at February 2, 2014 03:53 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

QUESTION #87:
What is the gist of what Utanapishtim tells Gilgamesh?

ANSWER:
Gilgamesh sets on his way to find Utanapishtim. When he speaks to Utanapishtim, Gilgamesh is not particularly happy with what he is told. Utanapishtim tells Gilgamesh that he is part mortal as his father, and that he will die eventually (Puchner 80). Gilgamesh is informed that death is a part of life. Utanapishtim is very knowledgeable and knows the value of life. Gilgamesh is struggling accepting the fact that is he going to die as Enkidu has. “No one sees death, no one sees the face of death, no one hears the voice of death, but cruel death cuts off mankind” (Puchner 80). Utanapishtim tries to tell Gilgamesh that no one is ever prepared for death, but death comes no matter the person.

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 2, 2014 04:43 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys to Narrative CA02
2 February 2014

Question #85:
What does Gilgamesh do to propel the boat once all the poles are used?

ANSWER:
Gilgamesh propels the boat to cross the Water of Death by using his belt, torn clothing and holding his hands high to create a makeshift. Somehow, the boat crosses the Water of Death and makes it to the side in which Utanapishtim lives eternally. “With twice sixty Gilgamesh had used up the poles. Then he, for his part, took off his belt, Gilgamesh tore off his clothes from his body, held his arms for a mast. Utanapishtim was watching him from a distance, speaking to himself, he said these words, (Foster 87).” Somehow, he reaches the other side by a gust of wind that helps him along the way. Gilgamesh desperately wanted to reach that side to ask the only man who found eternal life like a god where he can do the same. After seeking counsel, Utanapishtim tells Gilgamesh to stop dreading the days of life until his death and to live his life to the fullest until the time comes because humans are meant to die.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at February 2, 2014 06:26 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 February 2014

Question #82:
When he first meets Urshanabi, why does Gilgamesh hit the ferryman on the head and smash the “things of stone”?
Answer:
Gilgamesh wants to have all the power, he wants to sail the waters of death and cross the places that do not guarantee return. The tavern keep says to Gilgamesh “Yet, Gilgamesh, there is Ur-Shanabi, Utanapishtim’s boatman, He has the Stone Charms with him as he trims pine trees in the forest.” (Puchner 77). The quote addresses that Ur-Shanabi has the Stone Charms and he uses them to do unthinkable things, Gilgamesh wants the power to do such.
Work Cited
Puchner, Martin. Gilgamesh: The Epic of Gilgamesh. Trans. Foster, Benjamin R. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 2, 2014 10:24 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Professor Hobbs
English 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA 01
30 January 2014

Question #65:
Tablet 7. The Fall of Enkidu
Describe some of the visions that Enkidu sees in his second dream, when he visits the Underworld.

ANSWER:
In Enkidu’s second dream, he was standing between heaven and earth and a creature like “that of the lion-headed monster-bird Anzu” took him down to the “house of shadows, the dwelling of hell,” (Puchner 69). He described it as a house and everyone was dressed like “birds in feather garments” and everyone thrives in the darkness” (Puchner 69). There were crowns in heaps and many kings who ruled the land before. In line 151, even the queen of the netherworld, Ereshkigal, was there. “The day he had the dream, his strength ran out,” and after many bedridden days, Enkidu finally died, telling Gilgamesh that “he who falls quickly in battle in glorious” (Puchner 70).

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 2, 2014 10:32 PM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
2 February 2014

Question 76:
What is the physical condition of Gilgamesh when he reaches the tavern of Siduri? What is the motive for his wandering?

Answer:
When Gilgamesh reaches the tavern keeper, Siduri, takes one look at him in fear and shuts her doors. When Gilgamesh tells her who he is, she describes his condition by saying:

If you are Gilgamesh…why are your cheeks
emaciated, your face cast down,
Your heart wretched, your features wasted,
Woe in your vitals,
Your face like a traveler’s from afar,
Your features weathered by cold and sun,
Why are you clad in a lion skin, roaming a
steppe? (27, 31-36)

The reason Gilgamesh looks so worn out is that he has been traveling in search of eternal life. The only person he knows that has the magic elixir to cure death is Utanapishtim, who is very similar to Noah and his arc from the Judeo-Christian bible.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at February 2, 2014 10:50 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (CA02)
2.2.2014
Question #77
77. Utanapishtim, The Far-Distant/At the Edge of the World
Why would Urshanabi have a crew made of stone? What replaces the Stone Ones?
ANSWER:
What can be understood from the texts, a simple mortal cannot touch the waters of death, otherwise they die. “Stand back Gilgamesh! Take the first pole, your hand must not touch the waters of death, take the second, the third [. . .]” (Puchner 78). Urshanabi, tells Gilgamesh to use the poles to row across the waters, in replacement to the Stone Charms/Ones/Things.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 2, 2014 11:02 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

QUESTION #76:
What is the physical condition of Gilgamesh when he reaches the tavern of Siduri? What is the motive for his wandering?

ANSWER:
When Gilgamesh reaches the tavern, he is covered in filth and looks as though he is some type of killer, or a “slaughterer of wild bulls” (Puchner 75). His long journey has obviously worn him out enough to the point where he does not resemble someone of descent from the gods, but rather a petty criminal who poses a threat to her, which is why she locks her door (Puchner 75).
He wanders to Utanapishtim because he misses Enkidu and wishes to be reunited with him (Puchner 76). He wants the tavern keeper to allow him to cross the river to Utanapishtim so he can find Enkidu.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at February 3, 2014 12:32 AM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
3 February 2014

QUESTION #85:
What does Gilgamesh do to propel the boat once all the poles are used?

ANSWER:
When Gilgamesh is travelling through the waters of death, he uses up all the poles that he made to traverse the deadly waters. After his happened Gilgamesh, “tore off his clothes from his body” and fashioned a mast using nothing but his arms and the clothes he tore off himself (Puchner 78).

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at February 3, 2014 01:06 AM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narritive
2 February 2014

Question #97:
What is significant about the flower spiking Gilgamesh's hands when he plucks it?

Answer:
As soon as Gilgamesh was told about this miraculous plant, he immediately wanted to posses it. He acts foolishly and hastily in order to attain this magical plant which "like the wild rose, will prick your hand" (Anonymous 287).In the next line Gilgamesh simply leaves while he is being spoken to " If you can secure this plant,..." He rushes out after this line and disregards the speaker.

Gilgamesh was acting foolish once again by impulsively bathing in a "pond whose water was cool" (Anonymous 306). Instead of simply eating the plant and gaining his youth again he acts thoughtlessly and gets the magical plant taking from by a snake, this somewhat parallels the story of Adam and Eve with the snake.

This plant promised the hero a new fresh start with youth and health, however the prick on his hand when he secures the plant is crucial because it foreshadows the next event. The prick signified the heroes downfall and the foreshadowing that he would not receive his youth.

Posted by: DJ Menezes at February 3, 2014 02:35 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 February 2014

Question 86, Tablet 10, Utanapishtim, the Far-Distant/At the Edge of the World:
“After arriving in the land of the Far-Away, Gilgamesh tells Utanapishtim his story. What is Utanapishtim’s response to Gilgamesh and his quest?”

Answer:
Following the death of Enkidu, Gilgamesh continues on his quest for immortality in fear of dying. He recounts his tale to Utanapishtim about Enkidu and what his quest entails. Utanapishtim seems sorry for Gilgamesh trying to “prolong woe” similar to a “fool” (Puchner 80). Utanapishtim explains to Gilgamesh that his quest for immortality is just bring death closer to him by wearing out his body (Puchner 80). Today’s society is taught to fear death and do everything they can to stay alive. Gilgamesh is just like these people trying to beat death with immortality. Utanapishtim states that people who are asleep and people who are dead have a lot in common; there are cycles for both sleep and death and life that are in balance with the mystery of one’s time of death (Puchner 80).

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 3, 2014 08:53 AM

Jacklyn O’Brien
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

QUESTION #79:
After Gilgamesh identifies himself, why does Siduri not believe him?

ANSWER:
After Gilgamesh has successfully destroyed the Bull of heaven, he begins his travels to the tavern, in search for eternal life. The tavern keeper Siduri saw Gilgamesh approaching from a far and instantly assumes he is a murder, so she quickly bolt locks the doors. Gilgamesh arrives at the door and begins to threaten to break down the door if she does not open it, for he is the all mighty Gilgamesh. Siduri responded “If you are indeed Gilgamesh, who killed the guardian, who felled Humbaba who dwelt in the Forest of Cedars, who killed lions at the mountain passes, who seized and killed the bull that came down from heaven, why are your cheeks emaciated, your face cast down, your heart wretched, your features wasted, woe in your vitals, your face like a traveler’s from afar, your features weathered by cold and sun, why are you clad in a lion skin, roaming the steppe? (Puchner 75) Siduri was taken back because the heroic Gilgamesh did not look like a god; he instead came across looking like a criminal. Gilgamesh explains to Siduri he has been traveling in hopes to get to Utnapishtim, and is so destroyed looking because he has been mourning the death of his loved one Enkidu for six days and seven nights.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at February 3, 2014 09:44 AM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
2 February 3, 2014

Question #93:
What instruction does Utanapishtim give his wife to prove to Gilgamesh the results of the challenge?
Answer:
In the epic of Gilgamesh Utanapishtim is called the distant one and have given certain instructions to his wife to prove a point to Gilgamesh, during the challenge. Utanapishtim tells his wife to bake a loaf of bread every day that Gilgamesh is asleep, and place one by another by Gilgamesh head while he is asleep. Then instructs her to make a mark on the wall for every day that he is asleep to prove a point. She complete these task as Utanapishtim ask “the first loaf was dried hard, the second was leathery, the third was soggy, and the crust of the forth turned white, the fifth was gray with mold, and the sixth loaf was fresh, while the seventh still sat on coal” (Puncher, pg. 86) On the seventh day Utanapishtim touches Gilgamesh and he awakes. Once Gilgamesh awakes he states “scarcely had sleep taken over me, you touched me and roused me” (Puncher, pg.86) So by the wife completing the instructions given to her from Utanapishtim; her husband was able to make a point to Gilgamesh.

Posted by: Re-chia Jackson at February 3, 2014 10:40 AM

Alexander Hoschak
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
03 February 2014

Question:
88. Tablet 11. The Flower of Immortality
Why does Gilgamesh want to “pick a fight” against Utanapishtim?

Answer:
Gilgamesh wanted to pick a fight with Utanapishtim because he had been the old man he was looking for all along. He had been trying to find him because he used to be a mortal man and he became an immortal god. Gilgamesh wants the same thing. (Puchner 80-81)

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak at February 3, 2014 11:47 AM

Jose Parra
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
February 3, 2014

Question #101, Tablet 11:
Why does Gilgamesh give Urshanabi a tour of Uruk when they arrive back home? What is Gilgamesh's legacy?

Answer:
Gilgamesh returns home from his journey. When he returns he is somewhat sad because of the fact that the fact that he failed to stay up for seven days along with his failure to bring back the plant that grants youth. When he returns home this sadness changes into pride. He’s proud of his city (what he has created). As Gilgamesh and Urshanabi walk inside the city, Gilgamesh says to Urshanabi "Walk around and admire these walls. Enjoy them, be astonished how the top shines like copper, but is only brick. Be dazzled by their beauty. It was I, Gilgamesh, the king of the city of Uruk, was the one who built these walls. I am a hero to everyone in this city, for I have accomplished many great things in my life." He becomes more appreciative reminisces on all of the great deeds he has accomplished. He realizes that his life is one filled with greatness and will always be remembered. This is his form of immortality, his legacy.

Posted by: Jose Parra at February 3, 2014 12:05 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 February 2014

Question #88:

Why does Gilgamesh want to “pick a fight” against Utanapishtim?

Answer:

Gilgamesh want to “pick a fight” against Utanapishtim because he is seeking eternal life. Gilgamesh went to find Utanapishtim because he wanted to figure out how he could receive eternal life. After the flooding, Utanapishtim receives the gift of eternal life. Gilgamesh desperately wants that and will do anything to get it. He went across the river in search of Utanapishtim. Utanapishtim told Gilgamesh to ask the gods, the gods told Gilgamesh to enjoy the life that he has and not worry about eternal life. Therefore, Gilgamesh went back to the village with the answer to his question.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at February 3, 2014 12:15 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

QUESTION #80:
Why do Shamash and Siduri suggest that Gilgamesh will not find the eternal life that he seeks?
ANSWER:
Shamash and Siduri tell Gilgamesh that he will not find eternal life because he was made half human and half god. They tell Gilgamesh, “When the gods created mankind, they established death for mankind, and withheld eternal life for themselves” (Puchner 76). The gods have withheld eternal life only for them, and since Gilgamesh is half human, that makes him mortal. This means he has to die eventually.

Posted by: Henry Adu at February 3, 2014 12:41 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 86. Tablet 10. Utanapishtim, The Far-Distant / At the Edge of the World
After arriving in the land of the Far-Away, Gilgamesh tells Utanapishtim his story. What is Utanapishtim's response to Gilgamesh and his quest?

ANSWER:
Utanapishtim's response to Gilgamesh and his quest, is that of much concern as he questions Gilgamesh's motives and if the outcome is even beneficial, "You strive carelessly, what do you gain? When you wear out your strength in ceaseless striving, when you torture your limbs with pain, you hasten the distant end of your days." (Puchner 80). For the physical strain and deterioration that Gilgamesh is causing himself, only asserts what he fears the most, death.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 3, 2014 12:42 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 February 2014

Question #98:
What is Gilgamesh’s plan to use the flower?

Answer:
Gilgamesh wonders if he can use the flower to cure heartache, using it on an old man (Puchner 88 Lines 299-303) which he decided to name him “Old Man Has Become Young-Again-Man.” In addition, he planned to eat the plant himself so he can return to his old carefree youth.

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 3, 2014 12:43 PM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
2 February 2014


Question #81:
According to Siduri, who is the only one who has ever crossed the sea to Ut-napishtim?


Answer:
Siduri is a female tavern keeper who Gilgamesh is demanding the way to Utanapishtim. The tavern keeper informs him “there is has never been a place to cross . . . The valiant Shamash alone can cross this sea” (Puchner 77). Gilgamesh did not take no for answer. When Siduri said that if he did make it across the sea of Utanapishtim, making it past the waters of death, he would come across Ur-Shanabi, Utanapishtim’s boatman who gave him specific instructions and directions to get to Utanapishtim, as he will tag along as well (Puchner 77). Eventually, Gilgamesh and the boatman approach the land of Utanapishtim.

Posted by: natalie white at February 3, 2014 12:47 PM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

QUESTION #95:
Why does Utanapishtim tell Gilgamesh the secret of the Flower of Immortality?
ANSWER:
Utanapishtim was told that he would become immortal if he followed the gods orders during a great flood. He had to build a boat with exact measurements and he was stuck in the great flood for six days and seven nights. Utanaphishtim was granted eternal life. He told Gilgamesh the secret of the Flower of Immortality because he wanted to repay Gilgamesh for his help. Utanapishtim says, “Gilgamesh, you have come here, spent with exertion, what shall I give you for your homeward journey?” (Puchner 87). He decides to tell Gilgmesh about the Flower of Immortality and before Utanapishtim even finishes explaining it, Gilgamesh is tying rocks to his feet to get to the bottom of the pond to retrieve it.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at February 3, 2014 01:03 PM

Charles Fowler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Exploring Narratives
February 3, 2014

Question # 96: What does Gilgamesh use as anchors when he dives into the sea to locate the flower?
Answer: Gilgamesh was in search of a magic flower that can give you the power of immortality when the nectar has been drunk. He was given instructions of where he can locate the flower at the bottom of the ocean. He ties two stones to his feet so the weight can sink him to the bottom. “Immediately he finds the flower!” He then desired to offer this potion to other people Uruk.

Posted by: Charles Fowler at February 3, 2014 01:06 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

Question 96:
What does Gilgamesh use as anchors when he dives into the sea to locate the flower?

Answer:
Utanapishtim tells Gilgamesh that there is a certain plant he must find in the depths of the ocean. This plant is a “mystery of the gods” and he must use the thorns to prick his hand (Puchner 87). Gilgamesh uses stones as anchors for when he dives into the sea. In Tablet 11 it says, “He tied heavy stones to his feet, they pulled him down into the watery depths” (Puchner 87). After Gilgamesh finds the plant and pricks his hand, he cuts the heavy stones from his feet and floats up to the surface. He then finds out that this plant was the cure to heartache.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at February 3, 2014 01:10 PM

Jack Constant
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
English 220CL Journey's in Narrative CA01
28 january 2014

Tablet 9: The Quest to the Land of the Faraway

Question: How long is Gilgamesh's journey through Mount Mashum?

Answer: After adding up all of the hours that Gilgamesh traveled, I came up with the answer of a little bit over a week. That is how long it took Gilgamesh to journey through Mount Manshum. He a consistent pattern for most of the journey. That is , "When he had gone two double hours, dense was the darkness, no light was there, it would not let him look behind him" (Puchner 74). This continue's on going up in numbers and ends at twelve.

Posted by: jack constant at February 3, 2014 01:25 PM

Brittany C. Davis
02/02/2014
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Dr. Hobbs
94.Tablet 11.

What does Utanapishtim ask Urshanabi to do to Gilgamesh to revitalize him?
Utanapishtim ask Urshanabi to, do an incrediable task in order to be revitalize. First he is asked, to clean himself of his dirt, so he can show how his true beauty. He is then ordered to, bind his hair, and to remove the clothes he was wearing and to put on new robes. After he is on the boat he is told a plant under water that is a secret of the Gods. Gilgamesh throws himself into the water, in order to seek it.

Posted by: Brittany at February 3, 2014 01:30 PM

Aly Strang and Lydia Beach
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Eng220 CL Journeys into Narrative CA2
3 February 2014

Question #5
Mentor: What, according to Vogler, is the psychological function of the mentor archetype?

Answer:
The function of the mentor is supposed to be the self. The self is supposed to be wiser, and more god like than our typical human self. Vogler says, “Mentors are often former heroes who have survived life’s early trials and are now passing on the gift of their knowledge and wisdom.” (Vogler 40) Mentors are basically guiding the hero and giving advice like a parent figure.

Posted by: Aly Strang Lydia Beach at February 3, 2014 01:51 PM

Michael Castronuovo, Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

QUESTION #7:
What, according to Vogler, is a guardian archetype and what characters are guardians in The Epic of Gilgamesh?
ANSWER:
According to Vogler, a threshold guardian is in a story to test the hero’s commitment to their journey and to provide a better understanding for the hero to understand where their journey will lead them (Vogler 49).
In The Epic of Gilgamesh, the tavern keeper would be considered the threshold guardian because she guards the path to the river of Utanapishtim, where Gilgamesh wants to go so he can be reunited with Enkidu (Puchner 76).

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo, Chantal Bouthillier at February 3, 2014 02:17 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
2 February 2014

Question #89
List three similarities and at least three differences between Utnapishtim's account of the flood and the biblical account (look up the Old Testament book of Genesis online, if you need to be reminded of the narrative).

ANSWER:
There are several similarities and differences when talking about both accounts of the flood. On both stories we know that God or the Gods decided that there would be someone in humankind to build something to survive (in both cases, the arks). One was built by Utnapishtim and the other one by Noah. Another interesting similarity is that both floods occurred thousands of years ago. The third similarity is stated by many writings that both men took several species of animals into their Arks.

When it comes to differences we can also say that they are as present as similarities within those two floods. The first one is the duration of each flood. The biblical flood is said to have lasted 40 days and night while the Gilgamesh flood lasted only 6 days and nights. A second difference is that each Ark builder sent different types of bird after the flood ended in order to search if there was any land available. The last difference stated is that each ark had different shapes. Utnapishtim ark was said to being square while Noah's was rectangular.

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at February 3, 2014 02:18 PM

Alexander Hoschak, Mariana Convery
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
03 February 2014

Question:
What, according to Vogler, is the dramatic function of the mentor archetype?

Answer:
The dramatic functions of the mentor archetype are teaching and gift giving. With the teaching aspect, it is important for the mentor to train and inform the student/hero of all there is to know. Teaching is the key function of the mentor. Vogler also states that the teaching can go both ways. The teacher can also end up learning a lot from the student. The mentor also helps the hero to have the courage and he encourages the hero to move forward towards the threshold and to answer the call. With the gift-giving aspect of it, the mentor may give the hero/student some sort of weapon or certain piece of knowledge that can aid the hero/student in their journey or quest.

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak, Mariana Convery at February 3, 2014 03:20 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr.B.Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

Question#101:
Why does Gilgamesh give Ur-shanabi a tour when they arrive back home? What is Gilgamesh's legacy?
Answer:
Gilgamesh gives Ur-shanabi a tour when they arrive back home, because he is proud of everything he has. Gilgamesh wants Ur-shanabi to "study the foundation terrace and examine the brickwork" and admire the beauty of Uruk, the beauty of Gilgamesh's city(Puncher 88). Gilgamesh's legacy is of a human being one life, not trying to live an eternal life but, making the best of the life you have now.

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at February 3, 2014 05:47 PM

Nicholas Heiting and Jonathan Cruz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
3 February 2014

QUESTION #8:
What, according to Vogler, is the psychological function of the guardian archetype?

ANSWER:
According to Vogler, the functions that guardians serve are obstacles and tests for the hero to overcome and complete with the purpose of challenging their strengths, skills, beliefs, etc. In most stories, the protagonist encounters a few threshold guardians that they must conquer in order for them to continue their journey. Threshold guardians can be as simple as bad weather or as tragic as a war between two countries.

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting and Jonathan Cruz at February 3, 2014 08:53 PM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 220 CL CA02
30 January 2014

Question #54:
What damage is caused by the bull's initial three snorts?

Answer:
The Bull of Heaven was described as a very ferocious beast. This was noted after Ishtar said, "With the bull of heaven's fury I will kill him (Puchner 64)." The bull's first snort caused a pit to form which killed one hundred men. The second snort another pit opened killing two hundred men. At the bull's third snort one more pit opened and "Enkidu fell into it, up to his middle (Puchner 65)." However, this pit did not kill Enkidu. He was able to escape and with the help of Gilgamesh they killed the bull of heaven.

Posted by: Kent Wood at February 3, 2014 11:13 PM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
4 February 2014

QUESTION #6:
In the Epic of Gilgamesh, there are mortal men and there are immortal gods. Based on your understanding of the text, how are the gods of ancient Uruk and its environs viewed? What are their functions? Do they intervene in human affairs? If so, how and to what extent? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.) Would this story work just as well without the inclusion of the gods? Why or why not?

ANSWER:
In Gilgamesh, the gods play a very important role in the story, because without them, many of the characters would not have been created, and the entire premise of Gilgamesh being half man, half god would not be understood. An example of this is Enkidu, one of the main characters of the story, would not have been created because there would have been no gods to create him. Furthermore, to answer the question whether the gods intervene in human affairs; yes, they do because the gods created Enkidu based on the supplications of the people to stop Gilgamesh’s tyrannical behavior which is evidenced wherein it says, “The warrior’s daughter, the young man’s spouse, Anu kept hearing their plaints” (Puchner 39). Anu answers their prayers by scheming to have Aruru, who created the human race, to create Enkidu in order for Gilgamesh to connect to his human qualities of love and loss. Because of this, eventually Gilgamesh realizes that he is not a god but a man and will someday die. Therefore, yes,the gods are an important aspect of the story; yes, they intervene in human affairs; and,no,the story would not be as effective without them, especially considering the time period in which the story was written and the ideologies of the people at the time.

The personalities of the gods are unique and really represent the functions and experiences of the people at large, as well as the many aspects of the human psyche. Although they do intervene, they are not the most benevolent gods and are also feared. Enlil is an example of a god to be feared as he was the direct cause of the deluge to try and destroy the human race. He also is inapproachable by the environs because of the threshold guardian Humbaba that no man has been able to defeat. Another interesting aspect of the gods is that the males gods seem to be more malevolent whereas the goddesses seem to be the ones who care more about humanity and are always the once who offer protection and grace, which is a theme throughout the text, but the best example being where Ninsun, Gilgamesh’s mother ,asks Shamash why he endowed her son with a restless heart and then says, “May Aya, your bride, not fear to remind you, ‘Entrust him to the watchmen of the night” (Puchner 51).

Posted by: Mariana Convery at February 4, 2014 01:22 PM

Rebecca Maldonado, Joseph Natonio
ENG220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA 01
Dr. Hobbs
4 February 2014

QUESTION:
1. Hero: What, according to Vogler, is a hero archetype and what characters are the heroes in The Epic of Gilgamesh?

ANSWER:
The Hero archetype usually is associated with self-sacrifice in addition to representing the ego (Vogler 29). In the story, Gilgamesh is most definitely the protagonist but is he really the hero? He never really sacrifices anything. On the contrary, he’s more concerned with remaining immortal and claiming glory rather than making the ultimate sacrifice. You can really see his selfishness when he tried to convince Enkidu to go the cedar forest with him to destroy Humbaba for no real, decent reason (Puchner 49). However, in that instance, Gilgamesh was not afraid to die upon realizing that perhaps dying in battle would be a great way to be immortalized as stated in line 184: “‘Gilgamesh, who joined battle with the fierce Humbaba’ they’ll say,” (Puchner 40). All, in all, Gilgamesh made no real sacrifice even though he transformed internally during his journey from a bully to a better man, through the loss of Enkidu (Puchner 70) and other troublesome events.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado Joseph Natonio at February 4, 2014 03:03 PM

Becca Orden & Wilfred Ras
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
4 February 2014

IN CLASS QUESTION:
What, according to Vogler, is a mentor archetype and what characters are mentors in The Epic of Gilgamesh?
ANSWER:
According to Vogler a mentor guides the hero. They often speak in the voice of God, or are inspired by divine wisdom. Mentors are enthused. Enkidu is a mentor to Gilgamesh because he taught him how to be a better person.

Posted by: Becca Orde, Wilfred Ras at February 4, 2014 05:45 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
4 February 2014

QUESTION #4:
Close your eyes for a moment and think of YOUR perception of a hero, a type of person frequently known for their “noble qualities.” Based on what we have learned in our selected readings from The Epic of Gilgamesh, how would you define a hero in ancient Sumerian culture? Is Gilgamesh excessive in his behavior, or is he only as would be expected of a hero (and a king)? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g. page numbers, etc.)
ANSWER:
I think in the ancient Sumerian culture a hero would be described as part God and someone who is either joining forces with other Gods or going against other Gods. In my opinion Gilgamesh acts only as expected, maybe in some cases a little bit excessive, but for the most part I think he is acting as expected.

Posted by: Becca Orden at February 4, 2014 06:16 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 February 2014

QUESTION 13:
In many narratives (and in real-life), there is frequently a “sidekick” or helper character who is similar (but not equal) to the protagonist. Consider Robin to Batman, Booboo to Yogi Bear, Mini-Me to Dr. Evil in Austin Powers II & III, or even Paul Schafer to David Letterman on the Late Show with David Letterman. Why is Enkidu said to be so similar to Gilgamesh ("his equal; ... his own reflection, his second self, stormy heart for stormy heart")? Does Enkidu change throughout the course of his adventures? What sort of a man was he at the beginning? How does he change? What are the consequences of those changes? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)
ANSWER:
Enkidu and Gilgamesh are strong and kind of like mentors to each other. At first they were enemies but after they battled, they realized that they could help one another and make each other stronger. Both of them are half human and the other half of each of them is a very strong thing. Gilgamesh is part god while Enkidu is part animal.
Enkidu changes a lot throughout the story. At first he is an animal w3ith animalistic qualities and behavior. Shamat in a way tames Enkidu to become more human-like, but at the same time he keeps his animalistic strength. In the book, he transformed with human-like behavior, “his mood became relaxed, he was singing joyously. He felt light-hearted and his features glowed. He put on clothing and became like a warrior” (Puchner 45). Also in the beginning he thought that Gilgamesh was a good person, but he later found out that Gilgamesh took advantage of the people of Uruk.
A major consequence that was positive was that when Enkidu changed, so did Gilgamesh. After Enkidu found out that Gilgamesh was taking advantage of the people of Enkidu, he went to stop him and they battled. After they battled Gilgamesh realized his wrong doings and ceased the relationships. Another positive consequence was that since Enkidu was able to be tamed, he made Gilgamesh change for the better too after they fought.

Posted by: Henry Adu at February 4, 2014 06:43 PM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 February 2014

QUESTION 8:
How is Nature represented in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Is the world depicted as a place of safety and harmony, or a place of precariousness and uncertainty? In this version of the world, what problems could one possibly face? What views about the natural world emerge from the story? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)
ANSWER:
Nature is depicted very badly in The Epic of Gilgamesh. The best example is of the mountains. The gatekeeper didn’t want to let someone who was even part god through the mountain because of the danger it holds. Humbaba is there and is a very fierce opposition to Gilgamesh and Enkidu. In the book it says, “The guardian of the forest shrieked aloud, Humbaba was roaring like thunder” (Puchner 58). Then when Gilgamesh gets the Flower of Immortality, the snake takes it and sheds its skin so Gilgamesh can’t find him. That showed the danger of animals in nature. Nature is depicted very negatively and dangerous in the story. It’s not ‘fairytale friendly’. People in that world faced danger and uncertainty at every turn.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at February 4, 2014 06:59 PM

Natalie White
McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
3 February 2014

Question 8:
What, according to Vogler, is the psychological function of the Threshold Guardian Archetype?

Answer:
In the book, it states that the Guardians face obstacles and challenges in the everyday world. They face demons who clearly are the negativity that is pulling them back from succeeding and changing what needs to be changed and providing self-limitations (Vogler 50). The Threshold Guardians blocks the hero and tests the hero for its power worthiness.

Posted by: Natalie White McClellan Lowry at February 4, 2014 08:11 PM

Jack Constant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
4 February 2014

Tablet 10 Question: When he first meets Urshanabi, why does Gilgamesh hit the ferryman on the head and smash the "things of stone"?

Answer: "His battle cry resounded in the forest. When Urshabani saw the shining..., He raised his axe, he trembled before him, But he, for his part, struck his head...Gilgamesh, He seized his arm...his chest. And the Stone Charms, the protection...of the boat, Without which no one crosses the waters of death" (Puchner 77). Gilgamesh did not want anyone else to be able to get to where he is going. Without the charms, the ferry boatsmen would not be able to cross the sea of death.

Posted by: jack constant at February 4, 2014 08:35 PM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
4 February 2014

Question #3:
In the Epic of Gilgamesh, what sort of ruler is Gilgamesh? Is he liked or disliked by his people? Connect your answer to Enkidu. What is the meaning of the figure Enkidu? Why is he said to have come into being? For what purpose? Does Enkidu succeed in that purpose? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument.

Answer:
Gilgamesh was King of Uruk and somewhat of a stubborn and cocky ruler. In the beginning, the city or Uruk’s people were not so fond of Gilgamesh because of his selfish and arrogant attitude along with his brutal actions. However, he turned into a more respected warrior and was loved more by his people when Enkidu was created. Anu commanded Aruru to make a partner for Gilgamesh, someone who is just as strong, if not more (Puchner 40). Enkidu was half human and half a wild animal. Animals raised him, giving him more undomesticated characteristics. After Emkidu escaped the wildlife, Gilgamesh tamed him with more of the urban lifestyle. Enkidu was initially created to make Uruk have peace within the city (Puchner 40). Enkidu was someone who could compete with Gilgamesh. After the two were introduced, they soon went on an adventure together. They came home emptied handed but they gained a wonderful and strong bond.
Towards the end of the story, Gilgamesh and Enkidu became soul mates, instead of rivalries, like the whole purpose of placing Enkidu in front of Gilgamesh. On their second adventure, Gilgamesh watches Enkidu die a slow and painful death. His sickness was catching up to him and getting worse (Puchner 70).

Posted by: Natalie White at February 4, 2014 09:13 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (CA02)
3.2.2014
Question #2
2.
Close your eyes for a moment and think of YOUR perception of a king, the supreme ruler of a nation-state. In your opinion, how is a king supposed to behave? What is appropriate and inappropriate? Be prepared to discuss Gilgamesh’s style of rulership. Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)
ANSWER:
In my opinion, a king should be the leading example of its people. If a king wishes his people to be civil, then so shall he be; however, if they wish for unruly crowds, then they will be unruly themselves.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 4, 2014 10:01 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
ENG220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA 01
Dr. Hobbs
4 February 2014

QUESTION #3:
In The Epic of Gilgamesh, what sort of ruler is Gilgamesh? Is he liked or disliked by his people? Connect your answer to Enkidu. What is the meaning of the figure of Enkidu? Why is he said to have come into being? For what pupose? Does Enkidu succeed in that purpose? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim.

ANSWER:
Gilgamesh was very much a bully in the beginning of the story. He would often take the people’s sons as soldiers into battle and take the daughters for his own purposes (Puchner 39). “Gilgamesh would leave no son to his father, Day and night he would rampage feircly,” (Puchner 39). Many felt that he was a “headstrong wild bull” in Uruk (Puchner 39).

Enkidu was created to be Gilgamesh’s equal. “To his stormy heart, let that one be equal, Let them contend with each other, that Uruk may have peace,” (Puchner 40). Enkidu would typically be categorized as an ally. However, you could make the argument that he is a hero as he does end up dying and his death does change his comrade, Gilgamesh. In which case, his death was not for nothing, but essential in another character’s progression (Puchner 70). Gilgamesh says when speaking to Utanaphistim, that his friend whom he loved turned to clay. He was so upset he wished to be dead as well: “shall I too not lie down like him and never get up,” (Puchner 79). Enkidu’s purpose was to be Gilgamesh’s other half, to be someone important enough to make an impact on him and he did succeed. It changed Gilgamesh so that he was not as selfish for glory once he suffered a loss.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 4, 2014 10:11 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr.B.Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 February 2013

Question# 12:
In the Epic of Gilgamesh, how important is reputation? Along the same line of thought, what roles do glory and fame play for the primary characters? Why would that be something to worry about? Be prepared to find Specific evidence from the text to support your claim/argument.

Answer:
In the Epic of Gilgamesh, reputation is very important; their reputation depends on their actions throughout the story. For instance, Gilgamesh did not have a good reputation his people believed he was a bad king. It bothered many people that he would always “ leave no son to his father […] leave no girl to her mother!” (Puncher 39). Gilgamesh’s reputation tarnished here because of the way he carried himself around his people, who felt he was a “bad ruler, arrogant, oppressive and brutal,” which caused them to complain to the Gods (Puchner 34). Glory and fame are things primary characters have to worry about in terms of reputation. Glory and fame can be the very same thing that make a person’s reputation bad. When people are in power, they let fame and glory get to their heads and believe that they have the “birthright” to do something (Puchner 46). People know Gilgamesh for taking away brides on their wedding nights and then, leaving them to their husbands, his reasonings being that he believed he had the right as king, to do so (Puchner 46). When Gilgamesh goes out on an adventure to kill Humbaba, he does it for fame and glory. Gilgamesh says “I’ll establish my name: Gilgamesh, who joined battle with fierce Humbaba,” hinting that killing Humbaba is something that would make his reputation better (Puchner 49). At the end of the story, we can assume that Gilgamesh will earn a better reputation than before because, he is looking a life in a different way since he knows that he is living a mortal life.

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at February 4, 2014 10:50 PM

Jacklyn O’Brien, Tyler Sedam
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02: Journeys in Narrative
3 February 2014

QUESTION #3:
What, according to Vogler, is the dramatic function of the hero archetype?

ANSWER:
According to Vogler, there are several different dramatic functions of the hero archetype. The audience function talks about how the audience should be able to relate to, and connect with, the hero of the story. The audience should be able to see that they share certain characteristics of the hero in order to put a part of themselves into the story. The hero usually has certain desires and goals for themselves that we can all identify with (Vogler 30).
The growth function defines how, typically, the hero of the story is the character who grows or learns the most about themselves, or otherwise, throughout the story. The hero goes through many challenges and tribulations that he or she must overcome (Vogler 31).
Action is the dramatic function that, more or less, has the hero being the most active character in the story. The hero is the one who usually has to perform the final act of the story, typically one that involves the most risk to themselves, others, or the outcome itself (Vogler 31).
Defined as “the true mark of a Hero,” sacrifice is the best quality that a hero can exhibit, according to Vogler (Vogler 31). The sacrifice a hero makes in a story can be the biggest decision they have to make, as it could involve something as drastic as sacrificing their life or humanity for whatever their ultimate goal is.
Finally, the hero must face, and deal with, death, whether it is symbolic or literal. The hero must be able to, through the course of the story, teach us how to deal with actual death, or symbolically by failing a crucial task and the consequences it may bring by doing so. The hero must exhibit the understanding, and acceptance of, the possibility of death or failure, but be willing to take the chance that they will succeed in the end (Vogler 32).

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien & Tyler Sedan at February 4, 2014 11:12 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 February 2014

QUESTION #10:
Find as many examples of dreams as you can in The Epic of Gilgamesh. What is the role or function of dreams in this narrative? What purposes do they serve? Whenever someone in the story dreams, is it just “filler” or is it an integral part of the story?

ANSWER:
In The Epic of Gilgamesh, dreams are very integral to the plot of the story because of the foreshadowing that they present to the characters of what is to come. The dreams also seem to be a way for the gods to communicate with mortals like Enkidu. They also provide a way to see how some characters, particularly Gilgamesh and Enkidu, react to certain dreams, as well as what their interpretations of those dreams are.
In Tablet IV, Gilgamesh has several nightmares just before he and Enkidu get ready to travel to Humbaba. Gilgamesh worries that these nightmares are a bad omen for their upcoming journey and means that they will fail in their quest (Puchner 54). However, Enkidu is more optimistic about it and says that the dreams are actually a good omen (Puchner 55).
In Tablet VII, Enkidu has a dream in which the gods tell him that either he or Gilgamesh must die as a punishment for the killing of Humbaba (Puchner 66). This would be an example of foreshadowing events to come later, as at the end of the tablet, Enkidu dies.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at February 4, 2014 11:13 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy and Joe Sears
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 February 2014

Question #6:
What according to Vogler, is the Dramatic Function of the mentor archetype?
Answer:
In The Writer’s Journey, there are many examples of the Dramatic Function of the mentor archetype. There were four very popular archetypes in the section to focus on. The four popular archetypes include Teaching, Gift-giving, Motivation, and Planting. The idea of “teaching or training is a key function of the Mentor.” (Vogler 40). A teacher is described as someone who shows the hero the ropes in the story (Vogler 40). Gift-giving is another important archetype, it involves “a donor or provider: one who temporarily aids the hero, usually be giving some gift. It may be a magic weapon, an important key or clue, some magical medicine or food, or a life-saving piece of advice.” (Vogler 40). Motivation is one of the four important archetypes in the Dramatic Function. Motivation is how a mentor helps the hero overcome fear (Vogler 42). A mentor in some cases “shows the hero something or arranges things to motivate her to take action and commit to the adventure.”(Vogler 42). However, being a mentor is not always easy when trying to motivate the hero, sometimes the mentor has to push the hero to do something they despise deeply, or the mentor might have to cause a fight to push the hero in the direction they must go. Planting is the final important archetype in the popular four. Planting is when a mentor must “plant information or a prop that will become important later.”(Vogler 43). Mentors use planting “for the audience to note but forget about until the climactic moment where the gadget becomes a lifesaver.”(Vogler 43). Being a mentor is not always an easy job, “mentors provide heroes with motivation, inspiration, guidance, training, and gifts for the journey.” (Vogler 47). The mentor has a lot of responsibility on making sure the hero is ready for the adventure they will embark on throughout the story.
Work Cited
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey . Third . Studio City, CA: Michael Wiese Production , 2007. 40-47. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy and Joe Sears at February 4, 2014 11:49 PM

Jacklyn O’Brien, Tyler Sedam
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02: Journeys in Narrative
3 February 2014

QUESTION #3:
What, according to Vogler, is the dramatic function of the hero archetype?

ANSWER:
According to Vogler, there are several different dramatic functions of the hero archetype. The audience function talks about how the audience should be able to relate to, and connect with, the hero of the story. The audience should be able to see that they share certain characteristics of the hero in order to put a part of themselves into the story. The hero usually has certain desires and goals for themselves that we can all identify with (Vogler 30).
The growth function defines how, typically, the hero of the story is the character who grows or learns the most about themselves, or otherwise, throughout the story. The hero goes through many challenges and tribulations that he or she must overcome (Vogler 31).
Action is the dramatic function that, more or less, has the hero being the most active character in the story. The hero is the one who usually has to perform the final act of the story, typically one that involves the most risk to themselves, others, or the outcome itself (Vogler 31).
Defined as “the true mark of a Hero,” sacrifice is the best quality that a hero can exhibit, according to Vogler (Vogler 31). The sacrifice a hero makes in a story can be the biggest decision they have to make, as it could involve something as drastic as sacrificing their life or humanity for whatever their ultimate goal is.
Finally, the hero must face, and deal with, death, whether it is symbolic or literal. The hero must be able to, through the course of the story, teach us how to deal with actual death, or symbolically by failing a crucial task and the consequences it may bring by doing so. The hero must exhibit the understanding, and acceptance of, the possibility of death or failure, but be willing to take the chance that they will succeed in the end (Vogler 32).

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien, Tyler Sedam at February 4, 2014 11:50 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
4 February 2014

QUESTION #12:
In _The Epic of Gilgamesh_, how important is reputation? Along that same line, what roles do glory and fame play for the primary characters? Why would that be something to worry about? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)

ANSWER:
In the ancient world of _The Epic of Gilgamesh_, reputation is the second most important concept other than wealth in that society. For someone to establish a strong reputation, it gives that person a chance to immortalize their self by their accomplishments. Enkidu was enticed by Shamhat’s description of the reputation that Gilgamesh possesses. After learning Gilgamesh’s reputation, Enkidu “yearned for one to know his heart” and become his friend (Puchner 45). Without Gilgamesh’s reputation, Enkidu never would have been created or found interest in meeting and befriending him.

Gilgamesh was obsessed with increasing his fame and glory. He wants to prove to regular people and himself that he is greater than that of an average human. Gilgamesh tries to satisfy his lust for glory by killing the great beast Humbaba. Gilgamesh brought a large cider gate for his kingdom so that everyone will know what he had accomplished.

Glory and fame can become a double-edged sword because people will know what a person has done in order to obtain it. The adventures that are formed while trying to gain glory can have the adventurer making new enemies along the way. This can create a tragic outcome when the quest is complete. An event similar to this happens to Gilgamesh, when the gods curse his only friend Enkidu with a deadly illness; eventually killing him because the gods were angry with them for killing Humbaba and the Bull of Heaven, just to increase his own level of fame (Puchner 70).

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at February 4, 2014 11:53 PM

Kent Wood and John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 220 CL CA02
4 February 2014

Question #11:
What, according to Vogler, is the psychological function of the herald archetype?

Answer:
This archetype issues challenges and pronounces the coming of a significant change. These challenges aggravates characters and usually sparks some type of conflict.

Posted by: Kent Wood and John-Wesley Ingraham at February 5, 2014 12:32 AM

Re-Chia Jackson
Jesse Robinson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
2 February 4, 2014
Question #9
What according to Volger is the dramatic function of the guardian archetype?
Answer:
A dramatic function according to volger is when hero’s learn to incorporate guardians and use their strengths, and it basically is a test for that particular hero.

Posted by: Re-chia Jackson and Jesse Robinson at February 5, 2014 01:46 AM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
2 February 4, 2014

Question #11
Is the Character of Gilgamesh transformed in course of his journeys? Is he a different sort of man at the end, after his return home? If so, how? According to you interpretation of The epic of Gilgamesh, what is the best way of life? That of Gilgamesh? That of Enkidu? That of Utnapishtim? Be prepared to find specific evidence from the text to support your claim/argument.
Answer:
In the epic of Gilgamesh, the main character Gilgamesh known as a hero in that town he was part man, and part god. Gilgamesh has changed though out his life journey through the impact had on his life. Before his friend with Enkidu, he was careless and heartless he did not care for anyone but himself. Once he and Enkidu established a relationship, they were a force to reckon with. They took out any enemy in their path. The death of his friend causes Gilgamesh to lash out, and goes on a quest to find eternal life. When he meets Utnapishtim, a person who could give him this eternal life he is seeking. He wants to complete this challenge because he was restless and need to rest. Therefore, he decides to rest and falls asleep. He was unable to complete the task to way so he offered another option. To go in the water and grab this flower, but as he rises to give the flower to Utnapishtim a snake comes along and steal the flower. Gilgamesh hurt by this action, but he continue his journey a very determine man/god.
The best way of life is that of is that of Utnapishtim “the distant one” he has seen so much. The world destroyed right before his eyes. The earth flooded by the valiant enial. Enial destroyed everything in his path. He was told to build a boat to protect himself and people and animals around him. Six day of the flood and on the seventh day Utnapisthim says “I brought out a dove and set it free, no landing place came to its view, so it turned back then he tired a swallow” (Puncher pg. 84) He release a raven which does not return and then he seeks out to find the dry land. The Gods notice and they “crowded round the sacrificer like flies” (Puncher pg. 84) He speaks to the god before him “O, Gods, these shall be my lapis necklace, lest I forget, I should be mindful of these days, and not forget, not ever.” (Puncher pg. 84) He was not pleased with the gods and wanted eternal life, but only one god Ea could grant such a command. Utnapisthim granted eternal life him and his wife Enil states, “Hitherto Utnapisthim shall dwell far distant at the source of the rivers” (Puncher pg. 84) Utnapisthim showed that he was determined in this story and earned his right to be a god. He followed each instruction handed before him and prove he was worthy of this incredible rewarded given unto him and his wife.

Posted by: Re-chia Jackson at February 5, 2014 03:40 AM

Michael Adamson, Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA01
4 February 2014

Question 7, Group Activity:
“What according to Vogler is a ‘Threshold Guardian’ archetype and what characters are threshold guardians in ‘The Epic of Gilgamesh’?”

Answer:
According to Vogler, Threshold Guardians are sometimes aligned with the antagonist and mark the transitory stage between tasks or other minor villians (Vogler 49). Guardians are not all bad. It is up to the character and the reader to decide where non-obvious characters belong.
In ‘Gilgamesh’, the Threshold Guardians are like the calms before the storm as bad things tend to happen after the Guardian departs. Ishtar is a threshjold Guardian because she ushers in the Bull of Heaven. Ninshuluhha is the housekeeper to the underworldand allows Enkidu to pass into the afterlife following his death. The last two threshold guardians are Ur-Shanabi, ateh boatman for the poisonous Water of Death and Utanapitshtim who both held Gilgamesh transition following Enkidu’s death.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 5, 2014 06:58 AM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 February 2014

Question #11:
Is the character of Gilgamesh transformed in the course of his journeys? Is He a different sort of man at the end, after his return home? If so, how? According to your interpretation of The Epic of Gilgamesh, what is the best way of life? That of Gilgamesh? That of Enkidu? That of Utnapishtim? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/ argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)
Answer:
Gilgamesh is transformed through his journeys. In the beginning of the story Gilgamesh is a poor king, he treats his subjects badly and even takes part in rapping women “Gilgamesh would leave no son to his father.” (Puchner 39). No king should ever abuse his powers the way Gilgamesh did. As the gods watched Gilgamesh destroy his reputation, they decided to create a character by the name of Enkidu. Enkidu was created to put Gilgamesh back on the path to being a good king. Enkidu builds a friendship with Gilgamesh showing Gilgamesh who he really is and what he can do for the goodness of his people. Enkidu grows ill and eventually dies. This is heartbreaking for Gilgamesh; Gilgamesh uses the words of Enkidu to become the best king for his people. I believe Enkidu has the best way of life; he was created in order to help someone become a better person. Personally, I believe that helping people is one of the best gifts of life. Helping someone transform from some evil monster to a great ruler I imagine to be a great feeling.
Work Cited
Puchner, Martin. Gilgamesh: The Epic of Gilgamesh. Trans. Foster, Benjamin R. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 5, 2014 09:18 AM

Paola Vasquez and Daniella Zacaria
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
5 February 2014

QUESTION #1: What, according to Vogler, is a hero archetype and what character are the heroes in The Epic of Gilgamesh?

ANSWER:
According to Vogler, a hero is someone who is willing to sacrifice his own needs on behalf of others (Vogler, 29-30). The Hero archetype represents the ego’s search for identity and wholeness. Both Through Gilgamesh, protagonist, through him Enkidu becomes a protagonist and hero and no longer an antagonist. Gilgamesh is a hero because he gives up his power. Both protagonist are described the same, therefore, making both of them heroes (Pochner, 45).

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 5, 2014 10:37 AM

Aly Strang
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Eng220 CL Journeys into Narrative CA2
4 February 2014

Question #6
In The Epic of Gilgamesh, there are mortal men and there are immortal gods. Based on your understanding of the text, how are the gods of ancient Uruk and its environs viewed? What are their functions? Do they intervene in human affairs? If so, how and to what extent? Would this story work just as well without the inclusion of the gods? Why or why not?

Answer:
The gods intervene in human affairs plenty of times, considering that Gilgamesh his half god himself and he is living on earth. Gilgamesh finds Utnapishtim who was mortal and become immortal and asks him how he did so. Utnapishtim tells him a story about when the gods flooded the earth, Ea the leader said, “Wreck house, build boat, Forsake possessions and seek life, Belongings reject and life save!” (26 Puchner) The story wouldn’t work just as well without the inclusion of the gods, because they’re a huge piece to the Epic of Gilgamesh so many ways. When the gods betray each other or the mortals betray the gods there are always consequences. Enil the god of earth even tells Utnapishtim to lie to his people about why he’s building the boat. The immortal gods all play huge character in the story, like Aruru the goddess of creation who actually makes Enkidu out of clay and her own spit.

Posted by: Aly Strang at February 5, 2014 10:52 AM

Jacklyn O'Brien
Dr.B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
5 February 2014

QUESTION #4:
Close your eyes for a moment and think of YOUR perception of a hero, a type of person frequently known for their "noble qualities." Based on what we have learned in our selected readings from The Epic of Gilgamesh, how would you define a hero in ancient Sumerian Culture? Is Gilgamesh excessive in his behavior, or is he only acting as would be expected of a hero(and a king)? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument.


ANSWER:
A hero in the ancient Sumerian culture is much different then your typical "hero" you would see today.A hero in general is a person who performs great acts of bravery and kindness for the greater good of humanity. A hero is also normally very well liked. Gilgamesh as a hero has some of these characteristics but is a bit excessive. Gilgamesh with his looks and his strength is similar to a god, and frequently performs great acts of braveness to protect his people. However Gilgamesh also feels that because he does this he is entitled to anything and everything. For example Gilgamesh stealing men's wives on their own wedding night. No matter how high and mighty Gilgamesh may be he still is in the wrong for the way he feels to superior to the rest of the world. His arrogance makes him not favorable.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at February 5, 2014 11:16 AM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
5 February 2014

QUESTION #12: In The Epic of Gilgamesh, how important is reputation? Along the same line of thought, what roles do glory and fame play for the primary characters? Why would that be something to worry about?
ANSWER:
In The Epic of Gilgamesh reputation is extremely important because the characters actions depends on it. For example, you can say that Gilgamesh did not have such a good reputation because the people believed he was a horrible king. People described him as an arrogant and brutal ruler, making them go to the Gods and complain. Glory and fame play an important role for the primary characters because they are characteristics of their reputations. People who have never had glory and fame grow a big head and let it get to them, thinking they have power over everyone no matter what the circumstances are (Puchner 46, lines 75-84). At the end of his journey, Gilgamesh changed for better, viewing life in a different way, since he is now part of the mortal life.

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 5, 2014 11:26 AM

Daniel Menezes/Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CAO2
5 February 2014

Question 4:
According to Vogler, what is the mentor archetype and who are they in Gilgamesh?

Answer:
The mentor archetype, according to Vogler, are the characters who assist the hero and help him grow and become successful. The mentor archetype is usually an older and wiser individual who supplies the tools in order to make the hero successful.

The main mentor in the story in Endiku. Endiku is not the hero and cannot be seen that way after the killing of Humbaba, Endiku was only there to intimidate him. There was no real calling or reason for Endiku to be there and assist, other than to inflate Gilgamesh's ego and to glorify him. Some other mentor archetypes in this epic is Utnapishtim and Gilgamesh's mother as well. They give Gilgamesh advice and point him in the right direction.

Posted by: DJ Menezes/Henry Adu at February 5, 2014 12:17 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 1. In the U.S. system of governance, for example, certain "checks and balances" were built into the various seats of power by the framers of the constitution. In the city of Uruk, where Gilgamesh is king, are there checks on the monarchy's power? What are they and how significant are they? How would you characterize the political organization of Uruk?

ANSWER:
In the city of Uruk where Gilgamesh is king there are no checks on the monarchy's power; for Gilgamesh is the only one with power and because of his ultimate strength no one dared to challenge him, "In the enclosure of Uruk he strode back and forth, lording it like a wild bull, his head thrust high. The onslaught of his weapons had no equal." (Puchner 39). The significance of there being no checks in the city of Uruk causes Gilgamesh to do whatever he so pleases. He continuously bombardes the people of Uruk and intentionally take his people as slaves, "He was harrying the young men of Uruk beyond reason. Gilgamesh would leave no son to his father, day and night he would rampage fiercely. . . Gilgamesh would leave no daughter to her mother!" (Puchner 39); this shows the political disorganization of Uruk and a king that no one, even the gods cannot control.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 5, 2014 12:43 PM

Question #5:
Is The Epic of Gilgamesh primarily a man's story or a woman's story? What function do women play in the story? In comparison to men, how are women portrayed?

Answer:
The Epic of Gilgamesh is a man's story because it centers around the story of King Gilgamesh and his life. Women are mostly used and considered objects or very important. Compared to men, most of the women in this epic poem are portrayed with a lower societal status and they are seen as less important.

Throughout the Epic women are seen as either gods ,mortals with a higher status than most, or objects. For example Shamhat, the temple prostitute. She was known to tame a wild man by her sexuality. She is told, "Now use your love-arts. Strip off your robe and lie here naked, with your legs apart. Stir up his lust when he approaches, touch him, excite him, take his breath with your kisses, show him what a woman is. The animals who knew him in the wilderness will be bewildered, and will leave him forever" (Anonmymous). But after the act is completed, she is moved aside and thrown away and forgotten about.

An example from Gilgamesh that shows the common woman being portrayed as an object is at the beginning of the story in the first tablet. "[He] takes the girl from her mother and uses her, the warrior's daughter, the young man's bride, he uses her" (Anonymous). An interesting point to note is that the only character who expresses these attitudes towards women seems to be Gilgamesh. However, it exemplifies the attitudes towards woman during this time period.

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at February 5, 2014 12:46 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 February 2014

Question 9:
What is the attitude of the Epic of Gilgamesh toward Nature (forests, animals, wild life, etc.)? What is the attitude toward the destruction and neglect of Nature (as for example in the cutting down of Humbaba's cedar forest and Enkidu's abandonment of his former life in another forest)?

Answer:
The attitude of the Epic of Gilgamesh toward Nature is that they had great respect for it. Enkidu was a person who lived in the nature. Enkidu was a person who was part human and part animal. The author uses this character to illustrate how in the early civilization of Mesopotamia lived. The people in Mesopotamia had great admiration and respect for the earth among them, and that includes forests, animals, and wildlife. The attitude towards the destruction and neglect of nature was very positive, even though you would think it would be negative. It is positive because when they destroyed Humbaba, they finally had wood to take back to the village. Even though they destroyed half of the forest and Enkidu abandoned his former life, it shows how Enkidu finally moved to become a human and that the village was finally free from Humbaba.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at February 5, 2014 12:50 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
5 February 2014

Question 4: “Close your eyes for a moment and think of YOUR perception of a hero, a person frequently known for their ‘noble qualities.’ Based on what we have learned in our selected readings from The Epic of Gilgamesh, how would you define a hero (and a king)? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)

Answer:
When I think of a hero, I think of someone who is respectable and kind. He or she is able to think critically and doesn’t jump to conclusions or rush into something without thinking first. Heroes are capable of feeling the emotional burden that their actions could have caused. In contrast, I expect the typical king-figure to be rude and prideful. Kings would attack first and question later, and feel next to nothing about those they hurt. Granted, not all royalty behaves in such a manner as described, but some do and they are the ones people tend not to like.
In The Epic of Gilgamesh, I do not really see Gilgamesh as a true ‘hero’ but rather as a king just trying to save his own skin. By my previously mentioned definition of a hero, the only heroic thing Gilgamesh did was mourn for Enkidu (Puchner 76). Other than that one instance, he is basically rushing into things and thinking too highly of himself. He killed Humbaba and attacks Ur-Shanabi pretty much on sight without forewarning (Puchner 61, 77). This is besides the fact that Gilgamesh is vain and feels entitled to things given his divine heritage (Puchner 39). I want to be able to root for the hero to achieve his or her quests, but I cannot find myself wanting to root for Gilgamesh because he is just a king being a king trying to escape the best gift anyone could have after a full life.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 5, 2014 12:51 PM

Kelsey Stevens, Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
5 February 2014

Question:
What, according to Volger, is the dramatic function of the guardian archetype?
Answer:
According to Volger, the dramatic function of the guardian archetype is to test the hero. When the Threshold Guardian and the hero of the story meet, the guardian presents the hero with a challenge, task, or puzzle. It was said that, “Threshold Guardians challenge and test heroes on the path” (Volger 50). Heroes have different options they can choose from in order to deal with the test from the Guardian. They can run, attack their opponent head on, make an ally of a presumed enemy, bribe the Guardian, or use craft or deceit to get by. Volger says, “one of the most effective ways of dealing with a Threshold Guardian is to ‘get into the skin’ of the opponent” (Volger 50). It is often that the hero will temporarily disguise themselves as the enemy. The author claims, “instead of uselessly trying to defeat a superior enemy, they have temporarily become the enemy” (Volger 51). The job of a Threshold Guardian is to make sure the hero pursues in changing themselves.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens Marssiel Mena at February 5, 2014 12:53 PM

Chelsea Dubberly
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - Journeys in Narrative
February 5, 2014

Question 5: Mentor- What is the psychological function of the mentor archetype?
Answer: “The mentor archetype represents them self the god within us and the aspects of personality that is connected with all things.” (Vogler 40) Hero’s look up to mentors as a parent figure to be able to follow them. If the hero follows the mentors’ path that has been laid before them then the hero will be a mentor in the future.

Posted by: Chelsea Dubberly, Jose Parra at February 5, 2014 12:55 PM

Diana Berthil and Brittany Davis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 2. Hero: What, according to Vogler, is the psychological function of the hero archetype?

ANSWER:
According to Volger, the psychological function of the Hero archetype is the ego. The ego is defined as its own entity, based on how a person views themselves according to their own perspective, ". . . that considers itself distinct from the rest of the human race." (Volger 29). The individuality of an ego, causes it to be solely focused upon developing itself, "The hero archetype represents the ego's search for identity and wholeness." (Volger 30). The ego's search ultimately allows for the Hero to integrate different parts of him/herself and make them into one; "The ego, the hero thinking she is separate from all these parts of herself, must incorporate them to become the Self." (Volger 30).

Posted by: Diana Berthil and Brittany Davis at February 5, 2014 01:00 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 February 2014

Question 2:
Close your eyes for a moment and think of YOUR perception of a king, the supreme ruler of a nation-state. In your opinion, how is a king supposed to behave? What is appropriate and inappropriate? Be prepared to discuss Gilgamesh’s style of rulership. Find specific evidence from the test to support your claim/argument.

Answer:
A king is someone who is supposed to be selfless. The most important thing to a king is his people. His number one priority is to make sure his people are safe, cared for, and happy. They should carry themselves in a humble manner. Because it is possible for a nation-state to have enemies, the ruler must be willing to go and fight for his people, risking his life to ensure theirs. Respect is very important as a king. In order for a king’s people to respect him, he must respect them also. Gilgamesh is not the perception of a good ruler. He is self-centered. Tablet I says, “Gilgamesh would leave no girl to her mother! The warrior’s daughter, the young man’s spouse,” which indicates Gilgamesh is not respectful (Puchner 39). Gilgamesh rapes every woman in his nation. He claims that he must be the first one to have every woman, even if it is the night before her wedding. Gilgamesh only focuses on himself and his happiness. He is always finding enemies to fight just for fun, to prove that he is the strongest. He doesn’t necessarily fight in order to keep his people safe.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at February 5, 2014 01:10 PM

Brittany C. Davis
02/04/2014
Homework Question
7.Tablet 5.
What is the previous relation between Enkidu and Humbaba? How is Gilgamesh aided in the slaying of Humbaba by Shamash and by Enkidu? What positive and negative results of the exploit does Enkidu foresee? What are the auras of Humbaba?

Gilgamesh is aided in the slaying of Humbaba by Shamash, because after he prays to him, Shamash throws down thirteen lightning bolts on time, during the battle. I think the second question is asking about Gilgamesh’ dreams, and each time Enkidu describes them as good dreams that will bring Gilgamesh good fortune. The Auras of Humbaba are from his clothes, he is wearing seven of them and each gives off a different aura.
“Enkidu made ready to speak, saying to Gilgamesh: My friend! Do not listen to what Humbaba says, Do not heed his entreaties!”

Posted by: Brittany Davis at February 5, 2014 01:32 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 February 2014

Question #99:
Why does the snake grab the flower, shed its skin, and slither away forever?

Awnser:
The snake represents how Gilgamesh will never be young again like the snake who shed its skin and is now young.

Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at February 5, 2014 01:51 PM

Alexander Hoschak
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
05 February 2014

Question:
In the epic of Gilgamesh, what sort of ruler is Gilgamesh? Is he liked or disliked by his people? Connect your answer to Enkidu. What is the meaning go the figure Enkidu? Why is he said to have come into being? For what purpose? Does Enkidu succeed in that purpose?

Answer:
Gilgamesh gives everyone what he or she want but with the least work possible. He does not care for the citizens of his land and will do what he wants. Everyone dislikes him. The citizens prayed to the Gods and the Gods gave them Enkidu. Enkidu is half animal and half man. The citizens want to use Enkidu to stop Gilgamesh. Shamhot the prostitute teaches Enkidu about the civilizations of man and “teaches” him things. Once he had sex with Shamhot, the animals did not accept him and he had to be part of the humans. Enkidu must teach Gilgamesh on how to be a human but it is ironic seeing as how Enkidu is an animal. Enkidu does succeed in teaching Gilgamesh how to act like a human.

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak at February 5, 2014 01:55 PM

Allie Clemons & Zach Daley
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
5 February 2014
Question 3
Hero: What, According to Volger, is the dramatic function of the hero archetype?
Answer
Hero’s should have universal qualities, emotions, and motivations that everyone has experienced at one time or another: revenge, anger, lust, competition. Territoriality, patriotism, idealism, cynicism, or despair but, hero’s must be unique human beings, rather than stereotypical creatures or tin Gods without flaws or unpredictability like any effective work of art they need both universality and originality.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at February 5, 2014 02:17 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
5 February 2014
Question 2
Close your eyes for a moment and think of YOUR perception of a king, the supreme ruler of a nation-state. In your opinion, how is a king supposed to behave? What is appropriate and inappropriate? Be prepared to discuss Gilgamesh’s style of rulership. Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/ argument.
Answer
My opinion of a king would be one that has the ability to be an excellent leader such as holding high standards of his people and making them strive to be better and to have respect from his people and know that they will know that you are in charge and can handle them if necessary. A good ruler is one who is strong and instils fear upon his or her people to the extent that they know their place. I believe that Gilgamesh for the most part demonstrates a good leader but he shouldn’t have shown how much he was hurt by Enkidu’s passing because it’s a sign of weakness and people could have the ability to hurt him if they needed too but, also it is important he does this because it shows his loyalty.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at February 5, 2014 02:18 PM

Wilfred Ras
ENG 220 CL
Dr. Hobbs
2/5/2014

Question #81:
According to Siduri, who is the only one who has ever crossed the sea to Ut-napishtim?

Answer:
In Tablet 10, according to Siduri Gilgamesh was the one that has crossed the sea to Ut-napishtim. They had some conversations in the end of the tablet. Ut-napishtim in my understanding was questioning his violent actions. Also, he mentioned that he was going to reveal some God’s secret to him. A secret nobody knows.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at February 5, 2014 02:55 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
6 February 2014

QUESTION #13:
Setup: We have been looking at archetypes to determine the characteristics of each important entity in The Epic of Gilgamesh. Literary characters can be either flat (cookie-cutter and predictably one-dimensional) or round (fleshed-out and three-dimensionally complex). Friendship, for example, is a theme commonly used by contemporary writers to reveal character (the true nature of someone). However, as we have seen, even this very ancient text, which probably began its life in an oral culture, utilizes the themes of camaraderie and fellowship. The fact that Gilgamesh and Enkidu remain friends, despite their significant differences, reflects the same nature of real-life friendships. Instructions: Revisit the friendship of Gilgamesh and Enkidu in The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed (and well-supported), statement that examines how the theme of friendship reveals character in the relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu. Some things to consider as you develop a thesis: What kind of friends do Gilgamesh and Enkidu seem to be, e.g., like acquaintances? like brothers? like lovers? What motivates their friendship and moves it forward? What complicates it and hinders their friendship?
ANSWER:
When reading The Epic of Gilgamesh I immediately noticed a friendship being formed between Gilgamesh and Enkidu which was similar to that of brothers. Although they have many differences that is how friendship is in real life. You could have a lot of differences with your best friend but have those few significant things in common and that is solely the reason that the two of you are friends and I believe that is the case for Gilgamesh and Enkidu. The way I see Gilgamesh and Enkidu’s friendship is Gilgamesh plays the big brother because he is a much darker, older and hero seeming character while Enkidu is the little brother who is brighter and friendlier and more of a mentor to Gilgamesh to be a better person. I think the hero and mentor concept really keeps these two characters together and helps them to move forward because of how they balance each other out. I think what hindered their friendship the most is when they have the fight with the bull in tablet VI (Puchner, 65) but at the same time it helps them to grow because they conquered the bull together by using each other’s strengths.

Posted by: Becca Orden at February 6, 2014 02:54 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
6 February 2014

QUESTION #10:
Find as many examples of dreams as you can in the Epic of Gilgamesh. What is the role of function of dreams in this narrative? What purpose do they serve? Whenever someone in the story dreams, it is just “filler” or it is integral part of the story (in other words, the story wouldn’t work the same without it).
ANSWER:
Some examples of dreams would be the dreams Gilgamesh has in Table I where something kept falling on Gilgamesh, but it was too heavy for him to move (Puchner 43). His second dram in Table I, was about an axe being thrown down the in the street of Uruk that he fell in love (Puchner 44). Enkidu had dreams before the battle against Humbaba. The first dream Enkidu had was about a mountain that he saw. His second dream was about a mountain that threw Enkidu down and pinned his feet. The third dream was about the heavens crying out and daylight fading while darkness fell and a burgeoned fire, and swelled death (Puchner 56). One of Enkidu’s last dreams before he died was about him speaking to the great pine door, along with his last dream where he fought a lion-headed monster-bird Anzu and was trampled (Puchner 69).
The story would not be the same without these dreams. They are a necessary, integral part of the story and not just filler. They foreshadow future events, and they inquire details about the story that are important to be able to understand the story. The dreams help to show the full idea of what the Epic of Gilgamesh is about, and what Gilgamesh accomplishes. In addition, we would not have understood Enkidu’s part of the story as well, and it would not have showed the foreshadowing of his death, and his and Gilgamesh’s fight against Humbaba. The dreams show symbolisms as well, to show abstract ideas. The story would not work the same without the dreams.

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 6, 2014 03:15 PM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
7 February 2014

Question:
Mentor Archetype: Mentor (Wise Old Man or Woman) Archetype: The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one Mentor (Wise Old Man or Woman) exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary Mentor (Wise Old Man or Woman) for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)? You must cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and The Epic of Gilgamesh to fully support your answer.
Answer:
In The Epic of Gilgamesh, there are multiple mentor archetypes. According to

Christopher Vogler, a mentor archetype, is usually a positive figure who aids or trains the hero (39). Between tablets, one and three, three distinct mentors stick out: Shamhat the Harlot, Ninsun, and the Elders.

Shamhat the Harlot is a mentor to Enkidu. According to Vogler, a mentor can become a mentor through sexual initiation; “by being a partner who helps you experience the power of sex as a vehicle of higher consciousness” (43) and that is exactly what Shamhat does with Enkidu. She “loosens her garments” to Enkidu and by doing so, Enkidu “in his ardor he caresses her” (Puchner 42). After their tryst, Shamhat further mentors Enkidu by leading him to Uruk and to Gilgamesh, evidently propelling Enkidu and Gilgamesh’s relationship.

Another mentor archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh is Ninsun, also known as the wild cow and Gilgamesh’s mother. According to Vogler, a mentor can motivate the character by “showing them something or arranging things to motivate them to take action and to commit to the adventure” (42). Ninsun motivates Gilgamesh by leading him to find the companion of which he dreamt (Puchner 44). Ninsun deciphers Gilgamesh’s dream, informing him that the axe he dreamt of is a man and that he will befriend him, and they will become partners (Puchner 44).

The Elders can also be considered mentors; they tried to persuade Gilgamesh into doing what they thought was the right thing in not going after Humbaba. The Elders tried to warm Gilgamesh by telling him how grotesque Humbaba’s features are and how Humbaba’s maw is fire and breath is death (Puchner 50).

Posted by: Michael Adamson at February 7, 2014 10:09 PM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 February 2014

QUESTION #5:
Revisit the “The Battle of Humbaba” sequence of The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed (and well-supported), statement of what The Epic reveals about the values, i.e., the ethical standards of behavior, of ancient Babylonians. Some things to consider as you develop a thesis: What did they expect of their rulers? What values did they want their heroes to embody?

ANSWER:
Based on “The Battle of Humbaba,” the values of the ancient Babylonians in The Epic of Gilgamesh have to do with strength and fearlessness. Morals such as mercy and ethical behavior are actually frowned upon. This can best be seen towards the end of the battle with Humbaba where he pleads with Gilgamesh to spare his life, and in return he would offer him protection and allow him to take as much cedar as he wants. Yet, Enkidu shows not an ounce of pity for Humbaba and tells Gilgamesh, “My friend! Do not listen to what Humbaba says,/Do not heed his entreaties” (Puchner 60). Clearly, pity and grace is a sign of weakness in the eyes of Enkidu. Humbaba responds and tells Enkidu that he could have easily killed him while he roamed the steepe all these years, but he never hurt him and always let him go his way. This testimony doesn’t hit a moral bone in Enkidu’s body and is only thinking about Gilgamesh’s reputation wherein he prods Gilgamesh on again and says, “Now, my friend, let us go on to victory” (Puchner 61). He blatantly ignores the supplication of Humbaba and the kindness that he has shown to Enkidu all these years. Therefore, the most important values of the ancient Babylonians are strength and fearlessness, and to show pity would only be a sign of weakness, which is frowned upon.

Another important value for the ancient Babylonians is faith in signs and the gods. Before Gilgamesh and Enkidu set off on their journey, Gilgamesh consults the elders who tell him, “Trust not, Gilgamesh, in your strength alone/Let your eyes see all, make your blow strike home” (Puchner 50). Here they are saying that Gilgamesh should use the signs around him and then strike. After speaking with the elders, Gilgamesh gets a blessing from his mother, Ninsun, who supplicates to the sun god, Shamesh and his wife, to give divine aid to Gilgamesh during the battle where she says, “When Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and Humbaba meet,/Raise up for his sake, O Shamash, great winds against Humbaba,/South wind, north wind, east wind, west wind, dust storm…” (Puchner 52). That is exactly what happens before, “Gilgamesh’s weapons defeated Humbaba” (Puchner 59). Therefore, alongside the values of strength and fearlessness, faith in the power of the gods to help and protect are also highly regarded values of the ancient Babylonians.
Works Cited

Anonymous. Epic of Gilgamesh. The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Shorter Third Edition.
Ed. Martin Puchner, et al. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. 38-88. Print.


Posted by: Mariana Convery at February 8, 2014 10:53 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 February 2014

Question #24:
[Threshold] Guardian Archetype: The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one [Threshold] Guardian exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary [Threshold] Guardian for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)? You must cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and The Epic of Gilgamesh to fully support your answer.
Answer:
The Threshold Guardian Archetype is a character who has the responsibility to protect the “unworthy from entering” (Vogler 49) the hero’s path. The Threshold Guardian is an Archetype defined by Christopher Vogler; this archetype of the Guardian is in almost all stories written including The Epic of Gilgamesh.
A guardian might be a person or item watching out for the hero given the task to look over the hero and make sure no harm comes to them. However, the Guardian might not always liked by the hero because the guardian could be preventing the hero to do as they wish. The guardian makes sure the hero is ready before embarking into the unknown. There are several examples of Threshold Guardians in stories Guardians take on many different forms depending on the plot. The Threshold Guardian “may be border guards, sentinels, night watchmen, lookouts, bodyguards, bandidos, editors, doormen, bouncers, entrance examiners, or anyone whose function is to temporarily block the way of the hero and test her powers.” (Vogler 52). The Guardian may also be “a prop, architectural feature, animal, or force of nature that blocks, and tests the hero.” (Vogler 52).
In The Epic of Gilgamesh, there are the Scorpion monsters that protect the mountain of Mashum (Puchner 73). This mountain is important because Shamash; the sun god must pass through the mountain. The Scorpion monsters are very skeptical at first not sure if they shall let Gilgamesh pass. The Scorpion monsters realize Gilgamesh is “two-thirds of him is divine, one-third is human.” (Puchner 73). The fact that Gilgamesh is part God allows him to gain the permission of the Scorpion monsters to pass through the mountain. The Scorpion monsters allow him to enter because they feel he can handle whatever may come at him along the journey through Mashum.
The idea of a Threshold Guardian is a character that makes sure the hero is ready for the adventure at hand. The scorpion monsters had to believe Gilgamesh had everything it took to survive the journey through the mountain.


Works Citied
Puchner, Martin. Gilgamesh: The Epic of Gilgamesh. Trans. Foster, Benjamin R. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001.73. Print.
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey . Third . Studio City, CA: Michael Wiese Production , 2007. 49-52. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 9, 2014 08:21 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 February 2014

QUESTION #2:
The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which characters best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one Mentor exists, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary Mentor for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)?
ANSWER:
Through the Epic of Gilgamesh, there is more than one mentor. Through the story, Gilgamesh goes through more than one adventure and receives guidance from a mentor. A mentor can have a psychological function of representing the “the self”, can provide gifts for a journey, or can give motivation and/or inspiration along with training as well. There are multiple mentors for multiple characters through the Epic of Gilgamesh, starting with Gilgamesh himself being a mentor to Enkidu. After their initial meeting, Gilgamesh plays a mentor role. He guides Enkidu through some of the hardships and is inspiration for Enkidu leading up to the battle against Humbaba. “My friend, the mountain you saw is Humbaba; we will catch Humbaba and kill him” (Puchner 54). Here is an example of how Gilgamesh is encouraging Enkidu for the battle against Humbaba, he is being a mentor figure to Enkidu to help inspire him to defeat Humbaba. The most significant mentor through The Epic of Gilgamesh is Utanapishtim. He is the wise old man who gives Gilgamesh much guidance because he is so knowledgeable. Gilgamesh seeks to find Utanapishtim through the story because he wants to become immortal as Utanapishtim is. When Gilgamesh finally meets Utanapishtim, he is not satisfied with what Utanapishtim has to say. Utanapishtim is a good role as a mentor because he gives guidance to Gilgamesh, not necessarily, what he does not know, but what he does know but is still ignorant about it. “No one sees death, no one sees the face of death, no one hears the voice of death, but cruel death cuts off mankind” (Puchner 80). A mentor is someone who can give advice, someone who can guide an individual, and someone who can represent one’s self. The guidance does not always have to knowledge that someone does not know but also it could be something that you already know but show ignorance on the matter. This is the case with Utanapishtim and Gilgamesh. Utanapishtim is the primary mentor role in the story The Epic of Gilgamesh.

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 9, 2014 08:30 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 February 2014

Question #25:

Herald archetype: The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one herald exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary herald for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)?

Answer:

The herald archetype is pivotal to all narrative stories because the herald is the one who gives the hero a calling or issue to deal with. There are indeed a few characters in this epic which can be considered a type of a herald due to the fact that the story takes a few turns, however, the major herald archetype character in Enkidu. He is the primary herald for the first half of the narrative and ultimately alters Gilgamesh’s journey for the worse.
According to Vogler the herald is “A new person, condition, or information shifts the hero’s balance, and nothing will ever be the same” (Vogler 56). It was in fact Enkidu who came to suggest that Gilgamesh go on a quest. He informed Gilgamesh about Humbaba and that is where everything shifts and the story takes a turn. “There dwells in the forest the fierce monster Humbaba, You and I shall kill him, And wipe out something evil from this land (Anonymous 134-6)”. Gilgamesh is immediately interested and driven to go slay this fearsome beast. This new discovery of the beast is a calling which Gilgamesh refuses to ignore. Despite Enkidu’s intense warnings. “His maw is fire, his breath is death. Why do you want to do this? The haunt of Humbaba is a hopeless quest” (Anonymous 144-6).
Enkidu is the one who knows the mountains and the terrain where Humbaba is located and he also knows all of his tricks, “He has seen the road, has traveled the way. He knows the ways into the forest, And all the tricks of Humbaba” (Anonymous 114-8). He is there to guide Gilgamesh and help motivate him and call for change. According to Vogler “A Call to Adventure has been delivered, often by a character who manifests the archetype of the Herald”(Vogler 56). As soon as Gilgamesh learns of Humbaba, the call to adventure begins because Enkidu’s warnings are disregarded.
Other situations such as the hunter informing Gilgamesh about Enkidu can also be considered herald like qualities as well. However, the quest Gilgamesh sets out on with Enkidu ultimately leads to the upsetting of the gods and the death of Enkidu. Without the mission into the cedar forest, Enkidu would not have died and Gilgamesh would not be interested with eternal life. Therefore he would not have met Utnapishtim and set out on his second quest for immortality. The call to adventure which Enkidu brought to Gilgamesh’s life is without a doubt the main driving force in this story.


Posted by: daniel menezes at February 9, 2014 09:50 PM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 February 2014

QUESTION #1:
Hero Archetype: The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one hero exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary hero for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)? You must cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and The Epic of Gilgamesh to fully support your answer.
ANSWER:
According to Vogler, “A hero is someone who is willing to sacrifice his own needs on behalf of others” (Vogler 29). A hero should protect people, regardless of the consequences on his or her own life. The biggest thing a hero does is be selfless; to risk your own life, your own health, your own needs and wants, for people you don’t even know is exactly what a hero does.
In The Epic of Gilgamesh Enkidu is the best example of a hero. When he found out that Gilgamesh was taking advantage of the people of Uruk he immediately learned how to be more civilized and human-like and left to go defend them. Enkidu tells Shamhat, “I myself will challenge him, I will speak out boldly, I will raise a cry in Uruk: I am the mighty one” (Puchner 42). Enkidu then goes to Uruk and fights Gilgamesh. Even though he doesn't necessarily win, he makes Gilgamesh rethink his actions. Gilgamesh then decides to become friends with Enkidu.
Vogler also says a hero has to grow and transform. Enkidu does do more than Gilgamesh in the story. He helps Gilgamesh change too. Vogler says that a hero has to take action and make sacrifice, which is exactly what Enkidu does when he travels to Uruk. There is really only one hero in the story. Gilgamesh isn't a hero, he just wants what he wants and doesn't care about anything else. He doesn't care about anything or anyone besides himself.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at February 9, 2014 10:25 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (CA02)
9.2.2014
TEST Question # 17
17.
[Threshold] Guardian Archetype:
The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative.
• Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh?
• Does only one [Threshold] Guardian exist, or, are there more?
• If more than one exists, who is the primary [Threshold] Guardian for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)?
You must cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and The Epic of Gilgamesh to fully support your answer.
ANSWER:
In The Epic of Gilgamesh, there are more than one guardian archetype characters. One of the first threshold guardians mentioned is Humbaba, the Guardian of the Cedar Forest; he is who keeps mortals (non-God creatures) away from the Cedar forest, and so he must keep Gilgamesh and Enkidu away from the forest. The other threshold guardians are Gilgamesh and Enkidu (this is during Tablet I). Gilgamesh is a horrible king, who abuses of power; the Gods decide that in order to give Gilgamesh some competition they will create an equal, Enkidu.
“Gilgamesh would leave no son to his father, [. . .] The warrior’s daughter, the young man’s spouse, Goddesses kept hearing their [the people’s] plaints.”(Puchner 39). Gilgamesh abused of his powers, his strength, and even his kingship, the people of Uruk would pray to the gods to send them something to defeat Gilgamesh. The gods’ response came in the form of Enkidu. “When Aruru heard this [the people’s complaints], she conceived within her what Anu commanded, [. . .] she created valiant Enkidu [. . .] Shaggy with hair was his whole body, [. . .] He knew neither people nor inhabited land, he dressed as animals do.”(Puchner 40).
However, Enkidu was no hero, not at first at least. The hunter/trapper told his father that Enkidu “frightened to approach him. He has filled in the pits I dug, [. . .] torn out my traps, [. . .] helped the beasts [. . .] slip from my hands.”(Puchner 40). In a way, both Gilgamesh and Enkidu were obstacles the people had to endure until they met and became friends who balanced each other’s powers.
The second guardian mentioned is Humbaba the Cedar Forest’s guardian, up to Tablet III Humbaba does not make an appearance, but instead talked about by the Uruk elders. The elders recommend that Enkidu and Gilgamesh go into the Cedar Forest together since “He [Enkidu] knows the ways into the forest and all the tricks of Humbaba.”(Puchner 53). Even Enkidu himself tells Gilgamesh of Humbaba’s destructive nature. “Humbaba’s cry is the roar of a deluge, his maw is fire, his breath is death.”(Puchner 48).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 9, 2014 10:44 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 February 2014

Question #9:
The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which Character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one mentor (Wise Old Man or Woman) exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary Mentor (Wise Old Man or Woman) for this half of the Narrative (Chapters 1-3)? You must cite Passages from both Vogler and The Epic of Gilgamesh to fully support your answer.

Answer:
A mentor is “usually a positive figure who aids or trains the hero” (Vogler 39). Within the first three tablets of the journey, both Enkidu and Gilgamesh are being introduced in their own rights and each of them has their own mentor. Enkidu has Shamhat the harlot and Gilgamesh has his mother. In the first few tablets, the two protagonists are being drawn to each other.

In tablet one, Gilgamesh recants strange dreams to his mother. She tells him that the dreams are signs that Gilgamesh will find a companion. “You will fall in love with him and caress him like a woman. He will be mighty and rescue you, time and time again,” (Puchner 44). This, of course, meant he was meant to find Enkidu who is his equal made specifically by the gods in order to give balance to Gilgamesh’s own strength. “They Summond the birth goddess, Aruru…To his stormy heart, let that one be equal, Let them contend with each other, that Uruk may have peace,” (Puchner 40).

Likewise, Shamhat guides Enkidu to Gilgamesh. After laying with Shamhat, the animals of the steppe begin to reject him. “When they saw him, Enkidu, the gazelles shied off, The wild beasts of the steppe shunned his person,” (Puchner 42). Shamhat encouraged him to leave the steppe to meet King Gilgamesh, who also had god-like and unmatched strength. In regards to Gilgamesh, Shamhat tells Enkidu that “[y]ou are just like him, You will love him like your own self,” (Puchner 45).

To say there is only one real mentor within these first few tablets would be a bit misleading. Without the help of either woman, neither of the protagonists would come to know of each other, meet, or set off on their adventures together. These two women played arguably the more important roles of mentors in the story, setting the whole story in motion. However, perhaps it is Gilgamesh’s mother that plays the bigger role in convincing her son that there is someone equal to him in the world, seeing as how Gilgamesh is more stubborn. Once Enkidu travels to Uruk and has his battle in the streets with Gilgamesh and they realize that they are each other’s companions, the rest is history (Puchner 47).

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 9, 2014 11:19 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 February 2014

Answer for Question 22

In the Epic of Gilgamesh, the best character that fits in the Hero archetype is Gilgamesh, and from chapter 1-3, Enkidu is the primary Hero. In the story, Gilgamesh goes through many events that, later on, changes the way he is.
For instance, when Gilgamesh meets a person as strong as he is, Enkidu, they become friends eventually. Gilgamesh learns the value of friendship. Enkidu becomes Gilgamesh’s mentor and helps him be a better king. This is shown when the Bull of Heaven starts killing many citizens of Uruk and destroying the city. Enkidu and Gilgamesh design a plan to kill the beast. It states in the story, “Enkidu circled behind the Bull of Heaven [. . .] And Gilgamesh [. . .] thrust his dagger between neck, horn, and tendon” (Puchner 65).
Another event that changed Gilgamesh was when Enkidu died, and Gilgamesh realized that someday he would die, too. As a result, Gilgamesh goes to see Utanapishtim, a god, who gives a test to Gilgamesh. If he passes, he will become immortal. However, he fails. Before Gilgamesh leaves, Utanapishtim tells him about a secret plant that can make anyone young forever. Gilgamesh does not eat it because he goes to the river for a swim, and a reptile eats it. He starts weeping, but when Ur-Shanabi, Utanapishtim’s boatman, and Gilgamesh reach Uruk, Gilgamesh’s personality changes. Gilgamesh feels proud of the city he built and shows Ur-Shanabi everything about it. The reading states, “go up, Ur-Shanabi, peace out the walls of Uruk [. . .] one square mile of gardens [. . .] three and a half square miles is the measure of Uruk!” (Puchner 88).
Besides Gilgamesh, Enkidu is a primary hero for half of the story (chapters 1-3) because he protects the animals of the forest, keeping them from being caught by the hunter. Enkidu would tear “out the traps” the hunter set; he would fill “in the pits” the hunter dug (Puchner 40). Also, when he heard all the tyrannies that Gilgamesh was doing to the people, Enkidu wanted to defeat him. This is shown when “they grappled each other at the door of the wedding, they fought in the street” (Puchner 47).
In conclusion, Gilgamesh is the hero of the entire story, and Enkidu is the primary hero for chapters 1-3. This idea can be seen in the events that the two characters went through.

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at February 9, 2014 11:21 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 February 2014

QUESTION #16:
Mentor Archetype: The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or characters) best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one mentor exist, or are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary mentor for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)?

ANSWER:
In the first three tablets of The Epic of Gilgamesh, the elders act as mentors to Gilgamesh, as they are the wise old men and women who provide guidance for Gilgamesh and Enkidu, and tell them where to go and what to do once they reach their destination (Puchner 50). According to Vogler, a mentor could be someone who teaches the hero (Vogler 40) which is exactly what the elders do for Gilgamesh when they advise him to “let Enkidu go ahead” and “libate cool water to Shamash and be mindful of Lugalbanda” (Puchner 53) amongst many other words of advice.
Also according to Vogler, the hero could be someone “who temporarily aids the hero, usually by giving some gift” (Vogler 40). Based on this, Ninsun could also be considered a mentor, as she adopts Enkidu so he could act as a guide for Gilgamesh on their journey (Puchner 52), which could definitely be considered a gift for both heroes.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at February 9, 2014 11:27 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 February 2014

Test Essay Question 6:
Setup- We have been looking at archetypes to discover the characteristics of each important entity in The Epic of Gilgamesh. Literary characters can be either flat (cookie-cutter and predictably one-dimensional) or round (fleshed out and three-dimensionally complex). Friendship, for example, is a theme commonly used by contemporary writers to reveal character (the true nature of someone). However, as we have seen, even this very ancient text, which probably began its life in an oral culture, utilizes the themes of camaraderie and fellowship. The fact that Gilgamesh and Enkidu remain friends, despite their significant differences, reflects the same nature of real-life friendships.
Instructions- revisit the friendship of Gilgamesh and Enkidu in The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed (and well-supported), statement that examines how the theme of friendship reveals character in the relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu. Some things to consider as you develop a thesis: What kind of friends do Gilgamesh and Enkidu seem to be, e.g., like acquaintances? Like brothers? Like lovers? What motivates their friendship and moves it forward? What complicates it and hinders their friendship?

Answer:
In The Epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh’s best friend is Enkidu, a wild man created by Aruru. They were not always friends, Enkidu was originally created to keep an eye on Gilgamesh to make sure his behavior does not get out-of-hand (Puchner 40). Enkidu preformed the task he was created to do, but became Gilgamesh’s friend after losing to him in a wrestling match. In the time following, Gilgamesh and Enkidu’s friendship is more of a lover’s relationship rather than just a friendship.
In Tablet III, Ninsun, Gilgamesh’s mother, adopts Enkidu as a son, but tells both him and Gilgamesh that “Enkidu will protect his friend…let him return, to be a grave husband (Puchner 53).” This is basically saying that Enkidu and Gilgamesh are to have a relationship like a marriage and Enkidu should die if it means saving Gilgamesh. In a way, Enkidu and Gilgamesh are like soul-mates in today’s pop-culture. Before Gilgamesh met Enkidu, he had dreams about him and tells his mother he “fell in love with it and caressed it like a woman (Puchner 43).” Enkidu was created for Gilgamesh as a check and balance to his power as demi-god and king, much like how spouses are considered to be the ‘better-half’ of their partners in common culture.
To solidify their unspoken marriage, they sleep near each other and comfort one another when they are plagued by strange dreams and doubts like a proper couple should. When one falters, the other catches and consoles him.
Like any relationship, one would think Gilgamesh and Enkidu’s relationship is not perfect. In actuality, their relationship is a bit awkwardly set up with a sense of who is dominant one. Enkidu tends to shower accolades upon Gilgamesh who doesn’t really reply in thanks to them, as if he is so egoistic that he just accepts what Enkidu says about him as truth (Puchner 61-62). Even though he does not act like the dominant partner, Enkidu is willing to raise his voice and attack to defend Gilgamesh from Ishtar and the Bull of Heaven.
The last aspect of the love shared by Gilgamesh and Enkidu arises from Enkidu’s death as punishment for killing Humbaba and the Bull of Heaven. Gilgamesh is distraught by the death of Enkidu (Puchner 70). He had cared for him while Enkidu was on his deathbed and stayed with him until he died. It is not until after Enkidu is dead that Gilgamesh admits how deep his feeling for him are, saying repeatedly “whom I loved” while referring to Enkidu (Puchner 79). Enkidu’s death is also what causes to Gilgamesh to truly fear dying as his death had greatly affected Gilgamesh (Puchner 79).

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 9, 2014 11:37 PM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
11 August 2014

Question # 4

Of the eight archetypes presented by Vogler in his text, The Writer’s Journey, the herald is described as new energy that will be presented to the hero that will bring a challenge. Volgler describes the herald archetype as characters “issue challenges and announce the coming of significant change” (55). These characters are necessary in the narrative for the progression of the story. Heralds introduce new elements the force the hero to respond and change rather than continuing as they currently are. “Typically, in the opening phase of the story, heroes have . . . Handled an imbalance in life through a series of defenses or coping mechanisms” (Vogler 55). At which point the herald enters bringing a new set of conditions for which it makes it impossible for the hero to continue as they were without facing some kind challenge that will forever change them.

As described in Vogler’s text the heralds psychological function is to announce “the need for change” (56). The herald archetype is not necessarily going to manifest in a real character that however is common, it could instead present itself as a dream, a new idea, or a real person. “The Herald may be a positive, negative, or neutral figure” (Vogler 57). Their role or dramatic function is only to “provide motivation, offer the hero challenge, and to get the story rolling” (Vogler 56).

In Gilgamesh Enkidu is clearly an archetype character, his mere creation and arrival in the story requires Gilgamesh to react to the challenges Enkidu brings. At first Enkidu described by a hunter as a beast saying he “constantly feeds on the grass with his beasts, constantly making his way to the edge of the water hole. I am frightened to approach him ”(Puchner 41). Gilgamesh responds to the hunter, telling him to go back to the wood and to take the harlot with him. Telling the hunter to “let her strip off her clothing, laying bare her charms” (Puchner 41). The harlot seduces and tames Enkidu, and as they returned to Uruk the approached a wedding where Gilgamesh was going about to exercise first bed rights with the new bride. “Enkidu approached him . . . Not allowing Gilgamesh to enter, they grappled each other, holding fast like wrestlers” (Puchner 47). Gilgamesh is able to defeat Enkidu but in the process, Enkidu earns Gilgamesh’s respect and they become friends. Throughout the rest of the epic Enkidu influences and changes the direction of the story such is the case with Humbaba later on. Enkidu represents a herald because was a new energy that brought a new challenge which changed the story’s direction.


Works Cited
Vogler, C. . The writer's journey: Mythic structure for writers. Michael Wiese Productions, print.
Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. New York: W. W. Norton, 2013. Print.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at February 10, 2014 01:04 AM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives
9 February 2014

QUESTION #10.[Threshold] Guardian Archetype:

The assigned Volger reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narratives. Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one [Threshold] Guardian exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary [Threshold] Guardian for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)?

ANSWER:

In Vogler’s textbook, he describes the Threshold Guardian archetype as “an obstacle that all heroes encounter to test them and see if they are worthy enough for them to enter their gateway” (Vogler 49).The Epic of Gilgamesh is no stranger to this archetype and has many of these guardians throughout the story. Some of the guardians that the hero Gilgamesh meets help him in his quest to obtain glory and immortality. His close friend, Enkidu, was an obstacle at the beginning in the story, but as the story progressed, they became good friends after they wrestled with each other throughout the kingdom of Uruk and saw the similarities that they both possess (Puchner 47). Throughout the story, Gilgamesh encounters many guardians that he ultimately defeats, for example, Humbaba and the Bull of Heaven. Killing these guardians, however, came with terrible consequences that eventually lead to the death of Gilgamesh’s closest friend Enkidu.

During the first few chapters of the story, the primary Threshold Guardian is Enkidu. When Gilgamesh tried to copulate with Enkidu’s newly wedded wife Shamhat, Enkidu “blocks the door with his foot to prevent him from starting the process” (Puchner 47). The elders could be another Threshold Guardian in these chapters by preventing Gilgamesh from leaving on his journey to vanquish Humbaba and retrieve wood from the cedar trees, but they let him leave as long as Enkidu travelled with him (Puchner 50). If Enkidu did not want to go with him, the elders might have decided to forbid Gilgamesh from leaving. Enkidu’s role may change during the story, but he is an important character that assists the development of Gilgamesh into becoming a heroic figure that the people in his kingdom revere.

References
Puchner, Martin, etc. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Vol. 1. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2013. Print.
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. Third ed. Studio City, CA: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print.

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at February 10, 2014 01:55 AM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative CA02
February 2014

Question:
Setup: One way of discussing or learning about narratives is to closely examine the conflicts. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, there are many conflicts and sub-conflicts. Two of the earliest ones involve. (1.) Gilgamesh and the conflict his subjects have with him and (s) Enkidu and the conflict that trappers have with him.
Instructions: Revisit the earliest conflicts that Gilgamesh and Enkidu with others in the Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed statement that answers the questions : (1) how is the problem that trappers have with Enkidu similar and/ or dissimilar to problem that citizens of Uruk have Gilgamesh? And (2) how are the solutions of the trapper and the citizens of Uruk alike and/or unlike?
Answer: At the beginning of the epic of Gilgamesh, both Enkidu and Gilgamesh had conflicts with other people. Enkidu, introduced as a problem with the trapper who tells his father “he has helped the beasts, wildlife of the steppe, slip from my hands, he will not let me work the steppe,” this poses a problem for the trapper cause he cannot do his job with Enkidu in the steppe (Puncher 40). As for the king Gilgamesh, his subjects are unhappy with him because, “day and night he would rampage fiercely […] and Gilgamesh would leave no girl to her mother,” which caused his people to get impatient and complain to Anu (Puncher 39). Both of these conflicts are similar because both of the parties are upset because of Gilgamesh and Enkidu's actions. The trapper wants Enkidu to act like a normal person and not “constantly feed on grass with beast,” this way the trapper can do his work, and Enkidu can become civilized (Puncher 40). The people of Uruk want Gilgamesh to act more like a king not a dictator because, harrying the young men of Uruk is not the right thing for a ruler to do (Puncher 39). The conflict the parties had with both characters are different because the conflict with one was with a ruler the other was with a savage in Cedar woods. Something Enkidu and Gilgamesh both shared were that they were part human, Enkidu also being half-animal and the other part of Gilgamesh being divine. However, both the solutions of the trapper and the citizens of Uruk are similar in trying to manifest the human aspect of both the characters. Uruk citizen’s solution for Gilgamesh’s behavior was prayer to Anu who summoned Aruur to create Enkidu (Puncher 38). Their plan was to create “a partner for Gilgamesh, mighty in strength, let them contend with each other that Uruk may have peace,” by doing this, Enkidu will be able to humanize Gilgamesh, later on in the story (Puncher 40). Gilgamesh sent the hunter to take Shamhat the harlot, to seduce Enkidu with her charms, “when he sees her, he will approach her, his beasts that grew up with him on the steppe will deny him,” which will cause him to leave the steppe and become civilized (Puncher 42). Which fixed the problem the trapper had because, Enkidu will no longer be in the steppe hindering the trapper from doing his work.

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at February 10, 2014 03:08 AM

Jonathan Cruz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA 02
9 February 2014

Question #22 Hero Archetype:
The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one hero exist, or are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary hero for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)? You must cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers).

Answer:
Gilgamesh is the primary hero; however, times of his heroism are askew. His history states, "he saw what was secret and revealed what was hidden" and had dealt with such amazing trials that they be "Engraved" on "a monument of stone" (Puchner 38). "He built the walls of ramparted Uruk" and was the "Heroic offspring of Uruk"; in non-technical language, Gilgamesh was something of legend (Puchner 38). Later in the first tablet, it reveals that Gilgamesh's rule over Uruk may have gone to his head. The people he ruled over were angry about their king's deeds; for example: "Gilgamesh would leave no son to his father…Day and night he would rampage fiercely…Gilgamesh would leave no girl to her mother! The warrior's daughter, the young man's spouse" (Puchner 39). The gods heard the cries of the people, and decided to put Gilgamesh in his place by creating Enkidu, almost equal to Gilgamesh in both power and skill, to fight Gilgamesh in the hopes of smacking some sense into him. It would seem at this point that Enkidu holds a hero archetype in the story, and Gilgamesh is an anti-hero. When Enkidu came to Gilgamesh, they wrestled for a while, and during the grappling, Gilgamesh had realized that he now had a companion (sidekick). When the small altercation was over he proclaimed, "There dwells in the forest the fierce monster Humbaba, You and I shall kill him; And wipe out something evil from the land," likely a sign that his heroism reawakened (Puchner 48). After these events, Gilgamesh remains the primary hero for the entire story.

Posted by: Jonathan Cruz at February 10, 2014 04:09 AM

Jesse Robinson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 February 2014

Question #20
Setup: We have been looking at archetypes to determine the characteristics of each important entity in The Epic of Gilgamesh. Literary characters can be either flat (cookie-cutter and predictably one-dimensional) or round (fleshed-out and three-dimensionally complex). Friendship, for example, is a theme commonly used by contemporary writers to reveal character (the true nature of someone). However, as we have seen, even this very ancient text, which probably began its life in an oral culture, utilizes the theme of camaraderie and fellowship. The fact that Gilgamesh and Enkidu remain friends, despite their significant differences, reflects the same nature of real-life friendships. Instructions: Revisit the friendship of Gilgamesh and Enkidu in The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed (and well-supported), statement that examines how the theme of friendship reveals character in the relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu. Some things to consider as you develop a thesis: What kind of friends to Gilgamesh and Enkidu seem to be, e.g., like acquaintances? like brothers? like lovers? What motivates their friendship and moves it forward? What complicates it and hinders their friendship?

Answer:
At times, the friendship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu resembles that of brothers and other times lovers. The dynamic expression of emotions of and the interactions between Gilgamesh and Enkidu portrays their human nature of seeking someone to confide in.
The fight that introduced Gilgamesh and Enkidu to each other is like that of usual quarrel between brothers and there are definitely signs of strong love, which is prophesized by Ninsun, Gilgamesh’s mother. During Ninsun’s interpretation of her son’s dream she tells him, “…you will love him as a woman and he will never forsake you (15).” Further signs of this love can be seen when the duo hold hands as they lie down to rest during their trip to battle Humbaba (21).

During Gilgamesh and Enkidu’s journey through the cedar forest, Enkidu is frightened after passing through the gate and further into the forest (20, 22). This is in contrast to Enkidu’s enthusiastic behavior just before they left for the trip; Enkidu says, “…there is nothing to fear. Follow me, for I know the place where Humbaba lives… (20).” Luckily for Enkidu, Gilgamesh is there to encourage him to be brave, yet there are moments when Gilgamesh relies on Enkidu’s dream analysis to reassure their impending victory against Humbaba (21). The support Gilgamesh and Enkidu give each other reflects a true friendship and human nature.

Before Gilgamesh and Enkidu meet they are already set in conflict with each other. Enkidu was created for the sole purpose of confronting Gilgamesh and putting a stop to the exploitation of Gilgamesh’s own people (13). However, Gilgamesh and Enkidu become friends following their skirmish (17). Gilgamesh and Enkidu retain internal conflict. Gilgamesh is unsatisfied with his mortal man-among-mice status, and Enkidu struggles with his alienation and nascent civility. Gilgamesh and Enkidu exemplify friendship through their support for each other’s weaknesses.

Posted by: Jesse Robinson at February 10, 2014 05:19 AM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 5. Revisit the “The Battle of Humbaba” sequence of The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed (and well-supported), statement of what The Epic of Gilgamesh reveals about the values, i.e., the ethical standards of behavior, of ancient Babylonians. Some things to consider as you develop a thesis: What did they expect of their rulers? What values did they want their heroes to embody?

ANSWER:
The Epic of Gilgamesh underlying reveals many values and the accepted behavior of the ancient Babylonians, in each tablet. Specifically focusing on “The Battle of Humbaba” we can see by the words and actions taken place, what expectations the ancient Babylonians had of their rulers and what they esteemed in their heroes. These values and high standards of behavior included strength, mercy, and humility. Brought forth is the value of strength through the words of Enkidu as he urges Gilgamesh to stand strong when facing against Humbaba’s grotesque features, “Retreat not a foot, you must not turn back. Let your eyes see all, let your blow strike home!” (Puchner 59). It is impeccable that any ruler and/or hero has the strength and will power to go up against the most threatening and most forbidding of creatures and villains. Another value is that of mercy. Mercy is an important value, even though not all rulers and heroes are able to display it. Needed in any kingdom is fear, but the addition of mercy allows for a sense of trust and love, between a ruler and his people. Mercy is introduced by Humbaba as he pleads for his life to be spared, “O Gilgamesh, spare my life! Let me dwell here for you” (Puchner 60). As Humbaba pleads to Gilgamesh he not only tries bargaining but tries to relate sympathetic aspects like Gilgamesh’s childhood, “You were once a child, Gilgamesh, you had a mother who bore you. . .” (Puchner 60); this shows the need for a ruler and hero with human empathy. Most rulers and heroes want fame and recognition, but having them under bad circumstances is worse than the fame itself. Enkidu introduces humility by telling Gilgamesh to do the exact opposite and seal his status with the killing of Humbaba, “Establish your reputation for all time: Gilgamesh, who slew Humbaba” (Puchner 60). Although it would seem like such an act is acceptable, Enkidu makes it known that the gods overall will not be pleased by this, “The great gods will become angry with us” (Puchner 60).

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 10, 2014 09:38 AM

Jacklyn O’Brien
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG22CL Journey in Narrative CA01
09 February 2014

Question: Mentor (Wise old man or woman) Archetype: The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one Mentor (Wise old man or woman) exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary mentor for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)? You must cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and The Epic of Gilgamesh to fully support your answer.

“An archetype found frequently in dreams, myths, and stories is the Mentor, usually a positive figure who aids or trains the hero. Campbell’s name for this force is the Wise old Man or Wise Old Woman, This archetype is expressed in all those characters who teach and protect heroes and give them gifts.” (Vogler 39) The psychological function of the mentor is to represent the god within us, or the higher self. The mentor wants to encourage the hero to reach their highest potential. More often than not, the mentor is normally and ex-hero who wishes to pass on his/ hers wisdom and intelligence. Mentors are also there to always guide the hero in the right direction.
Throughout the story we see Gilgamesh pretty much do whatever he wants to do when we wants to do it. However Gilgamesh does turn to his mom Ninsun a few times for some advice. Ninsun could be considered a mentor for Gilgamesh in the beginning of the story. Gilgamesh then goes on to meet Enkidu. Enkidu although was created to tame Gilgamesh and to even be his equivalent, could also be considered a mentor to Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh begins to have terrible dreams that then lead to him losing his confidence. Enkidu encourages Gilgamesh by saying “Finish him off for the kill, put him out of existence. Humbaba is guardian of the forest of cedars, finish him off for the kill, put him out of existence, Before Enlil the foremost hears of this! The great gods will become angry with us, Enlil in Nippur, Shamash in Larsa. Establish your reputation for all time “Gilgamesh, who slew Humbaba.” (Puchner 60) Enkidu becomes Gilgamesh’s driving force, giving Gilgamesh confidence and helping lead him to greatest potential. Unfortunately Enkidu’s life is later sacrificed. Once Enkidu was gone Gilagmesh was in serious need of guidance. The final mentor Gilgamesh encounters is Utanapishtim. Utanapishtim is the wise old man Gilgamesh had been searching for, since he must know how as a mortal man he reached immortality. Utanapishtim attempts to make Gilgamesh understand mortal humans will never be immortal, and the special ones that do did so under unusual circumstances. Utanapishtim tells his personal story of how he and his wife reached immortality, and then later go on to test Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh fails the tests but is still informed about the flower of youth. Gilgamesh experienced many adventures involving great success as well as great sadness. However Gilgamesh would have not been able to do so without the help of his three mentors.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at February 10, 2014 09:56 AM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
10 February 2014


Part two:
Question:
How is the problem that trappers have with Enkidu similar and/or dissimilar to the problem that citizens of Uruk have with Gilgamesh? How are the solutions of the trapper and the citizens of Uruk alike and/or unlike?
Answer:
The problem the trapper encountered was Enkidu has been un-setting his traps and filling the pits he uses to catch animals. The trapper went to Uruk and Gilgamesh to set Enkidu with a prostitute, named Shamhat and she seduce him. Once he returns the animals want nothing to do with him. Gilgamesh problem is quite similar to Enkidu in women playing a large role in their decisions they make. Gilgamesh is half god and half man, he’s a leader and takes advantage of his people. He takes what he wants, and sleeps with any women he wants in the city. He over works the people on building the walls of Uruk. The people starts to pray to the gods and hoping for change with in their leader. So Aruru makes the creation of Enkidu who is half human half animal. Enkidu was created to confront Gilgamesh in all of his wrong doings and help the people of Uruk. The solutions are alike, and dislike because things changed for the better the people and a start of a new friendship when Enkidu and Gilgamesh. The animals received the bad end of the stick because now no one can undo the traps for them like Enkidu use to.

Posted by: Re-Chia Jackson at February 10, 2014 10:07 AM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
10 February 2014

Question #19:
Revisit the “The Battle of Humbaba” sequence of The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed (and well-supported), statement of what The Epic of Gilgamesh reveals about the values, i.e., the ethical standards of behavior, of ancient Babylonians. Some things to consider as you develop a thesis: What did they expect of their rulers? What values did they want their heroes to embody?

Answer:
In the story “The Epic of Gilgamesh”, we read about the legend of Gilgamesh, a divine creature. Gilgamesh persistently pursues idea of becoming a god and having everlasting life. On his journey, Gilgamesh meets Enkidu, another divine creature…the two become friends and battle along side each other. In the time of Gilgamesh and Enkidu, war was seen as accomplishment and conquer another was seen as legendary and would surely solidify ones reputation. The people of Uruk valued a hero with success in battle and one who was relentless in mind.
In tablet five, we learn about “The Battle of Humbaba”. In the previous tablet, we see Gilgamesh proclaim to the people of Uruk that he will invade and defeat Humbaba, stating “I will hunt him down in the forest of cedars…I will set my hand to cutting a cedar, An eternal name I will make for myself” (Puchner 49). Both heroes’ proceed into the forest weary about what the unknown holds for them. Once inside they confront Humbaba who casually tells the duo how he has taken pity on them and could have killed them, “Had I killed the likes of you, would I have filled my belly...I should cut off your head, Gilgamesh, throat and neck” (Puchner 59). Despite Humbaba’s intimidating appearance to duo engage in battle with him. During the fight, Gilgamesh offers a last minute prayer to Shamash, the sun god. Shamash answers the prayer by Gilgamesh and unleashes thirteen storms against Humbaba, “The thirteen winds blotted out Humbaba’s face” (Puchner 59). Once defeated, Humbaba pleads for his life, offering to be Gilgamesh’s servant and granting him property of the trees. However, Enkidu urges Gilgamesh that his reputation will not be complete without delivering the final blow, “Finish him off for the kill…Establish your reputation for all time” (Puchner 60). Gilgamesh listens to his friend and kills Humbaba; they take all the trees they need and leave.
In a means to solidify their reputation and become the hero the people of Uruk craved. The duo shows no mercy on Humbaba despite his mercy towards them. Because of their unethical behavior, Humbaba curses them saying, “May the pair of them never reach old age” (Puchner 60), which will lead to the ultimate demise of them both.


Work Cited
Puchner, Martin, ed. The Norton Anthology World Literature. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. Print.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at February 10, 2014 10:10 AM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
9 February 2014

Hero Archetype: Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one hero exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary hero for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)?

In The Epic of Gilgamesh there is not a character that perfectly fits the Hero archetype. Volger states that the Greek root of the word hero means “to protect and to serve” (Volger 29). Often times, the Hero is the main character of the story. There are characteristics of the Hero archetype that fits Gilgamesh. Volger claims that “Heroes are all ego” and a Hero must search for their identity and wholeness (Volger 29). Gilgamesh fits that part of the Hero archetype because he is very concentrated on his view of himself and proving himself to everyone around him. In addition, Gilgamesh is feeling very lonely in the first chapter because he has no companion. Gilgamesh is longing a friend. Gilgamesh tells his mother of two dreams that he has. His mother explains that in his dreams he meets a man that will become his companion who rescues him (Puchner 44). A hero is also supposed to be the character that grows the most throughout the story (Volger 31). Gilgamesh learned to care for others instead of only focusing on himself. When Enkidu died, Gilgamesh felt immense pain and heartache (Puchner 70). Gilgamesh only partially fits the Hero archetype. According to Volger, a Hero must be selfless and willing to sacrifice in order to help or protect their people. In the beginning of the story, Gilgamesh is described as extremely selfish. In Tablet II, a man told Enkidu how Gilgamesh lays with a bride the night before her weeding (Puchner 46). In tablet I, Gilgamesh is described by saying he will leave no woman to her mother (Puchner 39). This is extremely selfish of him to not only lay with the brides, but with every woman of his nation. Someone who completely fits the Hero archetype would never rape women.
Enkidu has characteristics of a Hero. Volger says that a Hero is willing to sacrifice his own needs on the behalf of others (Volger 29). Enkidu’s first night in Shamhat, he slew wolves and defeated lions in order to protect the herds so the shepherds could rest (Puchner 45). He is willing to help the shepherds. In addition, Enkidu is in search for wholeness. When Enkidu meets the harlot, the animals no longer accept him (Puchner 42). Volger claims that the Hero archetype must experience death, or the threat of death (Volger 32). Enkidu is put to death by the gods after assisting Gilgamesh in killing Humbaba (Puchner 70). Although Enkidu is not the main character, he holds traits of a Hero.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at February 10, 2014 10:37 AM

Wilfred Ras
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL
February 10, 2014

Question 1:
The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in the epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one hero exists, or, are there more? If more than one exist, who is the primary hero for this half f the narrative?

Answer:
In my point of view there is more than one hero. The primary hero however, is Gilgamesh. He was unstoppable. He was seen as the greatest of all. He was a warrior for his people and he was also ambitious. He had bad habits, though here is where Enkidu’s part comes in. He calms Gilgamesh down and helps him focus on what is really important. This was in my view Enkidu’s part of becoming a hero. These two became soul mates, however both of them got punished in the end of this story. Enkidu receives slow death.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at February 10, 2014 10:48 AM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 February 2014

QUESTION #13:
Setup: We have been looking at archetypes to determine the characteristics of each important entity in The Epic of Gilgamesh. Literary characters can be either flat (cookie-cutter and predictably one-dimensional) or round (fleshed-out and three-dimensionally complex). Friendship, for example, is a theme commonly used by contemporary writers to reveal character (the true nature of someone). However, as we have seen, even this very ancient text, which probably began its life in an oral culture, utilizes the themes of camaraderie and fellowship. The fact that Gilgamesh and Enkidu remain friends, despite their significant differences, reflects the same nature of real-life friendships.
Instructions: Revisit the friendship of Gilgamesh and Enkidu in The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed (and well-supported), statement that examines how the theme of friendship reveals character in the relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu. Some things to consider as you develop a thesis: What kind of friends do Gilgamesh and Enkidu seem to be, e.g., like acquaintances? like brothers? like lovers? What motivates their friendship and moves it forward? What complicates it and hinders their friendship?

ANSWER:
In life we never know what is a good or bad thing. In order to find out, we have to experience life and go through some obstacles. In The Epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh and Enkidu had a very powerful friendship. Their relationship can be described as a “bromance.” In Tablet II, when Gilgamesh and Enkidu are battling each other, “ Enkidu approached him,/ They met in the public street./ Enkidu blocked the door to the weeding with his foot,/ Not allowing Gilgamesh to enter (Poschner, 47, Lines 96-100). Who would have thought that Gilgamesh and Enkidu would build a powerful friendship? Gilgamesh learned from Enkidu, and Enkidu learned from Gilgamesh. Even though they were very different, at the end of the day it worked for their friendship. The Hero archetype represents the ego’s search for identity and wholeness (Vogler, 29-30). Both Gilgamesh and Enkidu, both protagonists, are described the same, therefore, making both of them heroes. For example, when the Gods decide to punish Enkidu for killing Humbaba, Gilgamesh is affected and refuses to let him go. After Enkidu’s death, Gilgamesh is determined to go on a journey in search of eternal life. The relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu is the central idea of The Epic of Gilgamesh, their love, loyalty and courage sets an example for the reader. It is safe to say that in The Epic of Gilgamesh, the love Gilgamesh and Enkidu had for each other makes them better men.

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 10, 2014 11:21 AM

Brittany C. Davis
02/09/2014
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Essay Question #8

Hero Archetype
Christopher Vogler describes a Hero Archetype and several aspects of a hero in different ways, to include Psychological Function, Dramatic functions, and a variety for heroes. The Epic of Gilgamesh is a tale of a King who has a friend that passes away and he goes on a journey to seek everlasting life. At first, it would seem the Hero of this tale would be Gilgamesh; however, I believe his friend Enkidu. After reading this story, I found that both characters displayed the characteristics of what Vogler describes as a Hero.
The first aspect Vogler describes, as a Hero Archetype would be the psychological aspect. He goes to explain that the hero has an ego. “Heroes are all ego: the I, the one, that personal identity which thinks it is separate from the rest of the group.” (Vogler, p 20) This statement without a doubt explains Gilgamesh, because Gilgamesh was extremely egotistical. Gilgamesh was under the impression that since he was king, and half god, he was a terrible ruler. Just before he is introduced to his new friend Enkidu, he was at a wedding demanding to sleep with the new bride. “For the goddess of lovemaking, the bed was made; Gilgamesh was to join with the girl that night. (The Epic of Gilgamesh T.II) With the psychological aspect, Vogler also explains when heroes are still on the journey of self-discovery or inside his or her mind, they will find friends, inside themselves, which brings how Enkidu is also a hero.
The second aspect that Vogler speaks about is, the dramatic aspect, and Enkidu is considered a hero, because Enkidu was very willing to sacrifice himself for Gilgamesh. “Sacrifice is the Hero’s willingness to give up something of value, perhaps even her own life, on behalf of an ideal or a group.” (Vogler p 31) I say Enkidu is considered a hero, because when Gilgamesh brought up the idea to go into the woods to fight Humbaba, Enkidu is reluctant. “That journey is not to be undertaken, that creature is not to be looked upon…Humbaba’s cry is the roar of a deluge…who can go into his forest?” (The Epic of Gilgamesh T II) The tone of this passage is very timid, I felt Enkidu saw no reason to go into the forest and fight Humababa; however, he went anyway, because Gilgamesh wanted to. As a result of going into the forest and slaying Humbaba, Enkidu is stricken very ill and ultimately dies.
With both of these heroes played together, it would be safe to say, however two heroes existed in The Epic of Gilgamesh. The primary hero described in Chapters 1-3 would have to be Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh displayed the primary aspects of the Hero Archetype. He experienced, the psychology aspect, the dramatic aspect, when Enkidu died, the aspect of dealing with death. “Hero’s show us how to deal with death” (Vogler p 32). Therefore, in closing, two heroes existed in this tale, however just like the Tale itself, only Gilgamesh is considered the one and only true hero.


Reference:
Vogler, Christopher The Writer’s Journey 2007.
The Epic of Gilgamesh

Posted by: Brittany Davis at February 10, 2014 12:04 PM

Thomas Meseroll
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220cl Journeys in Narrative CA02
7 February 2014

QUESTION #21:
1. How is the problem that trappers have with Enkidu similar and/or dissimilar to the problem that the citizens of Uruk have with Gilgamesh? and (2.) How are the solutions of the trapper and the citizens of Uruk alike and/or unalike?

ANSWER:
(1.) The problems that the trappers are faced with are similar to that of the people of Uruk in many ways. Both are faced with an adversary that is significantly mightier than themselves. Gilgamesh's physical superiority is detailed repeatedly through out the tale. He is described as "the wild calf of Lugalbanda, Gilgamesh is perfect in strength" (Gilgamesh 38, ln 35). "He was perfection in height" (Gilgamesh 39, ln 53) "The onslaught of his weapons had no equal" (Gilagmesh 39, ln 57). We can compare this to the trappers description of Enkidu to his father when he says "He is the mightiest in the land, strength is his, like the force of heaven, so mighty is his strength" (Gilgamesh 40, ln 116). The problems the citizens of Uruk face with Gilgamesh do differ from that of the trapper in one major way, in that Gilgamesh seems primarily to use his strength and might purely for his own purposes. To terrorize his subjects and rule his people with absolute authority. He takes what he wants and does what he wants without regard for any consequence. "He was harrying the young men of Uruk beyond reason. Gilgamesh would leave no son to his father, Day and night he would rampage fiercely" (Gilgamesh 39, ln 59) "Gilgamesh would leave no girl to her mother!" (Gilgamesh 39, ln 65). Enkidu, however, seems to use his abilities for "good". He is more animal than he is man when we first meet him. "He dressed as animals do. He fed on grass with gazelles, with beasts he jostled at the water hole, with wildlife he drank his fill of water" (Gilgamesh 40, ln 101). Because of this he has a kinship with the animals and uses his abilities to keep them safe. He would destroy the traps set by the hunter and fill his pits. This makes it so that the trapper cannot work. Unlike Gilgamesh, who seems to take pleasure in his attacks on his people, Enkidu does not deliberately cause conflict for the trapper. It is just a result of his helping the animals.

(2.) To solve their problems, both the trapper and the citizens of Uruk turn to a being much higher and more powerful than not only themselves, but their adversary as well. The citizens turn to the gods themselves and pray for them to send a savior. "Let her create a partner for Gilgamesh, mighty in strength, let them contend with each other, that Uruk may have peace" (Gilgamesh 40, ln 84).
The trapper turns to Gilgamesh, who, being the son of a god, is a god himself. He is described as "two-thirds of him was divine, one-third was human" (Gilgamesh 39, ln 50). There is a sense of irony in this story in that the solution to their problems, where in fact the other's problem. Enkidu was created by the gods in answer to the prayers of the citizens, and Gilgamesh, by way of sending the harlot, was the answer to the trappers problem of Enkidu.

Posted by: Thomas Meseroll at February 10, 2014 12:12 PM

Alexander Hoschak
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrrative CA01
10 February 2014

Question:
Herald Archetype: The assigned Vogler reading instruct on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one Herald exists, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who I the primary herald for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)? You must cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and The Epic of Gilgamesh to fully support you answer.

Answer:
According to Vogler, the Herald archetype is the one that “issues challenges and announces the coming of significant change.” (Vogler 55) He also states that the dramatic function of the Herald archetype is for motivation. They get the story rolling by alerting the Hero (and the audience) that change is coming. (Vogler 56) There are a few characters fit the Herald archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh. One of them is Shamhat. I believe Shamhat to fit the title of the Herald Archetype because she brings about change in Enkidu by sleeping with him turning him more into a human rather than an animal. (Puchner 42) I believe that the main Herald archetype character in the beginning of the story would be Enkidu. Enkidu may be able to fit a few of the archetypes but he also fits the Herald Archetype. He announces change in Gilgamesh by making him more a human. He announces change in the townspeople by making Gilgamesh a nicer person and a better ruler.

References:
Puchner, The Norton Anthology World Literature, 10 February 2014
Vogler, The Writers Journey, 10 February 2014

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak at February 10, 2014 12:28 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 February 2014

Question #12:
Revisit the “The Battle of Humbaba” sequence of The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed (and well-supported), statement of what The Epic of Gilgamesh reveals about the values, i.e., the ethical standards of behavior, of ancient Babylonians. Some things to consider as you develop a thesis: What did they expect of their rulers? What values did they want their heroes to embody?

Answer:
Gilgamesh and Enkidu fight Humbaba in the forest where Cedar trees grow. After a few days and nightmares, they finally climb the mountain cutting a few trees and going to a place where no mere mortal had ever traveled before. After walking in the forest for a while, they finally hear Humbaba roaring through the forest, they did not know what to do for a few moments but then they realized what is going on, and they sprang right into the action. In the midst of battle, Gilgamesh finds himself in a tough situation. He pleads to the, god that hears him is Shamash and the god decide to release thirteen storms against the Humbaba the beast. With those thirteen storms, Humbaba finally fell at the mercy of the Enkidu, and Gilgamesh, with the help of Shamash. Humbaba did not want to die and told Gilgamesh to spare his life. If Gilgamesh spared him, they can take as many trees from the forest and that he would be their servant. Enkidu refused to believe this and told Gilgamesh to kill him. Gilgamesh finally made a decision after hearing both sides and decided to slater the beast.

In ancient Babylonia, the people expect a very high standard of behavior from their rulers. They want their ruler or king to be able to protect them from any situation or danger. They expect their ruler to act in a very civilized manner and not terrorize the city in which he rules. A good example of how they want their king to rule is how we expect the president to act. The values that they want their heroes to embody are a couple. They want a hero to embody bravery, wisdom, courage, and humility. They should embody this because a hero should be brave no matter the situation. He should have the courage so that he can give some of that to his people. He should be wise so he can help other people by something other than violence. The people of Babylonia also expect their hero to be humble so that he can actually talk to everyone and not have an egotistical attitude towards everyone.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at February 10, 2014 12:38 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in narrative CA02
10 February 2014

Question 18:
Herald Archetype: The assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in
a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which
character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one herald
exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary herald for this half of the
narrative (chapters 1-3)? You must cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations
with page numbers) from both Vogler and The Epic of Gilgamesh to fully support your answer.
Answer:
According to Vogler, a herald “is simply a means of bringing news to the hero of a new energy that will change the balance”. (Vogler 57). The herald also announces the new challenge. The Herald can be a person, can be an event, or can be a dream. The herald may be a motivator and help the hero during his journey or it can be a villain and challenge the hero.
In the epic of Gilgamesh, when the man walks by when Enkidu and shamhat were making love, he acts as the first herald. He tells Enkidu, “He mates with the lawful wife, he first, the groom after”. (Puchner 46). This causes Enkidu to go to Uruk to try to stop Gilgamesh from taking advantage of the Urukian women. Enkidu goes to Uruk and challenges Gilgamesh in a fight. They fought, but neither one is victorious and they end up becoming friends. Gilgamesh realized he was wrong by sleeping with other peoples wives. Also, another example of a herald in the epic of Gilgamesh is when Ishtar asked Gilgamesh to marry her and he refused. “Come, Gilgamesh, you shall be my bridegroom. You shall be my husband and I shall be your wife”. Ishtar became angry and asks her father to release the Bull of Heaven to destroy the people of Uruk. As a result, Enkidu and Gilgamesh killed the Bull of Heaven to save Uruk. This event led to the death of Enkidu because the Gods punished him for killing Humbaba and Bull of Heaven. When Enkidu died, Gilgamesh became heart broken and decided to go look for everlasting life. The death of his partner Enkidu was the reason behind his journey to become immortal.

Posted by: Henry Adu at February 10, 2014 01:26 PM

Charles Fowler
Dr. B Hobbs
ENG 220 Exploring Narratives
February 10, 2014
Take Home Test

Question: Revisit the “The Battle of Humbaba” sequence of The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well developed, statement of what The Epic of Gilgamesh reveals about values, i.e., the ethical standards of behavior, of ancient Babylonians. Some things to consider as you develop a thesis: What did they expect of their rulers? What values did they want their heroes to embody?
Answer:
In the battle of Humbaba, Enkidu and Gilgamesh both approached the cedar forest where Humbaba was located. While they were cutting down trees they could hear the roars that Humbaba was making. They were then surrounded by sounds of weapons clashing. They were suddenly stricken with fear and had to remind each other to be strong. During the battle, Gilgamesh requested help from Shamash and she unleashes 13 storms on Humbaba. With the help of Shamash, Gilgamesh was able to subdue Humbaba. Humbaba was then pleading for mercy and began to beg for his life giving Gilgamesh reasons he should set him free. Enkidu was then able to motivate to finish the job and to finish off Humbaba. They then returned to Uruk which they carried a new gate and the head of Humbaba.
I would say that the values that ancient Babylonians heroes would be that they should consist of knowledge and bravery. This wasn’t your regular standard school boy stands up to bully bravery but the bravery to even stand up to gods. A super warrior where a hero consist of strength, bravery and very skilled in battle. A hero must also depart on journey of some sort. With the killing of Humbaba it also shows how fame was also valued during that period of time. Heroes are both liked and disliked where enemies will be created. Determination is also an important characteristics where nothing can get in your way to obtain your goals. These are ways how heroes were valued during that ancient time.
The strong ruled as kings and putting an end to anyone that threatened their power. There was lack of compassion or even justice. This is one characteristics that was expected from rulers during that period in time. They didn’t believe that there was any afterlife. The people during that time expected a king to protect his subjects as if he was a shepherd. The values that ancient Babylonians were more earthly. They considered that you need to do as much as you can while you are alive. Some kings didn’t have respect for gods.
Even thou it was different time where ancient heroes and kings possessed certain qualities, most of these qualities still describes heroes in our current time. Ancient kings and heads of governments also have things in common.

Posted by: Charles Fowler at February 10, 2014 01:48 PM

Jonathan Constant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 220cl Journey into Narrative Ca01
10 February 2014

Hero Archetype Test Essay
“A hero is someone who is willing to sacrifice his own needs on behalf of others” (Vogler 29). Gilgamesh and Enkidu consistently epitomize the hero archetype. Gilgamesh has a conversation with Utnapishtim about the heroics of Enkidu and himself saying, “he who stood by me as we ascended the mountain, Seized and killed the bull that came down from heaven, Felled Humbaba who dwelt in the forest of cedars, Killed lions at the mountain passes” (Puchner, 79). Throughout these heroes journey, they must go out of their ways to help others in need. The Gods from above epitomize the herald archetype. They give Gilgamesh a task to conquer. They send down the bull from heaven and Humbaba the giant from the forest of cedar. The herald archetype is usually someone who presents change and a call to adventure for the hero archetype. The herald can be positive, negative, or neutral, but in this example it is used in a negative aspect. In another example of helping others, Gilgamesh helps the Ur-Shanabi on page 77, “Gilgamesh, raise the axe in your hand, Go down into the forest, cut twice sixty poles each five times twelve cubits long, Dress them, set on handguards, Bring them to me” (Puchner, 77). Gilgamesh does so and brings what Ur-Shanabi had asked of him. A hero must also take charge and lead his or her group when times of crises or guidance are needed. On page 41, Gilgamesh must help the hunter with a fellow who has come from the uplands by saying, “Go, hunter, take with you Shamhat the harlot, When the wild beasts draw near the water hole, Let her strip off her clothes, laying bare her charms. When he sees her, he will approach her, His beasts that grew up with him on the steppe will deny him” (Puchner, 41). Gilgamesh must not only give advice and help those who are in need of guidance, but must also physically help others who are in need. Enkidu was the hero to die in the end of the novel. The Gods sacrificed Enkidu when he and Gilgamesh conquered the Bull from heaven and Humbaba the giant. Gilgamesh mourns the death of his friend, while roaming the wilderness in search of answers. The hero archetype must do more than just defeat monster’s and win the fair maiden’s heart. The Epic of Gilgamesh brings to light all of the aspects a hero must have to be said hero. The hero must be mentally and physically strong. The hero must be able to help others in need, weather by advice, or physically slaying their problems head on.

Posted by: jack constant at February 10, 2014 01:55 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
10 February 2014

Question 14:
Setup: One way of discussing or learning about narratives is to closely examine the conflicts. In The Epic of Gilgamesh, there are many conflicts and sub-conflicts. Two of the earliest ones involve (1.) Gilgamesh and the conflict his subjects have with him and (2.) Enkidu and the conflict that trappers have with him.
Instructions: Revisit the earliest conflicts that Gilgamesh and Enkidu with others (before their initial meeting) in The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well developed (and well supported) statement that answers the questions: (1.) how is the problem that trappers have with Enkidu similar and or dissimilar to the problem that the citizens of Uruk have with Gilgamesh? And (2.) how are the solutions of the trapper and the citizens of Uruk alike and or unlike?

Answer:
The trapper is the one who made Enkidu human. The trapper creates Enkidu a human because he claims that Enkidu was freeing animals from his traps although, we never see him do it. Alike with the trapper having issues with Enkidu, the citizens have a problem with Gilgamesh. The reason for the issue with the citizens is because they became so threatened by him that they ask the sky God Anu to create Enkidu so that Gilgamesh will have a competitor. After Enkidu is human he becomes friends with Gilgamesh, then they go on their journey together. The solutions are similar with the trapper and the citizens because they go to extremes to prove a point.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at February 10, 2014 02:04 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 February 2014
Part of Exam #1

Question #7
Instructions: Revisit the earliest conflicts that Gilgamesh and Enkidu with others (vefore their initial meeting) in The Epic of Gilgamesh and write a short, but well-developed (and well-supported) statement that answers the questions: (1.) how is the problem that trappers have with Enkidu similar and/or dissimilar to the problem that citizens of Uruk alike and/or unlike.

Answer:
Before transforming into a "human" and a more civilized "person", Enkidu used to be a hairy, part animal, and most important of all a very wild creature. At the same time, Gilgamesh was using all his strength, power, and uniqueness in order to sleep with brides on the day of their marriage, use men to take care of heavy labor, and reign Uruk with absolute power while people were unhappy about his treatment and actions. This is where the citizens of Uruk and the trapper who discovered Enkidu relate. When the trapper sees Enkidu for the first time he is shocked by his differences from humans because of his looks and also afraid for his wilderness, but most important of all the trapper realizes that Enkidu might be the one responsible for unsetting the traps he created to catch animals. Basically, there is the trapper who is mad at Enkidu for affecting his traps, and at the same time citizens of Uruk are feeling unhappy and even miserable because of the egoist and unfair practices of Gilgamesh.

The solutions of the trapper and the citizens of Uruk are almost identical when trying to solve their issues. Both seek for help by asking for assistance to a "higher" person. In the trapper's situation, he runs to Gilgamesh to let him know there is a frightening man in the woods. Gilgamesh later on sends Shamhat to take care of Enkidu. On the other hand, citizens of Uruk appeal to the gods so that they can interfere with Gilgamesh's actions and consequently they create Enkidu.

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at February 10, 2014 02:10 PM

Chelsea Dubberly
Dr.B. Hobbs
February 10, 2014

Vogler mentioned a type of archetype in his book and that was threshold guardian. In the Epic of Gilgamesh there is only one threshold guardian. This was the tavern keeper. The tavern keeper helped guide Gilgamesh through his journey. This is because no other mortal has ever been able to get through the passage in the mountain alone. She was warning Gilgamesh that this was a very dangerous journey and why would he make this trip alone. He has to watch out for Utnapishtim who lives on the mountain. Gilgamesh only travels at night in complete darkness.
In the text, the guardian was mentioned on page 76 and 77 when he was talking about his adventures and where he should go. Vogler states that a threshold guardian “often they will be lieutenants of the villain, lesser thugs or mercenaries hired to guard access to the chief’s headquarters. They may also be neutral figures who are simply part of the landscape of the special world. ” (Vogler, page 49)

“The Writers Journey” Christopher Vogler, Page 49
“The Norton Anthology World Literature”

Posted by: Chelsea Dubberly at February 10, 2014 02:10 PM

Joshua N. Natonio
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
9 February, 2014

QUESTION #2:
Mentor (Wise Old Man or Woman) Archetype: Which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in The Epic of Gilgamesh? Does only one Mentor (Wise Old Man or Woman) exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary Mentor (Wise Old Man or Woman) for this half of the narrative (chapters 1-3)? You must cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and The Epic of Gilgamesh to fully support your answer.

ANSWER:
According to Vogler, the Mentor (Wise Old Man or Woman) Archetype is “usually a positive figure who aids or trains the hero.” Vogler goes on to say that, this particular archetype “is expressed in all those characters who teach and protect heroes and give them gifts (Vogler 39-47).

Within the first three tablets of “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” Gilgamesh, Enkidu, the Harlot, the Trapper’s father, the elders of Uruk and Ninsun act in some varying capacity as a mentor to one or more characters. Although there are multiple characters throughout “The Epic of Gilgamesh” that act within the confines of the Mentor archetype, the primary mentor for Tablets I-III would be Ninsun. Ninsun is the goddess mother of Gilgamesh who is often referred to as “the wild cow”.

In Tablet III of “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” as both Gilgamesh and Enkidu visit the sublime temple to console with Ninsun about their quest to face the dreaded Humbaba, Gilgamesh says to Enkidu:

“Come, my friend, let us go to the sublime temple,
To go before, Ninsun, the great queen
Ninsun the wise, who is versed in all knowledge,
will send us on our way with good advice” (Simon 50-51).

At this point in the story, Ninsun hears the speeches of both Gilgamesh, her son and Enkidu. Ninsun decides to meditate in the bathhouse and pleas with Shamash, “the god of the sun and of oracles who over sees matters of justice and right dealing” (Simon 43). She pleas to Shamash for the strength and safety of both Gilgamesh and Enkidu.

After much deliberation, Ninsun grants Gilgamesh and Enkidu her blessings to confront the treacherous Humbaba. After making a second plea to Shamash, Ninsun summoned Enkidu to her chambers.

The great queen placed a token around Enkidu’s neck, and proclaims:

“As the priestesses take in a foundling,
And the daugters of the gods bring up an adopted child,
I herewith take Enkidu, as my adopted son,
may Gilgamesh treat him well” (Simon, 52).

As previously mentioned, although there are multiple mentors in “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” Ninsun characterizes the role of the Mentor archetype by imparting her knowledge on the heroes, aids the heroes journey through pleading with other gods, and by giving gifts to the heroes.

REFERENCES:

Simon, Peter. The Norton Anthology World
Literature. Shorter Third Edition, Volume 1.
New York, NY: W.W. Noron & Company, 2013. 38-
88. Print.

Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey: Mythic
Structure for Writers. 3rd ed. Studio City,
California: Michael Wiese Production, 2007.
39-47. Print.

Posted by: Joshua Natonio at February 10, 2014 02:11 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
6 February 2014

Question #8:
How is nature represented in the Epic of Gilgamesh? Is the world depicted as a place of safety and harmony, or a place of precariousness and uncertainty? In this version of the world, what problems could one possibly face? What view about the natural world emerge from the story?

Awnser:
Nature heavily ties into The Epic of Gilgamesh. Enkidu is part man part animal and is one with nature until he dabbles in the pleasure of the prostitute (Puchner 42). This resembles the story of Adam and eve since he has been awakened by taking pleasure in the fruits of the prostitute and is no longer one with nature. Nature also seems to be an antagonist for here on out. For instance when Gilgamesh has to cross the sea or when he and Enkidu travel through the forests, which supposedly no man can survive, to kill Humbaba (Puchner 51). From this one gets a sense that this is a world where anything can happen. No, it is not that safe but Gilgamesh does a pretty good job to make sure that the city of Uruk is not threatened by anything besides him, such as the bull of heaven (Puchner 65). Gilgamesh does have his way with pretty much anything and everything in the city and is a force not to be reckoned with. Uruk is also a place of uncertainty as mentioned with the bull of heaven anything really can happen. 
Works Cited
"The Epic of Gilgamesh." Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology World Liturature Vol. 1. New York: W. W. Norton & Comany, 2013. 33-88.


Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at February 10, 2014 02:22 PM

Chelsea Dubberly
Dr.B. Hobbs
February 10, 2014

5. I feel the Epic of Gilgamesh is primarily a man’s story. In this story woman are known for distracting the men and being temptation for them. With this the woman are able to accomplish their mission. He fell for her and gave his body to her. On page 45 the harlot is mentioned. This is where she convinced Enkidu to go with her.

“The Norton Anthology World Literature”

Posted by: Chelsea Dubberly at February 10, 2014 04:43 PM

Chelsea Dubberly
Dr.B. Hobbs
February 10, 2014

77. Urshanabi has a crew made of stone because it helps protect his boat. The stones get replaced with poles that had to be gathered from the forest.

“The Norton Anthology World Literature”

Posted by: Chelsea Dubberly at February 10, 2014 04:49 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
12 February 2014

QUESTION #8:
That Rascal, Jason. What is the Nurse’s view of Jason’s behavior? What is the Tutor’s (Attendant’s) view? What feelings does Medea, herself, express about Jason?
ANSWER:
The Nurse, the Tutor and Medea all generally feel the same about Jason. To leave a wife and children and to not to think of them again is wrong. The Nurse just wishes that the Argo Medea set sail had not set sail in the first place. If it had not set sail, then Medea would have never set eyes on Jason (Puchner 528). The Tutor feels bad for Medea, but is aware that men will always love themselves more than they will love others (Puchner 530). In other words, Jason did not care that he was married or had children, he moved on to someone who would be considered better because she was royalty. Medea is hurt most of all has a deep hatred towards Jason. She wants to kill Jason for leaving her and her children. Medea even curses her children dead because she is so angry and her children remind her of Jason. He is such an idiot. He could have thrown me out, destroyed my plans; instead he granted me one single day to turn three enemies to three dead bodies: the father, and the bride, and my own husband” (Puchner 538).

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 11, 2014 01:36 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
11 February 2014

Question #99:
Why does the snake grab the flower, shed its skin, and slither away?

ANSWER:
The serpent grabs the flower after Gilgamesh leaves it lying in the sand while he gets himself clean and finds water to drink. The snake steals the flower to seal the duality deal between life and death. As Utanapishtim tells Gilgamesh, death is apart of life and must be experienced by every human being Gilgamesh ventures off to complete his journey. Gilgamesh is destined to die a mortal and live gratefully for the rest of his life. Therefore, the snake was the part in the story that initiated Gilgamesh’s final attempt in seeking eternal life. “Gilgamesh saw a pond whose water was cool, he went down into it to bath in the water. A snake caught the scent of the plant, stealthily it came up and carried the plant away, on its way back it shed its skin (Foster 88).” The snake represents a serpent creature ending Gilgamesh’s desire for immortal life. The more he persists on living an immortal life the more the world disfavors his longing. Gilgamesh was so sure that he would live eternally that he carelessly left the flower in the sand without thinking about the possibility of it being taken away. The snake ate his only hope and ruined Gilgamesh’s sole purpose for his journey. After eating the flower, the snake sheds its skin before slithering away. The shedding of the snakeskin meant the snake digested the flower and it would be out of Gilgamesh’s life forever. Gilgamesh would never have the chance of seeking eternal life again. He lost his final chance at living an immortal life. Gilgamesh realizes the snake has ended his journey and his chance at living an immortal life. Gilgamesh returns home and accepts the lessons he learned on his journey. He will have to accept his life and live each day as if it were his last day. As he returned back to Uruk he realizes the snake has made him a better man and he humbles himself to his normal life.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at February 11, 2014 10:32 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 February 2014

QUESTION #2:
First, define the terms: “prologue” and “monologue”. In the prologue to Euripides’s Medea, what elements of dramatic conflict are first presented in the Nurse’s opening speech? Who is opposed by whom or what? What is at stake in this conflict? What does the text suggest are its probable outcomes?

ANSWER:
A “prologue” is the beginning of a story that gives the reader background on the story and on the characters to lay the groundwork for the rest of the story. A “monologue” is a long passage recited by one character, such as the nurse’s monologue at the beginning of Medea (Euripides 528).
In the nurse’s opening speech, she expresses her regret of the day that Medea met Jason (Euripides 529), because now there is hatred between the two due to Jason leaving Medea and his children to marry Creon’s daughter and be a part of the royal family (Euripides 529).
The nurse’s fear suggests that Medea is too smart and too stubborn to allow her husband to leave and humiliate her like he did. The text suggests that Medea will plan some type of revenge against her husband for his betrayal.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at February 11, 2014 11:37 PM

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