« Meshing with Gilgamesh and Knowing Noah | Main | Calls & Responses to _The Epic of Son-Jara/Sundiata/Sun-Jata_ »

January 03, 2014

Mediating Medea - Villian, Victim, or Both?


Image Source: http://www.reprodart.com/kunst/giovanni_benedetto_castiglione/medea_agn95362_hi.jpg

Students,

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

----------------------------------------

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 3, 2014 12:25 PM

Readers' Comments:

6 September 2008

ENG 225 Students,

Below you will find our ongoing course material for our coverage of Euripides's Medea.

For the time being, please find the questions from the first in-class reading check. As mentioned in class, you should be logging these questions (collecting them in your journal) as ANYTHING discussed in class or assigned for out-of-class is fair game for the mid-term and final examinations.

More to follow soon . . .

Have a great weekend,

Dr. Hobbs

---------

 

 

1. Multiple Choice (circle correct answer): Your reading assignment included a two-page introduction to the primary text (pages 693-94).  Who was the actual author of Medea?

 

(a)   Sophocles  (b) Aeschylus  (c) Aristophanes (d) Euripides

 

2. True or False (circle correct answer): The “protagonist” of Medea is not a man but a woman.

 

3. Fill in the Blank: The nationality/ethnicity of Euripides was _________________.

 

4. Short Answer: In the first act, according to the Nurse, why does Medea feel slighted?

 

5. Matching (Connect the correct pairs by drawing a line):

Aigeus                                     King of Corinth

Kreon                                      King of Athens

Jason                                       King of Iolcos

 

6. Multiple Choice (circle correct answer): Medea was composed in the . . .

 

(a)   400s B. C. E.  (b) 500s B. C. E.  (c) 600s B. C. E.  (d) 700s B. C. E.

 

7. True or False (circle correct answer): The ethnicity, class, or nationality of Medea’s character would have been regarded as  “foreign” to its original, intended audience.

 

8. Fill in the Blank: The ___________ is the first character to speak in Medea.

 

9. Short Answer: Who is the father of Medea’s children and how many do they have?

 

10. Matching (Connect the correct pairs by drawing a line):

 

                        The Nurse served                    Medea

                        The Tutor served                     the Corinthian Women

                        The Chorus included               the children of Medea

---------------------

Study your quotation below carefullly. In about one paragraph:

(1) specify who, exactly, is speaking the quoted lines and
(2) explain the context of the passage, i.e. what is currently happening, what does it mean and/or why is the character saying this?

Remember:
• When you find the quotation in the text, be sure to include specific page numbers as in-text, parenthetical citations.

1. “This is indeed the greatest salvation of all— / For the wife not to stand apart from the husband. / But now there’s hatred everywhere, Love is diseased.”
2. “If one is a good servant, it’s a terrible thing / When one’s master’s luck is out; it goes to one’s heart.”
3. “Have you only just discovered / That everyone loves himself more than his neighbor? / Some have good reason, others get something out of it.”
4. “We women are the most unfortunate creatures. / Firstly, with an excess of wealth it is required / For us to buy a husband and take for our bodies / A master; for not to take one is even worse.
5. “A person of sense ought never to have his children / Brought up to be more clever than the average.”
6. “A sharp-tempered woman, or, for that matter, a man, / Is easier to deal with than the clever type / Who holds her tongue.”
7. “Oh what an evil to men is passionate love!”
8. “Ah, come, Medea, [. . .] / And women, though most helpless in doing good deeds, / Are of every evil the cleverest of contrivers.
9. “[. . .] I know that all / A man’s friends leave him stone-cold if he becomes poor.”
10. [. . .] It would have been better for men to have got their children in some other way, and women / Not to have existed. Then life would have been good.”
11. “There is no benefit in the gifts of a bad man.”
12. “[. . .] grief is gain when you cannot mock it.”
13. “Is love so small a pain, do you think, for a woman?”

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 8, 2008 07:47 PM

Q-1 this is indeed the greatest salvation of all-/for the wife not to stand apart from the husbands. / But now there’s hatred everywhere, Love is diseased.
This statement was made by Medias nurse and she said it because Jason Medias husband had cheated on her and he was planning on leaving her and the kids.

----------------------------------------------------

Kamille G 08/09/08

5. “A person of sense ought never to have his children/ Brought up to be more clever than the average.”

In Euripides, the quote written above was spoken by Medea. Medea’s main intention behind using this quote was to mislead Kreon, to make him believe that she was not as smart as he thought she was. Kreon tells Medea that he is “afraid” of her, and also that he heard that she is “threatening” (pg. 701 line 280 and line 285). In this quote, Medea wanted Kreon to believe that his status as ‘a king’ would make him a smarter person than she was because she was only ‘a woman.’ During the time when Medea was written, men in high ranks of society were believed to have been smarter than the women who were looked down on. This however, is not the case with Medea, she is in fact as smart as Kreon, and Kreon suspects this when he says ‘you are a clever women’ (pg.701 line 283). Medea uses this quote as a way of changing Kreon’s thoughts about her as being clever to the notion that she is just like all the other women and not clever at all. Medea makes Kreon believe that it is shameful to be smart since she would be “objects of envy” and “hated” in society (pg.280 line 295 and 301). Medea however, knows all along that this is her plot to manipulate Kreon, into allowing her to stay in Corinth for the day so that she can get back at her husband, Jason, for rejecting her for another woman.

Posted by: John Daniel at September 8, 2008 09:41 PM

13. “Is love so small a pain, do you think, for a woman?”

This quotation was stated on page 723 line 1343 by Medea herself. Medea feels that Jason does not understand what type of pain she is going through. That is why she states is love so small a pain, do you think for a women because Jason thinks that Medea is over reacting about the whole situation and that she should not be hurt by such a thing. It seems to me that Medea is in a lot of hurt and wanted Jason to realize this. Medea really truly loved Jason and was torn about when she heard of his affair. She wants him to know that she hurts to not just him. It seems to me that Jason does not believe she should act out on her angry and pain and he is treating it like its not that big of a deal, but to Medea it is.

Posted by: Nichole T. at September 9, 2008 01:44 PM

7. "Oh what an evil to men is passionate love!"
Medea page 702 line 327

Medea is speaking to Kreon about her being exiled from the land. She is trying to persuade him to allow her to stay in the land for an extra day. She tells him that she needs to use time to find a place to stay when really she just wants to use it to poison the new bride so that her ex-husband may suffer. Her line could be referring to either the love of married people, or the love of their country.

Posted by: Quinten J at September 9, 2008 02:52 PM

Alex Slavin

Professor Hobbs

English 225

6. “A sharp-tempered woman, or, for that matter, a man, / Is easier to deal with than the clever type/ Who holds her tongue.”

This quote can be seen on page 702 and the speaker is Kreon. Kreon is exchanging words with Medea. Medea is trying to persuade Kreon to allow her to stay within the kingdom. Kreon now believes that Medea is plotting some evil against her children and husband. What kreon means by this statement is that he refuses to allow his intelligence to be insulted and will not stand to be taken advantage of. Kreon realizes she is clever and has an idea of why she really wants to stay for just one more day. She holds her tongue meaning that she is speaking to Kreon of why she must stay but really in her mind she is thinking of the evil she is going to commit. Medea was able to convince Kreon to stay one more day; he fell in her trap and now has partial blame for the murder of Medea’s children.


Posted by: Alex Slavin at September 9, 2008 02:52 PM

ENG 225-CA01

8. "Ah, come, Medea, [...]/ And women, though most helpless in doing good deeds, / Are of every evil the cleverest of contrivers.

During a reading check in class, my first answer was incorrect. In doing more research, I have discovered that this phrase is actually a part of a monologue of Medea. One of the main things I noticed was that Medea was very bitter in the end of her monologue. She shows her bitterness by saying,"You see how you are treated. Never
Shall you be mocked by Jason's Corinthian wedding."(Medea 403-404) I think one of the main things Medea is trying to do is justify her reasons for killing her children. She wants to remind herself that this is for the best of her children so that they will not be harmed by Jason as she was. The main thing I found interesting about this theme was that it is very similar to a very popular theme today. She is almost "killing people in the name of God." She is justifying a horrible deed. This could be a very interesting topic for a paper!

Since i do not have a book, I used the following text availiable online through Hartford College:

triceratops.brynmawr.edu/dspace/bitstream/10066/1338/2/Euripides.doc


Posted by: Joseph S. at September 9, 2008 07:46 PM

Group #4
“We women are the most unfortunate creatures./ Firstly, with an excess of wealth it is required/ For us to buy a husband and take for our bodies / A master; for not to take one is even worse.”

Medea speaks here. She is devastated after Jason married another woman. She makes a very strong statement here about the role of men vs. women. We see the female character come forward in a man-dominated society. In this aspect, we should also consider the fact that Medea is not only a woman but also a foreigner in Corinth. Still, she is fearless to come forward and make the statement. We have to credit Euripides here as a master of disguise – I mean, isn’t in reality him speaking through the character of Medea behind a waterfall of emotions. Magnificent!

Posted by: strahil s. at September 9, 2008 11:28 PM

Eng 225
MWF 12:30-1:20

9. "[...] I know that all / A man's friends leave him stone-cold if he becomes poor"

A quote from the character Jason and located on page 707. What it means is that basically friends are only friends with you while you have money but the moment that money is gone so is friendship.

Posted by: Brandon mckoy at September 10, 2008 12:59 AM

The only question that I got wrong was question 1, to which the correct answer is D.

Posted by: Matt M. at September 10, 2008 02:13 AM

Briana Brown
September 10, 2008
Lit 225
Prof Hobbs

1. “This is indeed the greatest salvation of all--- / For the wife not to stand apart from the husband. / But now there’s hatred everywhere, Love is diseased.”

This part of “Medea,” the nurse is the one speaking these few lines. She is saying in a poetic form how Medea show stand by her husband Jason, even though he has chosen not to have her. Medea still loves Jason with everything she has but now her love has turned into hatred. She even seems to grow some sort of hatred toward her children. Jason has broke this promise they made together to be man and wife but, yet he sees another woman. Medea grows bitter and cold.

Posted by: briana brown at September 10, 2008 08:57 AM

Anna R
Engl 225
CA01
Dr. Hobbs

Quote 5.
Page 701, line 293
After Jason left her, Medea felt nothing but revenge and bitterness. She knew he left her and their two children for Glauce, Kreon’s daughter, in order to marry her and start a family with her. When she talks to Kreon, he tells her that he is scared she might do something to his daughter and her new family. Obviously Medea has nothing but the feeling of revenge in her and wants to kill all of the people who broke her heart and had to do with her misery. From what I can understand from the lines Medea speaks, she doesn’t want Kreon to think that she is smart, since in her opinion people who are smarter then others feel hated. “It will make them objects of envy and ill-will” (295). Thus, she doesn’t want Kreon to think she is smart and maybe figure out what she has planned for his daughter and her family.

Posted by: Anna R. at September 10, 2008 10:43 AM

Walter Perkins
Eng 225
CA01
Dr. Hobbs

6. “A sharp-tempered woman, or, for that matter, a man,/ Is easier to deal with than the clever type/ Who holds her tongue.”

A. Kreon said this quote and was talking about Medea. This quote is found on page 702.
B. Kreon was talking about Medea in this quote as he elaborates on how it is easier to read or predict someone who is emotional than someone who is quiet and bite their tongue. He says this because the ones who wear their emotion on their sleeve can be predicted while the quiet ones can never be predicted and are usually the ones most dangerous.

Posted by: Walter P at September 10, 2008 11:01 AM

Quote:
12. […] grief is gain when you cannot mock it.
1. Who said the quote and consider why the said it?
2. Explain the context of the quote and does it have a meaning behind it.

Answer: The quote above was said by Medea to Jason after she poisoned their children. Medea’s actions and her reasoning behind harming her children was all because of the way Jason treated her and the bitterness she felt towards him. The line before spoken by Jason “You feel the pain yourself. You share my sorrow”, this shows the hurt Jason is feeling at this moment from the loss of his children. The quote shows how much hurt Medea has inside for Jason; it provides the reason behind her actions. Causing grief to the extreme of hurting the person deep enough to make them continue to feel sorrow for as long as they lived is what Medea had in mind for Jason. Killing the children was the best way to get back at him for the grief she felt when he left her for another women. Medea’s bitterness as well as anger towards Jason drove her to do what she felt was the best way to get back at him for what he has done to her.
Source: Book A Page 723 lines 1335-1340

S.Tavares
Eng 225 12:30-1:20

Posted by: S. Tavares at September 10, 2008 11:06 AM

The Tutor and The Nurse.
Talk about the fact that Jason of the Argonauts is willing to break ties with his mistress’ (Media) children, in order to promote his personal social status. The reason he decides to do this is because he never officially married Media in addition her royalty status does not apply because she is from a barbarian culture. Making the marriage to the new woman more valuable because he will now be recognized as royalty in his native culture. Based on lines 85-88 one can infer that the tutor does not believe that the nurse knows the “basic knowledge” of, everyone’s out for themselves.

John A. 225 01

Posted by: John Anderson at September 10, 2008 11:17 AM

Response to Question Number 8:

I feel as though in this quote king Aegeus is asking for Medea's help to do evil. In this quote he is basically telling her that she is not known for or good at doing good deeds but he glorifys her for being so good at being able to think up wicked schemes and deeds. This quote in itself adds to why in this play Medea is viewed as the villan.

Posted by: Myles Godet at September 10, 2008 12:15 PM

D.J. Garry
Dr. Hobbs
English 225 Ca. 01
9 September 2008
Medea Quiz Makeover
4. “We women are the most unfortunate of creatures. / Firstly, with an excess of wealth it is required / For us to buy a husband and take for our bodies / A master; for not to take one is even worse.”

Firstly, Medea is the character that is quoted in this passage. She is stating this because she is unhappy with the status that women have in her society. She feels that she is not in control of her relationship, and that women are secondary to men. She also speaks about how men are the ones that go out into battle, and the women have to be children. She would rather go into battle then to bear children, and then be left with them. She is basically unsettled with her spot in society. I am sure that many women felt the same at the time, and this is also a major theme throughout the rest of the play.

Posted by: David G. at September 10, 2008 02:04 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 11, 2008 06:46 PM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
11 February 2014

Medea
Question #11
11. How might the tutor/ attendant’s news, from the beginning of the play, affect Medea? What is the significance of this news for the reinforcement of central conflict? Explain.

Answer:
The new from the tutor new was negative regarding Medea and her household. The tutor tells the nurse “Creon, the ruler of this land, intends to drive these children and their mother out of Corinth”. (Svarlien, p.g.530) Jason, Medea ex-husband has ran off and remarried, and abandon his house hold, children, wife, etc. This news breaks Medea’s heart, and cause’s her to cry in rage not understanding why and how this could happen to her family. She states this “Aaaaah! Oh, horrible, horrible, all that I suffer, my unhappy struggles. I wish I could die. (Svarlien, p.g.531) This news is something that could break a women apart. Medea does not understand why her husband left her and their two boys, and runs off and get married to, and now the ruler wants them to leave of the island. I believe the ruler Creon believe that Medea had something to do with her husband leaving her and now wants to punish her and for her and her two boys to leave the island.

Posted by: Re-chia Jackson at February 11, 2014 06:27 PM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
11 February 2014
Question:
What did Medea do upon arriving in Greece at Iolchus? What is the present situation in Corinth? Explain.
Answer:
Upon arriving in Greece at Iolchus, Medea persuaded Pelias’ daughters to kill him by boiling him alive. Medea told them that doing so would make him young again (Puchner 529). The situation in Corinth is that Creon, the King of Corinth, intends on kicking Medea and her children out of Corinth. Creon intends on doing this because Medea is not royal like Jason and his new wife (Puchner 535).

Posted by: Michael Adamson at February 11, 2014 07:19 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 February 2014

Question #19:
What excuse/device does Euripides, as the playwright, use to bring Medea out in front of her house? Explain?
Answer:
Euripides, as the playwright uses a specific strategy to bring Medea in front of her house. The excuse of a feast awaiting outside “The feast is enough to make people happy. That’s all that they need.” (Euripides 533). Euripides is trying to cheer up Medea and stop her from killing herself or anyone else around her because her husband no longer wants to be with her. Medea is very upset “her glare is as fierce as a bull’s, let me tell you- she’s wild like a lion who’s just given birth whenever a servant tries telling her anything.” (Euripides 533).
Work Cited
Euripides. Medea. Trans. Arnson Svarlien, Diane. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 11, 2014 09:12 PM

Zachary Daley
Dr. Hobbs
CA01 ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
2/11/2014
Jason and the Argonauts
Question 5:
Backstory. Look up any reliable summary of the story Jason and the Argonauts as point of comparison to Euripides’s synopsis. According to the Nurse, why did Medea sail with Jason to Greece from her home in Colchis?
Answer:
The story of Jason and the Argonauts deals with a man named Jason who ends up getting married to Medea after becoming a hero. Soon Medea kills this other man’s children in order to teach him a lesson. After this, Jason leaves Medea and she starts to develop a plan to destroy Jason. At the end of the story, Medea ends up killing her own kids and Jason’s new girl in order to show him how he made her feel.
The story is being told by a Nurse, she says that Medea first takes a trip with Jason when they have their kids. The nurse is worried about Medea’s fascination with her kids and rightly thinks there is something wrong with Medea. The Nurse believes that the Medea goes on the trip with Jason because of her kids.

Posted by: Zach Daley at February 11, 2014 10:55 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (220CL)
11.2.2014
Question #21
21.
First, define the word: “patriarchy.” What parts of Medea’s great speech to the women of Corinth (lines 212ff) is stunningly modern in its account of the injustices done to women in patriarchal societies? Why are they modern? Explain.
ANSWER.
Patriarchy is a social system in which males are the head of society, and smaller groupings (such as families).
“My husband, who was everything to me- how well I know it –, is the worst of men. Of all the living creatures with a soul and mind, we women are the most pathetic. [. . .] we have to buy a husband: spend vast amounts of money, just to get a master for our body. [. . .] If a woman leaves her husband , the she loses her virtuous reputation. [. . .] A man, when he gets fed up with the people at home, can go elsewhere to ease his heart- he has friends, companions his own age. We [women] must rely on just one single soul. They say that we lead safe, untroubled lives at home while they do battle with a spear. They’re wrong. I’d rather take my stand behind a shield three times than go through childbirth once. ” (Puchner 534).
Medea’s speech seems at first to be mostly an archaic view of gender roles, however when placed in perspective there are still some truths to it. When women, in modern days, leave their husbands they usually leave with their children too (for the most part, not always). That leave the woman to not only be in charge of her own needs (a new home, food, automobile costs, etc.) but also those of her children (unless stated otherwise by the father). There is also the lack of “respect” towards women in the work field, which contributes to women having a harder time finding jobs which will support a single parent home. Medea is then forced to leave the city, by orders of Creon, along with her children.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 11, 2014 11:09 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
11 February 11, 2014

Question 10
At the beginning of the play, what new trouble has the Tutor (Attendant) heard of, regarding the children? Explain

Answer
At the start of the play, we find out that Medea’s husband has left her and, she is distraught by this and, sadly takes it out on her family. Medea explains that she can not even look at her own children because it reminds her of Jason, her husband that left her. Another issue that arises with the abandoned family is that the King is ordering them to leave Corinth. The nurse and the tutor diverge a plan to get the children inside the house but, try to keep them away from their mother who is away in a room crying about her broken family. Medea can be a very powerful and dangerous woman and they are afraid of what she may do to the children.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at February 11, 2014 11:14 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
12 February 2014

QUESTION #14:
First, define and distinguish between the terms: “metaphor,” “simile,” “apothegm.” Then, comment on the use of rhetorical devices and/or figurative language in the opening of the play; c.f., especially the Nurse’s monologue, the Tutor’s replies, the Corinthian women’s lyrical moments. Explain.

ANSWER:
A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance, as in “A mighty fortress is our God.” A simile is a figure of speech in which two unlike things are explicitly compared, as in “she is like a rose.” An apothegm is a short cryptic remark containing some general or generally accepted truth.

At the beginning of the play, Medea’s nurse speaks out in agony about her mistress’s woes in a monologue that explains to the audience what actions Medea has done. The Nurse uses a simile to put more emphasis on the problems that Medea faces, for example, the Nurse says that when Medea’s friends try to give her good advice she, “listens the way a rock does” (Puchner 529). When the Tutor is talking to the Nurse a few lines later into the story, he uses an apothegm by stating that Jason, Medea’s lover, “doesn’t cherish his children because he’s more preoccupied with his own bed” (Puchner 530). The Tutor does this to put more emphasis on the fact the Jason has betrayed his family because he wants to live a life of royalty and power. The Chorus uses a metaphor to express their distraught by stating, “I take no delight when this house is in pain” (Puchner 532).

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at February 12, 2014 02:37 AM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
11 February 2014

Question #1:
First, define the terms: “prologue” and “monologue.” In the prologue to Euripides’s Medea, what background facts do we learn from the Nurse’s opening speech (first 45 verses)?

Answer:
A prologue is an opening to a story that establishes the setting and gives background details, often some earlier story that ties into the main one, and other miscellaneous information. Whereas a monologue, similar to a Soliloquy, is when a single character expresses their mental thoughts aloud. It also can be used to o directly address another character. In the Nurse’s opening speech we learn some interesting background knowledge about Jason. Jason had set sail in his ship, the Argo, to Colchis in search of the “golden pelt” (Puchner 528). Here in Colchis, Jason meets Medea and along with falling in love with him, Medea helps Jason obtain the golden pelt. Medea persuades the daughters of Pelias to kill him and for that her and Jason are exiled to Corinth, “She would have never persuaded Paelias’ daughters to kill their father…Corinth. Here she’s lived in exile with her husband and children” (Puchner 529). However the nurse says that Jason and Medea’s relationship has gotten worst and that Jason leaves his family behind to marry another. This sends Medea into great depression “Poor Medea, mournful and dishonored…she wont touch food; surrendering to pain, she melts away” (Puchner 529). From the nurses opening speech we learn that because of Jason’s betrayal, Medea is left distort and emotionally unstable.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at February 12, 2014 02:40 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journey in Narrative CA01
11 February 2014

Question 20:
The character of Medea is revealed in the interview with the Corinthian women. What are its principal aspects as demonstrated by her words, silences, and/or movements? Explain.

Answer:
Medea reveals herself to the Chorus as being a vengeful woman. She is pretty much spewing curses of damnation upon her husband, his new wife, and herself (Puchner 532). It could also be said that she is a bit melodramatic and over-reacts to Jason leaving her, but she explains that she has the right to be upset, saying her husband was the “worst of man” (Puchner 534). Really, Medea is a manipulator. She can turn on her tears at will to get what she wants and can change her demeanor in an instant. Throughout her interaction with the Chorus, she is in a state that could best be described as a bipolar disorder where here manic and depressive stages are lividly angry or bathing in melodrama.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 12, 2014 04:04 AM

Jesse Robinson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
12 February 2014

QUESTION #1:
First, define the terms: “prologue” and “monologue.” In the prologue to Euripedes’s Medea, what background facts do we learn from the Nurse’s opening speech (first 45 verses)?

ANSWER:
As defined by OxfordDictionaries.com, the word prologue means “a separate introductory section of a literary or musical work.” In addition, OxfordDictionaries.com defines the word monologue as “a long speech by one actor in a play or movie, or as part of a theatrical or broadcast program.”

In Medea, the Nurse’s prologue reveals a previous journey involving the main character Medea. Medea met her husband, Jason, during his quest to take the “Golden Fleece” from Medea’s country of Colchis (Footnote 5). Medea travelled with Jason to where he would return with the Golden Fleece, and they conspired to kill Pelias, he who removed Jason’s father from power in Iolcos (Footnote 6). Medea and Jason, discovered to be king-killers, fled to “now be living here/ In Corinth with her husband and children (line 10-11).” However, sometime after arriving in Corinth, “Jason has taken a royal wife to his bed,/ The daughter of the ruler of this land, Kreon (lines 18-19).” Medea is thrown into despair from her husband’s adultery. The Nurse comments on Medea’s apparent apathy for her children, “She has turned from the children and does not like to see them,” and foreshadows grave acts to come, “I know and fear her/ Lest she may sharpen a sword… Stealing into the palace… Or even kill the king and the new-wedded groom (lines 36, 39-42).”

Work Cited
Lawall, Sarah N and Maynard Mack. “MEDEA.” The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 2nd Ed. Vol. A. New York: Lawall, 2002. Pp. 695-696. Print. Beginnings to A.D. 100.

Posted by: Jesse Robinson at February 12, 2014 07:35 AM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
12 February 2014

Question 7 - What is Medea’s attitude toward her children and what does the nurse fear she might do?

In the first scene of Medea the Nurse, of Medea,is speaking on a street of Corinth. Commenting on the pain Medea is feeling from her husband leaving her for a member of the royal class. Medea's lament is extreme and she is wishing for death , saying “what do I gain from being alive? Oh, god. How I long for the comfort of death” (Simon 532). In regards to the Medea’s the Nurse comments “She (Medea) hates her children, feels no joy in seeing them.” (Simon 529) In addition to Medea’s pain from abandonment and disdain for her children her Nurse fears that Medea may do something terrible stating “ I’m petrified to think what thoughts she might be having now: a sharpened knife-blade thrust right through the liver - she could even strike the royal family, murder the bridegroom too, make this situation even worse.”(Simon 529)

References:

Simon, Peter, ed. Norton Anthology of World Literature. Vol. 1. New York: Norton, n.d. Print.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at February 12, 2014 11:20 AM

Jacklyn O'Brien
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
12 February 2014


QUESTION: What request/promise does Medea ask for and receive from the Chorus? Explain


Medea is asking the Chorus for the permission to get her husband back.Normally women are superior and filled with fear when confronting a man. Medea asks for the strength and acceptance to bring her husband to justice.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at February 12, 2014 11:28 AM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
12 February 2014

QUESTION #10:
At the beginning of the play, what new trouble has the Tutor (Attendant) heard of, regarding the children? Explain.

ANSWER:
The Tutor heard that Creon intended to drive Medea and her children to exile from Corinth. The nurse is terrified of what is going on and cannot understand why Jason would allow this to happen to his family. She orders the tutor to bring the kids inside but to keep them away from their mother. Inside the house, Medea is crying. The nurse is scared since Medea is a very powerful and dangerous woman. The nurse is afraid that John will allow Medea to do something bad to their children (Pochner 530, lines 73-82). The tutor responds to Medea by telling her that John does not care because “He has a new bride, and he has forgotten them” (Pochner, 530, line 81).

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 12, 2014 11:39 AM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
12 February 2014

Question 22:
Based on the evidence in the text (i.e., testimony from the characters), what role did women play in ancient Greek society?

Answer:
The women in ancient Greek were rather controlled by the men. Women really did not have a say in much of anything. The women pretty much had to tend to their husband every second and take care of the household stuff. First, they have to buy their husband (the bride’s family had to pay their daughter’s newlywed husband a lump sum of money) (Euripides 534). If a woman was not happy with her husband and decides to leave him, her reputation is demolished; so refusing to be married to him is just impossible (Euripides 534).

Most women would rather take a stand and be in battle than to be at home and go through childbirth. When a man gets tired of being home, he leaves to ease his mind, somewhere “less stressful” (Euripides 535). Jason says “but you’re a woman—and you’re all the same” (Euripides 535). That says that the men did not think highly of the women at all, more like pathetic. If a women does not disappoint her husband and “yoke without discomfort and complaint”, the best thing to do is die (Euripides 534).

Posted by: Natalie White at February 12, 2014 11:39 AM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 February 2014

QUESTION #25:
First, define the term “retribution.” Why is Medea’s sense of isolation particularly strong? Why do the Corinthian women take a vow of silence to respect her determination to exact retribution on Jason? Explain.
ANSWER:
Retribution is defined as, “punishment that is considered to be morally right and fully deserved.” (Dictionary.com) Medea feels so isolated because she lost the thing in life that was most important to her. She was betrayed and didn’t have anyone to turn to, so she went crazy. She had to be by herself because of the threat she caused to her and people around her. She says, “The pain that I've suffered, I've suffered so much, worth oceans of weeping. O children, accursed, may you die – with your father! Your mother is hateful. Go to hell, the whole household! Every last one” (Puchner 531). Medea must be kept alone because she is a problem to everyone and herself. The Corinthian women stuck with Medea because they felt she had been mistreated by her husband and those who were supposed to care for her.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at February 12, 2014 11:43 AM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 February 2014


QUESTION 16:
Define the word “Parados”. In the parados, what specific purpose is served by bringing the Corinthian women on stage? What purposes does the Chorus generally fulfill in the Greek theatre? Explain?
ANSWER:
A parados “is a bank of earth built behind a trench or military emplacement to protect soldiers from a surprise attack from the rear.” (Dictionary.com) The Corinthian women are brought to the stage to represent their common fear of being abandoned. They live to serve their families and if their families are taken away from them, they really don’t have a purpose in life. The chorus says about Medea, “I heard someone’s voice, I heard someone shout: the woman from Colchis” poor thing, so unhappy” (Puchner 532). They are also hiding Medea’s plan to kill the important people of the town and that makes them guilty too. The purpose of the chorus in Greek plays is to say what the character can’t. They bridge the gap between the character and the audience. They represent one character in the play.

Posted by: Henry Adu at February 12, 2014 11:54 AM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 February 2014

Question 23:
First, define the term: “patriarchy.” What, in Medea’s speech, can/might be interpreted as a feminist critique of power relations as these existed at the close of 5th century B.C.E. Greece? How accurate does this description remain today of the power relation existing between men and women in our society? Explain.

Answer:
The term “patriarchy” means that in society and even in government, the father or the oldest male is the head of the family and so on down the family line of males. In Medea’s speech, it can be interpreted as a female critique that power relations existed even back in fifth center B.C.E in Greece. In Medea's speech, she talks about how her husband and how he abandoned her and their two children. Instead of the government taking action against the husband, they take action against Medea for failing to cope with the idea of him leaving her. The king told medea that she had one day to leave, in her view this is a patriarchy because they would let the husband remarry but not her.
In today’s society, patriarchy is not as bad as it once was before. In today's society, we value women and we let them hold their own values. In today’s society, women tend to say that they are equal to men and that may or may not be true, but the difference is that they can now say that without harming anybody.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at February 12, 2014 12:29 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 February 2014

Question#9:
What moral or message does the Nurse conclude/draw from the current situation?

Answer:
The Nurse is a servant to Medea and Medea's children. She worries about Medea because she sees she is a loose cannon somewhat, and she basically foreshadows the death of Medea's children. She is very loyal to Medea and also disapproves of Jason's actions and decisions. Because she is a basically a slave, she is simply an observer with little to no power in the situations.

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at February 12, 2014 12:44 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
11 February 2014

Question 17:
Define the word “parados.” In the parados, how does the Chorus of Corinthian women feel toward Medea?

Answer:
A “parados” is a song sung by the chorus at their entrance to the play. Parados are commons in ancient Greek dramas. The Chorus of Corinthian women feel sorry for Medea. They sing “the woman from Colchis: poor thing, so unhappy” (Puchner 533). The Chorus women feel grief for Medea because they know it was Jason’s choice to leave his family for royalty, not Medea’s fault.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at February 12, 2014 12:51 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG225CL Journey of Narratives CA01
12 February 2014
QUESTION #19:
What excuse/ device does Euripides, as the playwright, use to bring Medea out in front of her house? Explain,
ANSWER:
Euripides has the chorus ask the nurse to have Medea come outside and although the nurse doubts that Medea will come out, to the nurse’s surprise, she does. Medea comes in front of her house and says “women of Corinth, I have stepped outside so you will not condemn me” (Puchner 534). What I got from this was that she is hoping the women of Corinth will rid her of her pain.

Posted by: Becca Orden at February 12, 2014 12:58 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
12 February 2014

Question # 20
The character of Medea is revealed in the interview with the Corinthian women. What are its principle aspects as demonstrated by her words, silence, and/or movements? Explain.
Answer:
As the character Medea is introduced by a Corinthian women revenge and hatred are main aspects demonstrated by her words used to describe Medea. She begins telling the story by stating that she wishes that the Argo had never set sail, if it would have never set sail, Medea would have never met Jason, and none of this would have happened(Puncher 528). The Corinthian women also states how Medea regrets everything that happened "[...] she'll turn her pale neck aside, sobbing to herself for her dear father, her land, her home, and all that she betrayed for Jason," was for nothing because he then betrayed her for a "royal bed" (Puncher 529). In this interview with the Corinthian women Medea is not only regretful but revengeful and full of hatred " she hates her children, [...] there's no way to be her enemy and come out as the victor," Medea wants revenge for what happened and will do anything to get it (Puncher 529).

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at February 12, 2014 01:10 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
12 February 2014

QUESTION #5
Backstory, Look up any reliable summary of the story Jason and the Argonauts as a point of comparison to Euripides’s synopsis. According to the Nurse, why did Medea sail with Jason to Greece from her home in Clochis.
ANSWER:
According to the backstory, Medea, a sorcerer and princess, falls in love with Jason. Both characters sail to Greece after stealing the fleece that a dragon was guarding. The Nurse says on page 528, “Medea, never would have sailed away to reach the towers of Iolcus land. The sight of Jason never would have stunned her spirit with desire” (Puchner).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at February 12, 2014 01:15 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
12 February 2014

Question #14: first, define and distinguish between the terms: "metaphor," "simile," "apothegm." Then, comment on the use of rhetorical device and/ or figurative language in the opening of the play; c.f., especially the Nurse's monologue, The Tutor's replies, the Corinthian women's lyrical moments. Explain.

ANSWER:
A methaphor is a figure of speech that compares two different object without using the words "like" or "as" to compare. It is a type of analogy the associates a resemblence. A metaphor compares to objects asserting they are identical by the point of comparison. The comparison does not literally mean the two objects are alike but use figures of speech to represent each other. A metaphor compares or contrast two nouns. For example, "I am a rainbow" compares a person and a rainbow without using the words "like" or "as", therefore, making this statement a metaphor.
To contrast, a simile is will use the words "like" or "as" to compare two objects. "She is as white as a sheet of paper" is a simile between the pale pigment color of a girl's skin and a white sheet of paper. Another example, "The ballerina is as graceful as a prancing cat" compares a ballerina to a cat while dancing using the word "as" to compare. A simile may also use the words "so" or "than" to compare two objects.
An apothegm is a concise saying that forms an important truth. It is similar to a proverb saying which contains an instructive truth. It is a statement created from common sense into a proverbial form. The expression is form to implant an informative saying into the memory. For example, a mother might say "cleanliness is close to godliness" to persuade her daughter into maintaining a clean room.
In Medea, the Tutor replies to the Nurse in the beginning scene while they discuss Jason and his role in the household. As a father to Medea's children, the Tutor and Nurse believe he is responsible for caring about their life at home. The Tutor says, "He's no friend to this household anymore (Svarlien 530)." This statement is an apothegm about Jason and the children's life at home. In other words, the tutors is saying Jason does not care for the life his children live at home. The Nurse makes a statement when she cares for the children as they enter the house about their mother. She says, "Don't let them near their mother when she's like this, I've seen her: she looks fiercer than a bull (Svarlien 531)." In this statement, the Nurse is discussing the fury the mother has with in herself because of the separation she is experiencing from her ex-husband. She means Madea is extremely angry and will likely rage against her innocent children like a bull.
The Corinthian woman also speaks figuratively in her lyrics to Madea. She says, "This craving for final darkness" which means she acknowledges Madea's urge to end her life or experience death (Svarlien 532). Madea is so hurt and outraged that she desires to stop living to end her pain. In the chorus, the Corinthian woman also says, "Don't sharpen your minds against him (Svarlien 532)." In this lyrical saying, the Corithian woman means Madea should not hate Her ex-husband, Jason, or intend to plot any acts of wickedness against him. In the second response to Madea, the Corithian woman says, "If only she'd drop her anger, unburden her burning spirit, let go of this weight of madness (Svarlien 533)." In this statement, the Corinthian woman uses this lyrical statement to mean she wishes Madea would change her attitude or perspective towards her ex-husband and let go of her angry feeling towards him that she is keeping coiled inside of herself. She thinks Madea should stop carrying the burden that keeping her so angry on her shoulders. The Corinthian woman states in her third saying, "I heard a wail, a clear cry of pain; she rails at the betrayer of her bed (Svarlien 533)." In this saying, the Corinthian woman is describing the feelings Madea is experiencing as a woman who is dealing with an ex-husband who left her for another woman. She is in pain possibly feeling separation anxiety and betrayal of the one person she became a wife to in marriage. These statements are lyrical sayings that dramatically elaborate the way the character Madea is feeling in the first scene.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at February 12, 2014 01:26 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
12 February 2014

QUESTION #8:
That Rascal, Jason. What is the Nurse’s view of Jason’s behavior? What is the Tutor’s (Attendant’s) view? What feelings does Medea, herself, express about Jason?
ANSWER:
The Nurse, the Tutor and Medea all generally feel the same about Jason. To leave a wife and children and to not to think of them again is wrong. The Nurse just wishes that the Argo Medea set sail had not set sail in the first place. If it had not set sail, then Medea would have never set eyes on Jason (Puchner 528). The Tutor feels bad for Medea, but is aware that men will always love themselves more than they will love others (Puchner 530). In other words, Jason did not care that he was married or had children, he moved on to someone who would be considered better because she was royalty. Medea is hurt most of all has a deep hatred towards Jason. She wants to kill Jason for leaving her and her children. Medea even curses her children dead because she is so angry and her children remind her of Jason. He is such an idiot. He could have thrown me out, destroyed my plans; instead he granted me one single day to turn three enemies to three dead bodies: the father, and the bride, and my own husband” (Puchner 538).

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 12, 2014 01:26 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 6. What did Medea do upon arriving in Greece at Iolchus? What is the present situation in Corinth?

ANSWER:
Upon arriving to Iolchus, Medea falls madly in love with her husband Jason and in a rage of revenge for her husband constructs a plan to have Pelias' daughters kill their own father, "To reach the towers of Iolcus' land; the sight of Jason never would have stunned her spirit with desire. She would have never persuaded Pelias' daughters to kill their father." (Puchner 529). Medea is exiled along with Jason to Corinth, but the present situation in Corinth is that Jason abandons her and his children to marry into power with Creon's daughter, "since Jason has betrayed them, his own children, and my lady, for a royal bed. He's married into power: Creon's daughter. Poor Madea, mournful and dishonored." (Puchner 529).

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 12, 2014 01:31 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 6. What did Medea do upon arriving in Greece at Iolchus? What is the present situation in Corinth?

ANSWER:
Upon arriving to Iolchus, Medea falls madly in love with her husband Jason and in a rage of revenge for her husband constructs a plan to have Pelias' daughters kill their own father, "To reach the towers of Iolcus' land; the sight of Jason never would have stunned her spirit with desire. She would have never persuaded Pelias' daughters to kill their father." (Puchner 529). Medea is exiled along with Jason to Corinth, but the present situation in Corinth is that Jason abandons her and his children to marry into power with Creon's daughter, "since Jason has betrayed them, his own children, and my lady, for a royal bed. He's married into power: Creon's daughter. Poor Madea, mournful and dishonored." (Puchner 529).

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 12, 2014 01:31 PM

Jack Constant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220cl Journey into Narrative CA01
12 Feb 2014

8. question: That Rascal, Jason. What is the Nurse's view of Jason's behavior? What is the Tutor's(Attendant's) view? What feelings do Medea, herself, express about Jason?

answer: The Nurse's view point of Jason seems to be that he is deceitful, a betrayer, and how he used Medea. A few quotes to back these view points, "What should be loved has been contaminated, stricken since Jason has betrayed them, his own children, and my lady, for a royal bed" (Puchner 529). "At most, she'll turn her pale neck aside, sobbing to herself for her dear father, her land, her home, and all that she betrayed for Jason, who now holds her in dishonor" (Puchner, 529). The Tutor's view point of Jason is narcissistic and a bad father. He supports this by saying, "He has a new bride; he has forgotten about them. He's no friend to this household anymore" (Puchner 530). "Are you just learning this, that each man loves himself more than his neighbor"(Puchner,530)? Medea's viewpoint of Jason is that she hopes he dies and goes to hell. She also dislikes him for cheating and betraying her. She supports this by saying, "He was the one with the nerve to commit this injustice" (Puchner, 533). "May I see him, along with his bride and the palace scraped down to nothing, crushed with splinters" (Puchner, 533).

Posted by: jack constant at February 12, 2014 01:40 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
11 February 2014

Question #3:
First, define the terms: “prologue” and “monologue.” In the prologue to Euripides’s Medea, what elements of dramatic purpose / s does the Nurse’s opening monologue fulfill? C.f., first 45 verses of play. What is the purpose of the Nurse’s speech? Explain.

Awnser:
A prologue is an introductory passage before a work and a monologue is a speech made by someone. The Nurse’s monologue sets the mood of the play by giving the audience an introduction to the story and a little bit of a background from where the play picks up. The purpose of the Nurses speech is that music alone cannot change our emotional state (Euripides 533).

Bibliography
Euripides. "Madea." Puchner, Martin. The Northern Anthology World Liturature. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. 528-684.


Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at February 12, 2014 01:46 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
11 February 2014

Question #7
What is Medea's attitude toward her children and what does the Nurse fear she might do? Explain.

ANSWER:
Medea's attitude towards her children is the worst possible. After being left by Jason and traded by Glauce, she is not able to control her emotions and is willing to do everything in her reach to affect Jason.

The Nurse is worried because she knows that Medea is capable of doing horrible things to make Jason regret his actions. Medea has been cursing the existence of her own children. Medea will not cease her ambition for justice until she is done with her plan. The Nurse fears for the worse and in this case she realizes that it might be going through Medea's mind to kill her children.

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at February 12, 2014 01:58 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL : Journeys in Narrative CA01
11 February 2014

Question #9: What moral message does the Nurse conclude/draw from the current situation?

Answer:
The nurse’s opening lament mainly expresses the wish to undo the past. “I wish the Argo ha never set sail, had never flown to Colchis through the dark, Clashing Rocks,” and “My mistress then, Medea, never would have sailed to reach the towers of Ioclus land; the sight of Jason never would have stunned her spirit with desire,” (Puchner 528-29). The nurse later describes how Medea’s nature has changed. She won’t eat and she finds no pleasure in seeing her children (Puchner 529). Jason has dishonored her and the nurse feels Medea is “plotting something”. “There’s no way to be her enemy and come out as the victor,” (Puchner 529). Obviously Medea doesn’t kindly to betrayal. This opening sonnet explains the basis for the rest of the play.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 12, 2014 02:28 PM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 February 2014

QUESTION #37:
First, define the term: “irony.” Comment on the dramatic force of the King’s language, as he grants the postponement. “But no, if you must stay, stay for this day alone. / For in it you can do none of the things I fear” (ll. 352-353). Explain.

ANSWER:
Irony is defined as, “the expression of one's meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect.” (Dictionary.com) it’s ironic that the King grants Medea an extended stay because she claims she wants to get things in order for her children and other affairs while she’s exiled. Creon says that Medea can’t do any of the things he fears she will do in just one day, but she can. She makes a plan to kill the three people who mistreated her. I don’t understand why Creon thinks that she would actually get things in order while she’s exiled. Medea just can’t get caught going anywhere she isn't supposed to, but she has the chorus on her side, so it is completely reasonable that she could, in fact, execute her wrong-doers.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at February 13, 2014 11:07 AM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
13 February 2014

Question 35
How justified is Creon/ Kreon in insisting that Medea must go into exile? Is he straight forward in his declaration? Explain.

Answer
Creon is very much straightforward in his sentencing to send Medea out of Corinth. Creon specifically says “I hereby announce that you must leave this land, an exile, taking with you your two children. You must not delay.” Medea has been acting crazy because her husband Jason out of the blue decided that he was leaving his children and his wife for a new woman and wants to start a new family. The reason that Creon had to get involved was because his daughter is the new woman that Jason wants to marry. Creon continues “I’ll speak plainly: I’m afraid of you. You could hurt my daughter, even kill her. Every indication points that way. You’re wise by nature, you know evil arts, and you’re upset because your husband’s gone away from your bedroom. I have heard reports that you've made threats, that you've devised a plan to harm the bride, her father, and the bridegroom. I want to guard against that. I would rather have you hate me, woman, here and now, than treat you gently and regret it later.”

Posted by: Allie Clemons at February 13, 2014 10:48 PM

Zachary Daley
Dr. Hobbs
CA01 ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative
2/14/2014
Question 45:
In the second episode (after the first stasimon), what answer does Medea give to Jason’s offer? What had Medea done for Jason?
Answer:
Jason offers Medea money to help with taking care of their children and offers a place to stay with his cousins. He offers this almost because it seems he is obligated to give this to Medea. Medea responds with anger saying that she does not want his help she is offended by the offer. In this situation, she is still wondering why he left for another girl. Medea did not do anything to make him leave. Medea birthed his children, so Jason owes her.

Posted by: Zach Daley at February 14, 2014 08:14 AM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
15 February 2014

QUESTION #26
In the first episode (the visit from Creon/Kreon), how does Medea view her situation in Corinth? Her situation as a married woman, and mother? As a foreigner? Explain

ANSWER:
During the time Medea was in Corinth, she hated the life she was living. As a married woman, Medea felt dishonored and betrayed by Jason, her husband, because he left her alone to raise the children. He left them, so he could marry the Creon’s daughter. Medea’s feelings are stated on page 531 when she says, “oh, horrible horrible, all that I suffer, my unhappy struggles, I wish I could die” (Puchner).

As a mother, Medea feels nothing for her children; she “feels no joy in seeing them” (Puchner 529). This is because Jason left them for another woman, and he does not feel love for his children. The tutor says, “he’s forgotten them” (Puchner 530). Lastly, as a foreigner, Medea accepts the friendship from the women of Corinth, known as the “Chorus” in the story. She, as a foreigner, understands that some people are “arrogant in public view” (Puchner 534). She also understands that there is no justice in the Corinth and that as a citizen, she has to adapt in the town. Medea says, “nor, I can praise a citizen who’s willful, and who treats his fellow townsmen harshly, out of narrow-mindedness” (Puchner 534).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at February 15, 2014 08:23 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
16 February 2014

QUESTION #25:
How justified is Creon/Kreon in insisting that Medea must go into exile? Is he straightforward in his declaration? Explain?
ANSWER:
Creon is justified in his insisting Medea to be exile. Medea is a threat to him, and his daughter along with the people of the land. As a royal, it is Creon’s job to protect his family and his land, which is what he is doing by exiling Medea. Creon was scared of Medea, and was scared she was going to hurt or kill his daughter. “I’m afraid of you. You could hurt my daughter, even kill her” (Puchner, 535).

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 16, 2014 03:09 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
16 February 2014

QUESTION #33:
The key problem. After Medea’s meeting with Creon/Kreon, we should have some idea now of the main problem. What problem is a concern to Medea? Explain.

ANSWER:
The main problems that Medea is concerned with are the rights of women and that men have much more authority and rights than women do. Medea wants to get revenge for every woman who has suffered from men in their society. Medea makes claims throughout the story about the injustice that women face at the hands of man. The Chorus explains that, “The race of women will reap honor, no longer the shame of disgraceful rumor” (Puchner 539).

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at February 16, 2014 11:07 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 February 2014

QUESTION #31:
What request does Medea make of Creon and what appeal does she make in support of her request? What is Creon’s reaction to her request? Explain.

ANSWER:
When Creon exiles Medea and her children, she at first begs him to change his mind, pointing out that it is her husband that she is angry at, but not Creon, and would never harm his daughter (Euripides 536). However, he denies her request. She then asks him to allow her to stay just one more day, so that she could make arrangements to make sure her children are safe (Euripides 537).
Her appeal being that she only cares about the safety of her children appeals to Creon as a father, so he allows her to stay for just one more day. He points out that he is wrong to allow this, but that one day will not give her enough time to harm his daughter (Euripides 537), so he goes against his better judgement by allowing her to stay for a day.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at February 17, 2014 01:19 AM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENGCL 220 Journeys in Narrative
17 February 2014

Question # 45

Medea responds to Jason's on offer to provide her and her children with money for everything they will need in there exile by stating that she doesn't want anything from him and begins to list all the things she has done for him. Medea tells Jason that he would have never have gotten the golden fleece with out her. Madea then asked Jason where she was supposed to go in her exile as he has made your enemy to have the world.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at February 17, 2014 08:56 AM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17 February 2014

QUESTION #46:
Is Jason easily fooled or is Medea just a gifted actress when she asks for his forgiveness? What does she propose to convince and allay his worst fears? What is the effect produced by her tears? (Is this completely feigned?)

ANSWER:
Yes, Jason is easily fooled by Medea, but she is also a good actress. The reason that Jason immediately forgives and believes her is based on his male ego and the ideas of women at the time. Because Jason feels he is doing a good thing by marrying the princess, she pretends to confirm this by putting down the female race where she says, “We women – oh, I won’t say that we’re bad, but we are what we are. You shouldn’t sink down to our level, trading childish insults” (Puchner 551). This convinces him even more of his “righteousness” as a man and her ignorance as a woman in the minds of the Greeks.

She further convinces him by offering to send her children with him to raise, along with his new wife. He is elated to take them and raise them in the royal home, which further convinces him that his actions are righteous ones which is evidenced by his statement, “And as for you, my children, you will see your father is no fool. I have provided for your security, if the gods will help me. Yes, I believe that you will be the leaders here in Corinth, with your future brothers” (Puchner 551).

The effect produced by Medea’s tears are negative ones. Jason is so happy that she has justified his actions, and when she begins to cry, he does not understand why she is suddenly crying and says, “You! Why have you turned your face away, so pale? Why are fresh tears pouring from your eyes? Why aren’t you happy to hear what I have had to say” (Puchner 552). These are not fake tears, she is truly mourning for her children because she knows what she is about to do, but when she sees his reaction, she immediately appeases him and says, “It’s nothing. I was only thinking of the children” (Puchner 552). With that answer, he realizes she is just crying because she is a mother and will naturally miss her children.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at February 17, 2014 09:55 AM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
17 February 2014

Question 34:
First, define and distinguish between the terms: "conservative" and "progressive." Why might Euripides have been challenged by Greek conservatives of his time? Define the term: "iconoclast,". Discuss Euripides's role as social iconoclast. Explain.

The term "conservative" means to live in a traditional manner. For example, many traditional Americans have worked towards preserving Christianity, the religion that helped establish the nation. Conservative also means to preserve the existing conditions that are apart of a person's belief. A person preserving an institution because of its age, history and purpose may be conservative towards the institution.
"Progressive" is a term used when movement is being made from one position to another. It means to progress in change or reform. To improve towards better conditions or continue moving forward is the meaning of being "Progressive." For example, women have created fund raisers to donate to breast cancer foundations to form a "Progressive" medical outcome. More women are being supported for better treatment and a cure.
Euripides May have been challenged by Greek conservatives who continue to live under traditional Greek standards. The Greeks made strict laws that may have suppressed and prevent him from being able to fully express his options about the laws. For example, he may not have been able to add scences into the story of Medea and Jason because it would create character that rebelled against Greek Laws or did not fully abide by the current laws.
An "iconoclast" is a person that lives their lives to destroy another's beliefs. They attack tradition beliefs cherished by others. If the attacker believes the beliefs of the other people are wrong because of superstition then they will attack. An example of an "iconoclast" is an American pastor preaching against the Muslim brotherhood and the book the Muslims use as a doctrine. He believes what the Muslims have taught each other is wrong and because their beliefs and doctrine is wrong. Along with his sermon, he sets a pile of these books that obtain the doctrine on fire.
Euripides expresses his opinions through the characters in Madea. He may believe there are women like Madea who are being mistreated by men and need to fight suppression. The Greek men treated women as possessions. Jason was used as one of these men to portray the behavior they used to treat ordinary women like Madea. Euripides may have used this story to present these problems to the Greek society. Madea is a woman who is helpless under her circumstances and represents what danger she was placed into because of her problems. Madea begs Jason and says,"Jason, I beg you, please forgive the things I've said. Your heart should be prepared, receptive like a seed bed. We used to love each other. It's only right for you to excuse my anger. I've thought it over, and blame myself. Pathetic! Really, I must have been insane to stand opposed to those who plan so well, to be an enemy to those who plan so well by me: marrying the royal princess, to beget brothers for my children. Isn't it time to drop my angry spirit, since the gods have been so bountiful? What's wrong with me? Don't I have children? Aren't we exiles? Don't we need whatever friendship we can get? That's what I said to myself. I realize that I've been foolish, that foolish, that there is no point to my fuming rage." Madea says this to Jason out of deceit. She is conforming to the role of a helpless woman to please Jason. The speech is exactly what she does not agree with between their relationship and pretends to live displeased

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at February 17, 2014 11:04 AM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
17 February 2014

Question 44:
What help does Jason offer Medea? What is Medea’s reaction to his offer? Explain.

Answer:
After abandoning Medea and his family for another marriage, Jason tried to give a helping hand to them, trying to “fix” what he has broken. Jason offers Medea money for her exile off the land if she needed it. Then he offered to make arrangements with his friends to let her and their children stay as a guest in his friend’s home and show her hospitality (Euripides 544). Jason then goes on to tell her about the benefits she would gain from doing this.
Medea refused his offer with no hesitation. She states “I wouldn’t stay with your friends . . . There is no profit from a bad man’s gift” (Euripides 544). Jason is offended and tells her how she will suffer from not taking his offer. Medea then sends him on his way to his new bride. She does not let him forget that his new marriage will be one he will regret.

Posted by: Natalie White at February 17, 2014 11:33 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (220CL)
17.2.2014
Question #28
28.
What new misfortune does Creon/Kreon bring to Medea? What order does Creon/Kreon give to Medea? Why does he do this? Explain.
ANSWER.
Her first misfortune was a product of Medea’s husband, Jason, marrying another woman, Creon’s daughter, a princess.
Her new misfortune, brought by Creon, is that she and her children are to be exiled from the land. He does this because Medea scares him. Her anger could lead her to murder anyone in rage.
“Most of the time,” Medea explains “I know, a woman is filled with fear. She’s worthless in battle and flinches at the sight of steel. But when she’s faced with an injustice in the bedroom, there is no mind more murderous.”(Puchner 535).
To which Creon comes into the scene at says:
“[. . . ] I hereby announce that you must leave this land in exile, taking with you your two children. You must not delay. This is my decision. [. . .] I’ll speak plainly: I’m afraid of you. You could hurt my daughter, even kill her. Every indication points that way. [. . .] I have heard reports that you’ve made threats, that you’ve devised a plan to harm the bride, her father, and the bridegroom. I want to guard against that.”(Puchner 535-536).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 17, 2014 11:46 AM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17 February 2014

Question #48: Define the word: “predicament.” What accusation does Medea make against Jason? What is Medea’s predicament? Explain.

Answer:
A predicament is a difficult or tricky situation in which there is no easy solution. Jason has left Medea and his children in order to marry King Creon’s daughter. To quote the nurse: “This house? It no longer exists. It’s all gone. He’s taken up with his new royal marriage,” (Puchner 532). Medea is absolutely livid. “…her glare is as fierce as a bull’s, let me tell you,” (Puchner 533). She even starts to resent her children. In his fear of her, King Creon banishes Medea from the land (Puchner 535).

Medea’s situation is this : “I’ve become an enemy to my own family, those whom I should love, and I have gone to war with those whom I had no reason at all to hurt, and all for your sake,” (Puchner 541). Because of Jason’s betrayal of not only his wife, Medea, but his children also, this has stirred her anger, leading the king to fear her and banish her. She begs the king to give her one day to gather up her belongings. He acquiesces, only to give her enough time to devise a plan to kill Jason, his new bride, and the king.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 17, 2014 11:46 AM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 February 2014

Question #41:
To what is the Chorus referring when they mention the lack of respect for oaths and of shame in Greece? Explain.
Answer:
The Chorus is referring to the lack of respect for oaths and of shame in Greece. Medea murdered her brother, betrayed her family, and left her homeland. Medea suffers the guilt of this now throughout her life “For the injustice she suffers, she calls on the gods: Themis of Zeus, Protectress of oaths, who brought her to Hellas, over the salt water dark as night, through the waves of Pontus forbidding gate.” (Euripides 534). The Chorus feels that Medea is a disgrace to Greece, because her past and the actions she has committed.
Work Cited
Euripides. Medea. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 17, 2014 11:53 AM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17th February 2014

Question #47:
First, distinguish the word “sarcasm” from the word “irony.” Then, define both “rhetorical questioning” and “ellipsis.” Describe the rhetorical brilliance of Medea’s reply to Jason’s “offers.” How does she refute his claims? What device makes this refutation so memorable to the reader/spectator? c.f., for example, ll. 444-89. Explain.

Answer:
Sarcasm and irony have two different meanings. When a statement is sarcastic, it means that you do not really mean what you are saying, or you are saying it in a way in which you are joking or making fun of something or someone. When a statement or circumstance is ironic, it usually happens when someone makes a sarcastic statement that turns out to be true.
A Rhetorical question is a question that is not supposed to be answered. Ellipsis is a word that you have to use clues in order understand it. The rhetorical brilliance of Medea in reply to Jason’s offer was astonishing. Medea tells Jason all that she did for him, including killing his father and fleeing away from her family in order to be with him. So how can Jason help her when she cannot go back to her homeland or anywhere else where she made enemies because of him. This makes it so memorable to the reader because the irony of all this is that Medea never expected this to happen to her, and now she does not know what to do.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at February 17, 2014 11:57 AM

Aly Strang
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Eng220 CL Journeys into Narrative CA2
30 January 2014

Question #50:
What are the reasons that’s Jason gives for marrying the Corinthian Princess? Explain.

Answer:

Jason starts off with arguing that Medea has benefited and gain way more than him from their marriage, “you received more than you gave” (Puchner 547). Jason says that he owes his love to Aphrodite, the goddess of love, not Medea. Jason all pretty tells Medea that she now lives in a “barbarian land” and doesn’t know what “civil law” is (550-551). Then he tells Medea that he’d marrying the princess just for the money and “not to be poor” (576).

Posted by: Alexandra Strang at February 17, 2014 12:08 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17 February 2014

QUESTION #33: The key problem. After Medea’s meeting with Creon/Kreo, we should have some idea now of the main problem. What problem is a concern to Medea? Explain.

ANSWER: The problem that concerns Medea is that Creon tells her, she and her sons will be banished since she has been talking a lot of trash about marriage. The king is afraid that she might cause a bigger problem and kill everyone. She threatens the king to kill him and his daughter. “Shall I set the bridal home on fire,/ creeping silently into their bedroom? (Pochner, 538, Lines 386-387).” “Then I will kill in silence, by deceit (Pochner, 538, lines 399-406)”

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 17, 2014 12:11 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 February 2014

Question 29:
What is the structural [or “plot”] significance for the tragedy of Creon/Kreon’s visit to Madea? Does his announcement confirm Medea’s previous resolution or undermine it? What does the banishment awaken in her? Explain.

Answer:
The main point of Creon’s visit is to banish Medea and her children after she throws curses onto Jason and Glauce. Previously, Medea had said that she wanted Jason to suffer for what he had done to her and other women, but that attitude seems to vanish in favor of an “I-am-the-victim-and-no-one-likes-me” attitude when Creon appears (Puchner 536). In a way, this sudden visit by Creon and Medea’s change of attitude both confirms and undermines her resolution to make Jason suffer. It confirms Medea as being a manipulative woman and willing to do what it takes to get what she wants. However, her resolution is undermined because she is effectively being put in her place in the time period as a woman and is punished for saying things without capitalizing on them.
When Creon reveals to Medea that she is to be banished, Medea panics and begs to be allowed to stay in the city to live quietly (Puchner 536). This panic could be considered to be her ‘motherly instinct’ kicking in to get the best for her children, which is for them to remain in the city and lead normal lives instead of wandering around forever. Creon allows Medea one extra day to procure the necessary provisions for an exile such a place for her children to remain.
The other thing in Medea that was awakened by Creon banishing her was a greater desire of quickly getting vengeance. Medea resolves to take her extra day to find a means to rid herself of Jason, Creon, and Glauce (Puchner 538). Once again, she was able to manipulate someone to get what she wanted, and in this case it was to get one last chance to kill the thorns in her side.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 17, 2014 12:17 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative
17 February 2014

QUESTION #26:
In the first episode(the visit from Creon/Kreon), how does Medea view her situation in Corinth? Her situation as a married woman, and a mother? As a foreigner? Explain.

ANSWER:
As a married woman Medea thinks that women who marry become a possession of their husbands and Medea has witnessed that first hand. She also talks about how the women have to go thru child birth and aren’t allowed to really do anything in public, unlike the men who are able to do whatever they want. So after she states all of this to the chorus, she begs them to make Jason suffer as he made her suffer as woman. So she really isn’t having a good time in Corinth or as a married woman, or mother.

Posted by: Becca Orden at February 17, 2014 12:48 PM

Alexander Hoschak
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
17 February 2014

Question:
30. How does Medea reply to Creon/Kreon’s initial concerns? How does Creon/Kreon react to Medea’s reply? Explain.
Answer:
Medea replies to Creon’s initial concerns by begging for one days delay. Creon reacts by allowing her one more day.

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak at February 17, 2014 01:04 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
17 February 2014

Question #30:
How does Medea reply to Creon/Kreon's initial concerns? How does Creon/Kreon react to Medea's reply? Explain.

Answer:
Medea responds by begging and pleading for more time. After she finds out that she is being banished from Corinth, she desperately pleads for just another day in order to get her revenge. Creon responds by hesitating and resenting her, he still lacks trust and feels that he should not let her stay another minute in Corinth. However, he ends up giving her the extra day in town and she then executes her murderous plan.

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at February 17, 2014 01:14 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 February 2014

QUESTION #31:
What request does Medea make of Creon and what appeal does she make in support of her request? What is Creon’s reaction to her request? Explain.

ANSWER:
When Creon exiles Medea and her children, she at first begs him to change his mind, pointing out that it is her husband that she is angry at, but not Creon, and would never harm his daughter (Euripides 536). However, he denies her request. She then asks him to allow her to stay just one more day, so that she could make arrangements to make sure her children are safe (Euripides 537).
Her appeal being that she only cares about the safety of her children appeals to Creon as a father, so he allows her to stay for just one more day. He points out that he is wrong to allow this, but that one day will not give her enough time to harm his daughter (Euripides 537), so he goes against his better judgement by allowing her to stay for a day.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at February 17, 2014 01:25 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
February 17, 2014


Question # 37:
First, define the term: "irony." Comment on the dramatic force of the King's language as he grants the postponement. "But now, if you must stay, stay for this day alone./ For in it you can do none of the things I fear".
Answer:
The Term Irony is to express a meaning by using language that signifies the opposite. In Medea she pleads with King Creon allow her to remain in Corinth for one more day as she finds out what to do with her children. King Creon is hesitant but grants her one day. He explains that he doesn't have ruler's temperament (nature) and that reverence (treating one with respect) has often led him into ruin but he grants her one day. If Medea and her children are still in Corinth by sunrise it means death for them all, and that one day won’t be enough for her to do anything her fears.

Posted by: Jose Parra at February 17, 2014 01:27 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 46. Is Jason easily fooled or is Madia just a gifted actress when she asks for his forgiveness? What did she propose to convince and allay his the worse fears? What is the effect produced by her tears? (Is this completely feigned?)

ANSWER:
Medea is a gifted actress when she asks for Jason's forgiveness, for she plays into what she knows he wants to hear by taking fault, "I've thought it over, and I blame myself. Pathetic! Really, I must have been insane to stand opposed to those who plan so well to be an enemy of those in power and to my husband who's done so well by me" (Puchner 550). Medea proposes a treaty between the two and offers her hand along with their children's to diminish Jason's fears, "Come set aside, together with your mother, the hatred that we felt toward one we love. We've made a treaty. My rage has gone away. Take his right hand." (Puchner 551). The effect produced by her tears causes Jason to feel remorse towards Medea and promise the protection of their children, these tears are not completely feigned because she is well aware that her children are in danger because of her.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 17, 2014 01:34 PM

Jesse Robinson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17 February 2014

QUESTION #50:
Rationalization. What are the reasons that Jason gives for marrying the Corinthian princess? Explain.

ANSWER:
Jason tries to justify his marriage proposal to the princess by saying it will be better in the end for Medea and her children (lines 537-538). Jason claims the benefits of his new marriage will include his children becoming “worthy/ Of [his] position (lines 550-551).” Therefore, he claims by marrying the princess it will afford Medea’s children to achieve political office or some other high-responsibility position.

Work Cited
Lawall, Sarah N and Maynard Mack. “MEDEA.” The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 2nd Ed. Vol. A. New York: Lawall, 2002. Pp. 706-707. Print. Beginnings to A.D. 100.

Posted by: Jesse Robinson at February 17, 2014 01:38 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 February 2014

Question #28
What new misfortune does Creon/Kreon bring to Medea? What order does Creon/Kreon give to Medea? Why does he do this? Explain

ANSWER:
Being the King of Corinth, Creon is aware of the situation surrounding Jason, Glauce (his daughter), and Medea. After Jason divorced Medea and is looking forward to a future with Glauce, Creon is informed that Medea is furious against Medea and that she might plan something horrible, which could also affect Glauce.

Scared of anything bad that Medea could do, Creon decides to banish her from Corinth. Extremely devastated, Medea begs Corinth so that she can stay at Corinth and that she is of no harm against him and his daughter. Creon does not trust her completely but allows her to stay for one more day at Corinth just so that she can plan her future somewhere else with her children.

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at February 17, 2014 01:44 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 February 2014

Question #32:
After Creon/Kreon’s departure, how does Medea explain her behavior? What does Medea intend to do?

Awnser:
Medea plans to murder “father and daughter; and my husband” as stated in line 376 (Euripides). The father daughter and my husband refer to Creon, Glauce, and Jason respectively. She explains this behavior by telling Jason how she feels and how he could do such a thing to her, after all she has done for him.

Bibliography
Euripides. "Madea." Puchner, Martin. The Northern Anthology World Liturature. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. 528-684.

Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at February 17, 2014 02:05 PM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2014

QUESTION #58:
In the third episode (the meeting with Aegeus/Aigeus), what is Aegeus/Aigeus reply/counter-offer? What land does he rule and what is the only condition under which Aegeus/Aigeus will receive Medea there? Explain.
ANSWER:
When Aegeus and Medea meet she pleads with him to help her. They exchange stories and find that they (or so they think) can help each other. Medea says that she can help Aeugeus conceive a child with his wife through the use of certain drugs and Aegeus offers her shelter. Medea has an ulterior motive, she just needs enough time to plan how to kill Glauce and Creon. Aegeus is the King of Athens and he only allows her to come if she can leave by herself. Aegeus doesn’t want to get caught sneaking Medea out of the land. He tells Medea, “I’m not willing to escort you from this land” (Puchner 547).

Posted by: Lydia Beach at February 17, 2014 05:37 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
17 February 2014
Question# 29
What structural significance for the tragedy of Creon/Kreon's visit to Medea? Does his announcement confirm Medea's previous resolution or undermine it? What does the banishment awaken for her? Explain.
Answer:
Creon's visit to Medea is important to the plot because it is the moment when it is announced to Medea that she is to be exiled. He tells her "I hereby announce that you must leave this land, an exile, taking with you your two children,"and he wont leave until she leaves (Puncher 535). This announcement undermines Medea's resolution cause now she says "[...] instead he's only granted me a single day to turn three enemies to three dead bodies [...]," making her planning to kill them even harder to do (Puncher 538).

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at February 17, 2014 06:25 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
17 February 2014

Question 57
In the third episode (the meeting with Aegeus/ Aigeus), what request does Medea make of Aegeus/ Aigeus? What does Medea offer to do in return for Aegeus/ Aigeus? Explain.

Answer
Medea and Aegeus/ Aigeus can relate to each other in the sense that they were both banished from Corinth. The two do what seems to be a fair trade in getting what they want but, Medea offers Aegeus/ Aigeus magical drugs to cure his infertility and, in return Medea is offered refuge. Medea composes a plan to get revenge on Jason and his new life. She is only offering this deal with Aegeus/ Aigeus so that it can all play out perfectly.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at February 17, 2014 10:00 PM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 February 2014

QUESTION:
What will Medea do now with regard to Jason’s intended bride? What does she plan to do next?

ANSWER:
Medea plans to kill Jason’s intended bride then kill her own children. She plans to do this because she wants revenge towards Jason and give him the pain that he has given Medea. “The best way is the most direct, to use the skills I have by nature and poison them, destroy them with my drugs.” (Euripides, 538.) “this is my deceit, to kill the princess. I’ll send them to her, bearing gifts in hand- a delicate robe, and a garland worked in gold. If she takes these fine things and puts them on, she, and anyone who touches her, will die a painful death, Such as the drugs which I will smear them.” (Euripides, 548.) Later on in the story Medea mentions what she will do to her children. “I will kill the children-my children.” (Euripides, 548).

Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at February 17, 2014 11:34 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (220CL)
18.2.2014
Question #76
76.
Define the word “stasimon.” In the fourth stasimon, what does the Chorus predict for Jason’s intended bride, Jason, and Medea?
ANSWER.
A “stasimon is a series of strophes (and antistrophes) which act as a conversation between the chorus members.
In the fourth stasimon, the Chorus discusses the fate of the princess, Jason, and Medea. They predict that:
The princess will “be persuaded; the grace and the heavenly gleam will move her to try on the robe and the garland. The bride will adorn herself for death, for the shades below. She will fall into this net; her death will be horrible. Ruin will be inescapable, fated.” (Puchner 553).
For Jason they predict sadness at the loss of his newfound bride and children. “And you [Jason], poor thing, bitter bridegroom, in-law to royalty: you don’t know you’re killing your children, bringing hateful death to your bride.” (Puchner 553).
And finally for Medea, the chorus forecasts a life of misery and grief , because she is the one to kills her children in the end. “I cry for your pain in turn [Medea], poor thing; you’re a mother, yet you will slaughter them, your own children, for the sake of your bridal bed., the bed your husband now shares with somebody else.”(Puchner 553-554).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 18, 2014 02:07 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
18 February 2014

QUESTION #55:
If you don’t know these words, define the words “stasimon” and “stanza.” What prayer does the Chorus make in reference to Cypris in the second stanza? To whom is the Chorus referring in the third and fourth stanza? Explain.
ANSWER:
The definition of stanza is: a group of lines forming the basic recurring metrical unit in a poem; a verse (Dictionary.com) and the definition of stasimon is: a stationary song composed of strophes and antistrophes and performed by the chorus in the orchestra. The Chorus prays that “dreadful Cypris never stun my spirit with love for the bed of another and bring on anger, battles of words, endless fighting, strife” (Puchner, 544). I think the Chorus is really just asking to stay out of Cypris’s path. I think in the third and fourth stanza the Chorus is referring to Cypris because they use the word “dreadful” to describe him in the second stanza and that is the word they use to describe “him” in the fourth stanza as well.

Posted by: Becca Orden at February 18, 2014 02:24 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
19 February 2014

QUESTION #67:
What will Medea achieve through her plans for an action Jason’s fiancée and what is her motivation in this action? What, at the point in the play, has Medea decided upon as her form of revenge?
ANSWER:
Medea is so angry that Jason has left her; she wants to kill Jason’s fiancée. From that, she will feel relieved and a sense of pride from destroying Jason’s future by receiving what she sees as justice. She is very spiteful and she feels she will achieve happiness. Her motivation in this action is her spite, and her anger. Jason left her and their children and she wants to destroy his life the way he destroyed her. “He could have thrown me out, destroyed my plans; instead he’s granted me a single day to turn three enemies to three dead bodies” (Puchner 538). Medea’s form of revenge at that point was to kill Creon, Jason, and Jason’s fiancee.

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 18, 2014 04:19 PM

Re-chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
16 February 2014

Medea
Question:
49. What is Jason’s view of why Medea had help him? According to Jason what advantages did Medea derive from coming to Greece with him? Explain.
Answer:
Jason’s view of why Medea help him was to flee from the lands she was from, because she killed her brother and betrayed her father. She left with Jason to start a career, and had planned to destroy his life. When Medea came to Greece with Jason married and had children she had a better life offered to her. Even though he married the princess of Corinth he would give their child royal brother that would help out with Medea’s and Jason’s house hold, but she ruined the plan by letting her anger and jealously get to her and killed Jason’s new wife, her father, and their two boys.

Posted by: Re-chia Jackson at February 18, 2014 10:05 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
18 February 2014

QUESTION #70:
Define the word “stasimon,” “ode,” and “stanza.” In the third stasimon, what does the Chorus ask Medea in the second half of the ode/stanza?

ANSWER:
A stasimon is (in ancient Greek drama) a choral ode, especially in tragedy, divided into strophe and antistrophe: usually alternating with the epeisodion and, in the final ode, preceding the exodos. An ode is a lyric poem typically of elaborate or irregular metrical form and expressive of exalted or enthusiastic emotion. A stanza is an arrangement of a certain number of lines, usually four or more, sometimes having a fixed length, meter, or rhyme scheme, forming a division of a poem.

In the second half of the third stasimon, the Chorus asks Medea not to kill her own children. The Chorus does this by pleading to Medea not to kill her kids by stating, “we beg you, with every plea we can plead: do not kill your children” (Puchner 550). They continue to question Medea and ask her how she can even go through with this awful deed. If her “heart” and “mind” can really be up to the task of taking the lives of her only offspring(Puchner 550).

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at February 18, 2014 10:31 PM

Zachary Daley
Dr. Hobbs
220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
2/18/2014
Question 59:
In order to seal the deal, what does Medea require Aegeus to do? Why? What is Aegeus’s reaction to this requirement?
Answer:
Medea wants Aegeus to promise to never banish her from his land. This is a rule he Aegeus has to follow if he wants Medea to help him have children. His reaction to this is to just agree to never banishing Medea from his land and if he is to dishonor her then he deserves any punishment that an unholy man would get.

Posted by: Zach Daley at February 18, 2014 10:43 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
19 February 2014

QUESTION #56
In the third episode (the meeting with Aegeus / Aigeus), what question did Aegeus / Aigeus ask the Delphic Oracle? What was the oracle’s answer? Explain.

ANSWER:
During the third episode, Medea encounters Aegeus, king of Athens, and he greets her as a friend. In the story, Aegeus tells Medea that he came from “Phoebus ancient oracle” (Puchner 245). He went to ask the Delphic Oracle a cure for his sterility; he could not have children. Aegeus says, “Seeking how I might beget a child [. . .] still childless” (Puchner 545). The Delphic Oracle responded with and advice, “Don’t loose the wineskin’s hanging foot” (Puchner 545).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at February 18, 2014 10:46 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2014

QUESTION # 71:
In the fourth episode (the second meeting with Jason), what general attitude does Medea now present to Jason? What is Jason’s reaction to Medea’s apparent change of mind? Explain.

ANSWER:
In her second meeting with Jason, Medea appears to be very apologetic toward Jason for her attitude in their previous conversation. She commends him for treating her well during their marriage and for making plans to marry into the royal family (Euripides 550).
Jason accepts her apology, and also explains that he understands how she felt before (Euripides 551). He commends her for restraining her anger and hate and is naïve enough to believe that she is actually feeling bad for how she acted before.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at February 19, 2014 01:33 AM

Joe D Sears
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey’s in Narrative CAO2
19 February 2014

QUESTION #53: Does Jason suggest something of the contemporary “dead-beat dad”? What are some examples of figurative language that prove especially striking in his speeches? Explain their significance.
ANSWER: Through the eyes of Medea and her servants Jason looks like a “dead-beat dad”. When the Nurse states […] “since Jason has betrayed them-his own children” (Euripides 529) you feel as if he gave them up for a new family. However through Jason’s view he has done this to secure his family within Corinth, […] “I have provided for your security” (Euripides 551).
An example of Jason’s figurative language is […] “That’s how your career began.”(Euripides 562) you infer from this his meaning of Medea’s violent rage. It helps the audience get some insight of his views on Medea.

Posted by: Joe Sears at February 19, 2014 09:56 AM

Joe D Sears
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey’s in Narrative CAO2
19 February 2014

QUESTION #53: Does Jason suggest something of the contemporary “dead-beat dad”? What are some examples of figurative language that prove especially striking in his speeches? Explain their significance.
ANSWER: Through the eyes of Medea and her servants Jason looks like a “dead-beat dad”. When the Nurse states […] “since Jason has betrayed them-his own children” (Euripides 529) you feel as if he gave them up for a new family. However through Jason’s view he has done this to secure his family within Corinth, […] “I have provided for your security” (Euripides 551).
An example of Jason’s figurative language is […] “That’s how your career began.”(Euripides 562) you infer from this his meaning of Medea’s violent rage. It helps the audience get some insight of his views on Medea.

Posted by: Joe Sears at February 19, 2014 09:57 AM

Jacklyn O'Brien
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2014

QUESTION:In order to seal the deal, what does Medea require Aegeus/Aigeus to do? Why?
What is Aegeus/Aigeus’s reaction to this requirement? Explain.


Answer:
Aegeus travels to Medea in seek of help to rid his problem of being childless. Medea begins to beg "Don't let me go deserted into exile; receive me in your home and at your hearth. If you do it, may the gods grant your desire for children; may you die a prosperous man. You don't know what a windfall you have found! I'll cure your childlessness, make you a father. I know the drugs required for such things."(546) Aegeus responds back "For many reasons, woman, I am eager to grant this favor to you: first for the gods and secondly, the children that you promise."(546)

In exchange for Medea riding him of his childlessness Aegeus must promise and take an oath saying he will never expel her from his land for as long as he lives to give her to his enemy.
Aegeus clearly not thinking about the long term deal he had just made is only concerned with the overwhelming joy he feels knowing he will soon have the gift of a child.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at February 19, 2014 10:00 AM

Jacklyn O'Brien
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2014

QUESTION:In order to seal the deal, what does Medea require Aegeus/Aigeus to do? Why?
What is Aegeus/Aigeus’s reaction to this requirement? Explain.


Answer:
Aegeus travels to Medea in seek of help to rid his problem of being childless. Medea begins to beg "Don't let me go deserted into exile; receive me in your home and at your hearth. If you do it, may the gods grant your desire for children; may you die a prosperous man. You don't know what a windfall you have found! I'll cure your childlessness, make you a father. I know the drugs required for such things."(546) Aegeus responds back "For many reasons, woman, I am eager to grant this favor to you: first for the gods and secondly, the children that you promise."(546)

In exchange for Medea riding him of his childlessness Aegeus must promise and take an oath saying he will never expel her from his land for as long as he lives to give her to his enemy.
Aegeus clearly not thinking about the long term deal he had just made is only concerned with the overwhelming joy he feels knowing he will soon have the gift of a child.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at February 19, 2014 10:00 AM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
19 February 2014
Question:
How clever does Medea prove to be in making diplomatic arguments? In whose name are the sacred oaths taken to fulfill the promise of inviolable refuge in Athens?
Answer:
Medea proves to be very clever by making diplomatic agreements. When doing this she is able to have someone to go to when she exiles completely. Medea tells Aegeus that she says "she'll cure his childlessness and make him a father," by doing this she is giving Aegeus what he wants(Puncher 546). In turn she will get what she wants which is to be received in his home, that he will never expel her from his land himself, and that he will never give her up to her enemies (Puncher 547). This agreement is sealed with a sacred oath to Medea's father's father Helios and the whole race of gods, Augeus swears by earth, Helios, and by all Gods that he will whatever she tells him to do (Puncher 547). They agree that if he does not go on with the agreement, that he will get what he deserves.

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at February 19, 2014 10:33 AM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
18 February 2014

Question #73:
In the fourth episode (the second meeting with Jason), what does Medea want Jason to do? How does Medea suggest Jason should go about this? Explain.

Answer:
In the fourth episode in Medea we see a distort Medea begin to create a sinister plan. She asks for the nurses to call for Jason and tell him to come quick. Upon arrival Jason states that he has not come for Medea but for the sake of their children. Jason goes on to say that he has made provisions for their sons to take refuge in ally cities. However, Medea pleads with Jason to keep their sons and take them into his new home. She tells Jason to take the children to Creon’s daughter and make them yield to her with gifts in hope that she will allow them to remain in Corinth. Medea has cursed the gifts and Creon’s daughter will die upon receiving them, this is the begging of Medea’s revenge.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at February 19, 2014 10:53 AM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2014

Question #63:
After Aegeus’s departure why does Medea rejoice? Explain.
Answer:
Medea is very angry with her husband and his actions toward their family. Medea is creating a plan to kill her husband’s new wife in order to get revenge on him. Medea plays the guilt card with everyone she encounters including Aegeus. Aegeus finds out Medea has been exiled by “Creon, the ruler of this land of Corinth.” (Euripides 546). Aegeus is a find of Medea’s husband Jason but he feels the pain of Medea “Woman, your pain is understandable.” (Euripides 546). Aegeus agrees to let Medea stay in his town when she is exiled from Corinth. Medea seeks rejoice because she now has a place to hide after she kills the princess, her husband’s new wife. Medea can now continue with her plan in order to get revenge on her husband and leave him with nothing.
Work Cited
Euripides. Medea. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 19, 2014 11:52 AM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 February 2014

QUESTION #54: If you don’t know these words, define the words “stasimon” and “stanza”. In the second stasimon of the play, what view of love (“Cypris/Cyprian”- Aphrodite) does the Chorus present in the first stanza? Explain.

ANSWER: Cypris basically says that when love is desirable in excess it brings a man no type of honor nor appreciation of what they have. But when it comes in moderation, there is no gracious power. “Oh goddess, never on me let loose the unerring shaft of your bow in the poison of desire ”Pochner, 534).

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 19, 2014 12:14 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2014

Question #69:
Define the word "stasimon." In the third stasimon, what does the Chorus specifically praise in reference to Athens?

A stasimon in greek mythology is a stationary song, composed of strophes and antistrophes. The Greek word ὀρχήστρα means "place where the chorus dances". The chorus in the third stasimon refers to the city of Athens and how a city could not accept her if she goes through with killing her children. "How can this city of holy rivers, reciever of driends and loved ones, recieve you-when you've murdered your own children" (Euripides 861-65). The chorus ends the second strophe by begging Medea to not go through with her murderous plan. In the second antistrophe,the chorus tells Medea that she will not be able to go through with killing her children, "your tears will not let you kill them" (Euripides 878).

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at February 19, 2014 12:40 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19th February 2014

Question #64:
What structural purpose does the appearance of Aegeus/Aigeus serve? Where does it fall in the sequence: statement of conflict/problem, rising action, climax, turning point, falling action, dénouement? Is this scene merely a device to bring resolution to a fantastic story line? How plausible is the arrival of Aegeus/Aigeus at this precise moment? Explain.

Answer:
The King of Athens Aegeus appearance is to give Medea a home after Jason had left her. Medea could not head back home because she killed her brother for Jason to escape. Ageus arrival in this part of the story comes out of nowhere, Aegeus wants to make Medea an offer to take refuge in his town or village. This part of the story is the rising action or turning point because this is where it gets interesting. In this point of the story, Medea is thinking about killing her children out of spite because Jason had abandoned her and left her with his two children. When Aegeus comes into play, he offers a solution to her problem. This is not a scene to merely to provide a solution, Aegeus has a plan, and it involves Medea living in his town. In this part of the story, Aegeus arrival is very precise. The climax is just about to happen and with this is another turning point in the story.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at February 19, 2014 12:42 PM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
19 February 2014

Question 74:
In the fourth episode (the second meeting with Jason), what will Medea do to help Jason in the endeavor she has suggested to him? What does Jason think of this help? Explain.

Answer:
Medea does not want her children to be exiled with her from the land. So she gives them to Jason, since they are half his, for him to raise them while she is gone (Euripides 552). Medea and the children have made a treaty, since Medea has seen the situation while she was not angry (Euripides 551). She offered Jason’s new wife gifts such as “delicate robes and a garland worked in gold” (Euripides 552) for her to let Medea’s children live there and for her to talk to her father. Jason believes that he, as a person, means, much more than the wealth. Medea demands her children to plead to Jason’s new wife to exempt them from exile.

Posted by: Natalie White at February 19, 2014 01:02 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220CL: Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 February 2014

QUESTION #60: As part of the conclusion of their negotiations, by whom, specifically, does Medea make Aegeus/ Aigeus swear? Why might this be significant? Explain.

Answer:
Medea makes Aegeus swear “…by the earth we stand on, and by Helios – my father’s father – and the whole race of the gods,” (Puchner 547). It’s strange that she makes him swear on his grandfather seeing as how family does not really seem to be all that important to Medea. She kills her children in the process of getting revenge and even murdered her brother for Jason in an earlier instance. “If the gods will help me, he’ll pay what justice demands,” (Puchner 548). Perhaps, by making Aegeus swear to the gods, and asking the gods for their help, Medea assumed that then her plan would not fail.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 19, 2014 01:05 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220Cl CA02
19 February 2014

Question #75:
How astute, psychologically speaking, is Jason’s speech to Medea? With what does her charge her? What appears to be his attitude toward her, judged on his choice of words? How much or little has he understood her motivation? How seriously does he take her threats? Does Jason’s argument betray signs of self-serving interest? A lack of self-awareness? Out right hypocrisy? All of the preceding? Explain.

Answer:
When Jason meets Medea at their home again, he speaks to Medea to move the issue along with out considering how harsh of an incident has occurred in Medea’s life. He approaches Medea after King Creon sends Medea into exile. Medea expresses her anger to Jason about her situation as an ex-wife and mother with out her husband. Jason does not apologize for hurting her but instead offers to help Medea leave the Greek city. He defends his reason for leaving her by saying he intended to save his family and give them an opportunity to live like royals. Jason says, “It wasn’t for the women’s sake I married into the king’s family. As I have said, I wanted to save you, and give our children royal brothers, a safeguard for our household.” Jason goes on in the argument treating Medea as a crazy woman for hearing about the threats Medea made towards him and the family of his new bride. Jason makes a remark about Madea’s actions, “You would have been al for it! Even now you can’t control your rage against the marriage.” Medea threatens to kill him, the bride and the bride’s father, King Creon. It seems like he does not really understand her motivation because Medea keeps her homicidal thoughts to herself. Yet, he has heard the rumors of her threats and pleads that she take control over herself. He offers to help her and the children leave the city. Jason responds to Medea saying, “However, the words you spoke against the royal family- well, consider it a gain that nothing worse that exile is your punishment. As for me, I wanted you to stay,” and “I have come here looking out for your best interest, woman, so you won’t be without the things you need when you go into exile with the children. You’ll need money- banishment means hardship. However much you hate me, I could never wish you any harm.” Jason makes these two statements so that Madea will leave the city with his children. He considers her threats seriously because she has been sent to exile for them. Jason’s argument of defense does not respond as if he were he were self-serving but the way the story and Medea portray him his character is self-serving. He also says, “Woman, I approve your new approach- not that I blame you for the way you felt. It’s only right for a female to get angry if her husband smuggles in another wife. But this new change of heart is for the best. After all this time, you’ve recognized the winning plan. You’re showing wise restraint. As for you, my children, you will see your father is no fool. I have provided for your security, if the gods will help me. Yes, I believe that you will be the leaders here in Corinth, with your future brothers. Grow up strong and healthy. All the rest your father, with the favor of the gods, will take care of. I pray that I may see you grow up and thriving, holding sway above my enemies.” He responds bluntly and tries to make Medea believe his intentions are right. He is not aware of Madea’s true thoughts or her intentions. Madea pretends to accept him as an ex-husband and move on with her life but this is not true. She intends on making Jason feel sorry for his children and their life at home. In his second conversation with Madea, he listens to her hypercritical response that he is not aware of at the time. Madea plans on killing her children after the new royal family cares for them and Jason has been more involved in their lives.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at February 19, 2014 01:23 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2014


Question 62

Q: After making a diplomatic agreement and swearing some sacred oaths with Aegeus/Aigeus, why does Medea now feel triumphant? Is she justified in feeling this way? Explain.

Answer:

A: Medea feels triumphant after her accord with Aegeus because she had Aegeus swear to her that he would not expel her from his kingdom if she ever got there. This works for Medea because she plans on luring Jason’s new wife to her to kill the princess. Then, when she escapes, she will be safe with Aegeus. She is not justified in feeling this way because Aegeus made the promise under the pretext that she only wanted to escape Jason because he was mistreating her. Aegeus did not make the promise expecting there to be a large crisis involved as there would be if Medea arrives there after having killed Jason’s wife.

Posted by: Henry Adu at February 19, 2014 01:40 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
18 February 2014

Question 69:
Define the word “stasimon.” In the third stasimon, what does the Chorus specifically praise in reference to Athens?

Answer:
According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, a “stasimon” is an ode sang by the Chorus between two episodes in a Greek tragedy.
In the third stasimon, the Chorus learns of Medea’s desire to kill her children, which they explain to her is cruel and essentially goes against nature (Puchner 550). The Chorus questions how Medea could be accepted in society if she were to kill her children. They make an ode to Athens to praise the ideals of grace and wisdom the city was founded upon (Puchner 549-550). They ask Medea, “How can this city of holy rivers, receiver of friends and loved ones, receive you – when you’ve murdered your own children, most unholy woman – among them? (Puchner 550)” Basically, the Chorus is asking Medea not to do something that would bar her entrance into the best city, Athens, where the air is fragrant and holiness, grace, and wisdom abound (Puchner 549).

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 19, 2014 01:41 PM

Jesse Robinson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 February 2014

QUESTION #76:
Define the word “stasimon.” In the fourth stasimon, what does the Chorus predict for Jason’s intended bride, Jason, and Medea?

ANSWER:
Merriam-Webster dictionary defines stasimon as “one of the regular choral odes between two episodes in a Greek tragedy possibly sung with the chorus standing in its place in the orchestra.” Taking the fourth stasimon to begin on line 952 with the Chorus, the Chorus predicts the “bride, will accept the curse of gold,/ Will accept…death with her own hands (lines 954-955, 957).” In addition the Chorus predicts Medea will kill her own children and herself to bring vengeance to Jason, and, the Chorus predicts, the loss of his children and wife will cause Jason to appreciate his “Poor soul” and the “fall” he will experience (line 968).

Works Cited
"Stasimon - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary." Merriam-webster.com, 2014. Web. 19 Feb 2014. .

Posted by: Jesse Robinson at February 19, 2014 01:54 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 February 2014

Question #52:
What criticism does Jason make of woman in general? What criticism does Medea make of Jason’s arguments? Explain.

Awnser:
Jason make the generalization that without men, women wouldn’t be where they are. He makes this example by saying Medea would still be living at “the edge of nowhere” without him (Euripides 542). Medea finds that Jason is trying to make this situation her fault but she successfully counter argues his claims (Euripides 544). Jason is unwilling to take responsibility.
Bibliography
Euripides. "Madea." Puchner, Martin. The Northern Anthology World Liturature. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. 528-684.

Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at February 19, 2014 02:01 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
February 19, 2014


Question # 75:
How astute, psychologically speaking, is Jason's speech to Medea? With what does he charge her? What appears to be his attitude toward her, judged on his choice of words? How much or little has he understood her motivation? How seriously does he take her threats? Does Jason's argument betray signs of self-serving interest? A lack of self-awareness? Out right hypocrisy? All of the preceding? Explain.
Answer:
Jason's speech to Media is somewhat astute. During his speech he tells his reasoning for divorcing her and marrying the princess-"I wanted to raise sons in a style that fits my family background, give brothers to the ones I had with you, and treat them all as equals. This would strengthen my family and I'd be blessed with fortune...I can use my future children to benefit my present ones. Is that bad planning?" (p. 543). He charges her with insulting and even cursing the royal family-"the words spoke against the royal family well consider it a gain that nothing worse than exile is your punishment" (p540). Jason seems to not care too much for her. He showed a little bit of concern because she still is the mother of his children, he even offers her money and shelter while she is banished but Media refuses. He does not understand her motivation or simply does not care nor does he care about her threats. His arguments show signs that he only cares about himself, and that everything he has done was for his own self-serving interest.

Posted by: Jose Parra at February 19, 2014 02:09 PM

Wilfred Ras
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
February 17, 2014

Question 40:
What answer does the Chorus give to the ancient poets’ depiction of female faithfulness? What is their view of Medea’s situation? Explain.

Answer:
In the book the chorus mentioned how if a husband wants to be unfaithful, do not mind them. Leave that in a higher power to decide what they deserve. The chorus mentioned that if they choose a different bed, and a new bride, then let them be. Also the chorus mentioned that do not cry over what happened. In Medea’s case they tell her that she is justified in order to pay her husband back with what she wants to. Chorus did not accept Jason despite on what he said. He was unfaithful to his wife. In that matter he was not justified.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at February 19, 2014 02:47 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
22 February 2014

QUESTION #9:
The previously assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or, characters), best fits this archetype in Euripides’s Medea? Now that you’ve read Euripides’s Medea in its entirety, which character (or, characters), best fits this archetype in the narrative? Because of Euripides’s revolutionary use of the anti-hero, the characters in Medea may be more challenging to peg than in some other narrative. So, keep in mind that the archetype can be literal, psychological, or situational. Does only one ally exist, or are there more? If more than one exists, who or what is the primary ally for this dramatic narrative? Cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and Euripides’s Medea to fully support your answer.

ANSWER:
According to Vogler an ally is someone who “can serve a variety of necessary functions, such as companion, sparring partner, conscience, or comic relief” (Vogler, 71). When reading Medea I interpreted Aegus the king of Athens as the ally to Medea. Medea begins to confide in Aegus and he seems to be a shoulder for her to cry on. She tells him of her problems with Jason and he is shocked when he hears of Jason betraying Medea. Medea begins to tell Aegus that she “can cure his childlessness and make him a father” because she “know[s] the drugs required for such things” (Puchner, 546). When Aegus hears this news he agrees to let Medea stay in his house as long as she is able to travel there on her own. Aegus tells Medea that he is “not willing to escort [her] from this land” (Puchner, 547) because his “hosts must have no complaint with” him (Puchner 547). Although Aegus tells Medea this I think he is still the best candidate as ally because he offers his house up to her as her refuge and I think that is a very kind gesture and would be seen as something only a best friend would do. “One other ally that cannot go without mention is Helios, the sun god. As the grandfather of Medea, he provides her with a flying, golden chariot on which to escape Colchis to Athens” (Notes).


Works Cited
Puchner, Martin. "Medea." The Norton Anthology of World Literature. New York:
W.W. Norton &, 2013. 546-47. Print

Vogler, Christopher. "Ally." The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. Studio
City, CA: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. 71. Print.

Posted by: Becca Orden at February 22, 2014 06:57 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 February 2014

QUESTION #11:
In Medea’s first speech to the chorus, she claims that woman are afflicted with the most “wretched” existence on earth. How is gender explored in the play? Does Medea emerge as a champion of women’s plight through either positive or negative example?
ANSWER:
Medea is filled with anger and vengeance from her husband, Jason leaving her. She explains to the chores her anger and her ideas about men, woman, and the roles they play. Women are to be with their husband for a lifetime whether they are happy or not. Men are able to leave their wife if they see fit to do so without any repercussion. They will not hurt their reputation as women would if they were to leave their husband. Since Jason has left Medea, she is willing to share her feelings on the matter. “If a woman leaves her husband, then she loses her virtuous reputation. To refuse him is just not possible” (Puchner, 534). Technically, Medea could be looked at by other woman as an encouraging positive role model seeing as she is defending the woman of their time. Sadly, she is leading by a negative example though since she wants to take revenge on her husband, Jason by killing him for leaving her. Therefore, she is both a positive and negative role model. Either way, killing is the answer so ultimately she would be considered a negative champion to others because her vengeance becomes her.

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 23, 2014 01:06 PM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 February 2014

Test Question 7:
The previously assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Now that you’ve read Euripides’s Medea in its entirety, which character (or, characters), best fits this archetype in the narrative? Because of Euripides revolutionary use of the anti-hero, the characters in Medea may be more challenging to peg than in some other narrative. So, keep in mind that the archetypes can be literal, psychological, or situational. Does only one shapeshifter exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who or what is the primary shapeshifter for this dramatic narrative? Cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and Euripides’s Medea to fully support your answer.

Answer:
Based on the reading of the definition of the shapeshifter archetype in The Writer’s Journey, he/she is an ambiguous character whose loyalties are not known. The text states that, “The Shapeshifter serves the dramatic function of bringing doubt and suspense into a story” (Vogler 61). So the shapeshifter could be a good guy or a villain and whose motives are oftentimes not obvious throughout an entire book, play or movie. This is a very important archetype to have in any story, as it helps keep the reader or audience at the edge of their seat and the perpetual question that should stay in the readers/audience’s mind throughout the entire story: “What happens next?”

Based on The Writer’s Journey, there are different types of shapeshifter archetypes. Most male to female stories include one as shapeshifter. According to Vogler, “A common type of Shapeshifter is called the femme fatale, the woman as temptress or destroyer” (Vogler 61). Based on these qualities of doubt and suspense, the male-to-female genre and the concept of shapeshifter of femme fatale set out by Vogler, the character Medea is the perfect candidate for this archetype. Although she is also the hero as well as trickster of the story, she is femme fatale and the one who brings suspense and doubt to this male-to-female genre. She can be seen as the perfect shapeshifter of the story where she begins the monologue to the goddesses Themis and Artemis where she pleads, “do you see what I suffer, although I have bound my detestable husband with every great oath?” (Puchner 532). In this scene, she brings forth an emotion of pity and having been wronged and the audience feels sorry for her. Yet later in the story, when she begins to plot the death of her own children, the audience no longer feels sympathy for Medea but loathes her for even thinking of such an idea. Yet still she “shape shifts” in her conversation with Jason where she tells him that he can raise her children and then begins to cry leaving Jason stumped and asks, “You! Why have you turned your face away, so pale? Why are fresh tears pouring from your eyes?” (Puchner 552). Again, we have a shape-shifting moment where Medea cries when she talks of her children, which leaves the audience in suspense: Will she actually go through with her evil plan of killing her children or not. Jason, of course, has no idea why she’s really crying over the thought of her children and she just simply shifts her shape again as the ignorant woman, “I’m female, that’s all. Tears are in my nature” (Puchner 552.)

As the shapeshifter is the character who creates suspense and doubt in the audience, Medea herself, although she is the hero, is the main shapeshifter of the story. A minor shapshifter could also be Jason, because he is portrayed by Medea as the evil cheating husband, but when the audience hears his side of the story where he says, “I shall show you how I acted wisely and with restraint, and with the greatest love toward you and toward our children” (Puchner 542), it brings forth a sense of suspense and doubt, that perhaps Medea was acting irrationally and that Jason was really doing it for them. Although this is just a minor part for Jason because he is the bad guy of the story and Medea is the hero. So the true shapeshifter in Medea is Medea herself as the ultimate femme fatale.

Works Cited
Euripides. Medea. The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Shorter Third Edition. Ed. Martin
Puchner, et al. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. 528-564. Print.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at February 23, 2014 03:01 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 February 2014


Question 1
What is the nature if Medea’s rage? Is there one specific thing that is the source of her anger? Is it a passion? Is it opposed to her intellect, or part of it? Compare her anger to Achilles in the Iliad.
Answer:
The nature of Medea’s rage is Jason’s decision to leave her and marry the Glauce, daughter of the king of Creon, king of Corinth. Medea is deeply in love with her husband, Jason, who left her for the king’s daughter and Medea will not accept this injustice because she sacrificed a lot to be with him. The specific thing that angers Medea is that she left her homeland and everything behind in order to be with him and he, in turn, pays her back by breaking up with her and leaving her with two children to look after. “This disaster made her realize: a fatherland is no small thing to lose” (Puchner, 40). Her feelings of anguish are a passion, because she’s unable to control it. Medea even hated her own children because she didn’t want to have anything to do with Jason’s love ones, or she didn’t want anything related with Jason. This can be seen in this part of the text: “She won’t touch food; surrendering to pain, she melts away her days in tears” (Puchner 30). Her violent behavior is not opposed to her intellect because she is very cunning and sly in her actions, which leads to her succeeding in murdering all of Jason’s loved ones. She even killed her own children because they are Jason’s children or loved ones. Her anger is similar to that of Achilles because it is caused by a loved one been taken away from them. Both stories talk about someone wanting a revenge or someone killing someone’s love ones as a payback.

Posted by: Henry Adu at February 23, 2014 09:45 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 February 2014

QUESTION #18:
Jason is presented as a character with a heroic past, yet his actions in the play often exemplify the traits of a weak, reactive character. Medea also predicts an “unheroic death” for him at the play’s close. Does anything in the play testify to Jason’s background as a hero? Are we meant to sympathize with Jason at all?
ANSWER:
On the surface, Jason would appear as a hero, given the fact that he has led armies into battles (Euripides 529) and won those battles, which would have made him a hero to the people he led as well as the people who lived in his homeland. However, due to Jason’s actions throughout the course of the play, he does not appear to be a hero at all. He leaves his wife and children behind so he can marry into the royal family (Euripides 529). While he does argue that he is only doing this so he can help his wife and children get more money and give his children “royal brothers” (Euripides 543), in my honest opinion, that is just his excuse for doing the very selfish act of deserting his family. His actions in the play do not at all testify to his heroic background, but the background that we have been informed of at the beginning of the play does.
I believe that to a small extent, we have been to sympathize with Jason, at least at the play’s conclusion. Even though his betrayal of Medea and his children make him an unsympathetic character, the fact that he has just lost his fiancée as well as his only children (Euripides 562) make it somewhat impossible to not be able to sympathize with him. On the surface, he would appear to be the antagonist of the story, because his main enemy would be the protagonist. However, the protagonist murders her own children in an effort to get revenge against the antagonist, which makes it very difficult to have sympathy for her. In Jason’s situation, he has just gone from marrying into the royal family to losing everything that he loves, which makes it a lot easier to sympathize with him rather than his nemesis who murdered innocent children.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at February 23, 2014 11:15 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives
23 February 2014

QUESTION #4:
Throughout Medea, many characters refer to the past exploits of Jason and Medea as important for understanding their current situation. How does this past inform the present? Do the characters vainly wish to turn back the clock or is there a deeper meaning in these references to the past? Do their previous actions foreshadow their current predicament?
ANSWER:
In the story of Medea, the characters refer to the past exploits of Jason and Medea for many reasons. One of which is to help the audience understand a traditional Greek story. Some young or foreign members might not be familiar with the story of Jason and his quest to obtain the Golden Fleece, so various characters bring it up to explain to the patrons how the story has progressed to where it is now. At the beginning of the story, the Nurse gives a synopsis of the past events of Jason and Medea saying that she, “wishes that the Argo never set sail” and how Medea, “would have never persuaded Pelais’ daughters to kill their father” (Puchner 528). Another reason is to put more emphasis on all of the past affairs that main characters had to endure prior to where they are in the story now.
I do not believe that the characters explaining these references want to turn the clocks back, but rather use them to express an alternative or hidden meaning. Medea explains to Jason about his transgressions against her and calls him, “the very worst of men” (Puchner 541). When Medea states this, she is trying to show to the audience that men are the ones who cause all the problems in the society for her and other women. Earlier in the story, Medea talks to the Chorus and she complains to them about the burdens that women have for finding the right man, paying to marry him, and how if a woman leaves her husband that she is the one who is at fault and gain an unlawful reputation that tarnishes their name.
Mainly Medea’s past actions are the ones that foreshadow and come to fruition. She is wise and cunning. She will do anything to achieve her goal when she sets her mind on a task. She used her magic in the past to destroy those who opposed her. She did the same to crush Jason’s new family by using her magic to poison them.

References
Puchner, Martin, etc. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Vol. 1. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2013. Print.

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at February 24, 2014 04:56 AM

Jonathan Cruz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA 02
23 February 2014

Question #8 The Shadow Archetype and Euripides’s Medea:
The previously assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Now that you’ve read Euripides’s Medea in its entirety, which character (or, characters), best fit this archetype in the narrative? Because of Euripides revolutionary use of the anti-hero, the characters in Medea may be more challenging to peg than in some other narrative. So, keep in mind that the archetypes can be literal, psychological, or situational. Does only one shadow exist, or are there more? If more than one exists, who is the primary shadow for this dramatic narrative? Cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and Euripides’s Medea to fully support your answer.

Answer:
Medea, being a cunning and dangerous person within her subconscious, would almost be too easy casting as the shadow of the narrative due to her deadly malice. In addition, there is the concept of the differences of the lives of men and women in Medea’s time and the advantages men’s lives hold over the life of a woman. Alas, Jason seems to be the strongest candidate for a shadow to the (sort of) hero Medea due to the matter of his crime against her. He makes the excuse that the deed he performed was for the greater good of being able to “live well and not be poor”, to do this he needed to marry the princess which “would strengthen the family, and I’d be blessed with fortune…I can use my future children to benefit my present ones. Is that bad planning” (Puchner 542-543). The archetype of the shadow as explained by Vogler can be “humanized by a touch of goodness, or by some admirable quality”, showcased within Jason’s argument to Medea (Vogler 67). Medea casts off Jason supposed act of kindness as a cover up for his deed as she says, “If you weren’t in the wrong, you would have told me your marriage plans, not kept us in the dark—your loved ones, your own family” (Puchner 543). As the argument goes back and forth, Jason ends his verbal assault by giving Medea the chance to have her exile less of a hassle by offering to “make arrangements with my friends to show you hospitality” to which Medea does not accept (Puchner 544). To the readers, it is hard to tell if Jason’s intentions are what they mean, yet it seems that he wholeheartedly is making a good argument against his actions and would like forgiveness from Medea. However, Medea being the smart woman she is just will not have it, and for the rest of the story, Jason walks the path of the true villain of her life to the point of the ruining of his own life during the deaths of their children, his newlywed, and father-in-law.

Posted by: Jonathan Cruz at February 24, 2014 05:02 AM

Zachary Daley
Dr. Hobbs
220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
2/24/2014
Question 19:
The chorus at one point remarks that the most profound hate emerges out of the loss of the
deepest love (lines 521-522). How does the play explore the ambivalence of violent emotions?
Where does it preach against succumbing to such emotions; where, against resisting them?
Answer:
In Medea the most profound hate is with Medea and Jason, Medea was with Jason. Soon he leaves her for King Creon’s daughter, and this is when Medea starts to develop her hate for Jason. First, she is disgusted with Creon’s daughter Glause. Glause hears about Medea’s budding hate for her, collaborates with her father, and gets Medea banished from the kingdom. Once she is banished, she ends up meeting with King Aegeus. Medea gives him some fertility pills for a promise that she will never be banished from his kingdom. She starts to tell Aegeus her problems with Jason and ends up developing a plot to make his life hell and at the end of the reading; she wishes a very unheroic death for him. Aegeus does not want her to kill Jason like she wanted to but he ends up just being there for her by giving her a place to stay and promising never to banish her again.

Posted by: Zach Daley at February 24, 2014 08:47 AM

Zachary Daley
Dr. Hobbs
220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
2/24/2014
Question 19:
The chorus at one point remarks that the most profound hate emerges out of the loss of the
deepest love (lines 521-522). How does the play explore the ambivalence of violent emotions?
Where does it preach against succumbing to such emotions; where, against resisting them?
Answer:
In Medea the most profound hate is with Medea and Jason, Medea was with Jason. Soon he leaves her for King Creon’s daughter, and this is when Medea starts to develop her hate for Jason. First, she is disgusted with Creon’s daughter Glause. Glause hears about Medea’s budding hate for her, collaborates with her father, and gets Medea banished from the kingdom. Once she is banished, she ends up meeting with King Aegeus. Medea gives him some fertility pills for a promise that she will never be banished from his kingdom. She starts to tell Aegeus her problems with Jason and ends up developing a plot to make his life hell and at the end of the reading; she wishes a very unheroic death for him. Aegeus does not want her to kill Jason like she wanted to but he ends up just being there for her by giving her a place to stay and promising never to banish her again.

Posted by: Zach Daley at February 24, 2014 08:47 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (CA02)
23.2.2014
TEST Question # 2
2.
Medea states that Jason has left her because he tired of her as his wife. Jason states that he married Creon’s daughter because he wanted to ensure the livelihood of Megea and their children.
Is one of them right and the other wrong?
Why does Jason leave Medea?
What do their differing arguments reveals about their characters?
ANSWER:
According to Medea, Jason has left his family and married Creon’s daughter because “[he] imagined that for an older man, a barbarian wife was lacking in prestige.” (Puchner 543). However, Jason quickly explains that his intentions were only for the good of Medea and his children’s fate.
“I shall show you how I acted wisely and with restraint, and with the greatest love toward you and toward our children [. . .] When I moved here Iolcus, bringing with me disaster in abundance, with no recourse, what more lucky windfall could I find than marrying the king’s own child? It’s not that I despised your bed- the thought that irritates you most- nor was I mad with longing for a new bride, or trying to compete with anyone- to win the prize for having most children. [. . .] My motive was the best: so we’d live well and not be poor.” (Puchner 542).
If the reader has to choose one character to portray the true hero, then either character could be it depending on which side the audience chooses to view the situation. Medea states that she is the one who has lost the most out of her relationship with Jason. She sacrificed her patron land for Jason’s sake, only to have him betray her. “First, I saved your life- as every single man who sailed from Hellas aboard the Argo knows- when you were sent to yoke the fire-breathing bulls, and sow the deadly crop. I killed the dragon, too: the sleepless one, who kept the Golden Fleece enfolded in his convoluted coils; I was your light, the beacon of your safety.” (Puchner 540).
However, Medea is not a trustworthy protagonist, as she makes it clear herself by saying; “I betrayed my home, my father and went with you to Pelion’s slopes, Iolcus with more good will than wisdom- and I killed Pelias [king of Iolcus] in the cruelest of way: at his own children’s hands.” (Puchner 540).
If the audience chooses Jason as the true hero, then the argument that he indeed intended his marriage to the princess to benefit Medea and his children works. However Medea points out a good reason why Jason could be lying about his motives. “If you [Jason] weren’t in the wrong, you would have told me your marriage plans, not kept us in the dark- your loved ones, your own family!”(Puchner 543).

Works Cited

Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Shorter Third Edition ed. Vol. 1. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2013. Print.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 24, 2014 08:55 AM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CCL CA 02
February 2014

QUESTION #1:
In the U.S. system of governance, for example, certain “checks and balances” were built into the various seats of power by the framers of the constitution. In the city of Uruk, where Gilgamesh is king, are there checks on the monarchy’s power? What are they and how significant are they? How would you characterize the political organization of Uruk? Be prepared to find SPECIFIC evidence from the text to support your claim/argument (e.g., page numbers, etc.)

ANSWER:
In the city of Uruk there were no checks and balances that occurred. The political organization can be best described as a dictatorship. This conclusion was made because whatever king Gilgamesh said goes. He took advantage of many of his people. For example, “Gilgamesh would leave no girl to her mother (Puchner 39)!” In this quote we have evidence of the cruelty that was allowed to happen in Uruk under Gilgamesh’s kingship. He was completely out of control and the gods had to step in by sending Enkidu to try and tame him.

Posted by: Kent Wood at February 24, 2014 09:17 AM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CCL CA 02
February 2014

QUESTION #38:
How determined is Medea to put her plan into action? What is her primary motivation? What strong reasons/emotions compel Medea to seek exact repayment of the wrong done her? Why, in her mind, i she unsuccessful if she commits a crime and is apprehended and punished for it?

ANSWER:
Medea is totally relentless in her determination to fully execute her plan of action. She is fueled by the pain which her husband Jason has caused her and also by the hatred she has for him. As confirmed in this quote Medea is filled with hate and passionate anger towards her whole household which was triggered by Jason,“The pain that I’ve suffered I’ve suffered so much worth oceans of weeping O children accursed may you die—with your father your mother is hateful go to hell the whole household every last one (Puchner 531)!” Jason abandoned his family which included both his children and Medea. He plans to remarry the daughter of Creon Glauce. Jason left a stable family and turned it into a family of disarray and this was too much for Medea to handle mentally. Medea also believed she will be unsuccessful if caught because she will be put to death and her enemies will ridicule her. As seen in this quote, “There’s just one threat if i am apprehended entering the house my ruse discovered i’ll be put to death my enemies will laugh at me (Puchner 538).”

Posted by: Kent Wood at February 24, 2014 09:18 AM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CCL CA 02
February 2014

QUESTION #55:
If you don’t know these words, define the words “stasimon” and “stanza.” What prayer does the Chorus make in reference to Cypris in the second stanza? To whom is the Chorus referring in the third and fourth stanzas? Explain.

ANSWER:
Stasimon is defined as a choral ode usually found in tragedies. A stanza is defined as an arrangement of a certain number of lines, usually four or more, and it sometimes has a fixed length and/or rhyme scheme. The prayer by the chorus was, “Mistress never release from your golden bow an inescapable arrow smeared with desire and aimed at my heart (Puchner 544).” Therefore she does not want desire to puncture her heart anymore as it never, “bestows excellence never makes anyone prestigious (Puchner 544).” The third and fourth stanzas refers to Medea.

Posted by: Kent Wood at February 24, 2014 09:19 AM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CCL CA 02
February 2014

QUESTION #3:
First, define the terms: “prologue” and “monologue.” In the prologue to Euripides’s Medea, what elements dramatic purpose/s does the Nurse’s opening monologue fulfill? c.f., first 45 verses of play. What is the purpose of the Nurse’s speech? Explain.

ANSWER:
A prologue can be defined as an introductory part of a discourse, poem, or novel. While a monologue can be defined as a prolonged talk by a speaker. The nurse’s monologue sets the stage of the play by introducing the problem and the drama which has developed due to the plot, “I’m afraid she might be plotting something her mind is fierce and she will not endure ill treatment (Puchner 529).” Additionally, it helps the readers to gain some insight and background knowledge before they delve deep into the depths of the sorrow, pain, and injustices which occurred in the play.

Posted by: Kent Wood at February 24, 2014 09:21 AM

Joe D Sears
Dr. B. L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey’s
24 February 2014

QUESTION #5: The closing statement of the play by the chorus is that the events occurred as they did because of the will of the gods. However, no god is explicitly present in the play. What is indicated in blaming the gods for the horrors that occurred? What role do the gods play? Keeping in mind Jason’s and Medea’s history, for how much might the gods be responsible? Do Jason and Medea have free will, and are they responsible for their actions or not?

ANSWER: It seems that by the chorus stating […} “What we expect may not happen at all” (Euripides 564), they are saying the gods know more than we do. The gods in this case Zeus knows all and has the power to enforce things. I believe the indication of blaming the gods is to say no one could have stopped what transpired. No one but a god could have changed the outcome of Medea killing her children. Throughout the whole play there is no indication that the gods are actively playing a role in any of the characters actions. Jason makes the choice to marry another woman and forsake Medea. Medea makes the choice to kill her children for the sole purpose of causing Jason a lifetime of grief and pain. You could say that Jason was responsible for Medea killing the children, at the same time he did not wield a knife. Instead of Medea causing harm directly to Jason, she had the chance a couple of times, she killed the innocent children. All the characters have free will according to this poem. Jason and Medea are responsible for their actions. Jason could have stayed true to his original marriage and figured out another way to secure their place within the city. Medea could have left the children with Jason or taken them with her vice killing them.

Posted by: Joe Sears at February 24, 2014 09:49 AM

Joe D Sears
Dr. B. L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narritive CAO2
24 February 2014

QUESTION #5: The closing statement of the play by the chorus is that the events occurred as they did because of the will of the gods. However, no god is explicitly present in the play. What is indicated in blaming the gods for the horrors that occurred? What role do the gods play? Keeping in mind Jason’s and Medea’s history, for how much might the gods be responsible? Do Jason and Medea have free will, and are they responsible for their actions or not?

ANSWER: It seems that by the chorus stating […} “What we expect may not happen at all” (Euripides 564), they are saying the gods know more than we do. The gods in this case Zeus knows all and has the power to enforce things. I believe the indication of blaming the gods is to say no one could have stopped what transpired. No one but a god could have changed the outcome of Medea killing her children. Throughout the whole play there is no indication that the gods are actively playing a role in any of the characters actions. Jason makes the choice to marry another woman and forsake Medea. Medea makes the choice to kill her children for the sole purpose of causing Jason a lifetime of grief and pain. You could say that Jason was responsible for Medea killing the children, at the same time he did not wield a knife. Instead of Medea causing harm directly to Jason, she had the chance a couple of times, she killed the innocent children. All the characters have free will according to this poem. Jason and Medea are responsible for their actions. Jason could have stayed true to his original marriage and figured out another way to secure their place within the city. Medea could have left the children with Jason or taken them with her vice killing them.

Posted by: Joe Sears at February 24, 2014 09:51 AM

Joe D Sears
Dr. B. L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CAO2
24 February 2014

QUESTION #5: The closing statement of the play by the chorus is that the events occurred as they did because of the will of the gods. However, no god is explicitly present in the play. What is indicated in blaming the gods for the horrors that occurred? What role do the gods play? Keeping in mind Jason’s and Medea’s history, for how much might the gods be responsible? Do Jason and Medea have free will, and are they responsible for their actions or not?

ANSWER: It seems that by the chorus stating […} “What we expect may not happen at all” (Euripides 564), they are saying the gods know more than we do. The gods in this case Zeus knows all and has the power to enforce things. I believe the indication of blaming the gods is to say no one could have stopped what transpired. No one but a god could have changed the outcome of Medea killing her children. Throughout the whole play there is no indication that the gods are actively playing a role in any of the characters actions. Jason makes the choice to marry another woman and forsake Medea. Medea makes the choice to kill her children for the sole purpose of causing Jason a lifetime of grief and pain. You could say that Jason was responsible for Medea killing the children, at the same time he did not wield a knife. Instead of Medea causing harm directly to Jason, she had the chance a couple of times, she killed the innocent children. All the characters have free will according to this poem. Jason and Medea are responsible for their actions. Jason could have stayed true to his original marriage and figured out another way to secure their place within the city. Medea could have left the children with Jason or taken them with her vice killing them.

Posted by: Joe Sears at February 24, 2014 09:51 AM

Jacklyn O’Brien
Dr.B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 February 2014

QUESTION: Consider Medea’s final, startling escape on the flying chariot. What does it indicate or imply? Is Medea divinized at the conclusion of the play? Is this a final endorsement of Medea’s actions, since she will not suffer punishment from the city?

The ending of Medea is shocking as well as very confusing. Medea is approached by a messenger “The royal princess and her father Creon have just died-the victims of your poison.” Medea responds “This news is excellent. From this day forth ill count you as a friend and benefactor.” (Euripides 557) After Medea is thrilled with herself for her success in the riding of Glauce and Creon, she quickly eliminates any doubt she had before and is positive she must kill her children. “I must kill my children and leave this land before I give my enemies a chance to slaughter them with a hand that’s moved by hatred.”(Euripides 559) After Jason hears word of his future wife’s sudden death, he quickly runs to Medea in attempt to save his children. Unfortunately Jason was too late. As the servants open the doors for him to see the death of his children, Jason instead see’s Medea above the roof in a flying chariot, with the bodies of his kids. Medea refuses Jason any right to see, touch, or burry his boys. Medea instead insists she will take care of the bodies properly and fly’s away in her chariot.
The most fascinating part about the ending is how Medea is saved. Medea our protagonist who had committed four sinful murders, fly’s away on a chariot that was provided for her by the gods. Medea is to serve no punishment for her actions. This ending indicates the Euripides sympathy and compassion for women. Throughout the play it’s clear that Medea is trapped in a male dominated society. This could be another reason the chorus was so understanding and supportive of all Medea’s actions. They knew she was oppressed originally by a man and he deserves what he has coming to him. This ending also shines a light on Medea in a very Divine way. Medea is absolutely divinized by the conclusion of the play. Medea who originally is a barbarian woman, Escapes being exiled, and walks away scotch free after four dreadful murders. Medea at the end is basically invisible; she even is flown home by a chariot from the gods. Medea although will have to suffer the drama and pain of her actions for the rest of her life, she never had an actual punishment given by the gods or the city. Perhaps the Euripides wanted to leave us a little unsettled in the ending, or maybe they were just attempting to warn all fellow men out there.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at February 24, 2014 10:21 AM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 February 2014

Question #14:
Barring their death cries, the children remain silent throughout the play. How does Euripides handle their characters in order to supply an element of pathos to their deaths?

Answer:
Throughout the entirety of the play, we hear just about nothing from the poor children that were slain by Medea. When dealing with the nuclear family, the audience already feels emotions for the abused or forgotten people in that particular family. Family is something that just about every reader can identify with, and divorce or separation is where sympathy comes in for any family.
We gather from the play that Medea was unjustly left by her husband Jason. She had always treated him with the utmost respect and love. When he leaves her for another woman, she is heartbroken and is at a loss. Not only are we sympathetic to Medea at this point, but the children are even more innocent and less to blame than anyone in the story. Most readers will feel sympathetic towards the children because it is never the children’s fault if parents split up. Not long after Jason leaves Medea, Creon decides to exile her and the children as well from Corinth. Once again we have the children getting caught in the middle of this ugly situation.
The play is centered on Medea and Jason; everyone else suffers the repercussions of their actions, the children especially. The reason why the children need not speak in this play or even be developed characters is simply in that they are children. Any audience can feel pity and sympathy for them because they are not to blame for their tragic deaths. Children are innocent and helpless in many situations, they could not defend themselves against their mother; their fate was decided the minute Medea had made up her mind. Nobody could save them.
Euripides handles the characters of the children by not developing them as characters or having them speak throughout the play. There would be no real reason to develop these characters or have them speak because as soon as Medea decides to murder them, the audience immediately feels the element of pathos. That moment when she decides to kill, it is as if they had died right then and there. Through Medea’s lines in the play, we get more than enough to feel pity for the children. The innocence and helplessness of children is what allows Euripides to get away with not having the children talk or become fully developed characters. And by doing so, it makes more of a dramatic effect on the readers or audience because the lack of being a developed character makes it more personal and easier to relate; as if something like this could happen to anyone.

Posted by: daniel menezes at February 24, 2014 11:06 AM

Natalie White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
END 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
21 February 2014

Question 1:
What is the nature of Medea’s rage? Is there one specific thing that is the source of her anger? Is it passion? Is it opposed to her intellect, or part of it? Compare her anger to Achille’s in The Iliad.

Answer:
Medea is/was married to what she thought was the greatest man, Jason, who she had also had children with him. In the beginning of the play, Jason started off as a cold-hearted man right off the bat. He left Medea and their family for another marriage with another woman and who has children too. Medea’s rage in understandable in every aspect. She is broken, hurt, angry, etc, all at the same time. The only man she ever pictured herself with has betrayed her and all that she is worth. Jason abandoned her and their children. Medea also betrayed her family, killed her brother, all to protect and run away to be with the man who she thought would be her happily ever after. I think that this was the reason why Medea did what she did, to get revenge on Jason. That being what triggered her actions, Jason is very responsible for what she did.
Medea killed her own children to hurt Jason as he hurt her. Killing her children was a little harsh because that too affected her, but it was a passion to get revenge on Jason. What I do not think is that she was all herself when she did kill her children because no mother wants to live without her children, even though the nurse stated she hated her children and looking at them gives her no joy (Euripides 529). Medea was distraught and angry, so it made her go, in lack of a better word, crazy. She knew sending her children off to liv with Jason would make them have a much more significant bond and so killing them, would affect Jason more.
In the Illiad, Achilles is humiliated and makes him infuriated over battle, much like Medea, who was played by Jason from the start. Achilles’ anger is a little different from Medea’s, since he was just refusing to fight after to conflict over giving back his girl to Agamemnon. Medea’s anger came from spite from her “husband” that left her after she did everything for him. Achilles’ rage and anger came from the shame Agamemnon laid on him, publically. Which applies to Medea too. Jason publically embarrassed, humiliated, fooled her too.

Posted by: natalie white at February 24, 2014 11:47 AM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
23 February 2014

Question 5:
The children in Medea are a vexed issue. Consider the fact that their only words in the work are offstage, before being slaughtered by their mother. Consider also that in contrast to Medea’s killing of her children, Aegeus has just been to the Oracle in an effort to find a solution to his childlessness. What is the purpose of the role the children play here? Why are children so important to all of the characters? What is their relationship to society?

Answer:
The children in Medea play a very important role. Medea’s goal is to hurt Jason, because of his dishonor to her and their marriage. The children represent innocence. They were naive to everything that was going on around them throughout the play. They knew that their mother was upset and their father was gone, but they did not know of their mother’s cruel plans. The slaughtering of the children help us understand what kind of character Medea is. She is more focused on hurting Jason than the safety of her own children. The children are important to all of the characters because they all understand that they did not do anything wrong. The children are feeling the backlash of Medea’s anger because of their father’s choices. The story of Aegeus going to the Oracle of Delphi to try and fix his problem of sterility shows us that some people would do whatever they can to have children while others cannot even care for their own. Medea is not worried about her children, she cannot even look at them after Jason leaves her for the princess. This shows that Medea is unappreciative of her gift of fertility, meanwhile, Aegeus is mourning because he is not fertile.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at February 24, 2014 12:00 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 February 2014

Question #5:
The children in Medea are a vexed issue. Consider the fact that their only words in the work are offstage, before being slaughtered by their mother. Consider also that in contrast to Medea’s killing of her children, Aegeus has just been to the Oracle in an effort to find a solution to his childlessness. What is the purpose of the role the children play here? Why are children so important to all of the characters? What is their relationship to society?
Answer:
The part of the children in Medea may seem small, but they affect each character very differently. The children have very little speaking parts and short onstage scenes. The role of the children is very small, but the whole idea of the children plays a bigger piece. Medea uses the children as bait to try to get Jason to stay with her and to get Creon to give her more time before Medea, and the children go into exile. Medea begs for Jason to stay with her only because she has given him the gift of children,”You wanted a new bed, even though I’d borne you children.” (Euripides 541). Medea uses the children to frame Jason and make him look as if he is a horrible father. The children are not just important to Jason and Medea, but they play a role in the actions of all the characters. The tutor has a very close relationship to the children by the involvement in their family to some extent. Creon feels bad for exiling the children, but Medea is too crazy for her to remain in the same town as his family. Aegeus wishes he could find a solution to his childless life and confronts Medea. Medea takes up his offer and decides she will help him receive children as long as she has a place to go. Aegeus decides to grant Medea a favor “for many reasons, woman, I am eager to grant this favor to you: first, the gods; and secondly, the children that you promise.” (Euripides 546). The children face a hard relationship to society Medea uses the children to gain sympathy from the people of the village and Jason. Society has a week spot for children, and Medea uses that to her advantage in order to seek the revenge she has been planning on the royal family and Jason. The fact that the only lines the children have are offstage shows that they were not valued or really given the chance to save themselves. The children were forced to stay with Medea and were not given the opportunity to join the royal family with their father. Throughout the story, the children are rather dragged around by different characters. The Nurse wants to keep the children away from Medea when she is upset because she knows the children are not safe “Go inside now, children. Everything will be alright.” (Euripides 530). The children are kept safe and out of the reach of their mother during her breakdown.

Work Citied
Euripides. Medea. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001.73. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 24, 2014 12:06 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 February 2014

Question #5:
The children in Medea are a vexed issue. Consider the fact that their only words in the work are offstage, before being slaughtered by their mother. Consider also that in contrast to Medea’s killing of her children, Aegeus has just been to the Oracle in an effort to find a solution to his childlessness. What is the purpose of the role the children play here? Why are children so important to all of the characters? What is their relationship to society?
Answer:
The part of the children in Medea may seem small, but they affect each character very differently. The children have very little speaking parts and short onstage scenes. The role of the children is very small, but the whole idea of the children plays a bigger piece. Medea uses the children as bait to try to get Jason to stay with her and to get Creon to give her more time before Medea, and the children go into exile. Medea begs for Jason to stay with her only because she has given him the gift of children,”You wanted a new bed, even though I’d borne you children.” (Euripides 541). Medea uses the children to frame Jason and make him look as if he is a horrible father. The children are not just important to Jason and Medea, but they play a role in the actions of all the characters. The tutor has a very close relationship to the children by the involvement in their family to some extent. Creon feels bad for exiling the children, but Medea is too crazy for her to remain in the same town as his family. Aegeus wishes he could find a solution to his childless life and confronts Medea. Medea takes up his offer and decides she will help him receive children as long as she has a place to go. Aegeus decides to grant Medea a favor “for many reasons, woman, I am eager to grant this favor to you: first, the gods; and secondly, the children that you promise.” (Euripides 546). The children face a hard relationship to society Medea uses the children to gain sympathy from the people of the village and Jason. Society has a week spot for children, and Medea uses that to her advantage in order to seek the revenge she has been planning on the royal family and Jason. The fact that the only lines the children have are offstage shows that they were not valued or really given the chance to save themselves. The children were forced to stay with Medea and were not given the opportunity to join the royal family with their father. Throughout the story, the children are rather dragged around by different characters. The Nurse wants to keep the children away from Medea when she is upset because she knows the children are not safe “Go inside now, children. Everything will be alright.” (Euripides 530). The children are kept safe and out of the reach of their mother during her breakdown.

Work Citied
Euripides. Medea. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001.73. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 24, 2014 12:06 PM

Lydia Beach
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 February 2014

QUESTION #2:
Medea states that Jason has left her because he tired of her as his wife. Jason states that he married Creon’s daughter because he wanted to ensure the livelihood of Medea and their children. Is one of them right and the other wrong? Why does Jason leave Medea? What do their differing arguments reveal about their characters?
ANSWER:
Neither of their actions are right, but their explanations are just what they believe to have happened. Jason is the only one who knows why he left Medea. Jason says he left Medea to help make sure their family (especially the kids) was taken care of in the long run. However, I don’t believe him. I think he left Medea to get a higher standing in Corinth. He doesn’t care about anyone but himself. He’s not worried about what his kids will do in the long run, he’s just happy to be with royalty. He never cared about Medea. If he did care he would’ve done something when Creon ordered his wife and children into exile. Creon says, “Medea, I hereby announce that you must leave this land, an exile, taking with you your two children” (Puchner 535). If Jason really cared about his family, or just his children he would’ve helped them. He would’ve stood up to Creon or moved his family to a different place.
Medea’s explanation of why Jason left her shows that she has low self-esteem and believes that she wasn’t good enough for her husband. She plays the victim at first but when Aegeus, King of Athens comes along and offers to help Medea, she changes. She now thinks she has the upper hand and becomes more assertive and aggressive. She really decides on her plan of action and puts it into motion. Jason is a coward and has been that way through the whole story. His character doesn’t change; he just continues to show his true colors. Jason tires to act like a hero saying he married the princess because he wants to help his family but that’s not true. He just wanted to help himself.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at February 24, 2014 12:08 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 February 2014

QUESTION #12: As Medea prepares to send off her children with the crown and dress to Glauce’s bed-chamber (1041-1081), she waver five times over whether to proceed in a plan that will end with their deaths. What other evidence in the play justifies her indecision at this moment, and, conversely, what demonstrates a fixed resolved throughout?

ANSWER: In the opening cries, it can be argued and justified that Medea laments her children’s death. For example, when she feels helpless and suicidal to Jason’s divorce and wishes to die (Pochner, 531, lines 105-106). She wishes that her children and her husband die for all the pain they have made her go through (Pochner 531, 117-120). The nurse predicts that Medea will not give up until she sees the entire city of Corinth has been destroyed. Therefore, Creon decides to exile her but gives her an extra day to find a home for her children. He told her if he saw her after that, he would kill her. From the beginning, it was predicted that Medea was going to kill her children because of what Jason did. Medea’s indecision at this moment manifests the corruption of her feelings. For example, when Medea uses common sense and thinks about leaving to Athens and starting a new life with her children, granting them protection and a better home. This plan is better than all of the other ones that she had been thinking about. Therefore, you could say that Medea intentions were not bad, she was just hurt and wanted revenge against Jason.

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 24, 2014 12:16 PM

Alexander Hoschak
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative
24 February 2014

Question:
The theme of exile is recurrent in Medea. How does exile serve as a useful metaphor for Medea’s emotional states in the play? How are life and death figured as extensions of exile?

Answer:
During the time of Medea, exile was a very big deal. The Greeks believed that their home was the most important thing to them and being exiled meant that they no longer had ties to their homeland. Medea exiled herself. To start, she decided to exile herself from her true home, just for Jason. Due to her actions, she caused the King of Corinth to kick her out and to make her leave her family, friends and life. Life and Death are extensions of exile because the deaths in the play show how far she is going to exile Jason. When it comes down to it, life causes exile for Medea.

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak at February 24, 2014 12:40 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 February 2014

Question 10: The Trickster Archetype and Euripides’s Medea
The previously assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Now that you’ve read Euripides’s Medea in its entirety, which character (or, characters), best fits this archetype in the narrative? Because of Euripides’s revolutionary use of the anti-hero, the characters in Medea may be more challenging to peg than in some other narrative. So, keep in mind that the archetypes can be literal, psychological, or situational. Does only one trickster exists, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who or what is the primary trickster of this dramatic narrative? Cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) both form Vogler and Euripides’s Medea to fully support your answer.

Answer:
According to Vogler, the Trickster archetype “embodies the energies of mischief and desire for change” (Vogler 77). In Euripides’s Medea, Medea herself fulfills these requirements for being a trickster-hero as she wants to change her stance in the society she lived in following being abandoned by Jason. Medea commits the ultimate trickery in the narrative by feigning being a law-abiding citizen when talking to Creon (Puchner 537). Then, once Creon leaves, she enacts and completes her plans with the supernatural aid of Helios (Puchner 562). Medea’s plan was full of tricks against her enemies. She sent Glauce a set of clothes to save her children from exile, but the clothes were poisonous and killed both Glauce and Creon (Puchner 557). Medea then kills her children after she had saved them from exile (Puchner 561).
Vogler describes tricksters as being able to “provoke healthy laughter” or as being “comic relief” for the plot of narratives (Vogler 77-78). Medea, the main trickster in Euripides’s Medea, provides neither laughter nor comic relief. She is just an angry magician and manipulator bent on getting revenge. Even Vogler’s definition of the trickster hero, which Medea is in this narrative, does not fit her. Vogler says trickster heroes are protagonists who can make the audience laugh (Vogler 78). Medea does not have the ability to make the audience laugh unless the audience finds murder, revenge, and infanticide funny. Vogler’s first definition of what a trickster archetype entailed was the best fitting definition for Medea, the rest do not fit her at all.
Medea is not the only trickster in the narrative as Jason acts like a trickster in the beginning of the story by deserting Medea for Glauce, also fulfilling the role of the herald at the same time as Medea would not have acted as she had had he not left her (Puchner 529). He, too, doesn’t fit in with Vogler’s definitions, but he is still a trickster because be tricked Medea in the long run into helping him with the promise of marriage and then he left her and their children for another woman. That is a pretty mean trick to pull on someone who had helped with a quest.

Works Cited:
Euripides. “Medea.” The Norton Anthology: World Literature. Ed. Martin Puchner. Vol. 1. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. 525-564. Print.
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. 3rd ed. Chelsea: Sheridan Books, Inc., 2007. Print.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 24, 2014 12:49 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24th February 2014

Question 7:
The previously assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Now that you’ve read Euripides’s Medea in its entirety, which character (or, characters), best fits this archetype in the narrative? Because of Euripides revolutionary use of the anti-hero, the characters in Medea may be more challenging to peg than in some other narrative. So, keep in mind that the archetypes can be literal, psychological, or situational. Does only one shapeshifter exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who or what is the primary shapeshifter for this dramatic narrative?

Answer:
In Medea, the main shapeshifter has to be Jason. Jason is the shapeshifter in Medea because he switches role from an ally to an enemy. At first, Jason is married to Medea, and he is loyal to her. Then he leaves Medea in order to go with another woman. The reason why Jason is the main shapeshifter is his loyalty. Instead of being a loyal husband, he became a traitor that left his wife with two kids. Jason also changed the story because if he never had left Medea the story would have never happened. This is what the shapeshifter is supposed to do. The shapeshifter changes the story in a way in which they either become loved or hated, and they disguise themselves in such a way in which you do not know what they might be. Another shapeshifter is Medea; the reason why Medea becomes a shapeshifter is because of Jason. Medea pledged her loyalty in her husband, and she demonstrated it by helping him escape and killing her brother. Obviously when Jason leaves her, she is hurt by the situation at hand. Instead of taking it out on Jason, she takes it out on her kids and plans to kill them. The reason why Medea is a shapeshifter is that she went from loving her kids to wanting to kill her kids. The shapeshifter does not have to change shapes or forms in a literal sense. They can be a shapeshifter by switching titles or disguising themselves. They can disguise themselves as a hero when in reality they are a villain. They are just disguising themselves because they want something done or they want to accomplish something. This is the case in Medea. Jason and Medea are both the shapeshifters in this story. They are both shapeshifter because of the way they switch roles. 

Works Cited:
Europides. _Medea_. 435 B.C.E. (Ancient Greek); Trans. Rex Warner. Dover, 1993. Rpt. In Puchner ISBN -10: 0486275485

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at February 24, 2014 12:58 PM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
24 February 2014

Question 19 - The chorus at one point remarks that the most profound hate emerges out of the loss of the deepest love. How does the play explore the ambivalence of violent emotions? Where does it preach against succumbing to such emotions; where, against resisting them?

The play Medea by Euphrates explores many emotions particularly violent ones including passion, rage, revenge and pride. Medea can easily be described as a woman of extreme emotion in other plays where she is devoted to Jason as his wife she commits many unspeakable acts on his behalf. She has a passion for him that is strong and unchecked, leading to the events in Medea. Revenge combined with pride is probably the two biggest emotions that contribute to Medea's downfall. Clearly Medea is a prideful woman throughout the entire play, leading her to plot such a revenge as as killing her own children. At many points in the play characters clearly point out that the murder of her own children by Medea should be stopped. For example, the Chorus states “I ought to prevent this slaughter of children”(Puchner 561) just before Medea commits her revenge and afterwards calling it “an unholy laughter”(Puchner 561). This is of course interesting as Medea is the hero of the play, and by that extension it seems that the play is condoning the slaughter of children, despite the majority of characters protesting against it. Now in Medea’s mind as the hero she is doing what is right, she is bringing justice to those who have wronged her. In this case, Jason has wronged her and due to her blinding pride he must pay for his wrongdoing not only with the life of his new bride and father-in-law but with his childrens lives. Medea planning to commit the murders and effectively ending Jason’s family line states “he’ll never see them alive again, the children I bore him. Nor will he ever father another”(Puchner 548) However, even more interesting is that Medea sees the Murder of her children as her protecting them from the possibility of counter revenge by Jason. Medea combined with her out of control emotions of pride and revenge make her the ultimate anti-hero. It is her quest and challenge to right the wrongs done to her, but as a result of her violent nature she has to do this in an unspeakable manner. The play seems to on one hand openly condone violence by having the main character commit such heinous acts. Yet the story contradicts its self by having the majority of the supporting characters condemn them.

Works Cited
Puchner, Martin, gen. ed. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 3rd ed. Vol. 1.
New York: Norton, 2012. Print.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at February 24, 2014 01:01 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 February 2014

Question #2: Medea states that Jason has left her because he tired of her as a wife. Jason states that he married Creon’s daughter because he wanted to ensure the livelihood of Medea and their children. Is one of them right and the other wrong? Why does Jason leave Medea? What do their differing arguments reveal about their characters?
Answer: Jason claims Medea is being completely irrational. “But you’re a woman— and you’re all the same! If everything goes well between the sheets you think you have it all. But let there be some setback or disaster in the bedroom and suddenly you go to war against the things you value most,” (Puchner 543). Medea, on the other hand, says that Jason has seriously wronged her and caused her to go against everything she loves. “Here is my situation. I’ve become an enemy to my own family, those whom I should love, and I have gone to war with those whom I had no reason at all to hurt, and all for your sake,” (Puchner 541).
Medea sacrificed things for Jason while he sat back and enjoyed her aid in battle. Now that he has left her for the princess, obviously Medea is livid. Is she then correct in trying to kill everyone that has wronged her? Probably not. “An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind,” they say. With Jason’s argument, it may or may not be true that he did it for the sake of his family, however, there was no real need for him to do that. On the other hand, while Medea was so clearly wronged, she should not have gone to such lengths for revenge. This reveals that they are both extremely selfish to satisfy their own strange needs.

Works Cited
Euripides. "Medea." 2013. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. New York: W. W. Norton &, n.d. 528-64. Print.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 24, 2014 01:02 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 16. The theme of exile is recurrent in Medea. How does exile serve as a useful metaphor for Medea’s emotional states in the play? How are life and death figured as extensions of exile?

ANSWER:
Exile serves as a useful metaphor for Medea’s emotional states in the play, for she constantly feels a sense of not only abandonment but alienation and being unloved/unwanted. These reoccurring emotional states in the sense of exile, drives her to the point of no return for besides the chorus and the nurse no one understands the pain and neglect that burns deep within her; “Poor Medea, mournful and dishonored. . . She won’t touch food; surrendering to pain, she melts away her days in tears, ever since she learned of this injustice. She won’t raise her face; her eyes glued to the ground” (Puchner 529). Medea’s overall position in Corinth and emotional state are vulnerable. Not only is Medea exiled physically but the metaphor of exile deepens with the emotional state that she feels towards her family back home, her husband Jason, and her own children; “At most, she’ll turn her pale neck aside, sobbing to herself for her dear father, her land, her home, and all that she betrayed for Jason, who now holds her in dishonor. This disaster made her realize: a fatherland is no small thing to lose. She hates her children, feels no joy in seeing them” (Puchner 529).
Life and death are figured as extensions of exile, for it was for the sake and life of her marriage that Medea was original exiled. The reoccurring need for a correlated life and love with Jason causes the downward spiral towards all things ending for Medea, death. Medea emphasizes the ending of a women’s life through marriage, in correlation with her own experience; “Of all the living creatures with a soul and mind, we women are the most pathetic. First of all, we have to buy a husband: spend vast amounts of money, just to get a master for our body – to add insult to injury. . . If a woman leaves her husband, then she loses her virtuous reputation. To refuse him is just not possible. When a girl leaves home and comes to live with new ways, different rules. . . If we do well, and if our husbands bear the yoke without discomfort or complaint, our lives are admired. If not, it’s best to die. . . Here I have no mother, no brother, no blood relative to help unmoor me from this terrible disaster” (Puchner 534-535).

Works Cited
Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2013.
Print.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 24, 2014 01:14 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 16. The theme of exile is recurrent in Medea. How does exile serve as a useful metaphor for Medea’s emotional states in the play? How are life and death figured as extensions of exile?

ANSWER:
Exile serves as a useful metaphor for Medea’s emotional states in the play, for she constantly feels a sense of not only abandonment but alienation and being unloved/unwanted. These reoccurring emotional states in the sense of exile, drives her to the point of no return for besides the chorus and the nurse no one understands the pain and neglect that burns deep within her; “Poor Medea, mournful and dishonored. . . She won’t touch food; surrendering to pain, she melts away her days in tears, ever since she learned of this injustice. She won’t raise her face; her eyes glued to the ground” (Puchner 529). Medea’s overall position in Corinth and emotional state are vulnerable. Not only is Medea exiled physically but the metaphor of exile deepens with the emotional state that she feels towards her family back home, her husband Jason, and her own children; “At most, she’ll turn her pale neck aside, sobbing to herself for her dear father, her land, her home, and all that she betrayed for Jason, who now holds her in dishonor. This disaster made her realize: a fatherland is no small thing to lose. She hates her children, feels no joy in seeing them” (Puchner 529).
Life and death are figured as extensions of exile, for it was for the sake and life of her marriage that Medea was original exiled. The reoccurring need for a correlated life and love with Jason causes the downward spiral towards all things ending for Medea, death. Medea emphasizes the ending of a women’s life through marriage, in correlation with her own experience; “Of all the living creatures with a soul and mind, we women are the most pathetic. First of all, we have to buy a husband: spend vast amounts of money, just to get a master for our body – to add insult to injury. . . If a woman leaves her husband, then she loses her virtuous reputation. To refuse him is just not possible. When a girl leaves home and comes to live with new ways, different rules. . . If we do well, and if our husbands bear the yoke without discomfort or complaint, our lives are admired. If not, it’s best to die. . . Here I have no mother, no brother, no blood relative to help unmoor me from this terrible disaster” (Puchner 534-535).

Works Cited
Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2013.
Print.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 24, 2014 01:14 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 February 2014

Question:
Consider Medea’s final, startling escape on the flying chariot. What does it indicate or imply? Is Medea divinized at the conclusion of the play? Is this a final endorsement of Medea’s actions since, she will not suffer punishment from the city?

Answer:
At the end of the story, Medea indicates that she gets away with everything; her goal was accomplished. She poisoned the princess, along with her father, Creon-the king of Corinth, and made Jason, Medea’s husband, suffer by murdering their children. This is stated when Medea says, “I will kill the children [. . .] I’ll ruin Jason’s household [. . .] The new bride, evil woman, must die [. . .] Extinguished by my drugs,” (Puchner 548).

Medea poisoned the princess of Corinth, Jason’s future wife, by giving a robe and golden crown to Jason to give them to her in exchange for not sending Jason’s children into exile. When the princess put on the robe and crown, her skin started to change color. Soon, the princess was unrecognizable. When her father saw her, he said, “let me die with you” and the delicate rope “clung to him [. . .] his soul slipped away when he could not fight no longer,” the king died (Puchner 559). In addition, it is stated that Medea kills her children when the Chorus say to Jason, “Your children are dead by their mother’s hand” (Puchner 562).

Furthermore, Medea, has divinized at the conclusion of the play because her grandfather, Helios-the Sun god, helped her in her revenge. Helios was the one who gave Medea the robe and the golden crown as a gift to her so she could kill Creon’s daughter. He also gave Medea a golden flying chariot to protect herself. It is stated on page 562 when Medea says to Jason, “You will never touch us with your hands. My father’s father, Helios, gives me safety from hostile hands. This chariot protects me” (Puchner).

Finally, Medea did make a final endorsement before she left Corinth. She had a goal, which was to make all her enemies suffer and pay for what they had done to her, especially Jason. Medea started to achieve her goal by following her strategy, which was first poisoning the princess along with the king and killing her children with a sword, so Jason would feel devastated and childless. To make a final point, Medea took the bodies of the children so that Jason would never see them again. In conclusion, as a tragic hero, Medea shows a fate of vengeful justice throughout the story.


Work Cited
Euripides. “Medea.” 435 B.C.E. The Norton Anthology World Literature. Ed. Martin Puchner et
al. 3rd ed. Vol. 1. New York: www Norton, 2012. 548,549, 562. Print. 1 vols.

Posted by: dexomia.livia at February 24, 2014 01:16 PM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
23 February 2014

Question #8. The Shadow Archetype and Euripides’s Medea:
The previously assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Now that you’ve read Euripides’s Medea in its entirety, which character (or, characters), best fits this archetype in the narrative? Because of Euripides revolutionary use of the anti-hero, the characters in Medea may be more challenging to peg than in some other narrative. So, keep in mind that the archetype can be literal, psychological, or situational. Does only one shadow exist, or, are there more? Cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citation with page numbers) from both Vogler and Euripides’s Medea to fully support your answer.

Answer:
The shadow is generally negative, dark characters that the audience dislikes and come into confrontation with the hero; Vogler says, “the shadow archetype represents the energy of the dark side, the unexpressed, unrealized, or rejected aspects of something” (Vogler 65). The shadow archetype has two functions; psychological and dramatic. In Euripides’s Medea we are introduced the anti-hero, which is a leading character that lacks the qualities of your traditional hero. The anti-hero is played by the character Medea, a sorceress that falls in love with Jason and after being betrayed by him she becomes severely depressed. In this story Medea herself can be seen as a dramatic shadow, after becoming filled with hatred and depression she vows for revenge against Jason, by any means necessary.
Upon being introduced to Medea we are prompted by the nurse of dwelling danger that looms, “I wish the Argo never had set sail”(Puchner 528). The nurses fear that the on going trauma that Medea suffers from may, lead to horrific results. At first one may see Medea as a victim and sympathize with her, “Poor Medea, mournful and dishonored…surrendering to pain, she melts away her days in tears, ever since she learned of this injustice”(Puchner 529). Despite her ordeal, Medea never plays the victim can be said to express characteristic of being strong and brave, saying (I’d rather take my stand behind a shield three times than go through childbirth once”(Puchner 527). However as the story develops, Medea’s sinister side become very evident and she gears towards the characteristics of scary and violent, “If I should find some way, some strategy to pay my husband back, bring him to justice, keep silent”(Puchner 535).
Medea can be said be both a shape shifter as well as the shadow. She uses the dramatic function of the shadow archetype to wear different masks throughout the story. However consumed by hatred and depression she is consumed by her own darkness and therefore earns the archetype of the shadow.

Work Cited
Puchner, Martin, ed. The Norton Anthology World Literature. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2013. Print.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at February 24, 2014 01:17 PM

Brittany C. Davis
Dr. Hobbs
Medea Essay Question
February 22nd 2014
Question: 2. Medea states that Jason has left her because he tired of her as his wife. Jason states that he married Creon’s daughter because he wanted to ensure the livelihood of Medea and their children. Is one of them right and the other wrong? Why does Jason leave Medea? What do they deferring arguments reveal about their characters?
In the story of Medea written by Euripides, a woman called Medea, is distraught by the idea of her husband leaving her for another woman. Jason, her husband whom has just left her decided that he could no longer live with her or be married to her, for her best interest. At first in the beginning of the story the reader can sympathize and fell empathy for a woman going through such a heart break, especially since she has two children. However as the reader will soon find out, perhaps it might have been the good of her children and her own life as well. Euripides paints a picture of tragic, despair, and insanity in the story of Medea, and to get the bottom of who is actually right and wrong is very difficult to determine.
In the beginning of this story, the first words that Medea even speaks in this play is of death and sadness. “Aaaah! Oh, horrible, horrible all that I suffer, my unhappy struggles. I wish I could die.” (Medea p. 531) Medea is described as an irrational woman who wants her way all time at anyone’s expense. “Alright right, they die. What city will receive me?” (Medea p. 538) Throughout the rest of the story Medea devises a plan to murder her husband, his new wife, and his wife’s father. However her plans are foiled when she is set into exile by Jason’s wife Glauce. Medea is set back on track when she is given sanctuary in Athens, ran by Aegeus. Medea hatches a new plan to cause her husband’s suffering by murdering her own children. Medea’s argument is completely irrational, she is revealed to be a shape shifter in this tale. She appears to be one way to many and completely another way to others. She places a clever ruse on Glauce to gain her love to allow her children to be with their father, all the while planning to kill everyone. “I’ll send her gifts, much lovelier, I know, than any living person has laid eyes on: a delicate robe, and a garland worked in gold.” (Medea p. 552) When the reader is reading this, they are deceived to think that Medea’s intentions are pure, while all the while they are a mask for a more sinister plan.
Jason, is considered to be the Hero of this story. He was very willing to sacrifice what he had for the sake of his children. Jason was aware that Medea was unstable, knew she would make rash decisions, and compromise the safety of his children. “This is not the first time-I have often observed that a fierce temper is an evil that leaves you no recourse.” (Medea p. 539) He tried to make the best decision and remove himself from the situation. Sadly this plan backfired on him, and only made Medea angry. “No! Please believe me: It wasn’t for the woman’s sake I married into the king’s family. As I have said, I wanted to save you, and give our children royal brothers, a safeguard for our household.” (Medea p. 543) Euripides makes it appear as though, Jason was sacrificing his marriage to his wife and being with his children, for his children to have a better future. With this evidence for him, it looks as though even if it appears shallow at first, deep down Jason was truly only looking to bring his children into a better life, while Medea was trying to take that very life from them.
In closing, when asked the question, who is right and who is wrong in this situation, it would be easy to say Jason is wrong for abandoning his wife and children to be with a woman of royalty and power, although as the story progresses it would appear that Medea is not in the right as well. Medea was looking to murder her children merely to bring pain to her husband. While Jason was willing to sacrifice and remove himself from the picture so his children may have a better livelihood. It has been revealed that Medea carries a shape shifter archetype, and Jason carried the Hero archetype. This was a tragic tale, which ultimately leads to death, and leaves the reader wondering if in fact the end justify such tragic means.
Work Cited Page:
Euripides. “Medea.” 435 B.C.E. The Norton Anthology World Literature. Ed. Martin Puchner et
al. 3rd ed. Vol. 1. New York: www Norton, 2012. 531,538,539,543,552. Print. 1 vols.

Posted by: Brittany Davis at February 24, 2014 01:22 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 February 2014
Question# 5:
The closing state of the play by the chorus is that the events occurred as they did because of the will of the gods. However, no god is explicitly present in the play. What is indicated in blaming the gods for the horrors that occurred? What role do the gods play? Keeping in mind Jason's and Medea's history, for how much might the gods be responsible for their actions or not?
Answer:
In Medea the Gods are not present but, they are mentioned throughout the story a lot. By blaming the gods for the horrors that occurred, they take away the blame from themselves. In the story the God's are used as excuses for things that occur for instance when the chorus blame the God Apollo for women not having "divine inspiration," not being able to do poetry (Puncher 539). Another example of a person's actions being justified by blaming a God is when Jason blaming Eros, the God of sex for being the one who "forced your hand: his arrows […] compelled you to rescue me," there was no intervention of Eros Jason is just using that to shed light away from the fact that Medea saved him because she wanted to (Puncher 542). There is another part where Medea tells her children to give a gift to the princess, “these fine things that once my father’s father, Helios passed down to his descendants,” she gives it to her children in order to kill the princess but no evidence shows that she decided to do that because of Helios, this act was driven by her own decisions (Puncher 553). After the king sees his daughter died in his arms he says, “Oh, my poor unhappy child, what God dishonors you? What God destroys you,” however, it was no God that caused this to happen, it was Medea who decided to do this to the princess, she knew that by giving the gifts to the princess the princess would die (Puncher 558). In the ending of the story there is some type of presence of the God Helios, who is protecting Medea from “hostile hands,” showing that yes her grandfather is protecting her but there is no evidence that he cause her to kill her children (Puncher 562). The God’s are not responsible for the actions of Medea and Jason, the thing Medea and Jason do is use the Gods to swear on, blame for things they do, and use them as an excuse for the actions of others.

Works Cited
Puchner, Martin. "Medea." The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 3rd ed. Vol. 1. New York, NY: W.W Nortn &, 2013. 525+. Print.

Posted by: marssiel mena at February 24, 2014 01:24 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 February 2014
Question# 5:
The closing state of the play by the chorus is that the events occurred as they did because of the will of the gods. However, no god is explicitly present in the play. What is indicated in blaming the gods for the horrors that occurred? What role do the gods play? Keeping in mind Jason's and Medea's history, for how much might the gods be responsible for their actions or not?
Answer:
In Medea the Gods are not present but, they are mentioned throughout the story a lot. By blaming the gods for the horrors that occurred, they take away the blame from themselves. In the story the God's are used as excuses for things that occur for instance when the chorus blame the God Apollo for women not having "divine inspiration," not being able to do poetry (Puncher 539). Another example of a person's actions being justified by blaming a God is when Jason blaming Eros, the God of sex for being the one who "forced your hand: his arrows […] compelled you to rescue me," there was no intervention of Eros Jason is just using that to shed light away from the fact that Medea saved him because she wanted to (Puncher 542). There is another part where Medea tells her children to give a gift to the princess, “these fine things that once my father’s father, Helios passed down to his descendants,” she gives it to her children in order to kill the princess but no evidence shows that she decided to do that because of Helios, this act was driven by her own decisions (Puncher 553). After the king sees his daughter died in his arms he says, “Oh, my poor unhappy child, what God dishonors you? What God destroys you,” however, it was no God that caused this to happen, it was Medea who decided to do this to the princess, she knew that by giving the gifts to the princess the princess would die (Puncher 558). In the ending of the story there is some type of presence of the God Helios, who is protecting Medea from “hostile hands,” showing that yes her grandfather is protecting her but there is no evidence that he cause her to kill her children (Puncher 562). The God’s are not responsible for the actions of Medea and Jason, the thing Medea and Jason do is use the Gods to swear on, blame for things they do, and use them as an excuse for the actions of others.

Works Cited
Puchner, Martin. "Medea." The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 3rd ed. Vol. 1. New York, NY: W.W Nortn &, 2013. 525+. Print.

Posted by: marssiel mena at February 24, 2014 01:24 PM

Charles Fowler
Dr. B. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narratives
February 24, 2014

Questions 1. : What is the nature of Medea’s rage? Is there one specific thing that is the source of her anger? Is it a passion? Is it opposed to her intellect, or part of it? Compare her anger to Achilles’s in The Iliad.

Answer: I would say that the nature of Medea’s rage was more revengeful when Jason betrayed and left her and the kids for another woman. The source of her anger was ignited when Jason left and she decided that she wanted to kill his new bride and Jason. Her anger grew to where she wanted to do anything to affect Jason negatively. She even cursed and desired to kill her own kids. She eventually did kill her kids and Jason’s wife.
I felt that Medea had a passion for killing and it is a part of her intellect. To plot such a horrific revenge and carried it out exactly to plan where she killed who she wanted in order to hurt Jason and kill Creon for banishment from Corinth.
Both Achilles’s and Medea had an uncontrollable rage. They both felt that as thou revenge is the only solution for when someone hurts you or gives you pain. Both of them has suffered from dishonor and betrayal. They both took extreme measure when taking revenge. In Medea it was Jason that caused Medea pain resulting in the death of Jason wife death and death of her kids and in Achilles’s Hector was killed by the wrath of Achilles’s anger when his cousin was killed in battle. Killing was also easy for both Medea and Achilles’s where they didn't feel any remorse when taking a life. Even thou Medea had a tough time when she desired to kill her kids, she was still able to go through with it all. There drive for revenge even caused pain on themselves. They are both like wild beast with no direction.

Posted by: Charles Fowler at February 24, 2014 01:55 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01 (Take home Exam # 2)
23 February 2014

Question #15
Euripides has been credited with bringing elements of both realism and melodrama into the art of ancient tragedy. Where in Medea are these innovations evidenced.

ANSWER:
In the story of Medea written by Euripides, it is possible to encounter elements of realism and also of melodrama.

The fact that Jason married Glauce (daughter of Creon) and left his ex-wife Medea alone to take care of her two children is a sign of realism in the narrative. After settling down with Glauce, which is the daughter of the King of Corinth, Jason feels more comfortable because of a financial security provided by his actual wife.

On the other hand the story has more contents of melodrama and Medea is responsible for mostly all of it. Everything that is going through Medea's mind is considered to be an exaggeration. Medea says that she wished she could be dead. After that she plots an idea of murdering Glauce and her father. The ultimate critical sign of melodrama is proven when Medea kills her both children so that she can hurt Jason's feeling and make him feel guilty of all the actions he has taken towards Medea.

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at February 24, 2014 02:25 PM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 220CL CA 02
February 2014

QUESTION #9:
The previously assigned Vogler reading instructs on how to identify this specific archetype in a story and it provides many examples of it in other works, particularly cinematic narrative. Which character (or, characters), best fits this archetype in Euripides’s Medea? Now that you’ve read Euripides’s Medea in its entirety, which character (or, characters), best fits this archetype in the narrative? Because of Euripides’s revolutionary use of the anti-hero, the characters in Medea may be more challenging to peg than in some other narrative. So, keep in mind that the archetypes can be literal, psychological, or situational. Does only one ally exist, or, are there more? If more than one exists, who or what is the primary ally for this dramatic narrative? Cite passages (use quotations and MLA parenthetical citations with page numbers) from both Vogler and Euripides’s Medea Medea to fully support your answer.

ANSWER:
Upon reading Euripides's Medea in its entirety I have recognized the many archetypes which I have came across throughout the play. From hero to herald almost every type of archetype was introduced at some point within the play.

The first archetype noticed was the Hero archetype. As described by Christopher Vogler as, "Someone who is willing to sacrifice his own needs on behalf of others (Vogler 29)."
However, there was a bit of a twist in the archetype when it came to Medea by Euripides. Medea struck us the readers as an anti hero archetype. An anti hero is not the opposite of hero but it is described as, "A specialized kind of hero one who may be an outlaw or villain from the point of view from society but with whom the audience is basically in sympathy (Vogler 34)." Medea definitely has the sympathy of the readers because Jason her husband has put her through a lot of mental grief and stress.

Another archetype seen was the shadow. Jason embodied this archetype in the play Medea by Euripides. A shadow is sometimes better known as, "Characters called villains antagonists or enemies (Vogler 65)." Jason was instrumental in going against the anti hero Medea which seemed to fuel her plans. Jason however, performed double duty as he was also seen as a shape shifter archetype.

Quite a number of the ally archetype was also present in Euripides's Medea. This list of allies included King Ageus, the servants, and the Chorus. Allies are said to be able to, "Serve a variety of necessary functions such as companion, sparring partner, conscience or comic relief (Vogler 71)." Another instance of the shadow archetype also appeared in Medea, and this was not a character. Another type of shadow was the male dominated society which Medea faced daily and this added even more strife to her struggles.


Works Cited
Vogler, Christopher. “The Writer's Journey. Third Edition (2007) :
Print.
Puchner, Martin. "The Norton Anthology World Literature. Volume 1 (2013)Economics of
Print.

Posted by: Kent Wood at February 24, 2014 02:39 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey's in Narrative
February 24, 2014

Question #11:
In Medea’s first long speech to the Chorus (lines 213-261), she claims that women are afflicted with the most "wretched" existence on earth. How is gender explored in the play? Does Medea emerge as a champion of women's plight through either positive or negative example?
Answer:
Medea emerges from her house and gives a speech to the chorus. She first begins her speech by cursing those who judge the silent without knowing exactly who they are. She then continues her speech and switches the point of her speech to how detestable the life of a woman is. In this speech she explains how women are afflicted with the most "wretched" existence on earth. She explains how sexist the world is. She explains this by saying how women become their husband’s possession or property, how they endure the pain of Child labor, how they are forbidden from enjoying a public life and how once their home gets taken away from them they are left with nothing "we women are the most pathetic. First of all we have to buy a husband: spend vast amounts of money, just to get a master for our body-to add insult to injury" (p. 534). “They say that we lead safe, untroubled lives at home while they do battle with the spear. They're wrong. I'd rather take my stand behind a shield three times than go through childbirth ounce" (p. 535). She then pleads with the chorus to make Jason suffer just as he has made her suffer. This play explores gender roles by showing how much more power men have then women and how subordinate women are to men. Medea does emerge as a champion of women’s plight through negative example. She becomes somewhat the voice of all women in ancient Greece, she explains their struggle and how hard it really is being one. She becomes this through negative example because she uses what happened to her/what Jason has put her through in her speech.

Posted by: Jose Parra at February 24, 2014 03:53 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey's in Narrative
February 24, 2014

Question #11:
In Medea’s first long speech to the Chorus (lines 213-261), she claims that women are afflicted with the most "wretched" existence on earth. How is gender explored in the play? Does Medea emerge as a champion of women's plight through either positive or negative example?
Answer:
Medea emerges from her house and gives a speech to the chorus. She first begins her speech by cursing those who judge the silent without knowing exactly who they are. She then continues her speech and switches the point of her speech to how detestable the life of a woman is. In this speech she explains how women are afflicted with the most "wretched" existence on earth. She explains how sexist the world is. She explains this by saying how women become their husband’s possession or property, how they endure the pain of Child labor, how they are forbidden from enjoying a public life and how once their home gets taken away from them they are left with nothing "we women are the most pathetic. First of all we have to buy a husband: spend vast amounts of money, just to get a master for our body-to add insult to injury" (p. 534). “They say that we lead safe, untroubled lives at home while they do battle with the spear. They're wrong. I'd rather take my stand behind a shield three times than go through childbirth ounce" (p. 535). She then pleads with the chorus to make Jason suffer just as he has made her suffer. This play explores gender roles by showing how much more power men have then women and how subordinate women are to men. Medea does emerge as a champion of women’s plight through negative example. She becomes somewhat the voice of all women in ancient Greece, she explains their struggle and how hard it really is being one. She becomes this through negative example because she uses what happened to her/what Jason has put her through in her speech.

Posted by: Jose Parra at February 24, 2014 03:53 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
6 February 2014

Question #5:
The closing statement of the play the chorus is that the events occurred as they did because of the will of the gods. However, no god is explicitly present in the play. What is indicated in blaming the gods for the horrors that occurred? What role do the gods play? Keeping in mind Jason’s and Medea’s history, for how much might the gods be responsible? Do Jason and Medea have free will, and are they responsible for their actions or not?

Awnser:
Although there are no gods in the play, they are a figure much like God is to people today. Zeus is a way of explaining events that have occurred between Jason and Medea. People pray to the gods and what not but I do not find they have a direct impact on the characters. Medea starts to go senile when things do not go her way and Jason leaves her (Euripides 543). This is a devastating blow to her and is the start of her downhill progression where she will eventually murder her own children as well as Creon and Glauce (Euripides 558). This situation happened because Medea just could not cope with Jason leaving here because he got greedy and wanted more for himself. Not because it was the will of the gods. So yes, Medea and Jason have free will and are fully responsible for their actions.

Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at February 24, 2014 11:22 PM

Re-Chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
24 February 2014
Medea essay question

Question:
4. Throughout Medea, many characters refer to the past exploits of Jason and Medea as important for understanding their current situation. How does this past inform the present? Do characters vainly wish to turn back the clock or is there a deeper meaning in these references to the past? Do their previous actions foreshadow their current predicament?
Answer:
In the play Medea, Jason and his wife Medea has a past that connects to the current situation they are facing. Medea abandons her family and homeland, and murdered her own brother. In the present she has murdered her own children and Glauce (Jason’s second wife) because the anger she had against her husband. During this point of the play Jason regrets meeting, and marrying Medea, because the only thing she cares about is Jason coming home. He believes Medea would have even killed herself so he would come home and be with her. Jason feels Medea only cares about herself no one else. He goes back to remember that she murdered her own brother. If she murders her own brother what made him, his children, and current wife Glauce safe. Jason wish he could go back in time and when he first met Medea he would of left her where she was, if he could predict she would do these things to cause turmoil in his life. I believe at some point of Jason cheating on his wife that he knew she would flip out and go crazy, she murdered her own family with no remorse. Medea then runs off with Jason to the land of Greece. Medea wish her husband could have stayed committed to her and not walks out on her to marry the kings daughter Glauce, but stay home and help her raise their two boys. I believe that Jason brings this situation unto himself. If Jason would have left Medea in her hometown and went to Greece alone and then married Glauce and had children he would not be in this current situation. On the other hand he could of remain faithful to his first wife Medea, lived in Greece and raised their two boys. Medea really doesn’t have remorse for the turmoil she has caused in Jason life. Her love for him is so deep even if she went back in time she would do the same thing over again nothing different.

Posted by: re-chia.jackson at February 24, 2014 11:33 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys to Narrative
24 February 2014

Question #4:
Throughout Medea, many characters refer to past exploits of Jason and Medea as important to understanding their current situation. How does this past inform the present? Do these characters vainly wish to turn back the clock, or is there a deeper meaning in these references to the past? Do their previous actions foreshadow their current predicament?

Answer:
While Medea pursued Aegeus for an escape route, they spoke about the situation Medea had been dealing with at her home. She explained to Aegeus, the problem she was having with Jason, her ex-husband and how she needed him to offer her a place to stay. She spoke about the way Jason left her for another woman. Everything Medea had done includes running away from her barbarian land and killing her brother to stop the people from the island in which she belong from chasing her down. Jason and his charm influenced Medea. She bravely escaped from her barbarian island home to start a family with Jason in Greece. Jason was an adventurer who fell in love with Madea and used her sorcery to defeat a monster for treasure. These heroic acts all led to their love for one another and their lives in Corinth, Greece. The couple became parents to two angelic looking children and their home worked around their lives. These past forms the foundation to their relationship. These heroic acts define their history together. Medea feels as if she has put an enormous amount of effort into their lives together and does not deserve to be treated the way Jason has abandoned her home.
In the beginning of the story, the Nurse carries a conversation with the Tutor. They both discuss the relationship between Medea and Jason. They acknowledge the destruction in the home. They feel the father’s absence in the children’s lives and at home. The Nurse says, “Poor Medea, mournful and dishonored, shrieks at his broken oaths, the promise sealed with his right hand (the greatest pledge there is)- she calls the gods to witness just how well Jason has repaid her. She won’t touch food: surrendering to pain, she melts away her days in tears, ever since she learned of this justice. She won’t raise her face; her eyes are glued to the ground. Friends talk to her, try to give her good advice; she listens the way a rock does, or an ocean wave.” The behavior the Nurse notices in Medea eventually turns into the hatred Medea begins to carry toward her children and the royal family. The previous actions of Medea at home that were first seen by the Nurse and Tutor turn into a conversation of homicidal actions. Medea discusses the plan she devised to become friendly with the princess. The Tutor asks Medea, “So why are you crying? Why are your eyes cast down?” Medea responds, “Old man, I am compelled. The gods and I devised this strategy. What was I thinking?” She becomes a crazier thinker that eventually leads to the murders of her children, the King of Corinth, Creon and the princess bride. The Tutor is senior assistant to Medea; therefore, he is well aware of the lifestyle in their home. When he asks Medea what is wrong it is the climatic point in the story where she becomes extremely upset with everyone. She desires to kill and destroy everyone for believing what has happened to her is okay.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at February 25, 2014 09:23 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at February 26, 2014 07:30 AM

Google
My Blog

Creative Commons License
This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Some rights reserved. 2006.