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September 18, 2013

Saint Paul, the Apostle (a.k.a. Saul of Taursus) and his _First Epistle to the Corinthians_

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Saint Paul, the Apostle (a.k.a. Saul of Taursus). c. 5 B.C.E.-- 67 C.E.First Epistle to the Corinthians. 53-7 C.E. Jewish-Roman National. Theological text.


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Posted by lhobbs at September 18, 2013 08:45 AM

Readers' Comments:

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 October 2013

The relationship between Gatsby and Mr. Gatz seemed to be secure at a distance. Gatsby’s father seemed to be proud of all that his son did. When he went to Gatsby’s for the funeral, he showed Nick a photo of Gatsby’s house that Gatsby had sent him. Fitzgerald describes his dad explaining the picture as “He pointed out every detail to me eagerly. “ Look there!” and then sought admiration from my eyes. He had shown it so often that I think it was more real to him now than the house itself” (172). Gatsby’s father learned to love and be with Gatsby through spirit. Even though they were never around each other Mr. Gatz still had tremendous admiration for his son. In Richard Lattimore’s translation of Saint Pau’s Corinthians he states, “Love is patient, is kind, love has no jealousy, does not swagger, has no pride, is not immodest, does not look for its own advantage, is not stirred to anger, does not keep count of evil done, is not happy over wrongdoing, shares the happiness of the truth; all-sustaining, all-faithful, all-hopeful, all-enduring. Love never fails” (378). How Mr. Gatz expresses his admiration for is son is a good example of this. He does not resent his son for leaving but is grateful for all he was able to accomplish with his life
Works Cited:
Fitzgerald, Scott F. The Great Gatsby. New York City: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1925. Print.
Paul, Saint. The First Letter to the Corinthians. Trans. Richard Lattimore. Web.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 5, 2013 05:12 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013

Saint Paul believed in the modern time of love. The Greek word is known as agape or “divine love.” In the Novel The Great Gatsby it expressed many types of love and relationships. I believe love is something that is created in our minds and portrayed how we want to personally see it. Every one loves and sees love a little differently as well as our expectations of what love should be. In the Corinthians it question if love was even an impossible idea for humans.
The Corinthians goes on to say that agape love is a down to earth and unconditional love. Saint Paul believed that its origin and continuance does not depend on how much a person accepts being loved. When a person loves someone unconditionally it is when they truly love and care about the other person, and they do not require being loved in return.
13:4Love is patient and is kind; love doesn’t envy. Love doesn’t brag, is not proud, 13:5 doesn’t behave itself inappropri- ately, doesn’t seek its own way, is not pro- voked, takes no account of evil; 13:6doesn’t rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth; 13:7bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. (Corinthians 1 13:4-7)
This part of the Corinthians clearly speaks about what agape love is and is not. Henry C. Gatz was the father of Jay Gatsby. The father and son did not have a strong relationship but I do believe they had an agape love. Even though Gatsby’s father did not have much and he moved away from his father to make a better future for himself I think he knows that his fathers struggle helped make him a better person. He used being raised from nothing to motivate him to be great. Henry Gatz was proud of his son for making himself into a successful man. “If he’d lived, he’d have been a great man. A man like James J. Hill. He’d of helped build up the country.” (168) He also showed his support for Gatsby because when Nick had asked Gatsby’s father if he wanted to move the body west he said no because he knew Gatsby loved being in the east and its what he would of wanted to stay.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. Print.
"Corinthians 1 13:4-7." World English Bible. N.p.: n.p., n.d. N. pag. Print.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 5, 2013 08:19 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013

The Great Gatsby reflects Paul’s views on love in a significant way whether it is between Mr. and Mrs. McKee, Tom and Daisy; George and Myrtile; Nick and Jordan. Although the book covers various aspects of love none can compare to the love Henry C. Gatz had towards his son, James Gatz. The connection they shared was one sided, but it was powerful beyond measures.
This relationship ties in with Paul’s views on love when he said, “Love is patient” (Foundation 1 Corinthians 13:4). This when Mr. Gatz noticed his son was unhappy with his life and instead of holding him back he allowed him to go and waited patiently for his success.
“He looked around him now for the first time and saw the height and splendor of the hall and the great rooms opening out from it into other rooms, his grief began to be mixed with an awed pride"(Fitzgerald 168). This portrays the “love is not jealous” saying (Foundation 1 Corinthians 13:4).
Even though Mr. Gatz had found out about the death of his son through, “The Chicago Newspaper” (Fitzgerald 167) he still remained humble and kind to Nick even though he did not try to reach him, this also goes hand and hand with the, “Love is kind” (Foundation 1 Corinthians 13:4) saying.
Through all the pain, Mr. Gatz endured and all the disbelief that his son was gone he still had to bear it all and come to the realization that a “mad man” (Fitzgerald 167) had killed his son. As he reflected thinking that James Gatz or Jay Gatsby could have been, “a great man, he’d of help build up the country” (Fitzgerald 168). This goes to show you that love also, “believes, bears, and endures al things” (Foundation 1 Corinthians 13:7).
Lastly, Henry C. Gatz may have realized the person Jay Gatsby was, but he did not rejoice in the unrighteousness of him, but instead he rejoiced in the truth that his son, James Gatz succeeded at making a new life for himself, which was better than his parents. This showed that Mr. Gatz, “did not rejoice in the unrighteousness, but instead rejoiced with the truth” (Foundation 1 Corinthians 13:6).


Works Cited

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. "The Great Gatsby."
Foundation, The Lockman. "New American Standard Bible ."

Posted by: Jasmine Charlton at October 5, 2013 08:21 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013
Part II of Test:
“Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I have become sounding brass or a clanging cymbal. And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.” (1 Corinthians 13:1-2). In a better understanding on what Saint Paul meant in his story of Conception of Divine Love is that love comes and goes without changing. It is a self-giving love that gives without demanding or expecting re-payment. It is love that is so great that it can be given to the unlovable or unappealing. It is love that loves even when is it rejected. Agape love gives and love because it wants to; it does not demand or expect repayment from the love given. Agape is originally Greek, which means love. Paul uses the word agape as “God’s love” but if the understanding of the bible, in John’s book, men are said to agape sin and the world. The word agape has little to do with emotion and has a lot to do with self-denial for the sake of another.

References:
"1 Corinthians 13 - Agape Love." 1 Corinthians 13 - Agape Love. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Oct. 2013.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at October 6, 2013 02:35 PM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013

Essay Topic: For this essay, you are going to write about either Siddhartha and his son (OR) Gatz and his son. Choose one, not both. Once you have chosen a father-son set, you are going to apply Paul’s theory of agape.

Answer:Siddhartha is successful of the agape (unconditional) love for his son. At first, Siddhartha wanted to give his son time to mourn the loss of his mother before trying to establish a relationship with him. In Chapter 10, Siddhartha, “…hoped to win him over, by friendly patience” (Hesse 82). This exemplifies part of Paul’s agape theory of, “love is patient” (Corinthians 13:4) because Siddhartha did not force his son to love him. Siddhartha understood that his son was very close to his mother, so meeting him for the first time would make the son feel uncomfortable. Even after Siddhartha’s son ran away, he went after him and still had hope that his son would accept his heart. Unfortunately, Siddhartha’s son did not reciprocate the agape love for his father. When asked to get brushwood, the son shouted, “"Get the brushwood for your liking. I am not your servant. I do know that you will not hit me; you do not dare; I do know that you regularly want to punish me and put me down with your religious devotion and your indulgence. You want me to become like you, just as devout, just as soft, just as wise! I, listen up, just to make you suffer, I rather want to become a highway-robber and murderer, and go to hell, than to become like you! I hate you. You are not my father, and if you have been ten times my mother's fornicator” (Hesse 86). According to the Paul’s letter, “Love does not behave itself inappropriately and takes no account of evil” (Corinthians 13:6), which does not describe how the son behaved toward his father because he took advantage of him by requesting Siddhartha to do stuff for him and not caring about his destructive actions. The son also directly stated that he hated Siddhartha, which is the complete opposite of love.


Works Cited
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha: An Indian Tale. Trans. Online Public Domain Version by EBD Books. Germany: 1922. Print.

Saul (Paul) of Tarsus. The First Epistle to the Corinthians (Corinthians I). World English Bible Version Online. Letter.

Posted by: Rache Robinson at October 6, 2013 03:03 PM

Andrew Milljour
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
October 6 2013

Quiz 2: Part 2
Paul says “Love is patient and is kind; love doesn’t envy. Love doesn’t brag, is not proud.” (Corinthians 13:4). I believe that Gatsby’s father showed some of those qualities. Mr. Gatz continued to love Gatsby even after he ran away from his home when he was young. It wasn’t until later that Mr. Gatz realized that Gatsby ran away for a reason. “. . . Of course we was broke up when he run off from home, but I see now there was a reason for it. . .” (Fitzgerald 2145). Paul wrote that love is patient and Mr. Gatz showed his patients with his son. Gatsby had become a millionaire on his own and made the headlines of many newspapers. Word of his son’s whereabouts was sure to have reached Mr. Gatz, but he let his son continue with his life and still love him. Mr. Gatz was proud of Gatsby and did brag about it his sons achievements to others. Fitzgerald describes Mr. Gatz showing Nick a picture that Gatsby sent to him, “It was a photograph of the house, cracked in the corners and dirty with many hands” (Fitzgerald 2128). The part that reads “cracked in the corners and dirty with hands” shows that Mr. Gatz was pleased and gladly showed off what his son wealth to others in a bragging manner.

Posted by: Andrew Milljour at October 6, 2013 04:34 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
6 October 2013
In Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Henry C. Gatz is the father of James Gatsby. Mr. Gatz was not in Gatsby’s life while he became wealthy, but he was one of the only people that attended his funeral. This goes to show that despite the past Gatsby and his father had, Mr. Gatz still loved James unconditionally. They had their differences and did not stay in touch, but Mr. Gatz did not care about the material things that his son had, unlike all the people that were associated with him.
In Paul’s theory of agape love, it takes a part of I Corinthians 13:4-13:6, which describes love as “not quick to take offense. Love keeps no score of wrongs; does not gloat over other men’s sins, but delights in the truth.” In my opinion, Mr. Gatz displays this very well towards his son. He does not dwell on Gatsby’s wrongdoings with the bootlegging of alcohol. He still thought very highly of his son and what he could have been. “He had a big future before him, you know. He was only a young man, but he had a lot of brain power here […] If he’d of lived, he’d been a great man. He’d of helped build up the country” (Fitzgerald 168). Mr. Gatz had fulfilled all of the necessities of what it means to have unconditional love towards someone. Just as Paul explains that Jesus of Nazareth, he felt, was the personification of the father. He created humans, so he loved them no matter what. Just as parents create their children, they love them unconditionally.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print.
1 Corinthians 13:4-6. World English Bible. Print.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 6, 2013 05:04 PM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
6 October 2

Agape love is unconditional given by God. Paul defines love in Corinthians I by stating what it is and what it is not, “Love is patient and is kind; love doesn’t envy. Love doesn’t brag, is not proud, doesn’t behave itself inappropriately, doesn’t seek its own way, is not provoked, takes no account of evil; doesn’t rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth; bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endure all things. Love never fails” (Corinthians I, 13:4-8). This juxtaposition defines love as unconditional and the occasions in which love becomes conditional. This unconditional love can be applied to the Great Gatsby, utilizing two characters, Mr. Gatz and Gatsby; Mr. Gatz as the character who successfully portrays agape love. These two characters had limited interaction but, Paul’s definition of love is from God who is a father figure. As Paul states, “if anyone loves God, the same is known by him” (Corinthians I, 8:3).
Mr. Gatz as the father of Gatsby loved him unconditionally. Gatsby wanted nothing to do with his father when he left his parents’ house. Nick explained Gatsby believed his parents “were shiftless and unsuccessful farm people” (Fitzgerald 98). With this in mind, it seems Gatsby does not care for his parents. Although, discovered later, he did love his parents especially his father. Mr. Gatz had a conversation with Nick where Mr. Gatz seemed incredibly proud of his son. Mr. Gatz took the burden of not seeing his son after he fled, however, Mr. Gatz believed in his son for the remainder of his life. As recounted by Nick, Mr. Gatz describes his last relation as positive, Mr. Gatz states:
“He come out to see me two years ago and bought me the house I live in now. Of course we was broke up when we run off from home, but I see now there was a reason for it. He knew he had a big future in front of him. And ever since he made a success he was very generous with me” (Fitzgerald 172).
Could Mr. Gatz be considered unloving for appreciating his son and loving his success? Why would Gatsby go back to his parents if he wanted nothing to do with them? From the previous quotation by Paul, “if anyone loves God, the same is known by him” (Corinthians I, 8:3). To make this clear, those who love God will receive love in return. Gatsby went back to his parents because he did love them, wanted them to know that he did, and he was returned with love by Mr. Gatz, who is an appropriate character that shows agape love. He forgave the past of his son to love him for the remainder of his life. Even after death, Mr. Gatz, the father, still loved Gatsby, the son.

References
World English Bible. [S.l.]: Book On Demand, 2012. Print.
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 6, 2013 06:20 PM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013

Siddhartha lived up to agape love as much as he could this situation. This essay will first talk about the ways Siddhartha relationship with his son followed Paul’s theory of agape love and then the elements where their relationship faltered according to Paul’s theory.
Siddhartha does everything he can to get his son to love him. Siddhartha “did not force him, he did many a chore for him, always picked the best piece of the meal for him. Slowly, he hoped to win him over, by friendly patience.” This goes along with, “love is kind and patient; (1 Corinthians 13:4)” Just like Saint Paul states, “Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. (1 Corinthians 13:7)” Siddhartha keeps on bearing the poor treatment from his son. He does not want to give up on the fact that his son will eventually love him back. Siddhartha does not beat him or reprimand him for stealing Vasudevas fruit or breaking the rice bowls, he believes that being kinds is better than being mean. Vasudeva is telling Siddhartha that what he is doing is not going to work he has lived another life that is completely different from his. In addition, that his love is shackles holding his son down. Even though this is sound guidance, “Siddhartha could not heed his friend’s advice. (Hesse 68)” He still has hope that his son will love him back (Hesse 66).
Although, Siddhartha follows the majority of the guidelines for agape love he is missing a central point. Agape love is unconditional love a love that gives without wanting or receiving love in return. He loves his son, but he also wants his son the love him back so much that he literally does everything for him. According to Paul, love “does not rejoice at wrong doing but, rejoices with the truth. (1 Corinthians 13:6)” The wrongdoing on Siddhartha’s part is that he does not realize what he is doing with his one-sided love. Vasudeva tells him that its wrong of him to force his pampered son to live like they do. (Hesse 67) Siddhartha does not want to open his eyes to the truth that he is unintentionally punishing his child.

Work Cited
1 Corinthians. BibleGateway.com: A Searchable Online Bible in over 100 Versions and 50 Languages. Crossway Bibles, a Division of Good News Publishers., 2001. Web. 06 Oct. 2013.
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Bridgeford Classics, 2013.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 6, 2013 06:23 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
4 September 2013
Agapic love in an unconditional and divine love, the World English Bible Version of the Corinthians I says; “Love is patient and is kind; love doesn’t envy. Love doesn’t brag, is not proud, doesn’t behave itself inappropriately, doesn’t seek its own way, is not provoked, takes no account of evil; doesn’t rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth; bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never fails.”(Corinthians I, 13:4-13:8) I believe Henry C. Gatz is successful with agape love because, even though Gatsby left his family for riches and a new life, and he did not want to remember his past self and even claimed his parents were dead, his father still showed up to his funeral because he loved him. He also says “He had a big future before him, you know. He was only a young man, but he had a lot of brainpower here.”(Fitzgerald 168) Even after James is dead his father believed his son was so much more than just what he let people see. Gatz tells Nick that James bought him a house and would visit him every so often.
Gatz’s love for his son follows the points in Paul’s letters for what love is and what it is not. “Love doesn’t rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth” Gatz knew the truth about James life and had no problem relaying it to Nick he did not do this out of spite for his son and he did not think James deserved what happened to him. He just thought a good friend of his son should know the truth. “bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things” Gatz’s son has just died and of course he is upset about it but, there he is, telling nick about how much of a good person James was and celebrating all the good in his life.
Gatz shows Agapic love for his son, he loves him whether he would have stayed with his family, and he loves him after he moves away to have a live full of bigger and better things.
Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. "Chapter IX." The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. 168. Print.
"Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians." World English Bible. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 13:4-3:8.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at October 6, 2013 06:48 PM


In Hesses’ Siddhartha, the central character, Siddhartha, exemplifies a few of the characteristics of Paul’s theory of agape love with his son. He does not meet all, but most of the aspects that 1 Corinthians mentions. Siddhartha’s love for his son is patient and kind and full of hope. During his road to self-enlightenment, Siddhartha is entertained by the courtesan Kamala. She taught him about love making. She came to him after he ventured out on his own learning journey, with a little boy that soon was revealed as being Siddhartha Jr. Upon being bitten by a snake Kamala’s life ends. After Kamala’s death, Siddhartha lets his son have ample time to mourn over his loss. This is the first glimpse at Siddhartha exemplifying the phrase “love is patient and kind…” (World English Bible New Testament Corinthians 1, 13:4) because he does not try to make his son do anything. As a matter of fact, he mentions “he did not force him, he did many of chores for him” (Hesse Pg 83). Because he would do this, his son would frequently disobey the things that Siddhartha would tell him to do. Siddhartha, “slowly…hoped to win him over, by friendly patience” (Hesse Pg 83). Paul states that love “believes all things, hopes all things” (World English Bible New Testament Corinthians 1, 13:7). Although his son does not relay the love back to him Siddhartha shows the agape love that Paul speaks of. When Siddhartha Jr. had run away, Siddhartha badly wanted to follow after him. He kept on loving him and wanting to care for him because “love never fails” (World English Bible New Testament, Corinthians 1, 13:8).
Works Cited
Hesse, Hermann, and W. K. Marriott. Siddhartha. [Hollywood, FL]: Simon and Brown, 2012. Print.
The New English Bible. [London?]: Collins-World, 1972. Print.


Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at October 6, 2013 08:41 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013

Quiz II Part II

Agape love, according to Saint Paul, is the highest, most heavenly love there is. It is unconditional love, like the love that Jesus Christ had for his father and his people. In Siddhartha by Herman Hesse, Siddhartha is reunited with his son after Kamala dies. He loves his son very much, and wants to become very close with him. Even though his son is very hard on Siddhartha and does not respect him, Siddhartha lets him act this way to try and make him comfortable and happy. When his son runs away, Siddhartha chases after him despite his son’s obvious showing that he did not want to be found by him by taking the oar out of the boat he escaped on, “Don’t you see what your son is trying to tell you? Don’t you see that he does not want to be followed?” (Hesse 88). It is obvious that Siddhartha’s son is not interested in his father, let alone love him, but it is hard to tell whether or not Siddhartha had agape love for his son. It is hard to tell because in the book, he does everything he can to try to get close with his son and to make him happy, and it would seem as though he loves him, but you get the feeling that Siddhartha has a sort of selfish love for his son, not an agape love. Throughout Siddhartha’s whole life, he tries to find enlightenment and happiness, and by reuniting with his son he believes he will become one step closer to reaching his goal. I believe that Siddhartha did love his son, but not a sacrificial, selfless, unconditional love like agape love.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 6, 2013 08:54 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

In The Great Gatsby, we meet a character named Henry C. Gatz who is Gatsby’s father. The novel tells us very little about Mr. Gatz’s and Gatsby’s personal relationship. Going off of what we do know, I do believe that Henry C. Gatz does have agape love for his son. In the book, Gatz states that he was poor when Gatsby went off to do bigger and better things. No matter how much Gatsby is different from his father, his father always respected him for his motivation and successes and saw only the positive that came from everything that his son did. Paul’s letter about love states that love “believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things” (Corinthians I, 13:7). Mr. Gatz shows that he believed that Gatsby would have continued on as a successful man. Referring to Gatsby’s motivation, Mr. Gatz says “It just shows you, don’t it” (Fitzgerald 110). Mr. Gatz knew that his son had the potential to be great and he even had physical proof of it. Despite any rough patches that Gatsby went through, Mr. Gatz seems to have appreciated what Gatsby had done for him. “Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves like this or something” (Fitzgerald 110). Mr. Gatz clearly believed that his son was intelligent and driven and would have done many more great things with his life if he had gotten to live longer.

Works Cited
1 Corinthians. World English Bible. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Oct. 2013.
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. "Chapter 9." The Great Gatsby. Ware: Wordsworth Classics, 1993. 110.
Print.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 6, 2013 09:15 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
7 October 2013

Exam Part 2

1. The definition of agape love is unconditional love, and it is divine, according to Chapter 12 in Corinthians, it is said, “ Love is patient, love is kind and envies no one, love is never boastful, nor conceited, nor rude, never selfish, not quick to take offense. Love keeps no score of wrongs; does not gloat over other men’s sin, but delights in the truth, there is nothing love cannot face; there is no limit to its faith, its hope and endurance’’ (Corinthians 1, 12:27-13:13). Love is something that felt with the heart, mind, and soul. Agape love is not rude and evil; it would not do anything to harm the other person. This theory applies to tom and daisy they weren’t in agape love because tom never loved daisy because he cheated on her and when you love a person in a relationship there won’t be cheating or being a liar to your wife but not only that he wasn’t loyal to her to keep her love. According to Page 156 “ He might have despised himself, for he had certainly taken her under false pretense, I don’t mean that he had traded on his phantom millions, but he had deliberately given Daisy a sense of security; he let her believe that he was a person from much strata as herself- that he was fully able to take care of her. (Fitzgerald, 156) The love Tom and Daisy had is going destroy the bond and love that existed between them. Therefore, that love between him and Daisy was gone and no longer existed. Tom is a character that is selfish and very careless to those who loved him.

2. Siddhartha and his son were defiantly an example of agape love because Siddhartha does love his son and does not do anything to harm him but show him enlightenment. Agape love is unconditional love in which Siddhartha showed that to his son, Siddhartha never hated his son but rather loved him and took care of him. Siddhartha was a good father figure to his son because he gives him everything he should know about the life; he did not leave him to wonder on his own in the world. This applies greatly to Paul’s theory because Siddhartha, and his son is the perfect example of this theory, and it shows it at first when Siddhartha’s son first meets his father. According to page 118 “ But he loved him and preferred the sorrow and trouble of his love rather than happiness and pleasure without the boy” (Hesse, 118). He even loved his son even when he was sad over his mother but regardless of Siddhartha helped him a supported him through his grief, and that’s love. Siddhartha is very successful in agape love Just like in Corinthians chapter 13 “ It does not dishonor others, it is not self -seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrong” (Corinthians 1, 13:4-5). Also because the in Paul’s theory everything that within the theory applied to Siddhartha and his son, not only was it a perfect example, but it showed his actions and love for his son was unconditional, and his father was going to be there for him no matter what the son had gone through in his life.

Work Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Cutchogue: Buccaneer Books, 1976. Print.

Barker, Kenneth L., and Donald W. Burdick. Zondervan KJV Study Bible: King James Version. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2002. Print.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott, and Matthew J. Bruccoli. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. Print.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 6, 2013 09:18 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Paul’s view of love differs from the others we have seen due to the fact he believes in divine love also known as agape love. Agape love is unconditional love and includes everyone. Paul explains, “Jesus was portrayed as being sent by divine love to summon humankind to turn from its religious apostasy and moral decay, to accept God’s forgiving love, and to pursue a life of righteous, love, and justice” (Early Christians view on Love 27). In Paul’s first letter to Corinthians he states, “Love is patient and is kind; love doesn’t envy. Love doesn’t brag, is not proud, doesn’t behave itself inappropriately, doesn’t seek its own way, is not provoked, takes no account of evil, doesn’t rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth; bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things” (Corinthians I, 13:4-13:7). This letter explains humans are to love one another unconditionally, such as God does through Jesus. In F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, I will examine Mr. Gatz and his son James Gatz relationship from the time James was a boy to a young adult. Mr. Gatz is successful when it comes to agape love by loving his son unconditionally.
In The Great Gatsby, Mr. Gatz and his son James Gatz have an interesting relationship. Leaving home at a young age, Gatsby, and his father did not speak much. Mr. Gatz states, “Of course we was broke up when he run off from home” (Fitzgerald 172). The last time Mr.Gatz had seen his son was two years before his son’s death. Once Mr. Gatz received news of the death, he left Minnesota as soon as possible in order to make it to his son’s funeral. Once he arrived at the house, he was in awe. Mr. Gatz was proud of his son and all his accomplishments. The narrator states, “His pride in his son and in his son’s possessions was continually increasing” (Fitzgerald 172). Gatsby was a very determined being, and tried his best to become successful. Mr. Gatz states, “Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves like this or something. Do you notice what he’s got about improving his mind? He was always great for that. He told me I et like a hog once, and I beat him for it” (Fitzgerald 173). Mr. Gatz is successful with agape love because he never stopped loving his son throughout the years. Even though Mr. Gatz beat Gatsby for correcting him, he respected his son’s knowledge. Gatsby did not care much of his family, hints the last time he visited, and the lies he told about them being dead. Gatsby has had his share of wrongdoings in the past such as leaving home, disowning his family, and committing federal crimes. Despite all his wrongs, Mr. Gatz puts that aside and focuses on the positive. He admires his son willingness to get ahead, and the motivation he had. Mr. Gatz decides to keep his son body in West egg and has him buried in the backyard of the house. Thinking of what’s best for his son Mr. Gatz states, “Jimmy always liked it better down East. He rose up to his position in the East” (Fitzgerald 168). Once the funeral was over, Mr. Gatz left the East and headed west.


Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. Simon & Schuster, 2004. Print.
"Early Christian Views on Love." n. page. Web. 6 Oct. 2013.
"Paul's First Letter to the Corinthians ." Amazonaws. N.p.. Web. 6 Oct 2013. .

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 6, 2013 10:00 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013

When St. Paul refers to love he means, “Love is patient and kind; it is not jealous or conceited or proud; love is not ill-mannered or selfish or irritable; love does not keep records of wrongs; love is not happy with evil, but is happy with truth. Love never gives up, and its faith, hope, and patience never fail” (I Corinthians 13:4-7). Mr. Henry Gatz was a man of agape love. His love was unconditional like the quote from Corinthians. Before the character of Mr. Gatz is in the story, the reader assumes he is like his son Jay Gatsby. Once he arrives in New York and Nick gets to know him he realizes he is a gentle man that is forgiving and patient. Even though Jay Gatsby did bad things in his life, his father did not care about them because he loved his son. The way Mr. Gatz spoke about his son was even kind and hopeful, “Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves like this or something. Do you notice what he’s got about improving his mind? He was always great for that” (Fitzgerald 173). Although there are not any instances of Mr. Gatz and Jay together, there is enough evidence he was proud of his son and wanted the best for him.

Fitzgerald, Scott F. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribener, 1925. Print.
Good News Bible. Ed. n.d. New York: American Bible Study, 1993. Print.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 6, 2013 10:27 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013

When St. Paul refers to love he means, “Love is patient and kind; it is not jealous or conceited or proud; love is not ill-mannered or selfish or irritable; love does not keep records of wrongs; love is not happy with evil, but is happy with truth. Love never gives up, and its faith, hope, and patience never fail” (I Corinthians 13:4-7). Mr. Henry Gatz was a man of agape love. His love was unconditional like the quote from Corinthians. Before the character of Mr. Gatz is in the story, the reader assumes he is like his son Jay Gatsby. Once he arrives in New York and Nick gets to know him he realizes he is a gentle man that is forgiving and patient. Even though Jay Gatsby did bad things in his life, his father did not care about them because he loved his son. The way Mr. Gatz spoke about his son was even kind and hopeful, “Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves like this or something. Do you notice what he’s got about improving his mind? He was always great for that” (Fitzgerald 173). Although there are not any instances of Mr. Gatz and Jay together, there is enough evidence he was proud of his son and wanted the best for him.

Fitzgerald, Scott F. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribener, 1925. Print.
Good News Bible. Ed. n.d. New York: American Bible Study, 1993. Print.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 6, 2013 10:28 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013
Agape love is defined, as selfless, unconditional love that is shown is Paul’s letter to the Corinthians. In this, he states that agape love, “bears everything, believes everything, hopes everything, endures everything” (1 Corinthians 13:7). This passage from Paul’s letter directly relates to Gatz and his son’s relationship because of his return to see Gatsby after he is killed.
The return of Gatsby’s father proves that love “endures everything.” After all the things they had been through, the love did not fade. This is a prime example of agape love. Gatz explains, “ Of course we was broke up when he run off from home, but I see now there was a reason for it. He knew he had a big future in front of him. And ever since he made a success he was very generous with me” (Fitzgerald 172). No matter if they were rich or poor, they supported each other.
A parent’s love for their child is truly unconditional. Paul explains this in 1 Corinthians, and it is proved in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. No matter that Gatsby did not mention his father, he loved him unconditionally until the end. First Corinthians 13:7 directly relates to Gatz and his son’s relationship because of his return to see Gatsby after he is killed.

Works Cited
"1 Corinthians 13:7." N.p., n.d. Web. .
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. Print.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 6, 2013 10:39 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
06 October 2013

Gatsby Test #2 Essay: Siddhartha and his son

Answer: Throughout the course of the novel, Siddhartha experiences many different types of love; however, the Paul’s version of agape love as described in 1 Corinthians 13 depicts the relationship of Siddhartha and his son. Predominantly Paul view of love as “kind and patient” applies most directly to the relationship of Siddhartha and his son (Corinthians I, 13:4). When the pair first met despite the unfortunate circumstances, he instantly felt a familial love for the boy and “took him on his knees, let him weep, petted his hair” as Kamala died before of them (Hesse 79). Further as their time together progresses, Siddhartha patiently waited “for a long time, for months, for his son to understand him, to accept his love, to perhaps reciprocate it” (Hesse 83). Despite his son’s blatant disrespect for and violence towards both Siddhartha and Vasudeva, Siddhartha’s love for the boy, “doesn’t behave itself inappropriately” nor “rejoice in unrighteousness” (Corinthians I, 13:5-6). When meet with such objections Siddhartha did not respond with violence because he knew “water stronger than rocks, love stronger than force (Hesse 84). Finally, Siddhartha proves his love for his son to be unconditional agapic love when his son ran away from him. Standing outside Kamala’s pleasure garden, Siddhartha realized “deeply, he felt love for the runaway in his heart, like a wound” given to him in order “to become a blossom and had to shine” (Hesse 88).

Works Cited
Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. Trans. W.K. Marriott. South Carolina: Simon & Brown, 2012. Print.

World English Bible Version. Electronically Published. 1997. Digital.

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 6, 2013 11:19 PM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs
October 10, 2013
Part Two Test Two

The bond between father and son is often one of unconditional, self-sacrificing love. Saint Paul’s definition of agape love has just this same meaning. Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha represents this type of agape love through the relationship between Siddhartha and his son Siddhartha Jr. Though no man but God himself is deemed perfect, as Siddhartha would also be seen as imperfect due to his leaving of Kamala before his son was born, unconditional love is stronger than any force. Unfortunately for Siddhartha, his relationship with his son was unsuccessful in establishing true unconditional, self-sacrificing love.
Siddhartha had met his son under unfortunate circumstances; Kamala’s death had brought the two together for the first time. The familiarity with his son’s features at first sight took Siddhartha by surprise. He saw the figure as “a strange reminder, admonishing him of something forgotten” (Hesse, Lesser, Thurman, page 89). Upon seeing Kamala he realized this was his son, his own flesh and blood. Siddhartha definitely represents Paul’s claim of how “love is patient and is kind” (Corinthians 13:4) through his distribution of chores with his son. Siddhartha saw how his son was “accustomed to wealth, accustomed to fine cooking, a soft bed, accustomed to ordering servants around” (Hesse, Lesser, Thurman, page 93). However, Siddhartha did not force him, often did most of his sons chores and often chose the easiest of tasks for his son to complete to get him accustomed to doing work (Hesse, Lesser, Thurman, page 94). Ironically, like Paul’s definition of love being patient, Siddhartha hoped to win over his son “through benign patience” (Hesse, page 93).
Agape love, according to Paul, also “bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things” (Corinthians 13:7). This is seen in Siddhartha’s relationship with his son after he has broken the two rice bowls. Vasudeva pulled Siddhartha aside and spoke of where his son can best thrive. Siddhartha showed how his love for his son is building by saying “I am fighting for him, I am competing for his heart, with love and with kindly patience I will capture it” (Hesse, Lesser, Thurman, page 94). Although Vasudeva spoke truth in his words to his friend Siddhartha, he “could not follow his friend’s advice, he could not give his son away” (Hesse, Lesser, Thurman, page 96).
Where Siddhartha may be seen as failing to live up to a true unconditional love for his son is his inability to change his son’s attitude. As Paul had said, love does not behave itself inappropriately, doesn’t seek its own way, is not provoked, takes no account of evil (Corinthians, 13:5). He let his son disobey him and order him around in hopes that they would grow closer (Hesse, Lesser, Thurman, page 96). Siddhartha was trying to endure the torture of his son by maintaining his silence in hope it would be seen as respect but ultimately it lead to him being seen in a negative light as a model. Siddhartha’s son had enough of his father and said “I would rather be a bandit and a murderer and go to hell than to be like you! I hate you; you are not my father, even if you were my mother’s lover ten times over” (Hesse, Lesser, Thurman, page 98). Siddhartha let his son run from home and did not pursue until the next morning. If love truly is not provoked why was Siddhartha so desperately trying to win his son by giving him the easiest chores to do?
The final and most important aspect of Siddhartha failing to show true agape love for his son is his envy of those he ferried after his son ran away. Paul states in Corinithians 13:4, love does not envy; yet, Siddhartha thinks to himself “So many, so many thousands are so graciously favored-why not I? Even wicked people, even thieves and robbers have children, and love them, and are loved by them, I alone am not” (Hesse, Lesser, Thurman, page 101). The pain of losing his son may have played a pivotal role in his doubting of his true feelings, however it was this main reason he can be seen as unsuccessfully having true agape love towards his son.
Although his methods were unorthodox, Siddhartha had to work with what he figured out from his son in very short time. To go from a lifestyle where you are pampered day in and day out to a pilgrimage in which you lose your mother and meet your father whom left before your birth truly disturbed the young man’s life. Despite his best efforts, Siddhartha did love his son but not unconditionally. It can be seen that he did self-sacrifice by doing those extra chores and giving him the easiest of the bunch, but by being envious of those parents whose children loved them and letting his son run wild without restriction, Siddhartha lost his path on the road to true Saint Paul agape love.

Works Cited
Hesse, Hermann, Lesser, Rika, and Thurman, Robert A.F.. Siddhartha: an Indic poem. New
York: Barnes & Noble Classics, 2007. Print.
Saint Paul. World English Bible. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians. Corinthians 13:4-14:4.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 6, 2013 11:51 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL-Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
5 October 2013
Agape Love
The elements of Paul’s theory of “Agape love,” are exemplified in the story of Siddhartha. Some examples of this are between Siddhartha and his son and are represented in Siddhartha by: “Love is patient; love is kind, it does not envy, does not boast, it is not proud. Love is not self-seeking, and love is not proud (Corinthians I 13:4).” These apply a lot between Siddhartha and his son, because in the story when the son gets angry with Siddhartha, the little boy says to his father, “I do not want to be like you. I would rather become a highway robber or a thief than to ever be like you (Hesse Pg. 87)!” Throughout the story, it seems as though he is trying to figure out what it is about life that is worthwhile, and “though he is in a relationship with Kamala, he does not love her (Hesse Pg. 52).” Throughout the story, he lacks one thing, and that is essential love. Although the father loves his son, the father does not know how to love as he keeps trying to run away from love, instead of towards it. “Even when Siddhartha goes to the Buddha with his friend, Govinda, Siddhartha does not show any love to the Buddha instead he acts as though he is too proud of himself even to be disagreeing with the Buddha (Hesse Pg. 23-25).”

Posted by: stephanie gilbert at October 6, 2013 11:59 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013


Question: Apply Paul’s theory to a character from one of the primary texts we have completed reading., You will, by necessity, need to refer to the parts of Corinthians I that spell out exactly what agape love IS and what agape love ISN’T.

Answer: In the New Testament of the Bible, we are given the definition of love. First Corinthians details love as “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5 It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6 Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres” (1 Corinthians 13:4-7). This kind of love is also known as Agape. Agape love is considered divine because of its Godly tendencies. Agape love is selfless, sacrificial, and most importantly unconditional. There are two main types of love, which include Platonic and Agape. The differences between the two are based on the conditions of love given. Platonic love is based on the conditions such as beauty and wisdom. Therefore, if one is not beautiful or wise then one cannot be given love. This goes against 1 Corinthians 13:5 “it is not self-seeking.” On the other hand, Paul practiced Agape love when he tried opening up the Jewish faith not only to Jews but also to Gentiles.
In the Early chapters of the novel Siddhartha Agape Siddhartha’s father displays love. Losing a child or letting go of a child you have raised is not easy for any parent. Siddhartha’s father knew that his son was adamant about becoming a Samana but would not do so, without his approval. First Corinthians says, “Love is patient” (1 Corinthians 13:4).Siddhartha did not budge and waited for his father’s approval. “He saw Siddhartha standing his arms folded not moving from his spot” (Hesse,10). It was extremely hard for him to let his son go but he found it in his heart to allow him to leave. “ You will, he spoke , go into the forest and be a Samana. When you have found blissfulness in the forest, then come back and teach me to be blissful”(Hesse,11).


Work Cited

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. 2012 ed. N.p.: Simon & Brown, n.d. Print.

"King James Bible Online." KING JAMES BIBLE ONLINE. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Oct. 2013.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at October 7, 2013 12:53 AM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 October 2013

Question: For this essay, you are going to write about either Siddhartha and his son (OR) Gatz and his son. Choose one, not both. Once you have chosen a father-son set, you are going to apply Paul’s theory of agape. You need to show which elements of Paul’s theory are exemplified by the father and which are not. You will need to quote exact passages from the text that prove each claim. In your thesis statement, I want to know whether or not the father you chose is successful with agape love or unsuccessful. You’ll need to provide exact reasons why that are based on evidence you can produce from the text.

Answer: The relationship between Siddhartha and his son is truly incredible. Despite how often Siddhartha’s son ignores him and is blatantly rude to him, Siddhartha shows an unconditional amount of love. Three factors from Paul’s agape description stand out in respect to Siddhartha’s feelings toward his son. Siddhartha represents patience, kindness, and never failing love. Siddhartha is successful in regards to agape love described by Paul.
In Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, he states, “Love is patient” (Corinthians I, 13:4). Siddhartha’s son clearly desires his old life in the city and has a passionate hatred for his father. Regardless of these feelings, Siddhartha loves his son and strives to gain his love in return. Vasudeva, one of Siddhartha’s life mentors, advises Siddhartha to let his son go. It is stated in the novel, “Siddhartha could not take his friend’s advice; he could not give up his son. He allowed the boy to command him, to be disrespectful to him. He was silent and waited; he began daily the mute battle of friendliness and patience. Vasudeva was also silent and waited, friendly, understanding, forbearing. They were both masters of patience” (Hesse, 121-122). Patience played an enormous role in Siddhartha’s representation of love toward his son. Although this patience did not necessarily work out for Siddhartha in the end, Siddhartha tried his hardest to gain his son’s love through this attempt. He did not want to bother his son nor pester him with his feelings of longing for love. He wanted his son to feel, in his own heart, a sense of love toward his father without putting pressures on him.
Another aspect of agape love described by Paul is “Love is kind” (Corinthians I, 13:4). Through Siddhartha’s eyes, his son could do no wrong. Siddhartha was described in the novel as so, “This father was a good man, a kind gentle man, perhaps a pious man, perhaps a holy man – but all these were not qualities which could win the boy” (Hesse, 123). No matter how impolite and discourteous Siddhartha’s son was toward him, Siddhartha wanted everything to do with him. He wanted to be part of his life despite all the hatred his son depicted. In contrast, no matter how sympathetic and compassionate Siddhartha was, his son did not want anything to do with him. This lifestyle is portrayed in the tenth chapter as, “This father who kept him in this wretched hut bored him, and when he answered his rudeness with a smile, every insult with friendliness, every naughtiness with kindness, that was the most hateful cunning of the old fox. The boy would have much preferred him to threaten him, to ill-treat him” (Hesse, 123). Even though the son preferred a lifestyle of mistreatment, Siddhartha could never illustrate such an existence. Siddhartha’s heart was far too warm and loving to harm his son physically or mentally.
The final example of Paul’s description of agape love represented by Siddhartha toward his son is “Love never fails” (Corinthians I, 13:8). Not only did Siddhartha’s son run away in the middle of the night one evening, he also stole money and Siddhartha’s boat to take with him. Siddhartha’s eyes looked beyond the theft that had occurred. His only concern was his son’s safety and well-being. The fact that he ran away broke Siddhartha’s heart, and without any hesitation, Siddhartha knew he must follow his pride and joy. Vasudeva explained to Siddhartha that they should build in oar in order to retrieve the boat that was stolen. In Vasudeva’s eyes, that was the only reason the oar should be built. However, Siddhartha’s goal was much greater. He desired to reunite with his son. After a long while of searching, Siddhartha realized he needed to let his son move on with his life in order to reach the fulfillment that he himself was seeking. This explanation was described in the novel as, “He felt a deep love for the runaway boy, like a wound, and yet felt at the same time that this wound was not intended to fester in him, but that it should heal” (Hesse, 126). This may seem as though Siddhartha “gave up” on his love toward his son; however, this love is so strong that Siddhartha is willing to sacrifice his own heartache for this boy’s future. Siddhartha will hold these feelings of sorrow with him, but he will know that he saved his son from unhappiness and discontent. The grief Siddhartha feels will linger, but knowing that it was for the better in regards to his son will make his pain worthwhile. Although Siddhartha ended his search for his son, his love for his son never failed.

Works Cited

1 Corinthians 1 (King James Version). Bible Gateway, n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2013. .
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha;. [New York]: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 7, 2013 12:55 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 October 2013

Apage Love in Siddhartha
According to Saint Paul, agape love is unconditional in every way. In his letter to Corinthians 13; 4-13 “4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant 5 or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; 6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. 7 Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. 8 Love never ends. [. . .] 13 So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love.” Siddhartha and his father demonstrate this significantly, Siddhartha’s father having such a bright son did not boast. As he watched his young son grow and continuing to learn to have a love for knowledge, he admired and was incredibly delighted. “Joy leapt in his [Siddhartha] father’s heart for his son who was quick to learn, thirsty for knowledge; he saw him growing up to become great wise man” (Hesse 5).
The unconditional love is reciprocated from Siddhartha as he is polite and patient toward his father. When Siddhartha approached his father for the second time for permission to leave his home to become a Samana, he did it in a very mannerly fashion. “With your permission, my father. I came to tell you that it is my longing to leave your house and go to the ascetics. My desire is to become a Samana. May my father not oppose this” (Hesse 9). However, even though his father denied him permission, Siddhartha was not pleased, and in his own manner he decided to stand in the very spot where he was rejected all day and night. When his father approached him early the next morning notifying Siddhartha that he could die without rest nor food, Siddhartha agrees. His father quickly replied, “And you would rather die, than obey your father?” without missing a beat Siddhartha says “Siddhartha has always obeyed his father [. . .] Siddhartha will do what his father will tell him to do” (Hesse 11). Siddhartha’s patience and respect for his father demonstrated to his father who has faith and hope in his son to find “blissfulness in the forest, then come back and teach [him] to be blissful” (Hesse 11). Siddhartha and his father have demonstrated agape love through their patience, faith, hope, kindness, and respect for each other unconditionally.

Works Cited
Hesse, Hermann, and W. K. Marriott.Siddhartha. Hollywood, FL: Simon and Brown, 2012.
Print.

Posted by: camila pinzon at October 7, 2013 12:57 AM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
6 October 2013

Agape Love in The Great Gatsby

The apostle Paul speaks of agape love which is when someone loves someone else selflessly without sexual implications. This specific kind of love is found in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, between Gatsby and his father Gatz. When he was younger, Gatsby ran away from his farm home in the Midwest to become successful. His absence and abrupt departure deeply upset his family especially his father, Gatz. When Gatsby dies, his father arrives heartbroken and wracked with grief to the funeral because he never stopped loving his son. He was forgiving of his running away and tells Nick so by saying, “Of course we was broke up when he run off from home, but I see now there was a reason for it. He knew he had a big future in front of him. And ever since he made a success he was very generous with me” (Fitzgerald 172). The undying faith Gatz has in Gatsby is an example that “ Love suffereth long, and is kind [. . .]” (Corinthians 13:4). He found a book of Gatsby’s that he had as a child, and it had a schedule written out for him to follow. Gatz tells Nick, “Look here, this a book he had when he was a boy. It just shows you” (Fitzgerald 173). Gatz suffered for a long time until Gatsby returned home and made things right with his father, but ever since then Gatz has been extremely proud of Gatsby and his achievements. Gatz’s love for Gatsby is forgiving because love “[. . .] taketh no account of evil [. . .]” (Corinthians 13:5). He forgave his son for hurting him because love holds no grudges, and even in death, Gatsby continued to make his father proud.

*The American Standard Version Translation of Corinthians is used*

Works Cited

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 1925. Print.

Kirby, Peter. “The First Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians”. Early Christian Writings. 2001-2013. 07 Oct. 2013. Web.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 7, 2013 12:58 AM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02: Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013

Siddhartha shows agape love to his son Siddhartha Jr. Siddhartha shows many elements of agape love according to Paul’s theory. The significant factors of agape love that Siddhartha shows is “Love is patient” (Corinthians I, 13:4), “Love doesn't brag” (Corinthians I, 13:4), and “Love never fails” (Corinthians I, 13:8) from the World English Bible Version.

Ever since Siddhartha received guardianship of his son Siddhartha Jr., he showed endless agape love. He wanted nothing more than to be there for his son. He wanted to be a father and love his son even though Siddhartha Jr. is being complicated, and did not want to receive the love. For a long time, Siddhartha expressed Paul’s element of “Love is Patient” (Corinthians I, 13:4). For example, we learn that Siddhartha “waited patiently in the hope that his son would come to understand him, that he would accept his love and that he would perhaps return it.” (Hesse 118). Day after day, Siddhartha would wait in hopes that his son will one day receive and return the love that Siddhartha was willing to give him. Along with Patient, love Siddhartha expresses “Love doesn’t brag” (Corinthians I, 13:4). Not once does he brag about his son; instead, he sits and waits for him. Siddhartha explains to the ferryman that his son is not perfect. He says tells the ferryman “give me time yet, my dear friend. I am fighting for him, I am trying to reach his heart. I will win him with love and patience” (Hesse 119). Not once does he throw his son in the ferryman’s face. He sits by the river and waits. Siddhartha waits for his son to come around; instead, things just end worse for Siddhartha and Siddhartha Jr. In the end, we learn that Siddhartha will never give up on Siddhartha Jr. He shows us “Love never fails” (Corinthians I, 13:8). Even after the ferryman tries to tell Siddhartha that his son should go home, Siddhartha explains how he “could not take his friends advice; he could not give up on his son. He allowed the boy to command him, to be disrespectful to him.” (Hesse 121). It took Siddhartha Jr. running away for Siddhartha to realize that he was never going to get the love he wanted in return. Even though Siddhartha Jr. did not want to “love” Siddhartha, Siddhartha never gave up on him. He showed infinite love to him and will never lose the agape love for him.

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing, 1951. Print.

"Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians." Early Christian Views on Love: Paul. World English Bible Version. Web. 4 Oct 2013.

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at October 7, 2013 01:00 AM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02: Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013

Siddhartha shows agape love to his son Siddhartha Jr. Siddhartha shows many elements of agape love according to Paul’s theory. The significant factors of agape love that Siddhartha shows is “Love is patient” (Corinthians I, 13:4), “Love doesn't brag” (Corinthians I, 13:4), and “Love never fails” (Corinthians I, 13:8) from the World English Bible Version.

Ever since Siddhartha received guardianship of his son Siddhartha Jr., he showed endless agape love. He wanted nothing more than to be there for his son. He wanted to be a father and love his son even though Siddhartha Jr. is being complicated, and did not want to receive the love. For a long time, Siddhartha expressed Paul’s element of “Love is Patient” (Corinthians I, 13:4). For example, we learn that Siddhartha “waited patiently in the hope that his son would come to understand him, that he would accept his love and that he would perhaps return it.” (Hesse 118). Day after day, Siddhartha would wait in hopes that his son will one day receive and return the love that Siddhartha was willing to give him. Along with Patient, love Siddhartha expresses “Love doesn’t brag” (Corinthians I, 13:4). Not once does he brag about his son; instead, he sits and waits for him. Siddhartha explains to the ferryman that his son is not perfect. He says tells the ferryman “give me time yet, my dear friend. I am fighting for him, I am trying to reach his heart. I will win him with love and patience” (Hesse 119). Not once does he throw his son in the ferryman’s face. He sits by the river and waits. Siddhartha waits for his son to come around; instead, things just end worse for Siddhartha and Siddhartha Jr. In the end, we learn that Siddhartha will never give up on Siddhartha Jr. He shows us “Love never fails” (Corinthians I, 13:8). Even after the ferryman tries to tell Siddhartha that his son should go home, Siddhartha explains how he “could not take his friends advice; he could not give up on his son. He allowed the boy to command him, to be disrespectful to him.” (Hesse 121). It took Siddhartha Jr. running away for Siddhartha to realize that he was never going to get the love he wanted in return. Even though Siddhartha Jr. did not want to “love” Siddhartha, Siddhartha never gave up on him. He showed infinite love to him and will never lose the agape love for him.

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing, 1951. Print.

"Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians." Early Christian Views on Love: Paul. World English Bible Version. Web. 4 Oct 2013.

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at October 7, 2013 01:03 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013


Answer:
Paul’s theory of agape love has many factors to it. One relationship that follows factors of agape love is Mr. Gatz and his song Jay Gatsby. Even though Mr. Gatz was not in Jay’s entire life, I believe he still had enough of a relationship with his son to have some factors of agape love. Agape love is an unconditional love. An example of unconditional love could be the relationship between a mother and child. Mr. Gatz and Mr. Gatsby have an unconditional for each other. Paul believes, “Love is patient; love is kind and envies no one. Love is never boastful, nor conceited, nor rude; never selfish, not quick to take offence. Love keeps no score of wrongs; does not gloat over other men’s sins, but delights in the truth. There is nothing love cannot face; there is no limit to its faith, its hope, and its endurance” (3). Paul is describing what he considers unconditional love to be. Gatsby and his father share some of these factors. Their love is patient because all of the years that Gatsby was away from his father they still tried to stay connected. Even though Mr. Gatz hears that his son has killed someone, he still goes to Jay’s funeral. Even though he heard about his sons actions, he still loves his son. Even though Mr. Gatz heard his son killed somebody, he still thinks he could have been a great man. He said, “If he’d of lived, he’d of been a great man. A man like James J. Hill. He’d of help build up the country” (Fitzgerald 168). Mr. Gatz’s believes that his son would still have been a great person, even after what happened. This relates to Paul’s theory of how love keeps no score of wrongs. Even though everyone believes Gatsby did something wrong, his own father thinks he would still be a wonderful individual. Gatsby’s Father will continue to love his some no matter what happened. That part of Paul’s theory of agape love can relate to the relationship of Jay Gatsby and his father.

Work Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 2004. Print.
Saint Paul. "I Corinthians 12:27-13:13." Letter. MS.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 7, 2013 01:27 AM


Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 October 2013

Part II Test 2

Saint Paul’s letter to the Corinthians suggests that love is selfless and unconditional. This is the love that Siddhartha has for his son. Agape love is a love that represents selflessness and self-sacrifice, toward another person. It is the kindest and purest love. Jesus modeled this love for human kind. This is the love that God has for his people. Siddhartha’s craving for his son’s affection leads him into a new whirlwind of blissful suffering. Siddhartha shows a truly divine agape love toward his son.

Siddhartha does not try to force love upon his son; instead, he wants his son to come to him on his own terms. “Love is patient and is kind; love doesn’t envy”, resembles Siddhartha’s ability love for his son (Corinthians 1, 13.4). Slowly and patiently, Siddhartha tries to win his sons love. Siddhartha kindly addresses every disrespectful remark his son shoves his way. Siddhartha exclaims, “ How can I part with him? Give me some more time, my dear! See, I’m fighting for him, I’m seeking to win his heart, with love and with friendly patience I intend to capture it.” (Hesse 84).

Siddhartha realizes his total and undeniable love for his son; “ Indeed, he had never been able to lose or devote himself completely to another person, to forget himself, to commit foolish acts for the love of another person; never he had been able to do this, and this was, as it had seemed to him at that time, the great distinction which set him apart from the childlike people. But now, since his son was here, now he, Siddhartha had also became completely a childlike person, suffering for the sake of another person, loving another person, lost to a love, having become a fool on account of love. Now he too felt, late, once in his lifetime, this strongest and strangest of all passions, suffered from it, suffered miserably, and was nevertheless in bliss, was nevertheless renewed in one respect, enriched by one thing.” (Hesse 86). This proves that Siddhartha can really love at last. This is something he had never fully experienced before. Even after his son leaves him, Siddhartha concludes that he must let him go. He does not become bitter but loves him even more.

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. W. K. Marriott. Simon & Brown, 2012.

Paul, Saint. Paul's First Letter to the Corinthians . n.d. .

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at October 7, 2013 01:45 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 October 2013
Part II of Test/Quiz 2
In The Great Gatsby, the relationship between Jay Gatsby and his father, Henry Gatz, is not described in depth. However, in the final chapter when Mr. Gatz visits New York for Gatsby’s funeral, he goes into more detail about their relationship. I would say that Mr. Gatz’s love for Gatsby was mostly unconditional, he seemed very grateful of Gatsby’s support by saying that “he [Gatsby] was very generous with me,” (Fitzgerald 172). However, he also seemed slightly boastful when he showed Nick the photo of Gatsby’s house, “He had shown it so often that I think it was more real to him now than the house itself,” (Fitzgerald 172).
Mr. Gatz seemed to be very proud of his son and all of his accomplishments. He realized and accepted that Gatsby had left home in order to pursue his dreams of becoming something more than he already was, and Mr. Gatz was grateful for all of his support. “He [Gatsby] was very generous with me,” (Fitzgerald 172), is an example of how Mr. Gatz exemplified agape love because, in the context of the story, he is somewhat rejoicing that he was blessed with such a kind-hearted son. In Corinthians I (13:6), it is stated that “[Love] rejoices in the truth,” and that backs up the claim that Mr. Gatz’s love for Gatsby was unconditional, because he rejoiced in the fact that his son was so willing to help him.
However, the part that showed that Mr. Gatz’s love was not entirely unconditional was when it was mentioned that he carried a photograph of Gatsby’s house, which looked as if though he had shown it off very often. If he carried this photo around as an item to boast to his friends about what his son had, this shows that he was not using agape love. He used Gatsby’s success and material items as a way of making others think that he was superior to them. “Love is not envious or boastful,” (Corinthians I 13:4), is a verse that supports that he was not using agape love because, he was indeed being boastful about the things that Gatsby had, not thinking about the unconditional love that he should have for his son.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 1953. Print. This was useful in order to exemplify the instances in which Mr. Gatz was and was not showing unconditional love towards his son Jay Gatsby.
The Bible: New Revised Standard Version: Catholic Edition. New York: The Regina Press. 1993. Print. This text was useful in order to provide support from Corinthians I for the arguments of whether love was or was not truly unconditional.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at October 7, 2013 01:46 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
October 2013
Part II of Test/Quiz #2

The true identity of the wealthy Jay Gatsby is James Gatz, a common man hailing from North Dakota. His father is Henry C. Gatz, a man whose only part in The Great Gatsby is coming in at the end of the novel to attend the funeral for his son. Therefore, there is not much to speculate on when determining what kind of love they shared. When writing his first known epistle to the Christians in the church of Corinth, the Apostle Paul (Formally called Saul, a Roman citizen hailing from the city of Tarsus) dedicates a section (chapter 13) to the explanation of love. The type of love Paul describes is agape love: unconditional love that God the Father expresses for his creation, which includes everyone.
This concept was revolutionary at the time, considering that the prevailing ideas of Plato and Aristotle, which come with pre-existing conditions that will always exclude someone. Applying the prerequisites of agape love to the relationship of Gatsby and Gatz reveals a strained bond between father and son. “Love doesn’t brag, is not proud” (Corinthians I, 13:5), but Gatsby and Gatz both fail at this: “It was a photograph of the house, cracked in the corners and dirty with many hands. He pointed out every detail to me eagerly. “Look there!” and then sought admiration from my eyes” (172). Gatsby, wanting to prove what a success he is, send his father a picture of his mansion that Gatz in turn shows off to everyone he meets, as if the house were his son.
“Love doesn’t rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth” (Corinthians I, 13:6). Before the funeral, as Gatz admires all of Gatsby’s former belongings, “his grief began to be mixed with an awed pride. [. . .]His pride in his son and in his son’s possessions was continually increasing” (168, 172). This makes one wonder if Gatz would have the same sense of wonder if he knew that his son earned it all through illicit means. If “love never fails” (Corinthians I, 13:8), Gatsby should have no reason to impress his father with displays of wealth. Though Gatsby’s relationship with his father is not detailed, what little is revealed proves that they do not share agape love for each other.


Works Cited
“The First Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians.” World English Bible. N.p., n.d. Web. 6
Oct. 2013. .
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 2004. Print

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 7, 2013 03:34 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Part II of Test/Quiz #2

The true identity of the wealthy Jay Gatsby is James Gatz, a common man hailing from North Dakota. His father is Henry C. Gatz, a man whose only part in The Great Gatsby is coming in at the end of the novel to attend the funeral for his son. Therefore, there is not much to speculate on when determining what kind of love they shared. When writing his first known epistle to the Christians in the church of Corinth, the Apostle Paul (Formally called Saul, a Roman citizen hailing from the city of Tarsus) dedicates a section (chapter 13) to the explanation of love. The type of love Paul describes is agape love: unconditional love that God the Father expresses for his creation, which includes everyone.
This concept was revolutionary at the time, considering that the prevailing ideas of Plato and Aristotle, which come with pre-existing conditions that will always exclude someone. Applying the prerequisites of agape love to the relationship of Gatsby and Gatz reveals a strained bond between father and son. “Love doesn’t brag, is not proud” (Corinthians I, 13:5), but Gatsby and Gatz both fail at this: “It was a photograph of the house, cracked in the corners and dirty with many hands. He pointed out every detail to me eagerly. “Look there!” and then sought admiration from my eyes” (172). Gatsby, wanting to prove what a success he is, send his father a picture of his mansion that Gatz in turn shows off to everyone he meets, as if the house were his son.
“Love doesn’t rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth” (Corinthians I, 13:6). Before the funeral, as Gatz admires all of Gatsby’s former belongings, “his grief began to be mixed with an awed pride. [. . .]His pride in his son and in his son’s possessions was continually increasing” (168, 172). This makes one wonder if Gatz would have the same sense of wonder if he knew that his son earned it all through illicit means. If “love never fails” (Corinthians I, 13:8), Gatsby should have no reason to impress his father with displays of wealth. Though Gatsby’s relationship with his father is not detailed, what little is revealed proves that they do not share agape love for each other.


Works Cited
“The First Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians.” World English Bible. N.p., n.d. Web. 6
Oct. 2013. .
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 2004. Print

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 7, 2013 03:36 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Question: “You need to show which elements of Paul’s theory are exemplified by the father and which are not. You will need to quote exact passages from the text that prove each claim.”

Answer: The definition of agape love, as written by Paul in Corinthians I, is found in chapter 13. He goes on to list many things that love is and is not. If one were to use Paul’s definition as a strict checklist, then the love that Henry Gatz holds for his son Jay Gatsby, or James Gatz, is not agape, or unconditional, love. Paul states that, “Love is not boastful or proud,” however if Henry Gatz was anything, he was very proud of his son (Corinthians I, 13:4). He may have even boasted about his son’s accomplishments as a young man. The text of The Great Gatsby shows that the photo that Henry Gatz carried around was very worn as if he showed it to everybody he met (Fitzgerald 172). It was a picture of Jay’s mansion. In contrast, Paul also wrote that love, “never gives up, never loses faith,” (Corinthians I, 13:7). Fitzgerald clearly conveys that Henry Gatz never lost faith in his son. His son left at a very young age and never returned to his family. Fitzgerald leads his audience to ask whether his father really knew the truth about him. We know that when Gatsby is uncomfortable, or even in some cases, guilty, he tries to show the utmost courtesy (Fitzgerald 101). Did James Gatz feel so guilty that he felt shame in even his own name that he always sent money to his poor family? We cannot go on to cross every aspect off of Paul’s checklist because Fitzgerald just does not go into enough detail on the relationship between Gatsby and his father? However, Henry Gatz has already proven that the love he feels for his son is not agape love. This is not to say that he did not love his son. If he could find it in himself to boast about his son, he did not love his son unconditionally. 

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print.
New Life Bible. Wheaton: Tyndall House, 1996.


Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 7, 2013 09:40 AM

Christopher Holtzhower
ENG 210 CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
7 October 2013
Take Home Test #2
Paul discusses agape love in first Corinthians, and he describes what it is. “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres (Corinthians I, 13:4-7).” With this description, Siddhartha is the father figure that best represents agape love. Siddhartha was patient with his son, even though his son would anger him with his actions. In addition, Siddhartha was very kind because he kept putting up with the actions of his son, and could have very easily been angered enough to become violent with his son. For example, “A day came when young Siddhartha’s resentment finally erupted into open defiance of his father. His father had given him a task... He stood there obstinate and enraged, stamped on the floor, curled his hands into fists, and in a violent outburst of hatred and contempt, shouted into his father’s face (Hesse 96).” Even after this outburst, Siddhartha did not let that anger him, he kept trying to show kindness and love towards his son. Eventually Siddhartha realized that he could not force his son to stay with him, so he let him go free. This is an example of trust and hope, both of which are characteristics of agape love according to Paul. Siddhartha had to trust his son to leave on his own, and he had to hope that his son lived a successful and fulfilling life after he left him.
However, Siddhartha does exhibit some actions that are not agape love. It seems as Siddhartha is restricting his son by making him do the practices he does not want to do. This is very similar to what Siddhartha’s father did to Siddhartha when he was younger. Vasudeva reminds Siddhartha of this, and tells him that he needs to let his son go and do his own soul searching, like Siddhartha did when he was a young man. He then relates to agape love again when he lets his son leave. Paul writes, “When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put the ways of childhood behind me (Corinthians I 13:7).” This is the thinking that Siddhartha has towards his son. He realizes that whenever his son becomes a man, he will act wise and put his childish ways behind him.


Works Cited
1 Corinthians. 1 Corinthians 13 NIV. Bible Gateway, n.d. Web. 05 Oct. 2013.
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Sherab C. Kohn. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 2000.
Print.

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at October 7, 2013 10:02 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 – Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013
Part II of Quiz II
I believe that there are aspects of Siddhartha's love toward his son that are characteristic of the love outline by Saint Paul in his letter to the Corinthians. For example when expounding upon what his concept of agape-love is, Saint Paul writes that, “[Agape-love] bears everything, believes everything, hopes everything, endures everything” (Corinthians 1, 13:7). This is similar to the emotions that Siddhartha was experiencing when he was trying to win over his son when his son had first come to him and the ferryman with Kamala. After Kamala died, Siddhartha took it upon himself to raise and look after his son. However, the son was very forthcoming with his father and Vasudeva saw this. It was at this point that Vasudeva remarked to Siddhartha, “'I'm seeing that you are tormenting yourself, I'm seeing that you're in grief. Your son, my dear, is worrying you'” (Hesse 130). Siddhartha then responds to Vasudeva that he was “'Seeking to to win his heart, with love and friendly patience I intend to capture it'” (Hesse 130). This suffering that Siddhartha goes through to win over the affection of his son is an example of how Paul writes that agape-love endures through everything. Even though his son is not returning Siddhartha's affection and is rather hateful towards his father, Siddhartha's love for his son endures with the belief that he will win him over.

Works Cited
Faithful New Testament. Ed. William Zeitler. 2009. Print.
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. 1922. New York: Bantam, 1971. Print.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at October 7, 2013 10:05 AM

Cheyenne DeMaggio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Agape Love is clearly present in the relationship between Siddhartha and his son, Siddhartha Jr. Siddhartha is successful in practicing Agape love with his son by exhibiting patience, kindness, and the ability not to be provoked. Siddhartha also shows a sign throughout his relationship with his son that can also be considered going against agape by seeking his own way.

It is said in the World English Bible version of I Corinthians that “Love is patient and is kind” (Corinthians I, 13:4). Hesse shows the patience in this relationship by writing “For a long time, long months, Siddhartha waited for his son to understand him, to accept his love and perhaps return it” (Hesse 116). The entire duration of his relationship with his son, Siddhartha was patient enough to wait for Siddhartha Jr, to return his love, and even though it never happened, he was always still just as kind. Sadly, Siddhartha Jr never saw his father’s kindness as love, and this is shown when he exclaims to Siddhartha, “What you do is constantly try to demean me and punish me with your piety and kindness” (Hesse 121).

The World English Bible version also says that love “is not provoked” (Corinthians I, 13:5). Siddhartha has a strong will during his time with his son not to beat him for his wrong doing, and though this goes hand and hand with patience and kindness, it also shows that he is not provoked to do so. Vasudeva points this out to Siddhartha in his conversation with him on the matter when he says “You do not force him, beat him, or give him any orders because you know that soft is stronger than hard, water stronger than rock” (Hesse 117).
One way that Siddhartha does not exhibit Agape love is by always seeking his own way. The World

English Bible version of Corinthians says love “doesn’t seek its own way” (Corinthians I, 13:5). The entire time that Siddhartha is raising his son, he is focused on keeping him there with him and raising him as a ferryman. He never once considers where his son comes from, what he’s used to, and the possibility of them both moving to the city to pursue a different life together. Vasudeva also points this out to Siddhartha when he says “He (Siddhartha Jr.) has not, like you, run away from wealth and the city out of revulsion and a sense of excess. He had to leave all that behind against his will.”

Although Siddhartha is somewhat selfish in the fact that he wants to keep his son and live the life of a ferryman, he still practices Agape love towards Siddhartha Jr. through patience, kindness, and the ability not to be provoked. Siddhartha had good intentions on raising his son to the best of his knowledge, but they were just both focused on different lives for themselves.

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Sherab Chodzin Kohn. Boston: Shamhala, 2005. Print.

The World English Bible. Ed. Michael Paul Johnson. Public Domain, 1997. http://lgdata.s3-
website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/docs/797/877534/Saint_Paul__-_I_Corinthians_-
World_English_Bible_Version.pdf>

Posted by: Cheyenne DeMaggio at October 7, 2013 10:08 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10/6/13
Part II of Test/Quiz 2
Agape-love is the most pure form of love. It is the love shared by friends, parents, children, siblings, and God. In The Great Gatsby, I believe that Henry Gatz did have Agape-love for his son Jay Gatsby. If two people did not love each other then they would not teach each other the way those two characters did. “Agape love does not boast, it is not puffed up” (Corinthians, 13 line 3). Henry Gatz had the mentality of a working class man. That mentality is that one should not boast or think of himself to be better than anyone else and that is what he was trying to teach his son.
Another form of Agape love that Henry Gatz shows is when he speaks with Nick at Gatsby’s funeral. “He knew he had a big future in front of him. And ever since he made a success he was very generous to me” (Fitzgerald, 172). Gatsby really loved his father and that is why when he was successful he still helped his father financially. If you did not have that love for someone, how could you help him or her out in such a big way? “Bears everything” (Corinthians, 13 lines 7). Gatsby tried to give his father however much he could after his success. That is what Agape-love truly is. "Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves like this or something. Do you notice what he's got about improving his mind? He was always great for that" (Fitzgerald, 180). Even after his son’s death, Henry Gatz spoke highly of his son and his son’s dreams. “Agape-love never fails” (Corinthians, 13 lines 8) Even after Gatsby’s demise he is still hailed as someone his father admired. Even if the person died, the love you have for them does not.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at October 7, 2013 10:08 AM

Jayssy Hilary
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
6 October 2

The words “selfless love” is typically used when one is trying to describe Agape Love because it essentially is affection without sexual intimacy. It can be best described by the omnibenevelonce and love God has for us, and our reciprocal of that love.
The apostle Paul explored this idea of Agape love in the First Epistle to the Corinthians. Paul defines this love by defining the characteristics that make up his view of love. In Corinthians 13:4-7, Paul discusses in detail the different qualities that Agape love possesses, “Love is patient, and is kind…Love never fails.” From what Paul describes, this ideology of love can be applied to most forms of pure and unconditional love, chief among them the bond of unconditional love that exists between parents and their children.
In Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, two characters that express this type of love are Henry Gatz and his son.
Despite the fact that financially he was unable to give the things he would have maybe wanted his son to have, Henry Gatz loved his son unconditionally as most parents do. Unfortunately, little character development is presented in the novel in regards to Henry Gatz until the end, let alone his relationship with his son. Still, the fact that apart from the protagonist he is the only one that turns up to bury Gatsby does not fail to illustrate the love he had for his son, despite the embarrassment his son felt by him. Gatsby may not have reciprocated his father’s love as strongly, yet, their relationship does reinforce the fact “blood is thicker than water.”
Behind all of Gatsby’s extravagant parties, his fancy clothes, and this invisible wall he had built between himself and reality, Fitzgerald reminds us that the past does catch up and sometimes the things we run from are the only things that genuinely care and love us.
“He had a big future before him, you know…(pg. 168)” this quote is very descriptive in showing how Gatsby’s father felt about him, despite everything that happened in the past, he felt pride for his son. The need to share all of his son’s high qualities and potential is a quality many parents ceaselessly do despite whatever hurt children may inflict on their parents, and I think this can be a great example of Agape love. A love that is so pure and that knows no boundaries.
Despite the fact that there will always be a pain that was inflicted by James from running away from his parents, his father does not resent him, because deep down he knew his son was meant for bigger and better things in life. “but I see now there was a reason for it. He knew he had a big future in front of him…(pg. 172)”
Gatsby’s embarrassment of his upbringing and his quest to reinvent himself may have drawn a bridge between him and his father, yet that does not mean he did not love or acknowledge his father. Henry Gatz tells Nick about Gatsby’s generosity towards him once he had become successful. We also learn that, Gatsby had visited his father and bought him a new house. For many children,especially those who had a less fortunate upbringing, one of the signs that show affection and love is being able to give back something to your parents to show appreciation for what they had provided with or without the means. This shows that Gatsby had not forgotten or completely eradicated the memory of his father on his quest to find social class
One powerful line that stood out “he seemed reluctant to put away the picture, held if for another minute…(pg.172)” just showed how much parents wish to capture and prolong any memory they have of their children. Mr.Gatz is so fixed on his pride and love for his son, that it is as if he does not want to accept or believe that his son is gone.
References.
• Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Edition
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/agape+love
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1_Corinthians_13

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at October 7, 2013 10:11 AM

Lydia R Santana Santana1
Dr. Hobbs
ENG CL 210 Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013

Part 2 Essay

I believe, the In Great Gatsby, the father son relationship doesn’t show agape love according to Paul’s theory.

It states in Paul’s theory that;
“Love is patient, is kind, love has no jealousy, does not swagger, has no pride, is not immodest, does not stirred to anger, does not keep count of evil done, is not happy over wrongdoing, shares the happiness of the truth; all-sustaining, all-faithful, all-hopeful, all enduring. Love never fails” (Corinthians I 13.1). I believe that Henry C, Gats is more proud of his son and his accomplishments, which Paul states isn’t apage love , because he admires what he has. I believe a prime example of Henry showing his pride in Gatsby would be when he is showing Nick a picture of Gatsby’s house; which he treasured because he kept it in his wallet for years. This is made obvious when the dialogue takes place between Nick and Henry Gats occurs; Henry states,
“Jimmy sent me this picture.’ He took out his wallet with trembling fingers. ‘Look there.’ It was a photograph of the house, cracked in the corners and dirty with many hands. He pointed out
Santana 2

every detail to me eagerly. ‘Look there!’ and then sought admiration from my eyes. He had shown it so often that I think it was more real to him now than the house itself. ‘Jimmy sent it to me. I think it’s a very pretty picture. It shows up well” (Fitzgerald, p. 172). I believe that this also shows pride because of his son’s success. He admires what his son has accomplished, because Mr. Gats is very well aware that they lived a lower class of life compared to what Gatsby has later in life. I believe this is shown well on page 98 of the book when it states, “His parents were shiftless and unsuccessful farm people—his imagination had never really accepted them as his parents at all. [J]ay Gatsby of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself” (Fitzgerald, p. 98). I believe that this also shows pride because of his son’s success. He admires what his son has accomplished, because Mr. Gats is very well aware that they lived a lower class of life compared to what Gatsby has later in life. I believe this is shown well on page 98 of the book when it states, “His parents were shiftless and unsuccessful farm people—his imagination had never really accepted them as his parents at all. [J]ay Gatsby of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself” (Fitzgerald, p. 98).



Santana 3
Works Cited

(n.d.). First letter to the Corinthians.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. Three Novels: The Great Gatsby;. New York: Scribner, 1953. Print.

Posted by: Lydia Santana at October 7, 2013 10:13 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
07 October 2013
Question: For this essay, you are going to write about either Siddhartha and his son (OR) Gatz and his son. Choose one, not both. Once you have chosen a father-son set, you are going to apply Paul’s theory of agape. You need to show which elements of Paul’s theory are exemplified by the father and which are not. You will need to quote exact passages from the text that prove each claim.
Answer: I believe Mr. Gatz did love his son, Gatsby. He followed the rule of agape with “Love is patient and is kind,” (Corinthians I 13:4). He always spoke kindly of his son. Words of kindness like “He’d of helped build up the country” (Fitzgerald 168) and “Ever since he made a success he was very generous with me” (Fitzgerald 172). Also, at some points, Mr. Gatz started to sound like he was bragging. It states, “Love doesn’t brag,” (Corinthians I 13:4) and Mr. Gatz kept going on about Gatsby. He bragged about the house Gatsby brought for him, Gatsby’s house, and how he wanted to be successful as a child. All in all, when no one else besides Nick, came to Gatsby’s funeral his father did. Gatsby was not that close to his father, but his father still loved him enough to come to his funeral.
Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. S. (2004). The Great Gatsby. Scribner.
Paul's First Letterto the Corinthians. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://lgdata.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/docs/797/877534/Saint_Paul__-_I_Corinthians_-_World_English_Bible_Version.pdf

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 7, 2013 10:23 AM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 215CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013


In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby,” James Gatz abandons his North Dakota home, and family, behind to pursue a lifestyle that could not be provided for him. James’ father Henry, is a seemingly filler character when we first hear of him during Gatsby’s confession. His father is a prime symbol of agape love.
This undeniable love for his son, regardless of both his betrayal to their family and of abandonment. At a young age James leaves the farm life to his family in an attempt to be born anew. He then meets Dan Cody, a wealthy man who helps to mold James into the elegant Jay Gatsby. Dan Cody could be seen as a father figure to James, teaching him ins and outs of certain trades. Cody eventually passes away, and Gatsby learns to thrive and succeed on his own, making ostentatious amounts of money and doing whatever he pleases with it, all of which is to immaturely attract the attention of Daisy.
After the events of Myrtle’s murder and Gatsby’s alleged “accident,” George Wilson, Myrtle’s husband and tom mechanic, consults Tom about the murder of his wife. Tom eventually explains to George that Gatsby was the driver and executioner of his wife. While taking matters into his own hands, George ultimately kills Gatsby with a shot to the back. Nick Carraway holds a small funeral for Jay, being emotionally distraught has an emotional explosion and begins to remove people from the service. Again we see Henry Gatz appear at his sons funeral. One could argue that Henry had seen his son die twice, the first being his initial transformation from James to Jay, and the second being the physical death of James/Jay. Regardless of the persona he wore, Henry’s son has still passed away and he still cared enough to transport himself from the rural Midwest all the way to Long Island to attend his once-son’s death service. Unconditional, or agape love is love that exists out of genuine care, which is exactly how parents, especially a parent such as Henry Gatz, love.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at October 7, 2013 10:42 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
07 September 2013
Part 2 Quiz

Agape love as discussed in the lecture and the readings is the unconditional love that stays the same and does not change. “It is the love that gives without demanding or expecting re-payment. It is the love so great that it can be given to the unlovable or unappealing.” (John 3:19) This resembles the relations between Henry C. Gatz and his son, James Gatz. When James was young, he has left his family and headed east. He considered himself better that what his family was, but that did not mean that his father did not love him. In the novel, even though James has left, he still had some contact with his father as he bought him a house. The relation between them was agape because they still had a love for each other’s. This was also seen at the end as James father shows up at his son’s funeral, which no one has gone to beside Nick.

Posted by: abdulaziz alsaif at October 7, 2013 10:49 AM

Darius Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Without ever telling Siddhartha, Kamala gave birth to a son, his son, Siddhartha Jr. Siddhartha did not meet him until he was eleven years of age, with his mother lying on her death bed. Having no prior contact or knowing nothing about his son other than that he was his son, Siddhartha loved him instantly stating, “Rich and happy, he had called himself, when the boy had come to him (Hesse 83).” In his epistles to the Corinth Church, Paul speaks of this kind of love, an unconditional love between a father and a son. A love which “suffereth long,” “seeketh not its own,” “beareth all things,” “believeth all things,” “hopeth all things” and “endureth all things” (Corinthians I, 13:4-7). All things Siddhartha was previously unable of achieving, the “suffering for the sake of another person, loving another person, lost to a love, having become a fool on account of love” but “Now he too felt, late, once in his lifetime, this strongest and strangest of all passions, suffered from it, suffered miserably, and was nevertheless in bliss (Hesse 83).”


Works Cited
Hesse, H. (n.d.). Siddharta. Retrieved from http://lgdata.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/docs/797/831318/1922_-_Hesse__Herman_-_Siddhartha_-_NOVEL-106_Pages.pdf
Kirby, Peter. "Historical Jesus Theories." Early Christian Writings. 2013. 7 Oct. 2013 .

Posted by: Darius Anderson at October 7, 2013 11:05 AM

Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013
Copies: The Great Gatsby, from class and the New Life Bible
Gatz and his Son: Gatsby did not want to be connected to his father Henry Gatz. Tom explains, “James Gatz-that was really, at least legally, his name. He had changed it at the age of seventeen and the specific moment that witnessed the beginning of his career. In my opinion, this not related to Paul’s account of love. His version says, “love is patient and kind. Love is not jealous or boastful or proud or rude. Love last forever, but prophecy and speaking in unknown languages” Gatsby has little love for his family or his father. He changes his last name because his family does not come from money, and Gatsby wants to make a name for himself. I see this as being rude to his family and disrespects his family history and background.

Posted by: Jennifer Schubin at October 7, 2013 11:08 AM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Question: Part II of Test/Quiz #2

Answer: Agape love is something that was brought about by St. Paul thousands of years ago. According to him, he describes this love as something that is unconditional for a person or thing. In an article about early christian views on love that focuses on St. Paul, it states that "Jesus was presented as an incarnate model of divine love that all his disciples were called to follow. As God loved humankind through Jesus the Christ, so humans were challenged to love each other. And the kind of love envisaged was the unconditional love that harbors transforming possibilities about which Hosea spoke. This kind of love in modern time has come to be referred to as "agapaic,"from the Greek words for love (agapan and agape) that were widely used in the Greek language current at the time of Jesus" (St. Paul Historical Overview).
I feel that St. Paul's definition of agape love is far different from the meaning of platonic love because I feel that agape love is a more spiritual or family kind of love rather than a romantic, physical, and sexual kind of relationship (and also the fact that the true meaning of platonic love is actually men being in love in mind, body, and soul). Also, platonic love can be considered a conditional love because it is also a love of beauty and wisdom. This is very different from agape love because agape love is unconditional.
I believe that Henry C. Gatz has agape love for his son Jay Gatsby, (or James Gatz) in the novel The Great Gatsby. Even though he wasn't a huge part of Gatsby's life and they weren’t extremely close (especially when Gatsby got older), it showed that he cared so much about his son at the end of the novel when he showed up for his funeral. Out of the hundreds of people that came to Gatsby’s house for his parties and sort of used him and took advantage of him and his wealth, Gatsby’s father was one of the only people to attend his funeral. I feel that this shows a little bit of how Henry Gatz has agape love for his son because as soon as he read about it in the Chicago newspaper, he sent a telegram to tell them to wait to have the funeral until he was able to get there, and headed over immediately all the way from Minnesota. One of the ways that show his love for his son is by how nervous he was when he arrived and how he was pacing and rambling on making comments. Nick states, “he was at the point of collapse, so I took him into the music room and made him sit down while I sent for something to eat. But he wouldn’t eat, and the glass of milk spilled from his trembling hand” (Fitzgerald 167). He also describes his facial expresssions as “his mouth ajar, his face flushed slightly, his eyes leaking isolated and unpunctual tears” (Fitzgerald 168). Another way that Mr. Gatz shows agape love is because when Nick said he thought that Mr. Gatz might want to take the body West, he shook his head and replied that Gatsby always liked it better in the East. This shows that he is not selfish and would want his son’s body to be where he was happiest. Lastly, Mr. Gatz shows agape love for his son Gatsby at the very end of the book when Nick describes, “after changing my clothes I went next door and found Mr. Gatz walking up and down excitedly in the hall. His pride in his son and in his son’s possessions was continually increasing and now he had something to show me [. . .] It was a photograph of the house, cracked in the corners and dirty with many hands. He pointed out every detail to me eagerly” (Fitzgerald 172). He also shows Nick the schedule that Gatsby had written for himself when he was a boy that was in the back cover of one of the books he read. Mr. Gatz really believed in his son James, and shows this by all of the remarks and comments that he makes in the final chapter at the funeral such as “He had a big future before him, you know. He was only a young man, but he had a lot of brain power here [. . .] If he’d of lived, he’d of been a great man” (Fitzgerald 168). Showing up to his son’s funeral showed a lot of heart and class by Mr. Gatz, because they were not involved in each other’s lives very much at all. This shows true unconditional love, because despite the fact the Gatsby got framed for the murder of Myrtle, his father did not care and expressed his feeling for his son to Nick.

Works Cited

Fitzgerald, F. Scott, and Matthew J. Bruccoli. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. Print.

PDF: Historical Overview, Biblical Views: Chritian
St. Paul (Article-Early Christian Views on Love)

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at October 7, 2013 11:09 AM

Julia Della Penna
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

“Love is patient; love is kind and envies no one. Love is never boastful, nor conceited, nor rude; never selfish, not quick to take offense. Love keeps no score of wrongs; does not gloat over other men’s sins, but delights in the truth. There is nothing love cannot face; there is no limit to its faith, its hope, and its endurance.” - Saint Paul to the Corinthians (I Corinthians 12:27)
Agape love, also know as ‘unconditional love’ or ‘platonic love’, is selfless love of one person for another without sexual implications (especially love that is spiritual in nature) (Web, Www.freedictionary.com). In Saint Paul’s letter, The First Epistle to the Corinthians, from the King James Version, he states that Love is God, meaning one equals the other. Therefore, Paul is stating that all should love one another, just as God did his only son Jesus. Hence, all should love with unconditional love towards one another such as family, to be love god-like and to model after Jesus (KJV, 665).
In the book, The Great Gatsby, the relationship of Gatsby and his father (the love) shows sometimes to be conflicting. The son (Jay Gatsby) seems to be putting on a “different persona” from his father (Henry C. Gatz). In this case, Gatsby appears to be seeking more out of life he obtains; he is full of self-doubt, troubled, and lonesome. In this “father-son” connection, it gives the impression the two are not very close with one another. It is not until the end of The Great Gatsby the introduction of Mr. Gatz takes place (Fitzgerald, 167). He shows up to Gatsby’s funeral revealing he has not seen his son in over two years, most likely due to the reason Mr. Gatz used to beat Gatsby (Fitzgerald, 175); the abuse could have led to Gatsby being distant from his father. However, Mr. Gatz brings an old book and displays how he is indeed proud of his boy. The book, which younger Gatsby wrote about getting ahead in life, also reveals that Gatsby wrote about being nicer to his parents. Not much more expresses about the relationship between Gatsby and Mr. Gatz besides that there is a significant distance. 
Work Cited

Www.freedictionary.com. Princeton University, 2012. Web. 6 Oct. 2013.
.

"Early Christian Views on Love- Saint Paul." .

.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott, and Matthew J. Bruccoli. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at October 7, 2013 11:24 AM

Maria Benkirane
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 2013

Part II of test/Quiz 2

Paul's view on Agape love -unconditional love in his first letter to Corinthians is reflected in the relationship between Siddhartha and his son. During the course of the story, Siddhartha realizes that his son is different from him. He is spoiled, and unwilling to follow his father, but Siddhartha still loves him. He mourns a couple days because his son left him the way Siddhartha has left his father. However, he soon realizes that he needs to let his son follow his own path, the same way Siddhartha did. His son also steals money from him, but Siddhartha still loves him and that reflects the unconditional love he feels for his son. His son tells him that he would rather die than live the way his father lives. The next day, his son runs away from Siddhartha but then he follows him into the city because he is afraid for his safety: "I must follow him; a child can't go through the forest all alone. He'll perish" (Hess 88). The son only did wrong things to his father. He was rude, disrespectful and stole money, but it did not stop Siddhartha from loving him deeply and unconditionally.
Siddhartha expresses his feelings wanting his son to love him back and to accept him as a father. Siddhartha then says, "Siddhartha thought of his son, nurtured his love and tenderness in his heart, allowed the pain to gnaw at him, committed all foolish acts of love" (92). This reflects on what Paul said about love, "bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, and endures all things" (Corinthians I, 13:6). Paul also talks about what Agape love isn't, "Love doesn't envy. Love doesn't brag, is not proud, doesn't seek its own way"(Corinthians I, 13:4-5). Siddhartha endures everything about his son and loves him no matter what he does.

Sources:

Hesse, Hermann, and W. K. Marriott. Siddhartha. [Charleston, SC]: Simon and Brown, 2012. Print.

Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians. N.p.: n.p., n.d. PDF, World English Bible version.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 8, 2013 10:34 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
9 October 2013

Quiz 2 Take Home

Agape love is described in Paul’s letters to the Corinthians “Love is patient and is kind; love doesn’t envy. Love doesn’t brag, is not proud, doesn’t behave inappropriately, doesn’t seek its own way, is not provoked, takes no account of evil” (Corinthians 13:4-6). This shows that agape love is unconditional as the beloved does not have to do anything to earn this love. This is shown in Siddhartha when even though his son refuses to act as Siddhartha wants he admits to still loving him anyway “Siddhartha thought of his son, nurtured his love and tenderness in his heart” (Hesse 92). This quote explains that even after his son has stole from him and told him he would “rather want to become robber and murderer, and go to hell, than to become like you” (Hesse 87), that he still loves him, proving that there is no condition on Siddhartha love to his son, and therefore this is agape love. In addition, this type of love is the hardest love to achieve, and very few rarely ever do.


References

Hesse, Hermann, and W.K. Marriot. Siddhartha. (Charleston, SC): Simon and Brown, 2012. Print

Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians. N.P.:n.p,n.d. PDF (Web)

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at October 8, 2013 10:42 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment (part two of the test on _Gatsby_ and _Corinthians_ Unit) has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at October 9, 2013 07:26 AM

Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
5 November 2014

“If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am become sounding brass, or a clanging cymbal. And if I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all knowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. And if I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and if I give my body to be burned, but have not love, it profiteth me nothing.”(1 Corinthians 13:1-4 American Standard Version)

Question
This is a very common passage that is referring to what love is according to Paul. Is Paul’s version of love similar to any characters in the Symposium’s view of love? Why or why not?

Answer
Paul’s view of love is that if you do you not have love, you have nothing no matter what you do. For example, Paul states that, “but have not love, and I am nothing.”(1 Corinthians 13:3) Paul also believes and states that, “but now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; and the greatest of these is love.”(1 Corinthians 13:13) This version of love can be attributed to all the characters of the Symposium because they all have their views of love, and each character views their version as the most important.

Posted by: Allison Ward at November 5, 2014 04:36 PM

Shelby Rexroth
Dr. Hobbs
October 6th, 2014
ENG210

“1 For I do not want you to be unaware, brethren, that our fathers were all under the cloud and all passed through the sea; 2 and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea; 3 and all ate the same spiritual food; 4 and all drank the same spiritual drink for they were drinking from a spiritual rock which followed them; and the rock was Christ. 5 Nevertheless; with most of them God was not well-pleased; for they were laid low in the wilderness.”

Question: What did all the fathers have in common?

Answer: All the fathers were baptized into Moses in the cloud and sea and they all drank and ate the same spiritual food and drink from the same spiritual rock.

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at November 6, 2014 02:17 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 November 2014


“Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you?” (Chapter 3: The First Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians, par. 16, King James Bible translation).


Question:
Of all the loves covered in class, i.e. Heavenly, Commonly, Love of beauty, balance, and wholeness; which is most strongly represented in the quotation above? Answer in your own words but use quoted and cited passages from the text as support.


Answer:
In The First Epistle of Paul the Apostles to the Corinthians chapter 3:16, the love most strongly represented in the above quote is Heavenly. Heavenly love refers to the relationship one has with God, this quote epitomizes this notion by stating that god lives within humanity. However, in order to uphold this Heavenly relation with god and oneself, one needs to uphold his temple. One must also refrain from “defiling” the temple in which he dwells: the self (1 Cor. 3:17).

Posted by: Emily Finck at November 6, 2014 10:29 PM

Anthony Colello 
Dr. Hobbs 
ENG 210 CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
7 November 2014

Question:
What is meant by "For in the law of Moses it is written: you shall not muzzle the ox who threshes the grain?" Explain your answer, and use text from the story to support your answer.

Answer:
In the context of love and desire it seems that the farmer and the ox must share the roles of lover and beloved that we have seen in other texts such as Plato's Symposium. The ox works for the farmer, so the farmer will have use for the ox, and reward the ox with food. The farmer feeds the ox in hopes that the ox will provide for the farmer, "the plower must plow in hope, and the thresher must be in hope, of receiving his share" (Saint Paul, 370). In this scenario both parties win, the ox gets fed as well as the farmer. 

If we take the ox and the farmer out and replace them with a pair of humans, the story will remain the same. Each person will provide for the next so that the other will provide for them. This approach seems to focus on balance of give and take. In a relationship it is important not to only take, one must also give.

It seems that this text is not focused on individual love as we see between a couple infatuated with each other, living in a state of bliss where the ugly is clouded out by only beauty, as those who are in the early stages of love often perceive the world. 

Rather the love spoken about by Paul is a macro sense of the word. Large love if you will, the love for God and all of God's creations. 

Posted by: Anthony Colello at November 7, 2014 10:17 AM

Rebecca Messano
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
November 7, 2014

Question on 1 Corinithians 5:

In Corinthians 5, Paul writes to the church saying not to associate with immoral people. People at first didn't realize what he meant, they thought they could not associate with bad people at all. What he meant was with immoral Christians. My question is, how does one know if a Christian is bad? Essentially, one has to find out if a person is a Christian and then dig into them to find out if they have done anything immoral.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano at November 7, 2014 11:09 AM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 November 2014

“17 For Christ did not send me to baptize, but to preach the gospel, not in cleverness of speech, so that the cross of Christ would not be made void” (1 Corinthians 17).


QUESTION: Does Paul’s statements seem similar to that of Agathon from The Symposium? How does he address his audience, and to whom is he speaking?

ANSWER:
Yes, Paul’s statements do appear similar to that of Agathon as they both speak of praise their respective Gods. As Agathon stated in the symposium, “Nobody has spoken about the nature of the god who has given us these things” (Plato 28). Which we all know turns into a long eulogy for the God. Paul is quite similar as he explains to his audience, “4 I thank my God always concerning you for the grace of God which was given you in Christ Jesus, 5 that in everything you were enriched in Him, in all speech and all knowledge, 6 even as the testimony concerning Christ was confirmed in you, 7 so that you are not lacking in any gift, awaiting eagerly the revelation of our Lord Jesus Christ, 8 who will also confirm you to the end, blameless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ”(1 Corinthians 4-8). However, he does not approach his audience in the same manner as Agathon did, nor did he praise God or Jesus Christ like Agathon did of Eros. He approached his audience by addressing an issue, “10 Now I exhort you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you all agree and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be made complete in the same mind and in the same judgment”(1 Corinthians 10). Also, the audience to whom he is addressing is amongst Jews, and Greeks.

Posted by: Thomas Watson at November 7, 2014 01:25 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 November 2014


Question #10:
From the chapter article (required reading): “HISTORICAL OVERVIEW: Biblical Views: Christian: Saint Paul.” Did Jesus and his disciples have physical structures that they built dedicated to the practice of their movement? Where did early Christians meet? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
From the section of the required reading titled: Biblical Views: Christian Saint Paul, Jesus and his disciples did have physical structures of worship. Once Paul adopted the Christianity he began to preach the word of God to others: Converting as many as he could. Paul also began to create places of worship in each city he visited called “churches” (Biblical Views 27). The churches acted as a gathering place for those newly converted to Christianity and promoted a shared common bond between patrons.

Posted by: Emily Finck at November 8, 2014 01:34 PM

Sharonda S Byrd
B. LEE HOBBS
ENG 210CL
5 November 2014
First Letter to the Corinthians
“The husband should fulfill his marital duty to his wife, and likewise the wife to her husband. The wife does not have authority over her own body but yields it to her husband. In the same way, the husband does not have authority over his own body but yields it to his wife”
(1 Corinthians Chapter 7 3-4)


Question: Why is it important for unmarried or widowers to stay unmarried?


Answer: It is important that women that are single or widowed stay single so that they can focus on one thing and that’s God. Marriage brings a lot of stress and problems and if women are so focused on what’s going on in their marriage they will not be able to focus on God. Paul who wrote the Corinthians said that, “It is good for them to stay unmarried, as I do”, meaning that Paul has no distractions and has no stress in his life. He is focused on one thing and that women if single or widowed should do as he does.

Posted by: sharonda byrd at November 9, 2014 01:56 PM

Shelby Rexroth
November 9th, 2014
ENG 210 CA02
Dr. Hobbs


12. From the chapter article: “HISTORICAL OVERVIEW: Biblical Views: Christian: Saint Paul” What does the word “divine” mean? What is Divine Love? What is its connection to the ideas of Divine Love in the book of Hosea?

The word divine is defined to be “addressed, appropriated, or devoted to God or a god; religious; sacred.” In the readings, divine love is when Jesus “was being sent to summon humankind to turn from its religious apostasy and moral decay, to accept God’s forgiving love, and to accept God’s forgiving love, and to pursue a life of righteousness, love and justice. Jesus was presented as an incarnate model of divine love that all his disciples were called to follow.”

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at November 9, 2014 03:44 PM

Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
06 November 2014

“Now there are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit. And there are differences of administrations, but the same Lord. And there are diversities of operations, but it is the same God which worketh all in all. But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to every man to profit withal.” (1 Corinthians 12:4-6)
“For the body is not one member, but many. If the foot shall say, because I am not the hand, I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body? And if the ear shall say, Because I am not the eye, I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body? If the whole body were an eye, where were the hearing? If the whole were hearing, where were the smelling? But now hath God set the members every one of them in the body, as it hath pleased him. And if they were all one member, where were the body? But now are they many members, yet but one body.” (1 Corithians 12: 14-20)

Question:
How does Paul define diversity in the chapter? Moreover, how does his definition apply to the Corinthians and their gifts? After Paul talks about how the body of Christ works together, how does he describe the parts? Are there parts of the body that are unnecessary?

Answer:
Diversity is described in the chapter when Paul talks about the different kinds of gifts that the Holy Spirit gives us. He touches on the how the different kinds of gifts are used to serve the same lord (1 Corinthians 12:4-6). The definition applies to the Corinthians because in order to fulfill the mission of the Lord, each person must individually possess on of the gifts. In chapter 12, Paul also describes how the limbs of our body need one another in order to function as whole and although there are many parts of the body, there is only ONE body (1 Corinthians 12: 14-20). All parts of the body are necessary, “If each part of the were the same part, there would be no body.” Each part of the body has its special ability and in order for the whole body to function well. Paul uses the metaphor “one body” with different examples to show that regardless of the specific gift or function, everything works as a whole.

Posted by: irma sera at November 9, 2014 10:49 PM

Zailet Martinez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 November 2014

Question #9:
Was Jesus a Christian? Why or why not? Explain logic of your answer.

Answer:
Jesus was Jewish, and Judaism is the base of Christianity. Jesus was sent by God to free us from sin and guide us on the right path. “Jesus was portrayed as being sent by divine love to summon humankind to turn from its religious apostasy and moral decay, to accept God’s forgiving love, and to pursue a life of righteousness, love, and justice. Jesus used his apostles to go from city to city to tell the people about the messiah. Jesus then created the church to allow his followers to congregate in his name. Therefore, Jesus was a Christian because Christianity is based on him. His followers, Christians, get together in a church to talk about Jesus and all that he has done and continues to do to humanity.

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at November 9, 2014 11:29 PM

Anthony Colello
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
10 November 2014

Question:
From the chapter article (required reading): “Historical Overview: Biblical Views: Christian: Saint Paul.” What does the word “Christ” mean? What does the word “Messiah” mean? Explain your response.

Answer:
The word messiah and Christ are very similar in meaning as they should be. Both words, messiah, and Christ, mean “the anointed one” (Dictionary.com). This is because the word Christ is derived through translation of the word messiah. The word messiah is used typically by the followers of the Jewish faith. The people of the Christian faith typically use Christ to represent their definition of the “anointed one.” This is most likely due to the differing belief of who the messiah is, “Christians believe that Jesus was the Messiah who delivered mankind from its sins. Jews believe that the Messiah has not yet come” (Dictionary.com, http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/messiah?s=t). One belief that seems to be agreed upon is the idea of God’s unconditional love. Also, how God’s love is intended to “transform the loved one from a state of unfaithfulness to a new fidelity” (Overview). It is believed that when humans reach the full height of unconditional love and shalom covers the land that the “messiah” or “Christ” will return or at least make himself or herself present.

References
Dictionary.com. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/christ?s=t. 2014. web page. 10 11 2014.
—. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/messiah?s=t. n.d. web site. 10 11 2014.
Overview, Historical. "Historical Overview." Historical Overview (2014): 26. Print out.

Posted by: Anthony Colello at November 10, 2014 09:57 AM

DO OVER
Gabriela Navarro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
07 November 2014


“keep alert, stand firm in your faith, be courageous, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love” (16:13–14).

QUESTION #16:
For what reason does Paul speak the quoted massage above?


ANSWER:
Paul’s instruction to the Corinthians to take up a collection for the benefit of the poor in Jerusalem. He expresses his hope that he will be able to visit Corinth soon, and in the meanwhile urges the Corinthians to accept his emissary Timothy with open arms.

Posted by: Gabriela Navarro at November 10, 2014 10:40 AM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 November 2014

QUESTION #17: What was Paul’s ethnicity? What was Paul’s religion (originally)? What was Paul’s nationality? What languages did he speak?

ANSWER:
Prior to his name being Paul, Paul went by the name of Saul of Tarsus. Paul was also a citizen of Rome as well as belonging to the Jewish ethnicity. As stated, “One of the zealous persecutors of these early Jewish Christians was a learned young jew with Roman citizenship, Saul of Tarsus”(Biblical Views: Christian 2). Paul was originally Jewish until a dramatic spiritual experience drove him to convert to Christianity. To add, Paul inherited the gift of speaking in tongues that allowed him to speak to all people. “18 I thank God that I speak in tongues more than all of you” (1 Corinthians 14:18).

Posted by: Thomas Watson at November 10, 2014 01:22 PM

Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
10 November 2014

Question:
From the chapter article: “Historical Overview: Biblical Views: Christian: St Paul.” Who were the Messianists? Were they always called that from day one or did that come later?

Answer:
The Messianists were the people who believed, “that Jesus had been raised from the dead by God and that this risen Christ…had commissioned them to go into all parts of the world to proclaim the message…”(Historical Overview 27) They also believed that Jesus was the messiah. The title of “Messianists” did not come until later.

Posted by: Allison Ward at November 10, 2014 02:20 PM

Gabriela Navarro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 November 2014


QUESTION #15:
What firm example of Agape love, as performed by Jesus, is given by the author in the text?


ANSWER:
Agape love is active, not abstract or passive. It does not simply have kind feelings. It does kind things. The author states an example of Agape love, "let all that you do be done in love" (1 Corinthians 16:14).  God is not so much interested in what we do, but why we do it.

Posted by: Gabriela Navarro at November 10, 2014 03:14 PM

Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
11 November 2014

Question:
From the chapter article (required reading): “HISTORICAL OVERVIEW: Biblical Views: Christian: Saint Paul.” Is “Christ” the last name of Jesus? Were his parents called Joseph Christ and Mary Christ? Explain your response. Use quoted passage from the text (with MLA Parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answered:
Jesus last name was not “Christ.” Christ was a title given to him by the early Christians who believed that he was heaven-sent to show the people of the world the way, the truth, and the light of God. “Jesus was portrayed as being sent by divine love to summon humankind to turn from its religious apostasy and moral decay, to accept God’s forgiving love, and to pursue a life of righteousness, love, and justice” (St. Paul, pg. 26). Mary and Joseph’s last name was not “Christ”, Last names back in that time period were not common, rather it was the location which you came from which stood in place of your last name. “Jesus the Christ” was believed to have been the chosen one sent to shows God extreme love and mercy on the people of the world. “Jesus was presented as an incarnate model of diving love that all his disciples were called to follow.”

Posted by: irma sera at November 11, 2014 01:50 AM

Brianna Broughton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL- Love & Desire in Literature
12 November 2014

Biblical views: Christian

Which came first, Christianity or Judaism? Which is the parent religion and which is the child religion?

Answer: Judaism came before Christianity. In the first line of the article it reads: “Christianity was born within Judaism.” (first epistle to the Christians). Judaism was founded around 2,500 BC, and Christianity developed out of Judaism in the 1st century CE.

Posted by: Brianna Broughton at November 12, 2014 02:54 PM

Martin Terrasi
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
12 November 2014

Question: Did Paul know Jesus of Nazareth? Had they ever met in person while Jesus of Nazareth lived?

Answer: according to the reading in the Historical Overview Paul’s story starts after the death of Jesus with his conversion on his trip to persecute Jews. In his own writing, he admits that he never knew or met Jesus.

Posted by: Martin Terrasi at November 12, 2014 03:11 PM

Rebecca Messano and Allie Ward
ENG 210CL
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
November 14, 2014

-What does Agape mean? How is it different from Philia? How is it different from Eros?
Agape is the unconditional love that harbors transforming possibilities whereas Eros is erotic and Philia is brotherly love
-What are the conditions of Platonic Eros/Love that Agape love does not have?
Agape does not have erotic qualities unlike Eros and platonic is friendly, so it would be a strong, friendly love
-According to Paul, what is the longevity of love?
Paul says that "love will never come to an end"

Posted by: Rebecca Messano and Allie Ward at November 14, 2014 02:58 PM

Sharonda S Byrd
B. LEE HOBBS
ENG 210CL
9 November 2014
Biblical Views
Question: #1 From the chapter article (required reading): “Historical Overview”: Biblical Views: Christian: Saint Paul.” What does the article writer mean that “Christianity was born with Judaism”? Explain your response.


Answer: The article writer means when they talk about Christianity was born from Judaism is that the same themes the New Testament had the Old Testament had too. “As God loved humankind through Jesus the Christ, so humans were challenged to love each other. And the kind of love envisaged was the unconditional love that harbors transforming possibilities about which Hosea spoke”, this quote means that the same love that God showed us is the same love that Hosea ,which is in the Old Testament, talks about too. So Judaism which is represented in the Old Testament because of the covenants which were made relate to the love that is show throughout the New Testament.

Posted by: sharonda byrd at November 14, 2014 03:00 PM

Antonella Aviles and Sharonda Byrd
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA09
14 November 2014

Paul Corinthians Questions

Questions: What is Agapaic love? How is it different from Erotic love? How is it different from Philia love? What is Implied, Christian challenge to mankind regarding Agape love? Why? What firm example of Agape love, as performed by Jesus, does the author of the article give? Why might it be problematic to define that particular act as solely agapaic?

Answers: Agape love is defined in reference to the love that Jesus Christ has for his people when he let himself be destroyed on the cross for those he loved to be saved. Erotic love is more of a lustful relationship that one has with a lover than the sacrificial agape love. The philiac type of love is one that one has in a friendship and is loyal but not as undying as the agape love. Paul believes that the implied Christian challenge is that Christians should model themselves after Jesus himself (Corinthians 16:21-24.) Jesus’s “practice of ecstatic utterance and the matter of life and death in the spotlight of resurrection” of Jesus was the firm example of Agape love (Corinthians 16:21-24.). He mostly thought the selfless love that Jesus had for humans should be the overall role model for humans to be like in actions and morals.

Posted by: Antonella Aviles and Sharonda Byrd at November 14, 2014 03:19 PM

Martin J Terrasi Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
14 November 2014
Question: What was Corinth known for in the time of Paul? From where does the word “courtesan” draw from? Why does Paul write the Corinthians? What issues are on their mind?

Answer: Corinth at this time was known almost as an modern day Las Vegas mixed with Washington DC. A city with political and economic power coupled with a underlining dirty such as prostitution and the like making it a difficult to start a church in. “Corinth became an important commercial center. It was probably the capital of the roman province…in addition Corinth was famous for its courtesans”. (historical overview p.27) “courtesan” starts from women from Corinth known for being prostitutes. This is a problem for the new church because they are used to having restrictions when it comes to “fornication” and are unsure of how they must act. This is the reason for Paul writing his letters.

Posted by: martin terrasi matt weller at November 14, 2014 03:22 PM

Emily Finck and Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
17 November 2014


Question #2:
What things does Paul feel the need to “correct” in the behavior of the Corinthians? What are the positions of the occupations that many early Christians possessed, according to the writings of Paul? What were the various supernatural powers and titles held by these individuals? Be prepared to identify and explain them all (most important “job”).


Answer:
Paul felt the need to “correct” the sexual practices of the Corinthians, mainly the “relationship or a man with his stepmother” (Biblical Views: Christian St. Paul 27). Paul, felt the need to address and correct issues of “sex, celibacy, marriage, and commercial food” as well (27). In regards to the positions and occupations the Christians held, Paul categorized them from most important to least important. For example, “Apostles, prophets, teachers, miracle workers, healers, and ecstatic utterance” were what Paul viewed as the natural order of things (28). Ultimately those who were not apostles were not seen as important: Which is ironic because all of the occupations listed after apostle personifies the very definition of an apostle.

Posted by: Emily Finck at November 15, 2014 09:49 AM

Thomas Watson, Brianna Broughton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 November 2014

QUESTION #3: What topic does Paul tie in to his decision of both (a.) how Christians should behave, sexually, and (b.) how the church positions should be ranked in their hierarchy? What is this called? Without it, what are we, according to Paul?

ANSWER:
Paul ties the Corinth environment with a focus on spiritual gifts. Due to the issues within the Corinth environment, Paul had to deal with factional struggles, such as a man sleeping with his stepmother. He then addressed all of the concerns and moved forward with a focus on spiritual gifts. He orchestrated the hierarchy by stating this, “God has appointed, in first place apostles, in the second place prophets, thirdly teachers; then miracle-workers, then those who have gifts of healing, or ability to help others or power to guide them, or the gift of ecstatic utterance of various kinds”(Biblical Views: Christian St. Paul 28).

Posted by: Thomas Watson at November 16, 2014 11:05 AM

Shelby Rexroth and Gabby Navarro
ENG 210 CA02
Dr. Hobbs
November 14th, 2014

The article writer asks the questions, “Is unconditional love perhaps an impossible ideal for human beings?” Look CAREFULLY at all stipulations Paul gives for Agape love in I Corinthians 13:4-13 and then make your decision.
Should Paul’s Agape love serve only as an idea to striver for or is realistic to expect it as a possible reality for human beings? Is it a setup for disappointment? Why, or why not?

We believe that unconditional love is a possible ideal for human beings because God said that, that kind of love is impossible without him. It’s described to be “the kind of love that He gives us and wants us to develop within us for him, towards each other, and even towards ourselves.” It’s not a setup for disappointment because this kind of love “can bring us great comfort and assurance and also presents us with a major challenge”

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at November 16, 2014 03:24 PM

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