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August 16, 2013

The Students Were Watching Zora Neale Hurston

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Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. 1939. American. Novel.

Students,

Below, please . . .

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

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Posted by lhobbs at August 16, 2013 03:18 PM

Readers' Comments:

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
4 September 2013
Question:
14. The word lacerating means to cut, why would the author use this word to describe a kiss? What kind of kiss is this in Nanny’s opinion? Answer:
After Janie and Johnny kiss, Nanny sees this and Janie thinks, “That was the end of her childhood.” Then Nanny is telling Janie that she is a grown woman now and she wants to see her get married. Janie does not want to get married yet and she says the kiss was not anything special like that. Nanny does not like Johnny and seeing him kiss her granddaughter in her mind is as if he is attacking her because she does not think he is good enough for Janie.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at October 4, 2013 03:47 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 October 2013

Question: What is the relationship between Janie and Pheoby?

Janie and Phoeby seem to have a close relationship. When Janie was walking to her house all the other girls started to talk down about her just because she did not stop to say hi before she went home. When Pheoby gets up to go to Janie's house Hurstson describes is as, " She left the porch pelting her back with unasked questions. They hoped the answers were cruel and strange" (4). When Janie asks about the other girls Pheoby is honest and tell her that the other girls were asking questions. They seem to have a trusting relationship.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 5, 2013 05:26 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
4 October 2013

Question: “ How did Logan act when Janie asks what he would do if she ran away?”

Answer: In the story, the thought of running away only came to Janie after she have met someone else and they have promised to give her a better life and treat her like royalty. So when she told Logan of her intent to run away he suddenly felt a, “terrible ache in his body” (Hurston 30). Instead of showing his pain Logan decided to resort to scorn so that he can maintain power in the situation. His means of power were to make Janie feel terrible about herself he did this by saying,” Tain’t too many men’s would trust yuh, knowin ‘ yo’ folks lak dey do” (Hurston 30). Logan also threatened her by saying he would leave her for another girl more worthy to have him because they would trust each other.

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at October 5, 2013 05:33 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Question: Describe Joe Starks. Does he seem like a good risk for Janie? What suggests that she may be unhappy if she chooses to go with him? What details suggest that she may be happy with him?

Answer: Joe Starks, coming from and through Georgy “been workin’ for white folks all his life” (Hurston 28). Joe Starks was a wealthy man; he “saved up some money-round three hundred dollars” (Hurston 28). Receiving news of a new town that consisted of only colored people, he knew “dat was de place he wanted to be” (Hurston 28). On his way to Florida, he came across Janie, and the two “sat under the tree and talked” (Hurston 29) while her husband was out. From then on, the two would meet up “and talk about when he would be a big ruler of things with her reaping the benefits” (Hurston 29). Joe Starks seems to be the “perfect” man for Janie; he is rich and can give her all the things she wants/ needs. Joe Starks states, “you aint never knowed what it was to be treated lak a lady and Ah wants to be dre one tuh show yuh” (Hurston 29). Janie contemplates on whether leaving with Joe would be a good idea or not. Janie constantly thinks of her grandma when coming to a decision. Joe says, “Janie if you think Ah aims to tole you, youse wrong. Ah wants to make a wife outa you” (Hurston 29). Unhappy with Logan, her husband, Janie decides to leave him and go with Joe. I believe this will backfire on Janie. Logan may not have had a lot of money or be able to spoil Janie like Joe can, but he provided for Janie the best way possible.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 6, 2013 04:55 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 October 2013

Question: #16. Why does Janie’s Nanny want her to get married?

Answer: Janie's grandmother is concerned about her life after she sees her kissing a boy. She does not want her granddaughter to be used by any man. She is worried about her future and wants her to get married before she dies. Nanny wants her to marry Logan Killicks, a wealthy farmer in his middle age. She chose him so Janie would not have to work hard.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at October 6, 2013 07:56 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Question: How does Janie’s attitude affect Logan?

Answer: Logan seems to be getting upset with how Janie is acting. Janie says some upsetting things to Logan and Logan tries to fight back in order to hurt Janie the way that she hurt him. He did not want to hear it anymore because it bothered him. According to the book, Logan “flopped over resentful in his agony and pretended sleep” (Hurston 31). Logan continued to act in a distant manner because of Janie’s attitude.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 6, 2013 09:40 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013

Question 11: How do the black children at school treat Janie and why?

Answer: Janie is teased by the black children at school because she was "livin' in de white folks' back-yard" (9). Janie also receives hand-me-down clothes of Mrs. Washburn's grandchildren, which is in better condition than the ones the other black children wear. As a result, they act out in jealousy, some more than others, such as Mayrella: "So she would pick at me all de time and put some others up tuh do de same" (9).

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 6, 2013 10:33 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 October 2013

Question: Why does Janie wait by the gate?
Answer: After Nanny’s death, Janie began to wait by the gate and “Janie waited a bloom time, and a green time and an orange time. [ . . .] She began to stand around the gate and expect things. What things? She didn’t know exactly. [. . . ] She knew that God tore down the old world every evening and built up a new one by sun-up” (Hurston 25). Janie kept her faith in God as she grieved Nanny’s death and watched the seasons change spring all through fall. She knew God creates a clean slate every morning, a clean slate for her and her future.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at October 6, 2013 11:07 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013

Question: What did Nanny have to wait for before she could die?

Answer: Nanny waited until Janie was satisfied with her marriage with Logan before she could die. Nanny sat on her knees and prayed and when she was finished, “She scuffled up from her knees and fell heavily across the bed. A month later she was dead” (Hurston 24).

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 6, 2013 11:16 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
06 October 2013

Question: “How do the men feel about Janie?”

Answer: The men enjoy judging Janie’s personal life and affairs with Tea Cake (Hurston 3). They feel that Janie is too old for him, despite the fact “he’s round thirty his ownself” (Hurston 3). Further they criticize the way in which she spends them money that her husband left for her when he died. Finally, the men enjoy objectifying her body, which despite its age, is something to be admired. With lust-filled eyes they describe her features as buttocks as so firm it looks “like she had grapefruit in her hip pockets, the great rope of black hair swinging” and her “pugnacious breasts trying to bore holes in her shirt” (Hurston 2).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 6, 2013 11:22 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013

Question 10: Why was Janie confused about her race?

Answer: When Janie was young, she lived with her nanny. Her nanny's employer Mrs. Washburn would bring her white children over to play with Janie, and she was too young to realize that she was different from them because she was black. When she was six years old, she saw a picture of her with her white friends and finally realized that she was black.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 6, 2013 11:27 PM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
6 October 2013

Question: What does Janie learn about Joe Starks?

Answer: Janie learns that Joe Starks worked for white people, saved money, and started to make money. Also, he wanted to live in a town full of “colored folks” (Hurston 28). Joe Starks’ life story is explained as Janie is pumping water and listening to him. As his life’s story goes he had been “workin’ for white folks all his life. Saved up some money—round three hundred dollars, yes indeed, right there in his pocket. Kept hearing’ ‘bout them buildin’ a new state down heah in Flordy and sort of wanted to come” (Hurston 28).

References
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 6, 2013 11:42 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 October 2013


Question: Consider the story of Nanny’s hardships and suffering. What image does Nanny use at the close of the chapter in her appeal to Janie to be sensitive to her vulnerability? Why is it an especially appropriate image for Nanny, as a caretaker for others?

Answer: In Zora Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Watching God, Nanny uses the image of rape to appeal to Janie’s vulnerability. “Dat school teacher had done hid her in de woods all night long, and he had done raped mah baby and run on off just before day” (Hurston 10). Nanny was not getting any younger and she knew soon enough that it would be her time to leave this earth. Her only wish was that Janie was well off. “Mah dialy prayer now is tuh let dese golden moments rolls on a few days longer till Ah see you safe in life”(Hurston ,15). This image is appropriate because Nanny only wants the best for her Janie. She feels she failed the first time with her own daughter and raising Janie was like a second chance to raise a child successfully.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at October 6, 2013 11:49 PM

In the first chapter of Their Eyes Were Watching God, Janie Starks is being familiarize as a "mysterious" women walking down the main road back into town. Janie happens to pass by a group of local women who sit and gossip about her; making up stories and rumors of why she has return without the man with she left. ““What she doin’ coming back here in dem overhalls? Can’t she find no dress to put on?—Where’s dat blue satin dress she left here in?—Where all dat money her husband took and died and left her?—…Where she left dat young lad of a boy she went off here wid?—Thought she was going to marry?—Where he left her?—What he done wid all her money?—Betcha he off wid some gal so young she ain’t even got no hairs—why she don’t stay in her class?—”” (Hurston, 2.) The women are upset about the fact Janie did not stop and say hello or explain why she has return; they are envious of Janie. Amongst those women are Pheoby Watson, an old friend of Janie, who defends her and criticizes the other women for their rude comments and speculations. Pheoby states to the women, ““Well, nobody don’t know if it’s anything to tell or not. Me, Ah’m her best friend, and Ah don’t know.”” (Hurston, 2.) Pheoby ends up leaving the group of gossipers to go bring Janie food, to see how Janie is doing and informs her of the “gossip” going around town about why she is back and what probably “happened” to her. From the way the narrative displays the interaction between the two women through their dialect, it shows that Janie and Pheobe are close friends and insinuates they have known each other since they were a younger age. Since the character and nature of Pheoby is present first, we can somewhat see her side of the relationship with Janie. Although not much depth about the way Pheoby feels for or about Janie is present, something shows when Pheoby first stands up for her. Almost foreshadows that Pheoby feels protective over Janie to make sure her long-time friend reputation is not spat on with “sideline hate” of the local residents. Furthermore, Pheoby feels the need to “take care” of Janie by bringing her food because she knew she had not eaten and is curious to hear what her friend has been up to while she was in the Everglades.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at October 7, 2013 01:57 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013
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Question: How does Pheoby feel about Janie?


Answer:
At first when I was reading the chapter I got the impression Pheoby and Janie were more than friends. Then I got to a section that stated Janie was to be married. At this point, I assume Pheoby and Janie are just close friends, but Janie said that she no longer has a fiancé. Pheoby seems to have some feelings towards Janie. He does not come right out and say he loves her, but he gives off the impression that he loves her. The narrator states, “They sat there in the fresh young darkness close together. Pheoby eager to feel and do through Janie, but hating to show her zest for fear it might be thought mere curiosity” (Hurston 7). Pheoby acts as if he wants to see if he likes her, but hesitates because he is not one hundred percent sure. Janie may see their relationship as a friendship and Pheoby may want it to become more than a friendship.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 7, 2013 02:05 AM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs
October 7, 2013

35. How has Logan changed since the beginning of his marriage to Janie?
Janie had noticed how he had changed in the past months. She went over how he had stop talking in rhymes to her and didn't run his hands through her hair like he used to (Thurman, page 26). When Joe comes in to the picture Janie begins to question how she is being treated. When she finally begins to think about the idea and subliminally tells it to Logan he ignores it at first. While doing yard work the next morning she tells Logan this is not her place to be doing work and he realizes she has been talking with someone who is "grinnin' in yo' face and lyin' tuh yuh" (Thurman, page 32). This was the last straw and she left Logan. She was ready for a life where "flower dust and springtime sprinkled over everything" (Thurman, page 32).

Works Cited
Hurston, Zora Neale. "4." Their eyes were watching God. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. 26-33. Print.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 7, 2013 08:30 AM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Question: 9. Who raised Janie?

Janie's mother and father were not a part of her life when she was raised. Her grandmother took care and raised her. Janie states, "Mah grandma raised me. Mah grandma and de white folks she worked wid" (Hurston 8). Janie was born and raised at her grandma's house.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 7, 2013 09:19 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
ENG2010 CA01
Love and Desire Literature

Question #3. What do the town’s people say the woman did?

The town’s people were annoyed at the women. They made burning statements with questions regarding her. The men noticed that the women took the faded shirt and muddy overalls off that she was wearing and laid them for remembrance. The town’s people judged her. “She sits high, but she looks low” spoke on of the few towns people. This quote explains her type of personality towards the people in the town because she was not giving them the gossip that they wanted to hear.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 7, 2013 10:51 AM

Flavia Vazquez
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs

Question 12: What does Janie imply happened to her mother?

Answer: Janie implies that her mom was gone before she could remember. Janie's grandma was who raised her.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 7, 2013 11:05 AM

Flavia Vazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
October 6, 2013

Question 70: What days does Janie work?

Answer: Janie worked every day except for Sundays.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 7, 2013 11:08 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Question: 31. Why does Nanny say Janie should be happy in her marriage?

Nanny reminds Janie that, now that she's married she has many more things. Nanny mentions, "Got a house bought and paid for and sixty acres uh land," (Hurston 23), implying that Janie should feel very happy and grateful for the things that her marriage has brought her.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at October 7, 2013 11:11 AM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Question: How did Janie get the city man's attention?

To get the city man's attention, Janie, "ran to the pump and jerked the handle hard while she pumped" (Hurston 27). Then, that's when the man asked her for a drink of water.

Posted by: Rache Robinson at October 7, 2013 11:12 AM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013
Question: Why was Janie confused about her race?
Answer: As a child, Janie was confused about her race because she was raised with white children. While giving a brief account of her childhood to Pheoby, Janie explains that she “was wid dem white chillun so much till Ah didn’t know Ah wuzn’t white till Ah was round six years old”(Hurston 8). Janie had always assumed she was like all of the other children until one day she was looking at a photograph of herself and realized she was a darker skin color. She claims in the text that had she not seen herself in the picture, she would never have known she was any different from the other children.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 7, 2013 03:01 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2013
Question: What do we find out about the meat?
Answer: In this chapter, it can be inferred that having meat is a delicacy, possibly scarce in the town. One night at the store, Janie is working and takes note of Mrs. Tony’s conversation with Mr. Starks about bringing meat home to her family. She begs him for a small portion of meat to feed her family and is given side meat in a serving less than she asked for. She leaves the shop crying: “Some folks ain’t got no heart in dey bosom. They’s willin’ tuh see uh po’ woman and her helpless chillun starve tuh death. God’s gointuh put ’em under arrest, some uh dese days, wid dey stingy gripin’ ways” (Hurston 74). We find out that the meat is valuable in the town and the wealthy are vbery stingy about the distribution of it.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 7, 2013 04:35 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

7 Octobre 2013

Question: Summarize what Janie said to Joe in your own words.

Answer: First, Joe was mocking Janie's looks and was criticizing the way she was cutting the tobacco. Janie could not hold her anger anymore and insulted Joe back in front of the other men. She insults him by criticizing his old and ugly looks under his cloths. She describes him as being fat with a big belly and the way he looks naked saying, "You big-bellies round here and put out a lot of brag, but 'tain't nothing to it by yo' big voice. Humph! talkin' 'bout me looking' old! When you pull down yo' britches, you look lak de change uh life" (Hurston 79). This angers Jody so much, making him feel that he lost all his power and respect from the men in town. Jody responds to Janie physically by slapping her with all his power and drags her out of the store.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 7, 2013 06:35 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Question: What is it that makes Janie a woman? What is the connection to the opening images of Chapter 1?

Answer: Janie is a woman because she possesses the feminine qualities that accompany being a lady. The men notice her aesthetic features such as her buttocks and breasts. However, it is not just her physical attributes that make her a woman. It is much more because the other women are so desperate to bring her down to their level they commit her faded shirt and muddy overalls to memory as a mark against her. When the men and women see her walk around the corner made them stare because “[s]eeing the woman as she was made them remember the envy they had stored up from other times” (Hurston 2). Hurston gives images of grapefruits, rope, plumes, and pugnacious breasts. These items allude to the roles Janie’s character will play throughout the novel.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 7, 2013 07:56 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Question: How does Janie react to the flirting that is going on in front of the store?

Answer: The store is the community gathering place in the town, and all the men will hang out on the porch, and everyday Daisy will come by to spend time with her neighbors and to absorb all the attention the men will pay her. Everyone knows that all the pick-up lines and witty banter are said in good fun, and only some of the lines are serious. Janie describes the scene by saying, “The girls and everybody else help laugh. They know it’s not courtship. It’s acting out courtship and everybody is in the play”. (Hurston 67). Janie sits out on the porch and participates in the laughter, and she sees no harm in playing a role in the play.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 7, 2013 08:00 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Question: Why did Joe buy the mule?

Answer: Joe bought the mule after the guys on their store porch found the escaped animal by the shop and they decided to torment the animal. Janie then expressed her dislike for the treatment of the animal in a quiet manner, but Joe heard her and decided to buy the mule, but the guys turned the jokes on Joe and said, “Beatyuh tradin’ dat time, Starks! Dat mule is liable tuh be dead befo’ de week is out”(Hurston 58). Then Joe told them of his intention, which were to, buy the, “varmint tuh let ‘im rest” (Hurston 58).

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at October 7, 2013 08:26 PM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire Literature
7 October 2013

Question 62: What is Janie’s complaint about the way thing are going?

Janie’s complaint about the way things are going is very “strain”. An example of Janie feeling strain is through a conversation between Jody and Janie. "It's all right Ah reckon, but don't yuh think it keeps us in uh kinda strain?""Naw, Jody, it jus' looks lak it keeps us in some way we ain'tnatural wid one 'nother. You'se always off talkin' and fixin' things, and Ah feels lak Ah'm jus' markin' time. Hope it soon gits over." (Their Eyes were Watching God pg.59) Janie is envy with her moral sense. Janie views things in a more bitter way because of how she viewed certain things.

WORK CITIED

Dabee J. The Summons to Behold a Revelation: Femininity and Foliage in Zola Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. N.p.: n.p., 2009. Print.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 7, 2013 09:15 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 2013

Question 94: Why does Joe always call Janie old now?

Answer: In Chapter 7, Janie and Jody have begun to enter the age of seniority and their bodies are showing their age. "Maybe, he had seen it long before Janie did, and he had been fearing for her to see. Because he began to talk about her age all the time, as if he didn't want her to stay young while he grew old" (77). In order to keep his power over Janie, Jody must make her feel bad about herself so she cannot focus on his flaws.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 8, 2013 01:16 AM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
4th October 2013
Question: 3 #29. Read this passage from the novel: “Husbands and wives always loved each other, and that was what marriage meant. It was just so.” Do you agree with this statement or disagree? Explain.
Answer: Unfortunately, I disagree with this statement. I believe that marriage should be about love and that, that is what most people want marriage to define yet, it never is or was simply about the love shared between spouses. In the past, marriages were simply a business deal, where parents would just sell off their daughters, so it isn’t true that “husbands and wives always loved each other” because in these circumstances the couple barely knew each other so how could they even possibly be in love? Similarly, in today’s society, there are many marriages that are loveless, the spark between the couple has gone, and they simply stay together for the children or financial reasons. I think in today’s society marriage symbolizes love more than it did in the best, but that doesn't always been that there is love present in a marriage. I believe that a couple can love each other just as strongly without being married.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at October 8, 2013 12:42 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 2013


Question: What does Joe want Janie to help out with?


Answer:
Joe acts like there are not many things women are capable of doing besides housework, but he needs Janie’s help for one thing. Joe wants to make a store for the town. Joe thinks the town needs a store. Joe asked Janie to look over the store while he is busy doing other things. Joe says, “De mayor of uh town lak dis can’t lay round home too much. De place needs buildin’ up. Janie, Ah’ll git hold uh somebody tuh help out in de store and you kin look after things whilst Ah drum up things otherwise” (Hurston 43). In this statement, Joe was telling Janie he needs her help to run the store. Janie is a little confused and does not think she can help him, but he is telling her she has to help. Joe needs Janie’s help to watch the store.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 8, 2013 04:51 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 October 2013

Question: How does this contradict what he told her before he married her?

Answer: After arriving to the new town, Joe decides to rebuild the town, and his first project was building a new store. He expected Janie to help him run the stop, but she ended up doing most of the running. He said to her, “dress up and stand in the store” (Hurston 41). Janie eventually becomes tired of cooking and serving people, and barely spending time with her husband. She expresses to Joe, “it jus’ looks lak it keeps us in some way we aint natural wid one ‘nother. You’se always off talkin’ and fixin’ things, and Ah feels lak Ah’m jus markin’ time. Hope it soon gits over” (Hurston 46). When Joe first met Janie, he told her, “you aint never knowed what it was to be treated lak a lady and Ah wants to be dre one tuh show yuh” (Hurston 29). He contradicts himself because Janie has been working since she married him. He told her if she married him she would not have to work, and would be treated like how a woman is supposed to.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 8, 2013 06:49 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2013

Question: What do we know about Janie’s appearance?

Answer: We know that she has long, beautiful, black hair, but she has to tie it up when she works in the store. Her hair is mentioned quite often throughout the book. It appears to us that it is the best part of her looks. It is said about Janie “Tain't nothin' to her 'ceptin' dat long hair” (Hurston 38).

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 8, 2013 06:57 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
210 CL- Love and Desire in Literature- CA01
9 October 2013

Monday – 07/2013

# 100. Does the difference in the way men and women dream and remember described in the first two paragraphs of the novel apply to Joe and Janie?

I think so, because she is remembering what happened when Joe had hit her, and how it affected them after he hit Jodie. He wanted her to think he hated her, but in his heart; he did still love her. Even while he was dying, I think he still loved her.

Friday- 04/2013

# 29. Read this passage from the novel: “Husbands and wives always loved each other, and that was what marriage meant. It was just so.” Do you agree with this statement or disagree?

I think personally that husbands and wives do love each other it may not be all the time; because they are human and there will be fights/arguments. Because it is a part of human nature. But I think there has to be that unconditional love for that other person that keeps them from ending the marriage as well as respect. Because if there is no respect, the other person will take advantage of their partner and abuse the fact that they love them.


Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at October 8, 2013 07:20 PM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
08 October 2013
Question 24: What happened to Janie’s mom?
Answer: Janie does not find out what happened to her mother until she is a little older. Her grandma says” and he had done raped mah baby and run on off just before day,” (Hurston 19) explaining that Janie’s mother was raped by her schoolteacher. This is why Janie’s mother had her at such a young age. After the rape Janie’s mother changed, “she took to drinkin’ likker and stayin’ out nights,” (Hurston 19) and that is why the Grandmother has to take care of her.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 8, 2013 07:30 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2013

Question: 46. Why are Joe and Jamie suited for one another? (Whom do they both act like?)
Answer: Joe and Janie are suited for one another because they both have the same motive to become rich and are always looking for ways to better themselves and their town. They care more about the riches that they can have and owning more land. In the chapter the rest of the people in the town become jealous of the couple because of their beautiful house that makes the rest of the shakes look bad.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 8, 2013 07:59 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 2013

Question 92: The book says Janie got nothing from Joe except what money can buy. What does Janie probably want?

Answer: At this point in the book, Joe and Janie have been together for many years, and are both visibly aging. At the beginning of the chapter, she sets a very depressing tone talking about her empty life now, "She was a rut in the road, plenty of life beneath the surface but it was kept beaten down by the wheels" (Hurston 76). Her and Joe are pretty much just going through the motions of being married at this point. There seems to be no love in the marriage, and both their lives seem to be very empty.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 8, 2013 08:18 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 2013

Question: Why does Pheoby say the people are mad at Janie?

Answer: Pheoby that Janie is with Tea Cake and says that it isn't right for people to be with him.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at October 8, 2013 08:42 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 2013

Question: What does Sam Watson say is Joe's defense?

Answer: Sam is saying that the town wouldn't be intact if it wasnt't for Joe's somewhat bossiness.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at October 8, 2013 09:01 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
7 October 2013
Question: What has Nanny said about her life?
Answer: Nanny says that she raped by her master and the week after she got raped her daughter was born in which she named Leafy. Nanny escaped with Leafy because the master’s wife was Jealous and was planning to sell her after she was month old. Leafy was soon raped by her school teacher and in which she give birth to Janie and Nanny hoped for a future for Janie and not turn out to be like her Daughters. According to page 21 “ Ah was born back due in slavery so it wasn’t for me to fulfill my dreams of whut a woman oughta be and to do. Dat’s one of de holdbacks of slavery”(Hurston, 21). Nanny was not able to have her dreams done because her dreams and hopes had gone once Leafy got raped.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 8, 2013 09:29 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
7 October 2013
Question: What has Nanny said about her life?
Answer: Nanny says that she raped by her master and the week after she got raped her daughter was born in which she named Leafy. Nanny escaped with Leafy because the master’s wife was Jealous and was planning to sell her after she was month old. Leafy was soon raped by her school teacher and in which she give birth to Janie and Nanny hoped for a future for Janie and not turn out to be like her Daughters. According to page 21 “ Ah was born back due in slavery so it wasn’t for me to fulfill my dreams of whut a woman oughta be and to do. Dat’s one of de holdbacks of slavery”(Hurston, 21). Nanny was not able to have her dreams done because her dreams and hopes had gone once Leafy got raped.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 8, 2013 09:29 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 2013

Question: Why did Hicks go back to Janie’s?

Answer: Hicks thought Janie was beautiful when he first saw her and he talked about getting a woman just like her. Hicks says, “But dat wife uh hisn! Ah'm uh son of uh Combunction if Ah don't go tuh Georgy and git me one just like her" (Hurston 36). Hicks goes back to her house to flirt with Janie a little and tells her if she ever needs anything she can come to him.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 8, 2013 09:36 PM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs
52) What qualities in Joe make the town "bow down" to him? How does his power over other people affect him?
Joe does not have a bearing physical presence as some would assume that is how you command power of a town. Instead, he has this new house with "two stories with porches, with bannisters and such things" (Hurston, page 47). He has the big house on the block. It was the way he treated what some people would consider royalties that made him a figure. For example, spitting in the golden-colored vase where most people would put it on their kitchen table (Hurston, page 47). This affected his personality because it gave him power of judge, jury, and executioner. The best example is that of Henry Pitts being thrown out of town for getting caught with a wagon full of his own ribbon cane (Hurston, page 48).

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 8, 2013 10:31 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
08 October 2013

Question: “Why did Joe throw Henry Pitts out of town?”

Answer: Joe throw Henry Pitts out of town after he “caught Henry Pitts with a wagon load of his ribbon cane” (Hurston 48).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 9, 2013 12:10 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
7 September 2013
Question:
93. How has Joe changed?
Answer:
Joe has changed because he went from being a kind young man to bitter old man. He is always telling Janie she looks old and she can’t do anything, but once she calls him out he gets angry because he knows Janie is right, that he is older than her and looks worse than she does and he's just taking is frustrations out on her.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at October 9, 2013 12:39 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 October 2013

Question: Based on Charlie Jones’ pick-up lines to Daisy, would you say the way men try to pick up women has changed since the writing of this novel?
Answer: Daisy is well aware of her beauty, and how to exemplify it through her clothes, she knows white is her ideal color and Charlie is quick to let her know he noticed. “Lawd, Lawd, Lawd, it must be recess in heben if St. Peter is lettin’ his angels out lak dis. You got three men[Jim, Dave, and Lum] already layin’ at de point uh death ‘bout yuh, and heah’s uhnother fool dat’s willin’ tuh make time on yo’ gang” (Hurston 68). Based on Charlie’s pick up line, I do not believe the manner in which men pick up women back then has changed very much. Charlie was playing the role of a “wing man” in this instance as he complimented Daisy with a line very similar to pick-up line men continue to use today. For example, a popular one is, “Did you fall from heaven? Because you are an angel.” In addition, Charlie also helped impress Daisy by enhancing the intentions of his three friends, Jim, Dave, and Lum. He proclaimed they were ready to die for her, thus fulfilling his duty as a “wing man” by making his friends look like more desirable prospects rather than himself.

Posted by: camila pinzon at October 9, 2013 12:46 AM

Julia Della Penna
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2013

Question 74. Why does Janie have trouble with the mail?

Answer: Janie has trouble with the mail because people always came asking for it when it was bad timing. As quoted from Chapter 6, “People always coming and asking for mail at the wrong time. Just when she was trying to count up something or write in an account book.” (Hurston, 54). Furthermore, Janie had other issue with people heckling her that she would give the wrong change for stamps back, people wrote all kinds of ways, which made it hard to read some people’s writing, and when she had to put the mail up herself it always ended in a mess.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at October 9, 2013 01:16 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA 02 Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2013

Question# 71
Why does everyone like to talk about the mule?

Answer:
They use the Mule as a way to poke fun at Matt Bonner. Matt barely feeds his mule that is ill tempered, emaciated, and overworked.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 9, 2013 01:52 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
09 October 2013
Question 80: Who is the mule like? (Chapter 6)
Answer: The mule is like everyone. Sam states, “maybe de mule takes out after everybody” (Hurston 53). He says this because everyone picks on the mule, but also because everyone reminds the mule of Matt Bonner.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 9, 2013 05:38 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire Literature
7 October 2013

Question 62: What is Janie’s complaint about the way thing are going?

Janie’s complaint about the way things are going is very “strain”. An example of Janie feeling strain is through a conversation between Jody and Janie. "It's all right Ah reckon, but don't yuh think it keeps us in uh kinda strain?""Naw, Jody, it jus' looks lak it keeps us in some way we ain'tnatural wid one 'nother. You'se always off talkin' and fixin' things, and Ah feels lak Ah'm jus' markin' time. Hope it soon gits over." (Their Eyes were Watching God pg.59) Janie is envy with her moral sense. Janie views things in a more bitter way because of how she viewed certain things.

WORK CITIED

Dabee J. The Summons to Behold a Revelation: Femininity and Foliage in Zola Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. N.p.: n.p., 2009. Print.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 9, 2013 09:25 AM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2013

Question: 76. Why did Joe make her tie her hair back in the rag?

Joe makes Janie tie her hair back in the rag because he is jealous of other men. He "had caught Walter standing behind
Janie and brushing the back of his hand back and forth across the loose end of her braid ever so lightly so as to enjoy the feel of it without Janie knowing what he was doing" (Hurston 55). This event had made him make her put her hair up that night because he did not like what happened with Walter.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 9, 2013 10:36 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
9 October 2013

Question: Which man do you agree with Sim or Sam and why? What are they complaining about here?
Answer: Sim and Sam are arguing about Joe Starks’ behavior. Sim feels as though Joe is too hard on everyone as he tells Sam, “Joe Starks is too exact wid folks. All he got done made it offa de rest of us. He didn’t have all dat when he come here” (Hurston 49). Sam’s response to Sim was, “but none uh all dis you see and you’se settin’ on wasn’t here neither, when come. Give the Devil his due” (Hurston 49). The point of this argument shows Joe as a dictator, he is feared by some and thanked by others. Joe Starks at this point is a mayor of this new city but, he is only a mayor, not leader of the country in a democracy. Joe runs the town with an iron fist, which is unacceptable because Sim’s argument is valid. At one point, Joe’s tyrannical personality will bleed into his marriage with Janie which could be detrimental to her because he took her away from her previous husband. With this in mind, Joe persuaded Janie to run away with him and that was the preview of his tyrannical behavior. A tyrant will only get worse over time and Joe Starks is the perfect example.

References
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 9, 2013 11:12 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA 02 Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2013

Question# 131
How many days is Tea Cakes gone after the first time he and Janie get together?

Answer:
Tea Cake was gone for seven days. Tea Cake “waited a week exactly to come back for Janie's snub.(Hurston 100)”

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 9, 2013 12:52 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
9 October 2013

Question #13: What does she say happened with her dad that the town's people do not talk about?

Answer: Her dad was hunted by bloodhounds because of what he had done to her mother. He was trying to get in touch with her so he could marry her. "Dey didn't tell about how he wuz seen tryin' tuh git in touch wid mah mama later on so he could marry her" (Hurston 10).

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 9, 2013 02:00 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
11 October 2013
Question: Why isn’t Janie mean to Tea Cake when he comes back?
Answer: After Janie and Tea Cake meet, they immediately hit it off. The couple engages in a game of checkers, laughing, flirting, and enjoying each other’s company all evening. Some time passes after their encounter and Tea Cake has not returned. She becomes skeptical of his intentions thinking that maybe “he was hanging around to get in with her and strip her of all that she had” (Hurston 100). However, she is unable to be mean to him when he finally returns because he jokes around with her, playing an imaginary guitar.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 9, 2013 02:28 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
11 October 2013
Question: Why isn’t Janie mean to Tea Cake when he comes back?
Answer: After Janie and Tea Cake meet, they immediately hit it off. The couple engages in a game of checkers, laughing, flirting, and enjoying each other’s company all evening. Some time passes after their encounter and Tea Cake has not returned. She becomes skeptical of his intentions thinking that maybe “he was hanging around to get in with her and strip her of all that she had” (Hurston 100). However, she is unable to be mean to him when he finally returns because he jokes around with her, playing an imaginary guitar.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 9, 2013 02:29 PM

Julia Della Penna
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2013


Question 122: Why does Janie like going fishing in the middle of the night?

Answer: As quoted in Chapter 11, “It was so crazy digging worms by lamp light and setting out for Lake Sabelia after midnight that she felt like a child breaking rules. That’s what made Janie like it.” (Hurston, 102). Janie likes to go fishing in the middle of the night because it makes her feel like a “young child breaking rules.” Tea Cake asks Janie to go fishing since he does not want to end the night. He uses the excuse that it would be a waste to sleep the night away since the moon is too beautiful. Janie is at first hesitant since the time was after midnight, but Tea Cake ends up convincing her to go to Lake Sabelia. Janie feels like it is so absurd to be fishing at this time of the night that it is exciting to her.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at October 9, 2013 02:48 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
8 October 2013
Question:
What does Joe say about the townspeople?

Answer:
Joe says that the townspeople are trashy people and doesn’t allow Janie to associate with them because she he feels Jealous of other men looking at Janie with her long hair then even orders her to wear a head drag. According to page 54 “ He didn’t want her talking after trashy people, You’se Mrs. Mayor Starks, Janie I god, Ah can’t see what uh woman uh yo stability would wnt tuh be tresurin’ all dat gum-grease from folks dat don’t even de house dey sleep in”( Hurston, 54). This shows how Joe himself thought about the towns people and how he even thought about Janie to around the towns people.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 9, 2013 05:16 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

8th October 2013

Question: Chapter 11 #126 How does Janie blow off Tea Cake?

Answer: Janie is initially cautious around Tea Cake; she thinks he is a gold digger so she is rude to him when he first advances towards her. Eventually, when his playful charm draws her attention toward shim she does agree to go out with him on few occasions. I think that the way in which she blows him off in this chapter, is when she tells him that her feelings towards him are amicable and nothing more.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at October 9, 2013 07:56 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 October 2013

Question: Why does Janie say she never went around before?

Answer: Janie was saying this in response to Pheoby ‘s claims of Janie going to more open places than she would have in the past. Janie had informed Pheoby that she always wanted to go out more, but Joe, her late husband would not allow it. The author expressed this beam of truth by saying, “Ah always did want tuh git round uh whole heap, but Jody wouldn't ‘low me tuh”[Hurston, 112]. On the other hand, Joe allowed Janie to work the shop but nothing else. This was expressed when Janie said, “When Ah wasn’t in de store he wanted me tuh jes sit wid folded hands and sit dere, and Ah’d sit dere wid de walls creepin’ up on me and squeezing all de life outa me”[Hurston, 112].

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at October 9, 2013 08:48 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
10 October 2013


Question: What does Janie do at the end of the chapter that she has never done before? What meaning is given to all the events in this chapter when Janie says “It’s so easy to make yo’self out God Almighty when you ain’t got nothin’ tuh strain against but women and chickens”?
Answer: “Janie did what she never done before that is thrust herself into the conversation”(Hurston,75). Being married to Joe was like being married to a dictator. He does not treat her like his wife but more as a possession displayed around Eatonville. Joe Starks basically prevents Janie from living her life. He dictates everything about her from the way she wears her hair to the people she is allowed to associate with. “ He didn’t want her talking after such trashy people”(Hurston,54). After the day Joe smacked Janie, some sense was also knocked into her. She realized Joe did not fit the “pear tree” she envisioned and she was going to stop pretending she loved him. Janie finally spoke out as a sign of resilience to her failed marriage.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at October 10, 2013 12:45 AM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
10 October 2013

Question: How does Janie feel about going places with Tea Cake?

Answer: When Pheoby expresses her concern about Tea Cake, Janie tells her that she likes going to places and experiencing new things. She said she always wanted to do different things but that Jody never let her do them. Janie tells Pheoby, “When Ah wasn't in de store he wanted me tuh jes sit wid folded hands and sit dere” (Hurston 112). Janie was not satisfied with her life with Jody and wanted a change.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 10, 2013 01:53 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
10 October 2013
Question:
How does Teacake say he feels about Janie?
Answer: Tea Cake doesn’t come back for a week and Janie thinks that he is taking advantage of her wealth decides to be rude with him when he comes back. After that Tea Cake thinks they should go fishing and when him and Janie go fishing they stay up all night and Janie must sneak tea cake out so that way no body sees him and the towns people don’t gossip about the. Later that night Tea Cake tells Janie that he wants to make their relationship public and Janie refuses and tells Tea Cake that she only likes him as a friends, tea cake has strong feelings for Janie and is very upset that she doesn’t feel the same about him. According to page 103 “ Dats right, Tea Cake. They’s dere and Ah make use of ‘em whenever it’s necessary, but nothin’ special tuh me” (Hureston, 103). Janie is showing that she is not wanting Tea cake but nothing more then a friend and thinks that his feelings for her aren’t true at all, Tea Cake keeps telling Janie that he does have feelings for her. Therefore, He does not come back for a couple days and she finds him sitting at his porch and tries to talk to him about the problem. For so long does it take Tea Cake to prove to Janie that his feelings for her are real and that he isn’t lying to her.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 10, 2013 04:24 PM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs

111) What feeling does Janie like about being single?
Janie "liked being lonesome for a change" (Hurston, page 90). She thought the freedom feeling was fine and the men attempting to sway her did not represent a thing she wanted to know about (Hurston, page 90). She was so sick and tired of these men sitting and grinning at her she wished to literally smack them (Hurston, page 90).

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 10, 2013 07:10 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210 CL- Love and Desire in Literature- CA01
11 October 2013

Question # 129: What does Tea Cake think about this?

Answer: He did not want to let on that he liked her. Although, Teacake says, In the book “he would rather be shot with tacks then for her to be acting like she doesn’t like him (Hurston Pg. 105).” She is thinking at first that he is just saying that to impress her. Although, Teacake later says, “He has thought about it and struggled against it, but it does him no good. He says that her presence does not satisfy his youngness as she does (Hurston Pg. 105).”

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at October 10, 2013 07:12 PM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 215CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
10 October 2013

120. Why has Janie decided not to be nice to Tea
Cake anymore?

Janie obviously has feelings for Tea Cake. She thinks about asking Hezekiah about him but decides not to because she does not want him to think anything of it. So she leaves herself to her thoughts and starts thinking that because he hasn’t come back in a week, that he only wanted to “strip her of all that she had” (100). After all, she was forty. What would a young guy want with her? She let all her thoughts get to her mind and “decided to treat him so cold if he ever did foot the place that he’d be sure not to come hanging around there again” (100).

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at October 10, 2013 08:47 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
11 October 2013

Question: Why does Janie decide not to return to the past? What is significant about this decision? Is there any evidence that Janie has grown?

Answer: Janie decided not to return to the past because there is nothing there for here anymore. She is looking towards the “horizon” and what is still to come for here in the future. Her nanny has past away and she had come to the realization that she deep down hated her. She also has no interest in looking for a part time mother that was never really there anyway. “Digging around inside of herself like that she found that she had no interest in that seldom-seen mother at all. She hated her grandmother and hidden it from herself all these years under a cloak of pity. She had been getting ready for her great journey to the horizons in search of people; it was important to all the world that she should find them and they find here.” (Hurston 89) This is a significant decision because she finally was doing things that she personally wanted to do not because someone else has asked or told her to do it. This shows that Janie is starting to grow up and take her own path in life.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 10, 2013 09:10 PM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL
Love and Desire in Literature

#128. Chapter 11: Why does Janie say she and Tea Cake should not date?

Janie says that Tea Cake and her should not date because she does not believe him. She also keeps in mind that Tea Cake is twelve years younger than her. “Getting ready to laugh at me for an old fool. But oh, what wouldn't I give to be twelve years younger so
I could b'lieve him!”(Their Eyes Were Watching God). She caught herself falling for him and right away reminded herself that Tea Cake was trash. Janie was glad that she treated him cold during there conversation.

Work Citied
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God: A Novel. New York: Perennial Library, 1990. Print.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 10, 2013 09:23 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
10 October 2013

Question 107: How was Janie affected by Joe's death?

Answer: When Joe died Janie did not feel any sorrow, if anything she felt relieved that he was gone, and more free than ever. At the funeral she was kind of just going through the motions and acting like she was supposed to, but inside she was happy, "Inside the expensive black folds were resurrections and life. She sent her face to Joe's funeral, and herself went rollicking with the springtime across the world" (Hurston 88). She is looking at Joe's death as a second chance at life for her, and she is excited about it.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 10, 2013 09:43 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
10 October 2013

Question: How does Tea Cake say he feels about Janie?

Answer: Tea Cake told Janie that he likes her, but Janie is uncertain if he is telling the truth. She tells herself that he says that to all the girls, and he is taking her for an old fool. The next day Tea Cake comes back at daybreak and tells Janie, “You needs tellin’ and showin’, and dat’s what Ah’m doin’” (Hurston 107). Tea Cake knows that Janie will not believe him at face value, and he will have to show her through small acts of kindness like bringing her strawberries, spending the nights with her, and taking her shopping for the Sunday School Picnic.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 10, 2013 09:56 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

10 Octobre 2013

Question: Think about the way Janie thinks about Tea Cake compared to the way Janie thinks about Joe. How has Janie changed?

Answer: Janie has changed in the sense that she knows more about what she wants to do in her life and how she can really be happy. She wants to be alone, enjoy her freedom and not get involved with anyone. As she started to get closer and closer with Tea Cake, she still stays careful thinking that he only wants her for her wealth since she is much older than him. Janie is different with tea cake than she was with Joe in the sense that she is more cautious and he makes her smile. He likes her more than she does and wants more with her. Janie spends the night with Tea Cake and she felt something she never felt before: "Jane awakes the next morning by feeling Tea Cake almost kissing her breath away. Holding her and caressing her as if he feared she might escape his grasp and run away" (Hurston 107). Janie has not felt this kind of happiness and relief for a long time in her life and thats how it is different with the way she was feeling with Joe.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 10, 2013 10:15 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
10 October 2013

Question 118: What is signified by the description of the moon in the last sentence of the chapter?

Answer: Hurston describes the reflection of solar light from the moon as satisfying the thirst of the planet: "Soon its amber fluid was drenching the earth, and quenching the thirst of the day" (99). This sentence comes after Janie has spent some time getting to know Tea Cake. Janie's previous two husbands have failed her idea of love. When she is with Tea Cake, Janie feels complete as she acquires the love that she has been seeking for most of her life.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 10, 2013 10:21 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
10 October 2013

Question: How many days is Tea Cake gone after the first time he and Janie get together?

Tea Cake, "waited a week exactly to come back for Janie's snub" (Hurston 100). He did this because she was expecting more from him but he did not give it to her. Therefore, she chose to act cold which pushed him away.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 10, 2013 10:28 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
10 October 2013

Question #117. Chapter 10: What does Janie think of Tea Cake?

Answer: In Chapter 10 Janie meets Tea Cake. She thinks he is attractive. He is tall, dark, and handsome. He teaches her to play chess and treats her like equal. Then he helps her to close the shop. Janie feels comfortable with him.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at October 10, 2013 10:52 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
11 October 2013

Question: Think about the way Janie thinks about Tea Cake compared to the way Janie thinks about Joe. How has Janie changed?

Answer: When Janie first met Tea Cake, it was as if they had known each other their whole lives. Janie began to become more and more comfortable around Tea Cake, and she thought about him constantly. There was something about Tea Cake, which she could not resist. The narrator states, “All next day in the house and store she thought resisting thoughts about Tea Cake. She even ridiculed him in her mind . . . . But every hour or two the battle had to be fought all over again” (Hurston 106). Unlike how Janie felt with Joe, Tea Cake reminded her of the true meaning of love, and the feeling she felt as a young girl. The narrator explains, Tea Cake “looked like the love thoughts of women. He could be a bee to a blossom-a pear tree blossom in the springs. He seemed to crushing aromatic herbs with every step he took. Spices hung about him. He was a glance from god” (Hurston 106).

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 10, 2013 11:05 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
10 October 2013

Question: Chapter 10: “What does the stranger want to do with Janie?”

Answer: The stranger Janie encountered only desired to get to known her after their business exchange. After buying a pack of smoking tobacco, Tea Cake asked to play Janie “some checkers” (Hurston 95). During this time, they jokingly conversed about their lives, and Tea Cake taught Janie how to play the game (Huston 97). When Tea Cake needed to leave he walked Janie home; they shared a familiar feeling as though Janie “had known him all her life” (Hurston 99).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 11, 2013 02:28 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
09 September 2013

Question # 72

Answer:
Chapter 6 explains that most of the people around liked sharing mules with one another. At the store, Janie and others were always around having these conversations with others. As it is mentioned in the text, “ Janie loved the conversation and sometimes she though up good stories on mule, but Joe had forbidden her to indulge.” (Zora 53)

Posted by: abdulaziz alsaif at October 11, 2013 10:11 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Question: Why are so many men coming to visit Janie?

Answer: A lot of men are visiting Janie. The reader’s first impression is they are coming to ask her to marry her. Unfortunately, the reader assumes that men are coming for that reason because Janie’s husband's death. Janie's husband passed away, so that is why men are coming to visit her. Hurston states, “Before Jody had been dead a month, she noticed how often men who had never been intimates of Joe, drove considerable distances to ask after her welfare and offer their services as advisor” (90). In this quote, Hurston clearly states the reasoning why men travel to Janie. They travel to Janie to ask her about her welfare. That means they are asking her about her happiness and fortune. They also offer her to be her advisor. Some of the men may ask Janie to marry them, but the author does not come right out and say that the men asked to marry Janie. The men want to take care of her and make sure she is happy. This may lead to marriage, but it seems like men are just making sure she is happy. Those are the main reasons why men are coming to visit Janie.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 11, 2013 10:55 AM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs
October 11, 2013

137. Chapter 12: Why does Sam think Tea Cake is dating Janie?
Same thinks Janie is seeing someone because of her recent actions. The way "she looks might good; hair combed a different way nearly every day" dressing o impress someone (Hurston, page 111). She stopped attending church, got dressed in "pink linen" and "blue dresses because Tea Cake told her" (Hurston, page 110). The two are always together and its noticed by people; "Tea Cake and Janie gone hunting. Tea Cake and Janie gone fishing. Tea Cake and Janie gone to Orlando to the movies. Tea Cake and Janie gone to a dance" (Hurston, page 110).

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 11, 2013 10:57 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
11 October 2013

Question: Chapter 12: Why does Janie admit she wore the mourning clothes (black and white)?

Answer: Janie admits to wearing the mourning clothes not for her husband, but for everyone else. Janie says “So Ah wasn’t wearin’ it for him. Ah was wearin’ it for de rest of y’all” (Hurston 113).

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 11, 2013 11:08 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
11 October 2013

Question: 137. Why does Sam think Tea Cake is dating Janie?

Sam thought that Tea Cake and Janie were dating because they were spending a lot of time together. He mentioned, "Tea Cake and Janie gone hunting. Tea Cake and Janie gone fishing. Tea Cake and Janie gone to a dance," (Hurston 110). They were doing many activities together so that made him believe they were together romantically. Sam also mentioned, "you got to have something to comb your hair over," (Hurston 111) in order to support his suspicion.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at October 11, 2013 11:17 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
11 October 2013


Question: What are Pheoby's fears? Is Janie "takin' uh awful chance" with Tea Cake?

Answer: Pheoby is scared that Janie will be taken advantage of by Tea Cake. Janie has a history of being mistreated by men such as Joe Starks and Logan Killicks. Naturally, Pheoby warns Janie about marrying and running off with Tea Cake when she says, “anyhow, watch yo’self Janie, don’t be took advantage of. You know how dese young men is wid older women. Most of de time, dey’s after whut dey’s can git, then dey’s gone lak a turkey through de corn” (Hurston 113). Janie is taking a big risk for happiness because she has not been happy for the majority of her life. There has been small parts where she is happy but, it gets taken away from her, such as the situation Joe Starks putting her on a pedestal leaving Janie with no freedom. This is why Pheoby is warning Janie, even though she may not know all of Janie’s past, she still cares as a friend.


References
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 11, 2013 11:20 AM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
11 October 2013

Question 120: Why has Janie decided not to be nice to Tea Cake any more?

Answer: Chapter 11 opens with Janie immediately thinking about Tea Cake. You can tell she is interested in him, especially when she starts talking about their 15 year age difference and how she may be too old for him. She decides not to be nice to him because he might just be hanging around to try and strip Janie of everything she has, and I believe she also does not want to get too close to him. She goes on thinking about him and how she thinks he is the kind of man to have many woman at the same time, "Fact is, she decided to treat him so cold if he ever did foot the place that he'd be sure not to come hanging around there again" (Hurston 100).

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 11, 2013 11:25 AM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
14 October 2013

Question: Why does Janie admit she wore the mourning clothes (black and white)?

Answer: Janie admits to wearing the mourning clothes because that is what was expected of her from society. She explains to Pheoby that, “de world picked out black and white for mournin', Joe didn't. So Ah wasn't wearin' it for him. Ah was wearin' it for de rest of y'all” (Hurston 113). Now, after Joe’s death, Janie chooses to wear blue because it is what she likes and is what Tea Cake finds her attractive in.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 11, 2013 02:15 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
11 October 2013

Question 133: What is the significance of Tea Cake’s combining Janie’s hair? What kind of relationship does such an action establish between them?

Answer: Jody has made Janie hide her hair while he was alive to prevent other men from seeing it and as a way to control her. As a result, when she finds "Tea Cake combing her hair and scratching the dandruff from her scalp" (103), Janie realizes that Tea Cake is showing genuine affection for her. Janie is now free to express all of herself to the community and not hide behind anything. Tea Cake has shown that he respects Janie as a person and treats her like an equal. Janie's previous two husbands made her act in the role of an inferior woman, so she more than willing to enter a permanent relationship with Tea Cake.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 11, 2013 03:35 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
14 October 2013

Question: Why didn’t the stranger in the store go to the ball game?

Answer: When the stranger asked Janie why she did not go to the ball game, she stated, “Well, Ah see somebody else besides me ain’t dere” (Hurston 95). The stranger and Janie began to laugh; “Dat’s cause Ah’m dumb. Ah got de thing all mixed up. Ah thought de game was goin tuh be out at Hungerford. So Ah got uh ride tuh where dis road turns off from de Dixie Highway and walked over here and then Ah find out de game is in Winter Park”, the stranger stated (Hurston 95). The stranger mistaken the location of the ball game; therefore, he did not go.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 12, 2013 06:02 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
11 October 2013

Question: “What does Janie think of Tea Cake?”

Answer: After Janie had met Tea Cake she thought of him as being sweet because of his name when she said, “Tea Cake so you sweet as all dat”[Hurston 97]. Janie later found that he was sweet because he offered to teach her how to play checkers, which was uncommon for the men of that area like the author implied the men found it unnatural for Janie to play. Even Janie’s now deceased husband, Joe would tell her, “ Ah never would learn it wuz to heavy fuh mah brains” [Hurston 96]. Although Janie had let her guard down towards Tea Cake after he played checkers with her and helped with closing down the shop, Janie decided to put up her guards because she does not know of him and he may be up to something.

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at October 13, 2013 10:35 AM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng- 210CL - Love and Desire in Literature- CA01
13 October 2013

Question # 127. Think about the way Janie thinks about Tea Cake compared to the way Janie thinks about Joe. How has Janie changed?

Answer: I think Janie thinks more about Tea Cake than she does about Joe. Janie and Joe’s relationship was very materialistic, and Joe did not love her. I believe he was only worried about his status and about comparing his status to the white community’s. I think Janie and Tea Cake’s relationship thus far is realer. Janie I think has changed, in that she does what she wants to do after Joe dies; I think she feels less of a burden to follow commands of a man. Than she did when he was alive, I feel she has more freedom to decide for herself what she does or does not want to do. Who is becoming a woman that is strong and independent, and has a free spirit as well as a mind of her own?

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at October 13, 2013 11:51 AM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
14 October 2013
Question: What is signified by the description of the moon in the last sentence of the chapter?
Answer: According to page 99 “So she sat on the porch and watched the moon rise, soon its amber fluid was drenching the earth, and quenching the thirst of the day” (Hurston, 99). This means that Janie has found her own personal freedom with Tea Cake and feels that he respects her enough that Tea Cake asks her to play checkers because no man has respected Janie enough to play checkers with her. The drenching of the earth is the part that Janie is feeling new experiences and allot of excitement in her life that she waits to see what Tea Cake has to offer her in the days to come.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 13, 2013 12:01 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

8th October 2013

Question: 5 #59 What does Joe say about women?

Answer: Joe believes that women are just material properties that men own. He believes that women are inferior, have no intelligence, and are not entitled to a voice. Joe does appreciate Janie but for all the wrong reasons. He values her physical appearance , and only cherishes her because he sees her as a trophy wife.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at October 13, 2013 01:10 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

13th October 2013

Question: 11 #132 How does Tea Cake say he feels about Janie?

Answer: Tea Cake tells Janie that his feelings for are stronger than what she feels for him. After Tea Cake’s abrupt exit, he returns to reinforce Janie that what he had told her in regards to his feelings were true. After spending the night with Janie, Tea Cake returns once again and tells her that he wants her to be his girlfriend and wants to make their relationship public.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at October 13, 2013 01:19 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 October 2013

Question #50: What does Joe buy? Why is it significant?

Answer: Joe buys more land off of Captain Eaton in Eatonville where the colored town is. He is wanting to put in a post office and a store in the town. The reason that this is significant is that this town does not have a Mayor and this is Joe's perfect chance to become a Mayor of an all colored town, just like he wanted. He wants to be in control of everything and be an important person.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 13, 2013 04:20 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

13 Octobre 2013

Question: What do you think he wants from Janie?

Answer: I think that Tea Cake really wants to be Janie. At first, Janie thought that he only wants to be with her for her money, because she doesn't understand why a young man would want to be with an old lady. Tea Cake has really shown to be into Janie since he comes back to her every time they spend time together. He wants to make their relationship public to show that he really cares about her. After spending the night together, she wakes up the next morning in Tea cake's arms, "Janie awoke next morning by feeling Tea Cake almost kissing her breath away. Holding her and caressing her as if he feared she might escape his grapes and fly away" (Hurtson 107). This shows how Teak Cake is really attached to her and if he just wanted her money then he would not act this way with her. Tea Cake worked very hard for two weeks to be able to buy a car in order to take Janie to a picnic, but Janie was not sure he really wanted her, and if he was just doing it out of politeness. She told him she wouldn't mind if he takes someone else and he answered, "Janie, Ah hope God may kill me, if Ah'm yin'. nobody else on kin hold uh candle tuh you, baby. You got the keys to de kingdom" (Hurtson 109). Tea Cake has strong feelings for Janie, even more than she does towards him, and he really wants to have Janie in his life.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 13, 2013 04:43 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 October 2013

Question: What feeling does Janie like about being single?

Answer: Janie loves the freedom she has now that Jody is dead. She does not have to worry about Jody scolding her about the store. Janie can finally wear her hair down in a braid. She was glad that she could burn all of her head rags. When Janie and Pheoby were talking one day, Janie says, “Tain't dat Ah worries over Joe's death, Pheoby. Ah jus' loves dis freedom” (Hurston 93). Janie did have time to mourn, but now her life is more of a celebration.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 13, 2013 04:44 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desires in Literature CA02
11 October 2013

Question 139: How does Janie feel about going places with Tea Cake?

Answer: From what I gathered from the text, Janie really enjoys getting out and seeing different places. Jody always kept her cooped up either in the store or house, so I would assume that she feels like she can finally breath. Janie states;
"[N]aw, Pheoby, Tea Cake ain't draggin' me off nowhere Ah don't want tuh go. Ah always did want tuh git around uh whole heap, but Jody wouldn't 'low me tuh.[. . .] And Ah sit dere wid de walls creepin' up on me and squeezin' all de life outa me" (Hurtson, 112).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at October 13, 2013 05:00 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire CA01
13 October 2013

Question: Why does Janie like to go fishing in the middle of the night?

Answer: Janie’s relationship with Jody was constricting and possessive. He never allowed her to do anything except for what he told her to do. Tea Cake is beginning to liberate Janie from all of her constrictions by taking her fishing in the middle of the night. Janie says “ [. . .] that she felt like a child breaking rules” (Hurtson 102). Tea Cake is helping her break all the societal rules that previously held her in place, and it is the feeling of liberation that she gets to have when she is with Tea Cake that makes her fall in love with him.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 13, 2013 05:06 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
09 October 2013

Question: So far, what has Tea Cake asked Janie for?

Answer: So far Tea Cake has asked Jannie for smoking tobacco, match to light the cigarette, coke and a board to play checkers with him. Which is mostly in chapter 10; when they first meet at the store Tea Cake asked Janie, "[Y]ou got any smokin' tobacco? [. . .] 'You got a little piece of fire (Hurston, 95)? Then he asked, "How about playin' you some checkers? You looks hard tuh beat" (Hurston, 95). Then Tea cake asks Janie, " Anybody have uh Coca-Cola wid me" (Hurston, 101).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at October 13, 2013 05:56 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Question 27 Chapter 2)

Consider the story of Nanny’s hardships and suffering. What image does Nanny use at the end
of the chapter in her appeal to Janie to be sensitive to her vulnerability? Why is it an especially appropriate image for Nanny, as a caretaker for others?

Answer) Nanny was born into slavery and wants the best life possible for Janie, her granddaughter. Before she passes, Nanny wants to see Janie live a better life than she did. She wants Janie to marry a man much older than she named Logan Killicks, a very successful but “skullhead” looking farmer. Nanny explains to Janie, “Yeah, Janie youse got yo ‘ womanhood on yuh. So Ah mout ez well tell yuh whut Ah been savin’ up for uh spell. Ah wants to see you married right away.” (Hurston 12). Nanny wants Janie to marry for stability and protection. She then goes on to tell stories about her life that will give Janie a sense of what she has gone through. Nanny recalls, “ De next mornin’ she come crawlin’ in on her hands and knees. A sight to see. Dat school teacher had done hid her in de woods all night long, and he had done raped muh baby and run on off just before day.” (Hurston 19). She tells Janie how her mother was raped and mistreated by her school teacher. She tells Janie these stories about her past to help her understand how hard she has worked to allow Janie to have a better life than she or her mother, Leafy. Marrying Brother Logan Killicks would leave her with protection once Nanny passes.

Question 57 Chapter 5) Why did Joe want Janie dressed up?

Answer) Tony Taylor, compelled to make a speech describes Janie’s attire, “She couldn’t look no mo’ better and no nobler if she wuz de queen of England. It’s a pledger fuh her tuh be heah amongst us. Brother starks, we welcomes you and all dat you have seen fit tuh bring amongst us – yo beloved wife, yo’ store, yo’ land-“ (Hurston 42). Joe wanted Janie to dress to impress and take the roll of the Mayors wife.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at October 13, 2013 06:53 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature
13 October 2013

Question #134: Why does Tea Cake attract Janie? What is the magic that makes him so appealing? In what ways are their personalities alike?


Janie is attracted to Tea Cake in many ways. She thinks of Tea Cake as a “glance from God” (Hurston 106). This shows that she is extremely attracted to him. There personalities are similar in that Tea Cake likes spoiling Janie, and Janie likes being spoilt. This is shown when Tea Cake says “ been workin’ lak uh dawg for two whole weeks” (Hurston 108). This is to take her on a picnic. Janie then shows she likes being spoiled by saying that he doesn’t have to, just so she can get another compliment “Nobody else on earth kin hold uh candle tuh you baby” (Hurston 109). Janie knows full well that Tea Cake wants her, but wants to hear him say it.

Posted by: Matt nicholson-Lewis at October 13, 2013 07:07 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
13 October 2013

Question: 138. Chapter 12: Why do the townspeople think Tea Cake is spending money on Janie?

The townspeople think that Tea Cake is spending money on Janie because Janie tells them that he treats her how she is supposed to be treated. However, they believe that Tea Cake is using Janie for her money. “You better sense her intuh things then’ cause Tea Cake can’t do nothin’ but help her spend whut she got” (Hurston 111). This shows that Janie realizes and needs to tell Tea Cake how she feels. Janie saw it and so did the townspeople.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 13, 2013 10:12 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 October 2013

Question: What does Tea Cake represent to Janie that she had wanted so many years before?
Answer: When Janie meets Tea Cake for the first time, he looks familiar, but she quickly realizes he is not like most of the men. He teaches her checkers, makes her laugh, and is very interested in what she says as they converse. One game of checkers made Janie feel like an equal with Tea Cake, she thinks to herself as Tea Cake is setting up the game. “She found herself glowing inside. Somebody wanted her to play. Somebody thought it natural for her to play” (Hurston 96). At Janie could not bring herself to compare him to any other man she had met before, he was the bee to her blossom, he represented the love she had been in search for ever since she was seventeen. She stares at herself in the mirror deep in thought, “He looked like the love thoughts of women. He could be a bee to a blossom- a pear tree blossom in the spring” (Hurston 106). Janie seems to be falling in love slowly but surely for Tea Cake.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at October 14, 2013 12:43 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA02
10/11/12
Question: So far, what has Tea Cake asked Janie for?
Answer: Tea cake asks Janie if they will go fishing at midnight. The next day he brings over some fish so they can cook it. Tea Cake says “Ah’ll clean ‘em, you fry ‘em and let’s eat”(Hurston, 103). He then asks her to cook some food from the fishes that he has caught.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at October 14, 2013 01:09 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA02
10/9/13
Question: What does Tea Cake represent to Janie that she had wanted so many years before?
Answer: Tea Cake represents Janie’s pear trees, blossoms, and the bees. He represents the youth she remembered and wished she still had. It was carefree and Tea Cake represented the sunshine. “He was a glance from God” (Hurston 106). Tea Cake represented what God could offer in a sweet form.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at October 14, 2013 01:19 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA02
10/7/13
Question: What is the first thing Joe wants to build. Why?
Answer: Joe wanted to build a store. He wanted there to be a new store in the city run by blacks. He really wants to impress Janie by spending a lot of money on her and showing her off to people. He believes that it is important for her to be better than the rest; that they look like affluent blacks. In chapter, 5 it is said “Mostly he talked about plans for the town when he got there” (Hurston 34). He has many ideas he would like to see happen.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at October 14, 2013 01:28 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
13 October 2013
Question:
Do you think Janie was foolish to trust Tea Cake? Explain?
Answer:
No I don’t think Janie was foolish. Having had two failed marriages in the past Tea Cake tried his hardest to make her believe he was the one she needed. “Tea Cake and Janie gone fishing. Tea Cake and Janie gone to Orlando to the movies. Tea Cake and Janie gone to a dance. Tea Cake making flower beds in Janie's yard and seeding the garden for her….” (110) He was always doing things for her and with her that none of her past husbands had done.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at October 14, 2013 01:40 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA02
10/4/13
Question: How did the incident effect Janie’s mom?
Answer: An unnamed white schoolteacher raped Janie’s mom and it obviously had negative effects for her mother. Not much is known about her mother or her whereabouts. It did affect her to the point where she abandoned Janie and took off for some other place. Janie talks about how she her mother left her before Janie even knew who her mother actually was “She was gone from round dere long before Ah wuz big enough tuh know” (Hurston 8).

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at October 14, 2013 01:40 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
14 October 2013

Question: “How does Janie blow off Tea Cake?”

Answer: After Janie wakes up to Tea Cake combing her hair, she begins to doubt that Tea Cake truly feels so passionately about her (Hurston 105). Janie tries to dismiss Tea Cake by saying that he “done got me so sleepy wid yo’ head scratchin” and she needs to go to sleep (Hurston 104). However, Tea Cake immediately calls Janie on her bluff, and tells her that he know she “jus’ want me tuh go”(Hurston 104). Later Janie tell Tea Cake that he feels that way because the memories of their night together are still fresh in his memory and that, in the morning, he will feel different; they then part for the night.

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 14, 2013 02:03 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA 02 Love and Desire in Literature
14 October 2013

Question# 128
Why does Janie say she and Tea Cake should not date?

Answer:
She feels that Tea cake will make a fool out of her because he is young and handsome and she is aging. That there is no possible way he would be attracted to someone who is his senior by twelve years. Janie thinks, “He's trading on being younger than me. Getting ready to laugh at me for an old fool. (Hurston 105)”

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 14, 2013 02:04 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 October 2013

Question: Why isn’t Janie mean to Tea Cake when he comes back?
Answer: Although Janie was very cold towards Tea Cake, she did develop feelings for him. She was simply putting up her guard; to prevent herself from getting hurt or taken advantage of as she analyzed everything he said she thought. “He’s just saying anything for the time being, feeling he’s got me so I’ll b’lieve him [. . .] Getting ready to laugh at me for an old fool. But oh, what I wouldn’t give to be twelve years younger so I could b’lieve him!” (Hurtson 105). However, her last thought reveals she wishes she was twelve years younger to go back to be the naïve young girl she was who believed the words of a man to be her bee for her blossom, her pear tree love.
Now, Janie is all grown up and has little hope towards love. She does not see him the next day at work she spent all day thinking about him, “All next day in the house and store she thought resisting thoughts about Tea Cake. She even ridiculed him in her mind [. . .] But every hour or two the battle had to be fought all over again. [. . .] She laid in bed and pretended to think scornfully of him” (Hurston 106). Janie is completely heads over heels for him; only one day apart from him and all she thought about was Tea Cake. When he showed up at dawn at her front door, he said he was going to share his “day time feelings” (Hurston 106). “You needs tellin’ and showin’, and dat’s whut Ah’m doin’” (Hurtson 107). He stated to her he was going to show her how felt about her rather than tell her, and for that she was reassured that her feelings for him were being reciprocated back. She hoped if she fixed him up breakfast he would stay longer, but he left for work.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at October 14, 2013 02:18 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
14 October 2013


Question: Why isn’t Janie mean to Tea Cake when he comes back?


Answer: Janie is not mean to Tea Cake because of one significant reason. She cannot stay mad a Tea Cake because she loves him too much. Hurston states, “He frowned and struggled with the pegs of his eye with that secret joke playing over his face. Finally she smiled and he sung middle C, put his guitar under his arm and walked on back to where she was” (100). Tea Cake knows that Janie would not stay mad at him, so he does an inside joke and knows it will make Janie smile. Janie loves Tea Cake. She could never be mad at him. After he walks over to Janie, she does talk to him and she does not act mad towards him at all. Janie loves Tea Cake, and she cannot be mad at him.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 14, 2013 10:21 AM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
14 October 2013

136. What kind of activities do Janie and Tea Cake do together?

Janie and Tea Cake have begun to spend a lot of their time together. The town began to notice that she even stopped attending church. They noticed a change in her attired and critiqued the fact that she was even with him. They are done things like hinting. Fishing, to Orlando, the movies, to a dance, and fixed up the flower bed. Tea Cake had also taught Janie how to drive. They would play checkers, coon-can, and Florida flip. A lot of cute young couple activities.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at October 14, 2013 10:49 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
14 October 2013


Question: What does Janie discover about her feelings for her grandmother?

Answer: Janie discovers a very intense feeling about her grandmother. An incredibly strong feeling discovered after her grandmother’s death. Janie realizes that “she hated her grandmother and had hidden it from herself” (Hurston 89). The intense feelings of hate possibly stem from the fact that she has never met her real mother, Nanny did not help Janie find her mother, and Nanny arranged a horrible marriage for Janie with Logan Killicks. She did leave Logan but, she ended up with Joe Starks who died and left Janie alone. This coming of age theme ties in with her realization that she could only rely on herself and not others. Janie would have to find love on her own at some point. She did not want to be a subservient house wife or trophy wife but, a real wife. Her hatred for her grandmother came to her after her feelings boiled up to where she could no longer stand people controlling her love life.

References
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 14, 2013 11:10 AM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
4 October 2013

Question: In the fourth paragraph, the sun has “left his footprints in the sky.” What image is
created through this personification? What attitude toward nature is expressed in it?

Answer: The setting described in the fourth paragraph of chapter one is, “The sun was gone, but he had left his footprints in the sky” (Hurston, 1). Hurston has given human quality to the sun, and the image that is created through this personification is the stars in the sky. The “footprints” of the sun that has set are the stars, which are still creating the light that the sun had shown previously. The people – described as mules -- who had been slaving all day long were voiceless and powerless under the supervision of their “bossman.” In chapter one, the narrator says, “But now, the sun and the bossman were gone, so the skins felt powerful and human” (Hurston, 1). This means that now that the sun had set and the bossman had gone home, the people who could not speak all day regained their voices and felt powerful. They became human again, as they were treated as animals throughout the day. Sundown is expressed wonderfully compared to how the daytime was spent. The workers probably look forward to the sun setting each day.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 14, 2013 11:24 AM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
11 October 2013

Question: Why does Janie decide not to return to the past? What is significant about this decision? Is there any evidence that Janie has grown?

Answer: Janie does not want to return to the past because she realizes that she has so much potential in the future. She no longer has her grandmother watching over her, and she has no desire to go back to seek her mother. She describes her mother as being “seldom-seen” (Hurston, 89). Why would she want to go seek attention from her mother if she had never given her attention throughout her entire life? She also pursued her thoughts to the point of realizing that she hated her grandmother after all of these years. Her ambitions were described in chapter nine as, “She had been getting ready for her great journey to the horizons in search of people; it was important to all the world that she should find them and they find her. But had been whipped like a cur dog, and run off down a back road after things” (Hurston, 89). This proves that Janie has grown. She no longer wants to be “whipped.” She wants to create her own life with no supervision and restraints. She wants to work toward the horizon to discover what the future has in store.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 14, 2013 11:25 AM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Question: How do the people react to Tony’s speech?

Answer: The people react to Tony’s speech by laughing at him. As Tony introduces Brother Starks and his wife, it is described “A big mouthed burst of laughter cut him short” (Hurston, 42). The people explained to Tony that he did not know how to properly make a speech. They told him he was always quick to make the speeches but was incapable of doing so. Members of the crowd were also described to be “tittering,” or giggling, at his illiteracy and unawareness to the entire situation. Tony felt “peeved,” or annoyed and irritated, that the audience ruined his speech.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 14, 2013 11:26 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

Question: Ch. 9 How was Janie affected by Joe’s death? Look at the quote on the page.

Answer: At first, she did not seem upset or happy. This chapter did show that she obtained a lot of freedom. There was a point where Janie seemed sad and lonely. By the end of the chapter, it seemed to change. Janie said “Tain’t dat Ah worries over Joe’s death, Pheoby. Ah jus’ loves dis freedom” (Hurston 93). She seemed upset about Joe’s death, but she enjoyed the freedom that his death gave her.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 14, 2013 11:45 AM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013

Question: What happened to Tea Cake and why?

Answer: During Tea Cake and Janie’s escape from the destruction of the hurricane, Tea Cake saved her life, jumping into a river and fighting off an attacking dog. In the midst of this courageous act, Tea Cake was bitten by the rabid dog, infecting his brain with rabies. He grew very ill and began to lose his sanity, until his conscious mind had deteriorated to the point where he attempted to kill Janie. As he lunged forward, Janie “saw the ferocious look in his eyes and went mad with fear as she had done in the water that time” (Hurston 184). In defense of her own life, Janie was given no other choice then to take the gun from Tea Cake and end his life. Tea Cake was driven mad and eventually murdered by his own wife because of the spreading rabies disease.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 14, 2013 03:43 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
EngCL210- Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
16 October 2013

219. Why are they separating the whites from the blacks?

They are separating the whites from the blacks because the “whites” who are the people of the town want to have coffins, but the people of the town who are white; do not want the blacks to have coffins they just want to bury them and put quicklime over them.

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at October 14, 2013 07:10 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 October 2013

Question: What does Tea Cake do about it?

Answer: After a night of drinking, Tea Cake, Stew Beef, Sop-de-Bottom, Bootyny, and Motor Boat stopped by Mrs. Turner’s restaurant to grab a bite to eat. The restaurant, filled, caused Sterrett and Coodemay to eat while standing. Once Coodemay received his food, he no longer wanted to stand while eating. A fight broke out between, Coodemay and Sop, after “Coodemay tried to shove Sop out of the chair and Sop resisted” (Hurston 150). Tea Cake jumped in and “caught hold of Coodemay by the collar” (Hurston 150). Tea Cake stated, “Looka heah, y’all, don’t come in heah and raise no disturbance de place. Mis’ Turner is too nice uh woman fuh dat. In fact, she’s more nicer than anybody else on de muck” (Hurston 151). Tea Cake caused the conflict to worsen and Mrs. Turner found her restaurant demolished.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 14, 2013 09:37 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
14 October 2013

Question: “ Why did Tea Cake whip Janie?”

Answer: Tea Cake whipped Janie, not because of how she behaved or responded to him, but out of jealousy that other eligible bachelors were fighting for the attention of Janie. Tea Cake also used the whipping as a teaching tool for Janie to show her that he still had dominance over her. In chapter seventeen of the book, it shows you how the interactions were the same when, “men made passes at Janie, and women who didn't know took out after Tea Cake”[Hurston 147]. These interactions caused, “ Jealousies to arose on both sides”[Hurston 147], but, “before the week was over he had whipped Janie”[Hurston 147].

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at October 14, 2013 11:22 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
15 October 2013

Question: What is your reaction to Tea Cake’s interaction with Mrs. Turner at the restaurant?

Answer: The interaction between Tea Cake and Mrs. Turner was interesting because I did not think that Tea Cake liked Mrs. Turner. Then at the restaurant Tea Cake began to stick up for her. Mrs. Turner even tried to drag Tea Cake away from the fight and he reassured her everything was all right. With this moment, it seems they share a liking for each other, at least as friends.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 15, 2013 04:12 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
15 October 2013


Question: Think about the way Janie thinks about Tea Cake compared to the way Janie thinks about Joe. How has Janie changed?
Answer: In Zora Hurston novel, her character Janie did not love her second husband Jody. Janie merely tolerated him, “ She got nothing from Jody except what money could buy, and she was giving away what she didn’t value”(Hurston,76). The difference between the two men was one treated her like a slave and the other treated her like the love of his life. Jody kept Janie in a cage. He clipped her wings by taking away her freedom to talk, dress and act in the manner she wanted. It was obvious the joy she felt when he died. She was finally free to spread her wings and fly anywhere she wanted to. Her first act of freedom was when she “tore off the kerchief from her head and let down her plentiful hair”(Hurston,87). When she met Tea cake her whole life changed. She was finally able to laugh in public without being scolded. Tea cake brought a fresh new changed Janie had never experienced before.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at October 15, 2013 04:51 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

15 Octobre 2013

Question: How did the “colored people” feel about Janie in the courtroom?

Answer: Janie's colored friends all turned against her and they all proposed to go to court and testify against Janie: "The white part of the room got calmer the more serious it got, but a tongue storm struck the engross like wind among palm tress. [ . . . ] No nigger woman ain't never treated no better. He worked like a dog for her and nearly killed himself saving her in the storm" (Hurtson 186). When Janie won the trial, the colored people all left the court room because they have lost. However, After Janie's testimony, the white male juries all believed her and the white women understood everything that Janie had said: " So she was free and the judge and everybody up there smiled with her and shook her hand. and the white women cried and stood around her like a protecting wall and the negroes, with heads hung down shuffled out and away" (188). The colored people hated the fact that Janie had won the trial and believed that she deserved to be punished because of what she has done.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 15, 2013 05:54 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
15 October 2013

Question #231. Chapter 19: Why did they put Janie in jail?

Answer: Janie was put in jail for the murder of Tea Cake. She shot him, but it was a defense. She was set free after the trial.

Posted by: Ver aSmirnova at October 15, 2013 06:15 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 October 2013

Question: How does Tea Cake reason the “white man” is smarter than the “Indian”?
Answer: When word goes around that a hurricane is approaching people from the mucks, Indians, and wildlife begin to migrate. Lias is urging Tea Cake to come along with him and his uncle to Palm Beach before the storm hits, he exclaims, “De Indians gahn east, man. It’s dangerous” (Hurston 156). To which Tea Cake responds, “Dey don’t always know. Indians don’t know much uh nothin’, tuh tell de truth. Else dey’d own dis country still. De white folks ain’t gone nowhere. Dey oughta know it it’s dangerous” (Hurston 156). Tea Cake’s rationalization for the “white men” on being smarter than the “Indian,” is dating back to the time when Europeans came to North America, befriended the Native Americans, and took over their land through force and abuse. He claims if the Indians were so smart, why does the “white men” own America now? Clearly, they must not know much at all if the white folk are still sticking around the muck.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at October 15, 2013 08:51 PM

Flavia Vazquez
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA01

Question 108: What did Janie change after Joe’s death?

Answer: She started letting her hair out again. She had her hair in one thick braid.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 15, 2013 09:07 PM

Flavia Vazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210Cl Love and Desire in Literature CA01

Question 224: What does the doctor say will happen to Tea Cake?

Answer: The doctor says Tea Cake will die if he's not treated.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 15, 2013 09:15 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature
15 October 2013


Question #228: What does Janie do to the gun?

Janie fears for her safety as Tea Cake illness progresses. Therefore she gets scared that Tea Cake may draw the pistol on her at some point as he does not want her to get the medicine from the doctors. To give herself the best chance of survival she decides to “whirl the cylinder so that if he even did draw the gun on her it would snap three times before it would fire” (Hurston 182). The reason she does not simply hide the gun is because she fears “he might break it and find out she knew” (Hurston 182), this shows that she knows Tea Cake is volatile at this moment and is clever in trying to keep the situation under control.

Posted by: Matt nicholson-Lewis at October 15, 2013 09:15 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
15 September 2013

Question #125: What do you think he wants from Janie?

Answer: I think that he wants to sleep with her. Reason being, he says that everything on her, such as her hair, eyes, and lips, are his as well. "It's mine too. Ah ain't been sleepin' so good for more'n uh week cause Ah been wishin' so bad tuh git mah hands in yo' hair" (Hurston 103).

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 15, 2013 09:24 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 October 2013

Question: What does Tea Cake represent to Janie that she had wanted so many years before?

Answer: Janie wants Tea Cake to not take advantage of her because she liked him in the past and now that Tea Cake wants her, she just wants to keep her guard up because shes scared of getting hurt.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at October 15, 2013 09:36 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
15 October 2013

Question #132: How does Tea Cake say he feels about Janie?

Answer:Tea Cake says that he really cares and likes Janie. Since she did not believe him when he told her at night, he waited til daytime to tell her how he really feels, so that way she would believe him. "Ah see yuh needs tuh know mah daytime feelings. Ah can't sense yuh intuh it at night" (Hurston 106). He stays the night at Janie's and he has her laying in his arms. She wants to make him breakfast, but he won't have it. He is trying to show her that she needs her rest and that he truly cares for her. "Holding her and caressing her as if he feared she might escape his grasp and fly away [...] He wouldn't let her get him any breakfast at all. he wanted her to rest" Hurston 107).

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 15, 2013 09:42 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
14 October 2013

Question: 223. Chapter 19: What do we find out about the dog that bit Tea Cake?

Answer: We find out that the dog has rabies. "Janie, I'm pretty sure that was a mad dawg bit yo' husband." (Hurston 177)

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 15, 2013 09:45 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 October 2013

Question 240: Why did they run Mrs. Turner’s brother off the muck?

Answer: The community "blamed it all on Mrs. Turner's brother" (190) because they needed a scapegoat for their bad attitudes. They are upset about Tea Cake's death at the hands of Janie, but they rationalize that if Mrs. Turner's brother had not come back, Tea Cake would not have gone mad with jealousy and cause his own death.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 15, 2013 10:00 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
15 October 2013

Question: “What ended up happening to Motor Boat?”

Answer: Once Tea Cake, Janie, and Motor Boat realized the severity of the hurricane, the trio decided to flee the Everglades (Hurston 161). They fled to a house on a hill to rest while the lake prepared to overflow. When Janie saw the lake coming, she woke Tea Cake and Motor Boat so that they could run; Motor did not want to leave, so he stayed in the house for the duration of the storm (Hurston 163). When Tea Cake and Janie returned to the Everglades, they found out the Motor Boat had “sleep and float on off” throughout the duration of the storm safe in the house they where they left him(Hurston 173).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 15, 2013 10:50 PM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
15 October 2013

Question: Why doesn't Hezekiah want Janie walking home with Tea Cake?

Answer: Hezekiah did not think Tea Cake was worthy enough to be in the presence of Janie. He says that Tea Cake should not associate with Janie because he doesn't have "doodly squat" (Hurston 102). Although he is not a bad person, it is because he is in a lower social standing that Janie that should not be around him.

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at October 15, 2013 11:39 PM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature 210CL CA01
15 October 2013

218. What are the white men making Tea Cake do?

The white men approached Tea Cake just as he was speaking with Janie about leaving. They basically ordered him to dispose of dead bodies.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at October 15, 2013 11:43 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013

Question 225: Who is "he"?

Answer: When Tea Cake finds out he is going to die because of the infected dog bite, Janie gets upset and starts asking herself a bunch of questions about why this would happen to them. She asks "he" a lot of questions, "Was He noticing what was going on around here? He must be because He knew everything" (Hurston 178). It is obvious that 'He' is God.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 16, 2013 12:38 AM

Julia Della Penna
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
14 October 2013

Question 222: Chapter 19: What has happened to Tea Cake?

Answer: What happened to Tea Cake is that Janie shoots and kills him. When the hurricane hits the Everglades, Tea Cake and Janie try to flee as the water rises. As they swim to save their lives, a rabid dog bites Tea Cake. Tea Cake does not realize the condition of the dog and then three weeks later begins to fall ill. He first believes it due to work, which is him burying dead people from the storm, but they soon find out differently from the doctor. The rabies drives Tea Cake to go mad causing him to believe that instead of Janie "helping him and getting him medicine" "in fact,” she is cheating on him. As quoted from the dialect between Tea Cake and Janie from Chapter 19, “"Janie, whut is dat Turner woman's brother doin' back on de muck?" "Ah don't know, Tea Cake. Didn't even knowed he wuz back." "Accordin' tuh mah notion, you did. Whut you slip off from me just now for?" "Tea Cake, Ah Dat shows how sick you is puff. You'se jealous 'thout me givin' you cause." "Well, whut didja slip off from de house 'thout tellin' me you wuz goin'. You ain't never done dat befo'."” (Hurston, 180). She tries to calm him down by explaining why she would never do such a thing because she loves him too much. Janie quickly recognizes that Tea Cake is not getting any better and grows even more nervous. The madness from the sickness takes over Tea Cake, and he starts firing a pistol at Janie, "The pistol snapped once. Instinctively Janie's hand flew behind her on the rifle and brought it around." (Hurston, 183). In the end, when Janie realizes that the next shot Tea Cakes uses at her will end her life, she fires the rifle at the same time as him killing Tea Cake.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at October 16, 2013 01:15 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA 02 Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013

Question # 205
How is nature warning the people of glades?

Answer:
The Seminole were heading to higher ground because they saw that the saw grass was blooming which, meant that a hurricane was coming. (Hurston 154) The animals of glades where headed east. Rabbits “scurried through the quarters going east. (Hurston 155)” Reptiles and large Mammals were also heading in the same direction.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 16, 2013 01:44 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
15 October 2013
Question 116: Chapter 10: How is the stranger different than Jody?
Answer: The stranger is different than Jody, because he actually believes in Janie. Janie says “Jody useter tell me Ah would never learn. It was too heavy fuh mah brains” (Hurston 96), which means that Jody really never believed in her or thought she was smart. The stranger replies back with “But you got good meat on yo’ head. You’ll learn” (Hurston 96), he believed in her. She felt that she could actually learn checkers because of him. She needed the positive words in her life.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 16, 2013 03:59 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
15 October 2013
Question 143: Chapter 12: Why had Janie said that she and Tea Cake need to leave town?
Answer: The main reason Janie said that her and Tea Cake needed to leave town was because there would be comparisons. She said, “Cause Tea Cake ain’t no Jody Starks, and if he tried tuh be, it would be uh complete flommuck. But de minute Ah marries ‘im everybody is gointuh be makin’ comparsions” (Hurston 114). She wanted a life where they could start fresh. She also mentions, “So us is goin’ off somewhere and start all over in Tea Cake’s way” (Hurston 114), so they can get that fresh start, and she does not have to hear about Jody.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 16, 2013 04:00 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013


Question: Why does Tea Cake get jealous?


Answer: Tea Cake gets jealous because he thinks that Janie had an affair. Many men get easily jealous over a topic like this. Tea Cake questions Janie about her where she has gone because he does not think his wife has been loyal to him. Janie says to Tea Cake, “Tea Cake, ‘tain’t no use in you bein’ jealous uh me. In de first place Ah couldn’t love nobody but yuh. And in de second place, Ah jus’ uh ole woman dat nobody don’t want but you” (Hurston 180). Janie is telling Tea Cake that he should never worry about her loving another man because she would never love anyone else but him. She also mentions how she is older, and no one would ever want her, but him. Tea Cake is worried and jealous that Janie may have been cheating on him.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 16, 2013 08:47 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013

Question: 126. Chapter 11: How does Janie blow off Tea Cake?

Janie blows off Tea Cake because she has thoughts resisting him. She even ridiculed him in her minda and was a little ashamed of the association. “Bet he’s hangin’ round some jook or ‘nother.” (pg.106). She second guessing Tea Cake when clearly he really only wants her attention

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 16, 2013 09:16 AM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

16th October 2013

Question: 18 #215 what does Janie say about the dog?

Answer: Janie expressed that the dog not only is the cause of her husband’s eventual death but hers too. She places emphasis on the fact that the dog is full of hate. Janie believed that watching Tea Cake’s suffering due to the bite alone, was a fate equivalent to death.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at October 16, 2013 10:32 AM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 October 2013

Question: 242. Chapter 20: How is Tea Cake still alive?

Tea Cake literally is not alive, but alive in Janie's memory. Tea Cake, "could never be dead until she herself had finished feeling and thinking" (Hurston 193). Until Janie is ready to let go, Tea Cake is alive.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 16, 2013 10:36 AM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 October 2013

Question: What did Janie tell Pheoby she and Tea Cake are going to do?

Answer: Janie is going to sell the store, leave town, and marry Tea Cake. She's also tired of living by her grandmother's way and wants to start living by her own way. Pheoby tells her to be careful but then laugh about her happiness that she has with Tea Cake.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at October 16, 2013 10:39 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
16 October 2013
Question:
212. Chapter 18: What does Motor Boat decide?
Answer:
Motor Boat decides to stay in the house and not leave with Janie and Tea Cake to palm Harbor Road. “Aw, get up, Motor Boat! Less make it tuh de Palm Beach road. Dat's on uh fill. We'se pretty safe dere.” “Ah'm safe here, man. Go ahead if yuh wants to. Ah'm sleepy.”

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at October 16, 2013 10:53 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
16 October 2013


Question: How does the African-American Community (in Hurston’s narrative) feel about the Native American Community?

Answer: A very peculiar question indeed, the Native Americans in Hurston’s narrative are free spirited yet smart. It turns out they were right about the Hurricane coming and they were ignored by Janie. As quoted in chapter eighteen, “Indians are dumb anyhow, always were” (Hurston 155). It does not seem as though Janie thought this but, who did? As chapter 18 continues, Tea Cake spoke to a neighbor and said, “Indians don’t always know much uh nothin’, tuh tell the truth. Else dey’d own dis country still. De white folks ain’t gone nowhere. Dey oughta know if it’s dangerous” (Hurston 56). Earlier within the chapter, Janie and Tea Cake were partying with the Native Americans but, it seems that Janie and Tea Cake represent the African-American Community. Janie and Tea Cake both feel as though the Native Americans are clueless and underneath them. As the story goes, the Native Americans survived because it is what they have learned to do. If looking at the text in a different light, it seems as though Hurston made the Native Americans seem aware of the environment, smart and friendly. The Native Americans were kind to Tea Cake and Janie, especially when they warned Tea Cake and Janie about the incoming hurricane. The stereotype of Native Americans presented was included on purpose to show them as better. Especially with the juxtaposition used with white people.

References
Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 16, 2013 10:55 AM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013

Question: Why did Janie go to the funeral in overalls?

Answer: Because Janie was so upset that Tea Cake died that she didn't care about her appearance that she didn't want to wear black so she just went in her overalls.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at October 16, 2013 10:55 AM

Kaitlin Millner
16 October 2013
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210 CL
Love and Desire in Literature

Chapter 19 # 235 : Why did Janie invite Sop to the funeral?

Janie invites Sop to the funeral because Tea Cake died in her arms and Janie was last accused of fooling around with Mrs.Turner’s brother. Sop was in the middle of Tea Cake and Janie’s relationship because Sop was the one who was making Tea Cake jealous by sharing that Mrs.Turners brother is back in town with the same sickness as Tea Cake.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 16, 2013 10:58 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 October 2013

Question: 110. Why are so many men coming to visit Janie?

Joe's recent death has left Janie widowed and alone to care for all of the things they cared for on her own. Janie now has to run the store on her own, so the men that are visiting her are essentially trying to convince her that she cannot take good care of the store and run it on her own. When Ike Green visits her, he tells her that she should "be keerful 'bout who [she] marry" (Hurston 91). He says that all the men who have visited her are trying to take advantage of her, given the situation she is in.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at October 16, 2013 11:26 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 October 2013

Question: 214. What happened between the dog and Tea Cake?

When the storm came and Tea Cake and Janie got pulled into the water, there was a dog that tried to attack Janie. After Janie got ahold of the cow's tail, the dog got on the dog got on the cow's back and continued to try to attack Janie. Then Tea Cake dove towards the dog to try and stop him, "opening his knife as he dived" (Hurston 166). As Tea Cake came out of the water he "seized the dog by the neck" (Hurston 166), and the dog responded by biting him. Ultimately Tea Cake finished the dog and kept Janie safe.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at October 16, 2013 11:37 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013

Question: Chapter 17: What happens to the restaurant?

Answer: The whole restaurant got destroyed during the fight. It was said that there were “broken dishes and crippled up tables and broken off chair legs and window panes and such things. It got so that the floor was knee-deep with something no matter where you put your foot down” (Hurston 152). All of the items that belonged to the restaurant were broken and shattered.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 16, 2013 11:40 AM

Morgan Salter and Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 October 2013

“The wind came back with triple fury, and put out the light for the last time. They sat in company with others in other shanties, their eyes straining against crude walls and their souls asking if He meant to measure their puny might against His. They seemed to be staring at the dark, but their eyes were watching God” (Hurston 160).

This excerpt comes from the great hurricane that forced Janie and Tea Cake from their home, seeking security in higher lands. The author literally gives a description of the event, portraying their fear and concern for their lives. In the description of this catastrophe, there are metaphors which pertain to a larger picture. The wind of the storm can be interpreted to symbolize God Himself, with the power to demolish towns. The phrase “put out the light for the last time” can be used as a metaphor for ending life and God’s power to do so. Seemingly looking out of the window at the darkness of the storm, they in fact were looking beyond the physical world into spiritual thought. As they gaze out the window in awe of the natural disaster and in fear of their lives they wait for God’s next move: “their eyes were watching God.”

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 16, 2013 03:24 PM

Hector Rosario
Matt Nicholson-Lewis
ENG210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs

6) "Then Tea Cake came prancing around her where she was and the song of the sigh flew out of the window and lit in the top of the pine trees. Tea Cake, with the sun for a shawl. Of course he wasn’t dead. He could never be dead until she herself had finished feeling and thinking. The kiss of his memory made pictures of love and light against the wall. Here was peace." (Hurston, 193).

The who of this passage refers to Janie's self-reflection on the circumstances at hand. The reason she is self-reflecting [what] is on Tea Cake's death and her coping mechanism. She realizes she still loves Tea Cake but has to take care of herself as well. She recalls the memory of Tea Cake, almost as if reminiscing on good times. Hurston implies that Janie is at peace for doing the right thing. The line "Here was peace" (Hurston, 193) confirms she is finally comfortable with herself.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 16, 2013 06:21 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 October 2013

Question: Why do the townspeople think Tea Cake is spending money on Janie?

Answer: The townspeople think Tea Cake is spending money on Janie now to get closer to Janie’s saved money. In chapter twelve, it is stated, “De men wuz talkin’ ‘bout it in de grove tuhday and givin’ her and Tea Cake both de devil. Dey figger he’s spendin’ on her now in order tuh make her spend on him later” (Hurston, 111). They believe he is spoiling her so that she will feel compelled to do the same for him in the future.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 16, 2013 07:17 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
14 October 2013

Question: Why did a scuffle break out at Mrs. Turner’s restaurant?

Answer: When Dick Sterret and Coodemay arrived at Mrs. Turner’s restaurant, the employees let them know that there were no more available seats for them. The restaurant was packed, and they would have to wait to be seated. Sterret told the waitress that he could eat while standing, so she could fry him some fish and bring him a coffee. After Coodemay heard Sterret order, he decided he could do the same since he was just as drunk as his friend. When the waitress brought out their meals, Sterret took the plate and began to eat. When she went to serve Coodemay, he responded, “Naw, you hold it fuh me, baby, and lemme eat” (Hurston, 150). She refused, and Coodemay assured her Sop would give him his seat so that he could eat instead of her holding the tray. When Sop rejected him the seat, Coodemay tried to push him. Although Sop dodged the shove, Coodemay’s action caused a riot to break out. The fight was described as, “…coffee got spilt on Sop. So he aimed at Coodemay with a saucer and hit Bootyny. Bootyny threw his thick coffee cup at Coodemay and just missed Stew Beef. So it got to be a big fight” (Hurston, 150).

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 16, 2013 07:31 PM

Kelly Scott
Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 October 2013

Question: Insight on the passage: “’Ah’m glad y’all stop dat crap-shootin’ even if it wasn’t for money,’ Janie said. ‘Ole Massa is doin’ His work now. Us oughta keep quiet.’ They huddled closer and stared at the door. They just didn’t use another part of their bodies, and they didn’t look at anything but the door. The time was past for asking the white folks what to look for through that door. Six eyes were questioning God” (Hurston, 159).

Answer: This scene takes place in chapter eighteen during the storm. Tea Cake and Motor Boat had been playing dice and cards to pass the time and entertain themselves while the thunderstorm carried on. After a particular eruption of thunder and lightning, Tea Cake and Motor Boat decided they needed to stop. Janie was thankful that they ended their games even though they were not playing for money. Janie describes God, as she refers to as Ole Massa, as doing his work by creating this storm and allowing it to continue. A context clue that signals to the reader that Ole Massa is God is Hurston’s use of capitalization. This indicates a proper noun, and based on the context of the sentence, the reader can decipher that she is speaking of God. When the narrator states, “They just didn’t use another part of their bodies, and they didn’t look at anything but the door” (Hurston, 159), it is suggested that Janie, Tea Cake, and Motor Boat sat in a complete stillness with their eyes glued to the door. They did not move one part of their body, and their eyes were fixated. The next line that describes that the time had passed to ask a white person about what was happening explains that it was nighttime. Earlier in the story, in chapter one, the line, “But now, the sun and the bossman were gone…” (Hurston, 1), helped me to understand what was meant in this sentence. After sundown, the white folks that were “in charge” of these men and women left for the night. Since the white folks were gone in this passage, it infers that it was after sundown. Janie, Tea Cake, and Motor Boat had no one to question except God. The description, “Six eyes were questioning God” (Hurston, 159), helps the reader to understand the fear the three of them were probably feeling. They did not understand what the storm had in store for them, and they were looking to God for answers. Perhaps they were asking him things such as, “Are we going to make it through this catastrophe?” or “When will this storm end?” This line is also very similar to the book title, so this infers that the reader is getting close to understanding the meaning behind the title.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 16, 2013 07:58 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
13 October 2013

Question: Why does Nanny say she would not marry again?

Nanny claims she would not marry because she did not want any one harming her baby.

Nanny states: "Ah wouldn't marry nobody, though Ah could have uh heap uh times, cause Ah didn't want nobody mistreating mah baby" (Hurston 19).

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at October 17, 2013 11:07 AM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
13 October 2013

Question: How does Mrs. Tony react to the piece of meat Joe offers her?

Mrs. Tony came to Joe telling him she was hungry, and she asked if he could give food for her and her children. Mrs. Tony said things like "Mist' Starks, please gimme uh lil piece uh meat fur me and mah chillun." (Hurston 73).

Mrs. Tony then got offended with the piece of meat Joe had given her. She replied with "Lawd a'mussy! Mist' Starks, you ain't gointuh gimme dat lil tee- ninchy piece fuh me and all muh chillun, is yuh?" (Hurston 74). After Joe gave her the meat, she replied with saying how cold of a heart Joe has. She said "Some folks ain't got no heart in dey bosom. They's willin' tuh see uh po' woman and he helpless chillun starve tuh death. God's gointuh put 'em under arrest, some uh dese days wid dey stingy gripin' ways." (Hurston 74)

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at October 17, 2013 11:16 AM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
15 October 2013

Question: What kind of activities do Janie and Tea Cake do together?

Chapter 12 starts off by stating all fun activities that Janie and Tea Cake do together. We learn that "Tea Cake and Janie gone hunting [. . .] fishing [. . .] to the movies [. . .] to a dance [. . .] and play checkers." (Hurston 110).

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at October 17, 2013 11:23 AM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013

Question: What happened to the lake?

The book says that "De lake in comin'!" (Hurston 162) multiple time in the text. With the hurricane that is making landfall we learn that the lake is overflowing and it is now flooding all the surrounding communities.

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at October 17, 2013 11:26 AM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 October 2013

Question: Why do people say Janie was not convicted?

Answer: People said that Janie was not convicted because she killed another black, not a white man. Janie overhears a man in front of the courtroom say, "She didn't kill no white man, did she? Well, long as she don't shoot no white man she kin kill jus' as many niggers as she please" (Hurston 189). This implies that they think that even if she had been guilty for killing Tea Cake for a different reason they may have found a way to say she was free to go.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 17, 2013 02:19 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA02
17 October 2013

Question 125 Chapter 11) What do you think he wants from Janie?

Answer) While Janie and Tea Cake go off spending time together, the town gossips about their relationship. Tea Cake has the reputation for having no money. He is much younger than Janie is, and people around town reckon he is only with her for her money. Sam Watson tells Pheoby, “You better sense her intuh things then ‘cuase Tea Cake can’t do nothing’ but spend whut she got. Ah reckon dt’s whut he’s after. Throwin’ away whut Joe Starks worked hard tuh git tuthgether.” ( Hurston 111). Later in the Chapter Pheoby speaks with Janie and tries bring attention to this issue. Janie replies with, “He ain’t never ast de first penny from me yet, and if he love property he ain’t no different from all de rest of us… He’s aimin’ tuh make hisself permanent wid me. We done made up our mind tuh marry.” (Hurston 113).

Question 208 Chapter 18) Who is Big Massa?

Answer) Big Massa is referred to as God. He is the one and only master. “Ole Massa is doin’ his work now. Us oughta keep quiet.”, Janie said as a big burst of thunder and lightning rocked the house.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at October 17, 2013 03:41 PM

Lindsey Thilmony and Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
17 October 2013

Question: Number 12 Chapter 20

Answer: In this quote, the reader realizes that Janie is content with her life even after Tea Cake has died. The narrator compares him to an angel when they state, “Tea Cake, with the sun for a shawl” (Hurston 193). Tea Cake is Janie’s guardian angel now. Janie will always miss him and she will never stop missing him until Janie herself is dead. Until then she will live on with the memory of his kisses and warm embrace. There is peace in Janie’s life now. Her life has been chaos since the beginning of the book but in the end, Janie did find her pear tree love.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 17, 2013 04:29 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 October 2013

Question: What lies were the coloreds telling about Janie?

Answer: Janie’s friends in the ‘Glades made their own assumptions before she had a chance to tell her side of the story. They sat above her and sent dirty looks and a wave of contempt and hatred towards her. They said, “ [. . .] she had took up with another man. Sent for him to come there from way off” (Hurston 186). Janie had never cheated on Tea Cake, nor did she ever have the urge to leave him. This lie spread by her friends was done so in fear and quite possibly grief.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 17, 2013 09:34 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
17 October 2013

Question #239: Why did Janie go to the funeral in overalls?

Answer: The reason that Janie wore overalls to the funeral is because "she was too busy feeling grief to dress like grief" (Hurston 189). This means that she was too upset and too worried about her feelings to show that she was upset.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 17, 2013 09:41 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
17 October 2013

Question #239: Why did Janie go to the funeral in overalls?

Answer: The reason that Janie wore overalls to the funeral is because "she was too busy feeling grief to dress like grief" (Hurston 189). This means that she was too upset and too worried about her feelings to show that she was upset.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 17, 2013 09:41 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Jocelyne Hilary
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 October 2013

Question: “[…] No hour is eternity, but it has its right to weep. Janie held his head tightly to her breast and wept and thanked him wordlessly for giving her the chance for loving service. She had to hug him tight for soon he would be gone, and she had to tell him for the last time. Then the grief of outer darkness descended.” (Hurston 184)

Answer: Janie is remembering the good times she spent with Tea Cake, and appreciating the time, they spent together. Janie knows nothing lasts forever, but she is sad to see Tea Cake go. Tea Cake gave Janie a real chance at love and reminded her of what it is to be a bee in a pear tree. The author uses symbolism for the fact that it is dark outside to represent the death of Tea Cake. Even though Tea Cake and Janie had a rough patch, deep down inside the two loved each other. By killing Tea Cake, it shows that Janie has matured and grown as a person, since the beginning of the novel, and will continue to grow.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 17, 2013 09:45 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in literature CA02
10 October 2013

Question 229: Why has Janie began to fear Tea Cake?

Answer: Janie started to fear Tea Cake after the sickness from the dog bite had entered Tea Cake's body and he started to change. He caught her in the morning just before she made her way to the doctors to get more medicine and he questioned where she was going. She explained that she was going to fetch some more medicine because Tea Cake was becoming to ill and she suggested that he be hospitalized. He took offense to her suggestion because he felt that she didn't want to take of him anymore and that he was more of a burden. Janie tries to explain, stating that that's not the case at all and that he was just to sick for her to take care of him. But all he did was,"[G]ive her a look full of blank ferocity and gurgled in his throat. She saw him sitting up in bed and moving about so that he could watch her every move" (Hurtson 182). At this point, Janie started to fear Tea Cake.

Posted by: Lydia Santana at October 17, 2013 10:10 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
17 October 2013

“Ah’m glad y’all stop dat crap-shootin’ even if it wasn’t for money,” Janie said. “Ole Massa is doin’ His work now. Us oughta keep quiet.” They huddled closer and stared at the door. They just didn’t use another part of their bodies, and they didn’t look at anything but the door. The time was past for asking the white folks what to look for through that door. Six eyes were questioning God. (Hurston 159).
Questions: 1) What might this passage mean in context of the whole work?
Answer: I think that this means that they constantly live their life gambling on things usually money and they finally realized to not gamble their life on this storm and try to get to safety. They talk about the white folk because they had warned them about the dangers but they decided not to listen to their warning. Now all they have left to do is look to god and ask him why they are put into this situation.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti and Kaitlin Millner at October 17, 2013 10:24 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desires in Literature CA02
07 October 2013

Question 45: Janie says Joe is portly like ____ folks. What does she mean by this?

Answer: Janie states that Joe is, "[P]ortly like rich white folks"(Hurtson 34). Janie states this because he started to buy her nice things like "the best things the butcher had, like apples and glass lanterns full of candy"(Hurtson 34). Also he took demand and charge of people and made things happen, which wasn't as common among African American men during this period of time. As it states in the text, "[H]e mostly talked about plans for the town when he got there. They were bound to need somebody like him" (Hurtson 34). Which is what I believe Janie is referring to when she describes Joe as "rich white folks."

Posted by: Lydia Santana at October 17, 2013 10:29 PM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
17 October 2013

Question #21: “What do we find out about Janie’s mother (Nanny’s baby)?”

Answer: In chapter 2, we find out a few things about Janie’s mother. In the beginning of the chapter, we learn Janie has never seen her mother. Later on, Nanny begins to tell Janie about how her mother was raped by a school teacher and left for dead in the woods. Nanny continues to tell Janie her mother became a heavy drinker and ran off a little after Janie was born (Hurston 20).

Posted by: Paula Pion at October 17, 2013 10:46 PM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
17 October 2013

Question #81: “Why does Joe say he gets mad at townspeople?”

Answer: Joe says he is mad at the townspeople because they are always gossiping rather than being more productive. He also, describes the townspeople as “trashy” when talking to Janie so, he probably does not like the townspeople in general (Hurston 54).

Posted by: Paula Pion at October 17, 2013 10:49 PM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
17 October 2013


Question #108: “What did Janie change after Joe’s death?”

Answer: After Joe’s death, the only thing Janie changes is her hair. She burns all her head rags that Joe made her wear around the store, and she puts her hair in one long braid (Hurston 89).

Posted by: Paula Pion at October 17, 2013 10:52 PM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
17 October 2013

Question #143: “Why had Janie said that she and Tea Cake need to leave town?”

Answer: Janie tells Pheoby she and Tea Cake need to leave town because as soon as they marry, the townspeople will begin to compare Tea Cake to Joe. Janie doesn’t want Tea Cake to have to go through that (Hurston 113). Janie also says, “Ah done lived Grandma’s way, now Ah means to live mine,” which shows Janie wants to leave town to start new and live life the way she intended and no longer the way Nanny wanted her to live (114).

Posted by: Paula Pion at October 17, 2013 10:54 PM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
17 October 2013

Question: What does the stranger want to do with Janie?

After the stranger flirts a little with Janie, he asked her to join him a game of checkers. In Chapter 10, the stranger asks, ""How about playin' you some checkers? You looks hard tuh beat" (Hurston 95).

Posted by: Rache Robinson at October 17, 2013 11:41 PM

Destiny Hubbard, Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
17 October 2013

Question: Insight on the passage “The wind came back with triple fury, and put out the light for the last time. They sat in company with the others in other shanties, their eyes straining against crude walls and their souls asking if He meant to measure their puny might against His. They seemed to be staring at the dark, but their eyes were watching God” (Hurston 160).

Answer: We believed that this was the starting point for the climax of the story. This is where the characters are beginning to notice the might of the storm. The storm itself foreshadowed that the troubles were coming near. They fled the Everglades, Tea Cake was bitten by a rabid dog trying to save Janie, and Janie ends up shooting Tea Cake to save herself. All of these things spawned off from the storm that is talked about in this passage.

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard, Monica Guirguis at October 17, 2013 11:41 PM

Erica Bodden, Salvatore Chisticieb
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
17 October 2013


Question: They all leaned over to listen while she talked. First thing she had to remember was she was not at home. She was in the courthouse fighting something and it wasn’t death. It was worse than that. It was lying thoughts (Hurston 187).

Answer: Janie was no longer in the comfort of her own home anymore. She was now in the territory of Palm Beach. A place where nobody knows her and her story is a mystery. She is on trial for murder; waiting for a group of people who know nothing about her life to make the final decision of what is to come next. Her crime is murder, the murder of Tea Cake Woods. Janie has one chance to explain to the court her reasoning for shooting her husband. “ She tried to make them see how terrible it was that things were fixed so that tea cake couldn’t come back to himself until he had got rid of the mad dog that was in him”( Hurston 187). Janie loved Tea Cake and shooting him was the last thing she would have ever done. Nevertheless, once the mad dog disease settled into his brain he was dead before they reached Palm Beach. Janie was torn in two rough places with two bad outcomes. There was no gray area that could be met. The result was losing Tea Cake.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at October 18, 2013 12:05 AM

Flavia Vazquez and Jordan Desdees
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
17 October, 2013

Question 5: "[...] After a few little questions he told her to tell just how it happened and to speak the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. So help her God.
They all leaned over to listen while she talked. First thing she had to remember was she was not at home. She was in the courthouse fighting something and it wasn't death. It was worst than that. It was lying thoughts. (Hurston 187).

Answer: In this passage we can see how Janie was judged throughout the entire novel. Also she seemed to sometimes be out of place, like all the moments when Janie was "watching God", in this passage she tells how she had to remind herself that she was at the courtroom. While in the courtroom, Janie was being judged by all the people present, especially the people of color; and throughout the novel she was always being judged, and by people of color. So this shows all the things Janie had to go through during her life. This passage also shows that Janie is the kind of person who cares more about being judged accordingly, than being judged based on misunderstandings.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 18, 2013 12:09 AM

Erica Bodden,
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
17 October 2013

Question: How does Tea Cake Justify beating Janie?

Answer: Tea Cake justifies beating Janie so that he could regain his confidence.” Being able to whip her reassured him in possession”(Hurston,147). Tea cake knows he doesn’t fit the standards of Janie’s social class. He is constantly reminded about how beautiful she is and why she would be with him. These constant feelings have made him extremely insecure. Nerveless, when he heard Mrs. Turner was seeking to fix Janie up with her brother it set him on a wild tangent.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at October 18, 2013 12:26 AM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
18 October 2013

Question: What was unusual about the mule's death?

What the usual thing about the mule's death was that when it died, its legs were stuck up in the air. In Chapter 6, it states, "But way after a while he died. Lum found him under the big tree on his rawbony back with all four feet up in the air. That wasn't natural and it didn't look right, but Sam said it would have been more unnatural for him to have laid down on his side and died like
any other beast" (Hurston 59).

Posted by: Rache Robinson at October 18, 2013 12:29 AM

Julia Della Penna
Dana Delosa-Scribe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 October 2013

Chapter 20 (Black 12):“Then Tea Cake came prancing around her where she was and the song of the sigh flew out of the window and lit in the top of the pine trees. Tea Cake, with the sun for a shawl. Of course he wasn’t dead. He could never be dead until she herself had finished feeling and thinking. The kiss of his memory made pictures of love and light against the wall. Here was peace. She pulled in her horizon like a great fish-net. Pulled it from around the waist of the world and draped it over her shoulder. So much of life in its meshes! She called in her soul to come and see.” (Hurston 193)

Answers:

Who: Janie is reflecting to herself after returning to Eatonville.
What: Janie is reflecting upon Tea Cake’s death and that regardless of the fact that he is not physically present, emotionally, they are still connected.
When: This quote takes place after Tea Cake’s death when Janie returns to Eatonville at the end of the novel.
Where: This quotation is taking place in her home in Eatonville, Florida
How: This quotation came about after Janie’s discussion with Pheoby about her time spent with Tea Cake and his death.
Why: This quotation came about because Janie was reflecting upon her love with Tea Cake and their life together

1). What might this passage mean in context of the whole work?
• In the context of the entire novel, this quotation reflects on the true love that Janie based on the pear-tree from Chapter 2. Janie realizes that after marrying three men, Tea Cake was the “bee to a blossom”(Hurston 106). Despite his physically death, a part of Tea Cake will remain alive with Janie so long as she continued “feeling and thinking” of him (Hurston 193).

2). What has the author/narrator/character explicitly said in this passage (in your own words), and what has the author/narrator/character perhaps implied? Look up imply if you do not know that this means.
• Hurston explicitly states that as long as Janie remembers Tea Cake, a part of him will remain alive and with her. Hurston implies that Janie “pulled in her horizon” via finding her definition and dream of true love with Tea Cake (Hurston 193).

3). How does the new content affect what you already know, and how does it shape your expectations for what is still to be encountered in the text?
• The content expressed in this quotation exemplifies the love Janie desired after her afternoons spent under the pear-tree. This quotation relieves that Janie “called in her soul to come and see” that she achieved her life-long goal of achieving true and meaningful love (Hurston 193).

4). How does what you’ve read fit into any historical contexts (not the author—cultural history)?
• The historical context surrounding this novel is not applicable to the quotation directly; however since the quotation refers to her life long journey, it applies on a broader scale. The novel was set during the early Nineteenth-Century during which the African Americans were largely discriminated against and suppressed. Janie defined the norms for a the typical African American woman of the time by being strong, independent and determined to achieve her life’s goals even if society would cast judgment on her for them (Hurston Chapter 1).

5). Does what you’ve read have something to say about the novel/course themes?
• The final quotation of novel completely summarizes the theme of obtaining the dreams on a horizon and specifically to Janie, a true agapic love. Janie and Tea Cake experienced truly unconditional love; even in his death, Janie will still continue to “feeling and thinking” of Tea Cake (Hurston 193).

6). Does the passage answer any essential questions that you, the reader, might have formulated?
• Janie’s statement that “she pulled in her horizon like a great fish-net” answers the question of whether or not she realized her dream of true love with Tea Cake (Hurston 193).

7). What questions still remain unanswered at this point?
• The question that remains unanswered at this point is what Janie is going to do with the remainder of her life in Eatonville.

8). What information are you lacking to fully understand what you’ve read?
• The only additional information that would assist in the understanding would be further insight into Janie’s mind to see if she will try to love again.

9). What new questions emerge from this passage/point in the narrative?
• Will Janie move on from Tea Cake, and marry another man?
• How will Janie’s experiences effect the other women of Eatonville; will they remain passive or will they go after their dreams?

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 18, 2013 01:25 AM

Alexia Chambers and Ashley Johnson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
17 October 2013
Question:
“[…] No hour is ever eternity, but it has its right to weep. Janie held his head tightly to her breast and wept and thanked him wordlessly for giving her the chance for loving service. She had to hug him tight for soon he would be gone, and she had to tell him for the last time. Then the grief of outer darkness descended.” (Hurston 184).

1)What might this passage mean in context of the whole work?
Each husband Janie had was controlling or mean to her but Tea Cake was the only one she ever really loved
2) What has the author/narrator/character explicitly said in this passage (in your own words), and what has the author/narrator/character perhaps implied? Look up imply if you don’t know that this means.
Literally the narrator is saying Janie is hugging him tightly to her chest as he is dying she implies that Janie is bidding her last farewell to the only love she really felt in her heart
3) How does the new content affect what you already know, and how does it shape your expectations for what is still to be encountered in the text?
It did not change anything; we already knew she loved him
4) How does what you’ve read fit into any historical contexts (not the author—cultural history)?
There is no historical context in this passage
5) Does what you’ve read have something to say about the novel/course themes?
Janie spends her life looking for her pear tree fantasy romance and she is always thrown into a marriage she does not want. When she finally finds her true love, he is taken away from her.
6) Does the passage answer any essential questions that you, the reader, might have formulated?
We have no questions
7) What questions still remain unanswered at this point?
No questions
8) What information are you lacking to fully understand what you’ve read?
No lacking information the passage was very literal about her actions
9) What new questions emerge from this passage/point in the narrative?
What will happen to Janie next? She has such a hard life

Posted by: Alexia Chambers and Ashley Johnson at October 18, 2013 01:26 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Maria (Camila) Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
19 October 2013

Question: 6 “Then Tea Cake came prancing around her where she was and the song of the sigh flew out of the window and lit in the top of the pine trees. Tea Cake, with the sun for a shawl. Of course he wasn't dead. He could never be dead until she herself had finished feeling and thinking. The kiss of his memory made pictures of love and light against the wall. Here was peace. She pulled in her horizon like a great fish-net. Pulled it from around the waist of the world and draped it over her shoulder. So much of life in its meshes! She called in her soul to come and see.” (Hurston 193).

Who: Janie is speaking to herself, she is deep in thought.

What: Janie is thinking to herself as she stares off in the distance from her bedroom window.

When: The 1930’s after Janie moves back to Eatonville. After the death of Teacake.

Where: This is taking place in Eatonville, in her bedroom.

Why: Janie is thinking about Teacake every day.

How: Today she has given him more thought because she ends up explaining the entire story of life after she moved out to Phoeby.

1)What might this passage mean in context of the whole work?

Answer: Janie finally found her peach tree love, Tea Cake was the bee to her blossom, he always brightened her world whether it was in the muck or the hurricane. He could do this both dead or alive. Throughout the entire story Janie kept referencing “the horizon” and in the horizon there is the sun. She says that Tea Cake had the sun as a shawl. She finally has been to the horizon and back. She is at peace now. Janie believed “She couldn’t make him look just like any other man to her. He looked like the love thoughts of women. He could be a bee to a blossom-a pear tree blossom in the spring” (Hurston 106).

2)What has the author/narrator/character explicitly said in this passage (in your own words), and what has the author/narrator/character perhaps implied? Look up imply if you don’t know that this means.

Answer: The author is stating that Tea Cake had “lit the top of the pine trees” and that the “sun was his shawl”. What the author is implying is that Tea Cake is the horizon that Janie has always been looking for. Tea Cake is her light and sunshine. The author says how Tea Cake is no dead, but in reality he is. What the author means is that Tea Cake is not dead to Janie because he lives in her memory. The author says he could never be dead until she cannot feel or think anymore. This means that until Janie is also dead or incapable of thinking or feeling, the thought of Tea Cake and the memories are still with her. The author states how Janie pulls in this horizon and was at peace, which implies that Janie is wrapping herself in the thoughts of happiness she gets from Tea Cake and she is finally at peace and knows love.

3)How does the new content affect what you already know, and how does it shape your expectations for what is still to be encountered in the text?

Answer: From the beginning we are first introduced to a naive seventeen year old girl Janie and as we continued reading we realize that all of her life she has had a dream of love. Janie believed in love no matter how many trial and errors she encountered such as the random black boy she kissed, Logan, Jody, and finally Tea Cake. Once Janie found Tea Cake she was determined and mature. She grew up along the way until she was finally left a widow. This time she was satisfied because she had finally found love.


4) How does what you’ve read fit into any historical contexts (not the author—cultural history)?

Answer: Janie was not a typical black woman from the era because of the way she lived her life. Janie lived her life as if she were a white person. She never really fit in with the culture. She did not want to be a follower. Janie always chased the dream of love. If she had been the typical black woman from the 1930’s, she would have just married a man and been satisfied with it. She would have accepted a “comfortable” life and not have run away from Logan. She went out of her way and took many risks. She is finally at peace in the end because she has found love.

5) Does what you’ve read have something to say about the novel/course themes?

Answer: Most women did what they had to live a "comfortable life". Janie wanted love and at the end she got to have her cake and eat it too. She grew happy to experience love. Without love she would not be at peace she would be alone and no "love or light would make pictures against the wall". Throughout the entire novel, Janie continually referenced the “horizon”. Janie says “Ah done been tuh de horizon and back and now Ah kin set heah in mah house and live by comparisons” (Hurston 191). The horizon was clearly a big deal to her and it meant that once she got to the horizon, then she would be satisfied. Janie states that Tea Cake took her to the horizon in back, meaning he helped her reach her ultimate goal of happiness.

6) Does the passage answer any essential questions that you, the reader, might have formulated?

Answer: One of the questions brought about was would she ever become satisfied? At first she did not seem like she was ever going to be satisfied or find what she was looking for. Each time she started up with a new man, it was a new adventure. Without these adventures and experiences, she may not have realized who to truly appreciate in the end. She is eventually satisfied because she falls in love with Tea Cake.

7) What questions still remain unanswered at this point?

Answer: A question that remains unanswered is “does Janie die of a broken heart or does she die peacefully”? Another question is “does she end up finding another man after Tea Cake”? We never find out if she goes on to another man, she was with a man consistently ever since she got married to Logan.

8) What information are you lacking to fully understand what you’ve read?

Answer: We are lacking the information as to whether or not her previous marriage to Logan was legitimate. We also never knew if she got a divorce, which would make every marriage after that void. The novel states “they were married there before sundown, just like Joe had said” (Hurston 33). This shows that Janie and Jody were married in a short amount of time revealing that one of the marriages had to be illegitimate. We also never understand why Janie never gets pregnant.

9) What new questions emerge from this passage/point in the narrative?

Answer: Two new questions that emerge from the passage referred to are “does Janie’s mental health get affected?” and “how is her wellbeing after everything”. We are never told how the rest of Janie’s life ends.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 18, 2013 01:32 AM

Connor Schaefer, Abdula Lsaif
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 October 2013

Question: “And then again Him-with-the-square-toes had gone back to his house. He stood once more and again in his high flat house without sides to it and without a roof with his soulless swords standing upright in his hand. His pale white horse had galloped over waters, and thundered over land. The time of dying was over. It was time to bury the dead.”

Answer: The main idea of this passage is that it is discussing how someone left his home before the hurricane, and now he has returned to see the damage. It is hard to say that this passage reflects off the entire book because it is just one event that happens towards the end of the book. It does not occur in the beginning and then carry through the entire book. This passage is describing what is about to occur in the chapter because it mentions right in it what the characters are going to do next. Another thing that the reader may feel from this passage is that there does not seem to be hope left for the characters. At this point, all they can do is attempt to clean up the after mass of the hurricane. This scene does not affect what the reader already knows, but it does change the mood of the story. It makes it more of a serious and sad feeling. This event can fit into a history because many different hurricanes have damaged towns to the point of deaths. The main question that occurs when reading this passage is who the person is they are referring to as him. The author never clearly states whom he is. In the quote, “And then again Him-with-the-square-toes had gone back to his house. He stood once more and again in his high flat house without sides to it and without a roof with his soulless swords standing upright in his hand. His pale white horse had galloped over waters, and thundered over land. The time of dying was over. It was time to bury the dead” (Hurston 169) the author is referring to a man that has come back to the town and is going to help clean up the damage. That is what this passage talks about in simple terms.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 18, 2013 01:42 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
18 October 2013
Question 220: Chapter 19: Why does Tea Cake want to go back to the ‘Glades?
Answer: Tea Cake is ready to move on. He says, “us been in dis dirty, slouchy place two days now, and dat’s too much” (Hurston 168). Also, he wants to be in a place where he knows the people. He states, “de white folks down dere know us” (Hurston 172). He wants to be back in a place that makes him comfortable and he does not have to be afraid.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 18, 2013 01:45 AM

Jasmine Collins and Lydia Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
18 October 2013
Question: Chapter 19 Number 3: “And then again in Him-with-the-square-toes had gone back to his house. He stood once more and again in his high flat house without sides to it and without a roof with his soulless sword standing upright in his hand. His pale white horse had galloped over waters, and thundered over land. The time of dying was over. It was time to bury the dead.” (Hurston 168).
3) How does the new conflict affect what you already know, and how does it shape your expectations for what is still to be encountered in the text.
Answer: The man with the square toes was mentioned before in Chapter 9, “The icy sword of the square-toed one” (Hurston 87); so we already knew about him, but what we did not know was why he was in this chapter. We figured he was the Angel of Death, and that he was ready to take Tea Cake, since he took Jody’s’. I expect that someone is going to die. Also, another expectation would be that there is hope. Hope, that Tea Cake will live to fight another day.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 18, 2013 01:50 AM

Darius Anderson
Aye’Kendria George
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 October 2013

Question: “Ah’m glad y’all stop dat crap-shootin’ even if it wasn’t for money,” Janie said. “Ole
Massa is doin’ His work now. Us oughta keep quiet.” They huddled closer and stared at
the door. They just didn’t use another part of their bodies, and they didn’t look at
anything but the door. The time was past for asking the white folks what to look for
through that door. Six eyes were questioning God. (Hurston 159).
Answer: Tea Cake did not think there would be a hurricane to come through the glades because “De white folks ain’t gone nowhere. Dey oughta know if it’s dangerous,” so Janie, Tea Cake and Motor Boat decided to stay in their hut to wait out the storm (Hurston 156). But he was wrong, the hurricane did come to the glades and the winds were ripping and howling and tossing about. As “a big burst of thunder and lightning trampled over the roof of the house” they all froze and realized that this was nothing that could be controlled by the white man and turned their eyes to God looking for an answer (Hurston 159).

Posted by: Darius Anderson at October 18, 2013 06:38 AM

Allison Knipe- Group 2
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 October 2013

“The wind came back with triple fury, and put out the light for the last time. They sat
in company with the others in other shanties, their eyes straining against crude walls
and their souls asking if He meant to measure their puny might against His. They
seemed to be staring at the dark, but their eyes were watching God” (Hurston 160).

This passage is telling us that Janie, Tea Cake, and the others are in the storm, waiting. Their eyes were watching God, meaning they were basically awaiting their fate. They didn't know if they were going to meet their maker just yet but there was a good chance.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 18, 2013 08:49 AM

Kylie Fagan and Jen Schubin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 October 2013

In Class Close Reading Activity-Group/Passage #8: "The wind came back with triple fury, and put out the light for the last time. They sat in company with the others in other shanties, their eyes straining against crude walls and their souls asking if He meant to measure their puny might against His. They seemed to be staring at the dark, but their eyes were watching God."

Insight: This passage from Chapter 18 has great importance to the meaning and plot of this book, as well as the title. If you notice, the last line of the passage actually has the exact words of the title in it, and we believe this means that it is finally getting to the main theme or "focus" of the book. This passage is just part of the narration, which means that a person in the story is not actually speaking these words, but we know that most of the passage is referring to God because of the capitalization of He and His. We feel that this passage could very much be foreshadowing the end of the story when the storm comes, and also could be foreshadowing their death. One of the main lines that shows this and makes us believe they are going to die is "their souls asking if He meant to measure their puny might against His" (Hurston 160).

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at October 18, 2013 09:33 AM

Blake Holtzhower
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210 CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013
15. What ended Janie’s childhood?
Janie’s “Nanny,” forcing her to marry Logan Killicks, ends Janie’s childhood. She does not want to marry him, because she does not love him, or have any desire to be with him. Nanny insists that she marries him because it will provide her with protection and a home to live in. Nanny knows she will be dying soon and wants to make sure Janie will have someone to take care of her when she is gone. Nanny says to Janie, “Tain’t Logan Killicks Ah wants you to have, baby, it’s protection. Ah ain’t gettin’ ole, honey. Ah’m done ole. One mornin’ soon, now, de angel wid de sword is gointuh stop by here (Hurston 15).”

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at October 18, 2013 09:49 AM

Blake Holtzhower
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210 CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 October 2013
241. Chapter 20: Why did Janie leave the muck? Janie left the muck because it was not the same without Tea Cake. “But the muck meant Tea Cake and Tea Cake wasn’t there. So it was just a great expanse of black mud (Hurston 191).” This also shows that Janie believes there is nothing in the muck worth staying for after Tea Cake died.

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at October 18, 2013 09:58 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
4 October 2013

Question 17: “Who does Nanny say the white man is?”

Answer: Nanny states who the white man is after her argument with Janie about love. Nanny becomes so distraught that she is pushed to actually striking her granddaughter in the face. After realizing the error in her actions, she draws her sixteen year old teenage granddaughter into her lap. This is when she says that “‘de white man is de ruler of everything as fur as Ah been able tuh find out,’” while rocking Janie (29). She is not referring to “de white man” as one individual man, but instead, as all white men. She, along with many other original slaves, only know the white men as superior, and out of love, she wants to be sure that Janie does not have to endure the same hardships.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 18, 2013 10:42 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 October 2013

Question 99: “Does Janie understand the feelings in Joe that drive him to strike her?”

Answer: Hurston does not clearly state whether or not Janie understands the feelings behind Joe’s reasoning for hitting her. When Janie insulted Joe’s manhood, his mind began spiraling in reaction to her words. Joe knew, along with the rest of the town, that he was a very wealthy man with many possessions. However, the town did not know anything about his “manhood” as it was just not something discussed on the front porch of the store. He began thinking that nobody would envy him anymore and that nobody would want to trade pride for objects (123). He now admitted that he was no different from anybody else. This revelation, to him, felt like a smack in the face. This, along with his inability to form a verbal response, drove him to hit his wife. Did Janie understand this? I do not think so. I think she believes that her husband hit her out of anger, which appalled her. After being hit, she left the store (124).

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 18, 2013 10:43 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
9 October 2013

Question 131: “How many days is Tea Cake gone after the first time he and Janie get together?”

Answer: After Tea Cake and Janie spend their first night together, Tea Cake was already up very early to go off to a job that Janie knows nothing about. She goes through the day hoping to see him later in the evening. However, when and before he doesn’t show up, Janie begins feeling very doubtful about his love for her (163). This new emotion sent her in a “darkness” that loomed over her for four days. On that fourth day, he drove up to the house in a car. Soon after his return she learned that he had not disappeared due to his lack of love for her. Instead, he disappeared because he was trying to do something to express his love for her.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 18, 2013 10:44 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
11 October 2013

Question 146: “What does Janie mean when she says “Ah done lived Grandma’s way, now Ah means tuh live mine”?

Answer: Janie goes on to explain to Phoeby exactly what she means when she says that she already lived her grandmother’s way. Nanny, being a slave, always longed to be like “de white man” and have the ability to sit on the porch in comfort and ease. Like any other loving parent, she wanted the same, if not more, for Janie. Following her grandmother’s wishes, she first married a man she didn’t love, and then married a man she believed she loved, but also lived a life of “‘sittin’ on porches’” (172). After meeting Tea Cake, she believes she has actually found true love. With this discovery, she finds that she does not want to sit around, but wants to go out and experience life and adventure.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 18, 2013 10:45 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
14 October 2013

Question 210: “What does Tea Cake tell Janie to do with their papers?”

Answer: When Tea Cake learns that the storm is too dangerous for him and Janie to stay in their house, he begins gathering his and Janie’s essential belongings. He tells Janie to get their insurance papers and money. He continues to tell her to “‘cut uh piece uh dat oilcloth quick fuh our papers,’” (237). He wholeheartedly knows that he and Janie will have to risk their lives in the storm. He knows that if anything, they will need their insurance papers and whatever money they have. Putting the papers in the oilcloth will prevent them from getting ruined in the hurricane.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 18, 2013 10:46 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Jasmine Charlton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
16 October 2013

Question 9: “And then again Him-with-the-square-toes had gone back to his house. He stood once more and again in his high flat house without sides to it and without a roof with his soulless sword standing upright in his hand. His pale white horse had galloped over waters, and thundered over land. The time of dying was over. It was time to bury the dead.” (Hurston 168).

Answer: “Him-with-the-square-toes” refers to, or symbolizes, a power higher than the control of mere humans, such as Tea Cake, Janie, and the rest of the people living in the Everglades. When Hurston states that his house has no walls or roof, she is creating an image for the reader. The reader imagines that the figure is so mighty, and without fear, that it needs no protection like people do. His horse did more than what normal horses can, which was to “gallop over water.” In a shift of focus, Hurston foreshadows what may come later in the novel. However, in the here and now, she is also referring to paying respects to those who lost their lives in the storm by giving them proper burials. Although dying is very hard to cope with, the people must face their next responsibility.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 18, 2013 10:58 AM

Erica Esqueda
Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 October 2013
Quote 5 – Ch. 19: “[…] After a few little questions he told her to tell just how it happened and to speak the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. So help her God. They all leaned over to listen while she talked. First thing she had to remember was she was not at home. She was in the courthouse fighting something and it wasn’t death. It was worse than that. It was lying thoughts” (Hurston 187).
This quote basically is saying that Janie is in the courthouse and is fighting within her conscience about whether she can tell the truth or not, out of fear of not be listened to. In this passage, Janie is debating whether she needs to lie in order to save herself or to actually tell the truth. The reason why is doing this is because in her life, she has always had to hide her true feelings and thoughts because her husbands, Logan, Joe, and even Tea Cake, never really allowed her to speak her mind. Her Nanny was like that with her many times as well and never allowed her to release her true feelings because they were always shutdown. Therefore, when it is mentioned that “she had to remember that she was not at home, she was at the courthouse…” (Hurston 187), she realized that maybe here she did not have to listen to her lying thoughts, she could speak the truth and not be shut down by anyone. The fact that she is able to finally be able to speak her mind might affect her overall as a person. She may be more open to being honest with others, and know that she does not have to be afraid about stating her view on things. During that era, women were not really allowed to have a say in things, therefore, the story of Janie highlights that. She was not really allowed to have a say in whether or not to marry Logan Killicks in the beginning because her nanny made the decision for her. One of the main themes was gender inequality and that was definitely seen throughout the novel between Janie and her husbands. They were very controlling of the things that she said and did, so the inequality was quite obvious. The passage does not really answer any of our questions about Janie and whether she finally felt fulfilled in life. A question that emerges from this passage would be what the lying thoughts were, what was she thinking of saying that was not the truth? A question that remains unanswered would be whether Janie ever felt that she was fulfilled in life after the relationships she had had. The book ends with “She called in her soul to come and see,” (Hurston 193). This could mean that she finally was able to reach inside of her soul and begin to live a life that she had always wanted to live. She was now able to just focus on her own self and not worry about anything else.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at October 18, 2013 11:05 AM

Darius Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 October 2013

Question: Why doesn’t’ the African-American Community leave like the Native American
Community does?
The Native American Community sensed the Hurricane coming, stating the “Saw-grass bloom” as how they knew and heeded the warning to get to higher ground. The African American community ignored the signs of the Native Americans’ saying, “Indians don’t know much uh nothin’, tuh tell de truth. Else dey’d own dis country still (Hurston 156).” They rather followed “de white folks,” who did own this country, and “ain’t gone nowhere (Hurston 156).

Posted by: Darius Anderson at October 18, 2013 11:20 AM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 October 2013Close reading assignment in class.

“[...] No hour is ever eternity, but it has its right to weep. Janie held his head tightly to her breast and wept and thanked him wordlessly for giving her the chance for loving service. She had to hug him tight for soon he would be gone, and she had to tell him for the last time. Then the grief of outer darkness descended.” (Hurston 184).

Who? Janie and Tea cake. What? Janie is holding Tea Cake while he is dying. When? After she shot him in self-defense. Where? In their house. Why? Tea Cake went crazy from a rabid dog that bit him. How? He began to suspect Janie cheating on him.

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Feedback from Dr. Hobbs: Per your homework instructions, all answers must contain (1.) an MLA heading that contains the full name of the course with section number, etc., (3.) a retyping of the question itself, and (3.) quoted passages from the text (with in-text citations) that prove the claim in your answer. This response has errors in either one or all of these areas. Please study the posts left by your colleagues.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at October 20, 2013 08:38 PM

Emily Paulino
McKenzie Burns
16 October 2013
In-Class Reading Activity

That she shot him for his own good because he was very ill. What is being implied to that love eventually ends between a couple, if either its death or break up or something else.

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Feedback from Dr. Hobbs: Per your homework instructions, all answers must contain (1.) an MLA heading that contains the full name of the course with section number, etc., (3.) a retyping of the question itself, and (3.) quoted passages from the text (with in-text citations) that prove the claim in your answer. This response has errors in either one or all of these areas. Please study the posts left by your colleagues.


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Posted by: Emily Paulino at October 20, 2013 10:49 PM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10/14/2013
Question: How is Janie’s personality different from the other women on the muck?
Answer: Janie is of mixed race and when she was living with ,Joe, she was always told that she was of higher status and that she was better than any of the common folk. Her personality is different because she is very accepting of all different types of people who live on the muck. The migrant workers are cautious of her and others. Mrs. Turner is also very conceited and thinks she and whites are better than most blacks are. Janie has an attitude that is indifferent to all of this. In the text “They quit hiding out to hold their dances when they found that their American friends didn’t laugh at them as they feared”, (Hurston 154). People were scared of others who were of a different race or background that they did not know.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at October 21, 2013 11:04 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs


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Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at October 22, 2013 04:38 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
22 February 2014

QUESTION #41:
How does Janie's attitude affect Logan?

ANSWER:
Janie's attitude affects Logan in such a way that at this point of time in their marriage, Logan sees her as a spoiled woman with no work ethic. He wishes to see her work with him on their property together. "Heah, Ah just as good as take you out de white folks' kitchen and set you down on yo' royal diasticutis and you take and low-rate me!" (Huston 31). Here, Logan is exemplifying how spoiled and underworked Janie is as a result of her attitude.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 22, 2014 08:43 AM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
23 February 2014

QUESTION #38:
What is Joe promising Janie?

ANSWER:
Joe Promised Janie that he wants to marry her. Joe wants to treat with class and respect, not like her husband does: “Ah wants to make a wife outa you. […] You ain’t never knowed what is was to be treated lak a lady and Ah wants to be de one tuh show yuh.” (Hurston 29).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 23, 2014 12:27 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
23 February 2014

Question: Why does Nanny say Janie should be happy in her marriage.

Answer: Nanny wants Janie to be happy in her marriage because Logan treats her well and can provide for her. Proof of this can be found on page 23, when, Nanny says, " Heah you is wid de onliest organ in town, amoungst colored folks, in yo' parlor. Got a house bought and paid for and sixty acres uh land right on de big road..." (Hurston 23)

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 23, 2014 10:42 AM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
23 February 2014

Question #24

Chapter 2: What happened to Janie’s mom?

ANSWER:

The protagonist of the novel Janie Crawford, was raised by her grandmother in West Florida. She never had the chance to get to meet her parents. Her mother Leafy ran away after giving birth to Janie. In chapter two, we get to read about her mom's tough life history. At the age of seventeen, Leafy’s white schoolteacher took her to the woods and raped her. The incident left its marks. A few years later she became an alcoholic and ended up leaving her daughter Janie, and the family behind.

“It was a long time before she was well, and by dat time we knowed you was on de way. And after you was born she took to drinkin’ likker and stayin’ out nights” (Hurston, 19). This touchable and powerful quote is a perfect example of how many young girls end up after getting abused by men. In this case, it is even sadder since she is waiting her child Janie.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 23, 2014 01:08 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

QUESTION #37:
Chapter 4: what does Janie learn about Joe Starks?

ANSWER:
In this chapter, the author goes, and explains to us how Janie learned many important lessons about marriage, integrity and love. When Janie first met Joe Stark, she thought he is one of those folks who want to be a big voice. Later he goes on and tells “Janie, if you thing Ah aims to tole you off and make a dog outa you, youse wrong. Ah wants to make a wife outa you.” “You mean dat, Joe?” “De day you puts yo’ hand in mine, Ah wouldn’t let de sun go down on us single. Ah;m uh man wid is the right man in whom he showed her that he principles.” (Hurston 29). Janie believes that Joe cares and appreciate.

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 23, 2014 01:34 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
23 February 2014

Question #28
What might the pear tree symbolize in this chapter?

Answer:
The pear tree symbolizes Janie’s unrealistic view of the nature of the world. The pear tree represents Janie’s life and the full out question the remains in Janie’s head of where is her life going to lead. She is searching for self-discovery more than anything else in her life. The pear tree represents death, changing of life and trying to find her in the hectic life that she is living (Hurston 1). I hope that Janie will eventually gain what she is trying to out of finding her place in the world and figuring her life out as an individual.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 23, 2014 05:02 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
24 February, 2014


Question: What did Nanny have to wait for before she could die?

Answer:
The chapter 3 of the book was representative of the way people lived back in the days. In fact many girls like Janie couldn’t choose their husband and many couple ended up not loving each other. The idea that was love wasn't necessary to enjoy the relationship you had with somebody else. Janie clearly express the way she sees love, as common physical attraction between two people “Cause Ah hates de way his head is so long one way and so flat on de sides and dat pone uh fat back uh his neck” (p.24 Hurston). However the idea that Nanny has of love is totally different. Nanny looks at a man able to bring her wealth security.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 23, 2014 05:34 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
24 February 2014

QUESTION 35:
How has Logan changed since the beginning of his marriage to Janie?

ANSWER:
At the beginning of the marriage Logan continued to spoil Janie as her grandmother did. In chapter 4 Janie also mentions that her husband spoke in rhymes to her, but stops before a year into their marriage. Janie's grandmother said to her "He's kissin' yo' foot and 'tain't in uh man tuh kiss foot long" (Hurston, 23). Then in chapter 4 Logan begins to tell Janie about helping him work, he even goes out to buy a second mule to help him work. He begins to reconsider spoiling her as she is used too.

Posted by: Rosa Esquivel at February 23, 2014 09:26 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

QUESTION #29:
Read this passage from the novel: “Husbands and wives always loved each other, and that was what marriage meant. It was just so.” Do you agree with this statement or disagree? Explain.

ANSWER:
I disagree with the statement: “Husbands and wives always loved each other, and that was what marriage meant. It was just so.” I do not think marriage means that wife and husband will always love each other. To me, a man and a woman are getting married when they love each other and “think” their partner is the good one, the one with who they want to spend the rest of their life. Marriage is not the insurance to love and to be loved for the rest of our life, but the premonition to have found the chosen one.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 23, 2014 11:08 PM

Will fumero
Dr. Hobbs
eng210 CL
2/21/14

Chapter 3: What is it that makes Janie a woman? What is the connection to the opening images of chapter 1?

Answer:
Janie is much more grown now compared to before in chapter1. In this chapter, she is about to be married. Not only is there an age difference but a personality difference. She is more unsure now than she was before about her decisions, the polar opposite from being a child.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 24, 2014 02:29 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014
Question: #30
Why is Janie upset?

Answer

Janie is upset because she doesn’t understand why she doesn't love Mr. Killicks yet. She wants someone to explain to her, how she is supposed to develop love for him. Cause you told me Ah mus gointer love him, and, and Ah don't. Maybe if somebody was to tell me how, Ah could do it." (Zola 23). Janie just doesn’t understand that it may take some time for her feelings to completely process.

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 24, 2014 06:07 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014
Question #36:
How did Janie get the city man’s attention?
Answer:
To get the city man’s attention Janie runs to the pump and starts pumping. The text states “he didn’t look her way nor the other way except straight ahead, so Janie ran to the pump and jerked the handle hard while she pumped”(Hurston 27).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 24, 2014 08:30 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
22, February 2014
Question #
Chapter 1: In the fourth paragraph, the sun has “left his footprints in the sky.” What image is created through this personification? What attitude toward nature is expressed in it?

Answer:
The image created through the “footprints in the sky” is the personification of a sunset leaving for the night. Through the sunset, the “footprints” had set the tone of the evening for the people to gather and have “sociable” time during the sunset. The tone of this story means to provide meaning that the sunset is almost ritualistic to the people in the story’s beginning. “It was the time for sitting on the porches on beside the road. These sitters had been tongueless, earless, eyeless conveniences all day long” (Hurston 1).

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 24, 2014 09:23 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

QUESTION #26. Chapter 2: How did Janie’s “conscious” life commence? Discuss the meanings suggested by the pear tree and the other poetic images used to describe this experience.

ANSWER: Janie’s “”conscious” life had commencd at Nanny’s gate” when she had been seen “letting Johnny Taylor kiss her over the gatepost” (Hurston 10). During her “conscious” life, Janie apparently could often be found below a pear tree (Hurston 10). This pear tree was a “blossoming” one which can symbolize Janie’s coming of age, when she was starting to learn more about sexuality concerning women (Hurtson 10, Class discussion). Furthermore, the narrator mentions that there is a change concerning parts of the tree: “from the leaf-buds to snowy virginity of bloom,” and this can be seen to symbolize Janie’s change from an innocent young lady and virgin to one who is just starting to have or will have sexual experiences (Hurston 10, Class discussion). One certain time Janie was below the tree is described by the narrator (Hurston 11). “The visiting bees” are mentioned in the experience below the pear tree, and this can symbolize “the birds and the bees” and imply that Janie is having her own sexual experience (Hurtson 11, Class discussion). Also, the narrator says, “The thousand sister-calyxes arch to meet the love embrace and the ecstatic shiver of the tree from root to tiniest branch creaming in every blossom and frothing with delight” (Hurston 11, Class discussion). The phrase “love embrace” express that Janie must be having some kind of experience involving love (Hurston 11, Class discussion). The ending of that quote expresses the wonderful feelings Janie has had while she was below the tree this specific time which can be seen to symbolize an orgasm (Class discussion).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 24, 2014 01:43 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

QUESTION #26. Chapter 2: How did Janie’s “conscious” life commence? Discuss the meanings suggested by the pear tree and the other poetic images used to describe this experience.

ANSWER: Janie’s “”conscious” life had commenced at Nanny’s gate” when she had been seen “letting Johnny Taylor kiss her over the gatepost” (Hurston 10). During her “conscious” life, Janie apparently could often be found below a pear tree (Hurston 10). This pear tree was a “blossoming” one which can symbolize Janie’s coming of age, when she was starting to learn more about sexuality concerning women (Hurtson 10, Hobbs). Furthermore, the narrator mentions that there is a change concerning parts of the tree: “from the leaf-buds to snowy virginity of bloom,” and this can be seen to symbolize Janie’s change from an innocent young lady and virgin to one who is just starting to have or will have sexual experiences (Hurston 10, Hobbs). One certain time Janie was below the tree is described by the narrator (Hurston 11). “The visiting bees” are mentioned in the experience below the pear tree, and this can symbolize “the birds and the bees” and imply that Janie is having her own sexual experience (Hurtson 11, Hobbs). Also, the narrator says, “The thousand sister-calyxes arch to meet the love embrace and the ecstatic shiver of the tree from root to tiniest branch creaming in every blossom and frothing with delight” (Hurston 11, Hobbs). The phrase “love embrace” express that Janie must be having some kind of experience involving love (Hurston 11, Hobbs). The ending of that quote expresses the wonderful feelings Janie has had while she was below the tree this specific time which can be seen to symbolize an orgasm (Hobbs).

Works Cited
Hobbs, Burgsbee Lee. “Notable Passages from Their Eyes Were Watching God.” ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01 in The Creative Life category in University Explorations, Saint Edward’s Hall Room 116, 24 Feb. 2014. Socratic Seminar.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 24, 2014 09:54 PM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

Question#42 Do you think Joe will keep his promise?

Answer:
Joe comes off as an ambitious guy who seems to have a weak spot in his heart for Janie. He flatters her with dresses and things she want, and tells her the better life she can have. “Janie, if you think ah aims to tole you off and make a dog outa you, youse wrong. Ah wants to make a wife outa you” (Hurston, 29). Joe pretty much expresses how badly he wants to wife Janie, although all the big dreams he is telling her can just be an act to get her to actually be with him.

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 25, 2014 12:54 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
25 February 2014

Question#93
How has Joe Changed?

Answer:
Joe changes physically and emotionally, it gets harder for him to move around and he is starting to look much older. Janie is becoming less attracted to him also, “That made her look at him all over. Joe wasn’t as so young as he used to be. There was already something dead about him” (Hurston, 77).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 25, 2014 12:56 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
25 February 2014

Question'Does Janie understand the feelings in Joe that drive him to strike her.

Amswer: No, she is not aware of the feelings in Joe that drive him to hit her. This is because she said to him, in front of all the people at the store, "When you pull down yo' britches, you lak like the change uh life" ( Hurston 79). If Janie were aware of his feelings she would not have said this because she doesn't like to hurt people, and that hurt Joe.

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 25, 2014 05:24 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
25 February 2014

Question 22: Why did Nanny’s Missis want to have her whipped?

Answer: Nanny, Janie’s grandmother was born into slavery and was owned by a white family. In her younger years, Nanny was raped by her master and became pregnant. When she finally had the child, her master’s wife noticed that the child had lighter features. She asked Nanny, “Nigger, whut's yo' baby doin' wid gray eyes and yaller hair?' She begin tuh slap mah jaws ever which a'way” ( Hurston 17). From this observation, she concluded that it was her very own husband’s baby. Nanny’s Missis wanted her beaten immediately for such betrayal; little did she know it was under the force of her husband. “First thing in de mornin' de overseer will take you to de
whippin' post and tie you down on yo' knees and cut de hide offa yo' yaller back. One hundred lashes wid a raw-hide on yo' bare back. Ah'll have you whipped till de blood run down to yo' heels! Ah mean to count de licks mahself. And if it kills you Ah'll stand de loss. Anyhow, as soon as dat brat is a month old Ah'm going to sell it offa dis place” (Hurston 18).

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 25, 2014 06:17 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
25 February 2014

Question #82
Sam and Walter get into an argument about nature and caution. Do you think its nature or caution that keeps one from burning themselves?

Answer:
Sam and Walter never agree on anything, and on this fine day the question came up asking “Whut is it dat keeps uh man from getting’ burnt on uh red-hot stove, caution or nature?” (Hurston 64) Sam replies to this answer by saying that “its nature dat keeps uh man off of uh red-hot stove, nature tells yuh not to fool wid no red-hot stove, and you don’t do it neither”(Hurston 64). Walter answers the question by saying the exact opposite. Walter says “its caution Sam. Listen, Sam if it was nature, nobody would not have tuh look out for no babies touchin’ stoves would they, cause dey just naturally would not touch it. But dey sho will, so it’s caution” (Hurston 64). Personally, I feel that, as children we are naturally told when the stove is red do not touch it. But of course we choose to touch it because they told us it was hot so we want to see for ourselves. That also ties into the caution because we want to see why our parents are so worried about if we are going to touch it or not. I feel that it’s caution that stops us because naturally you’re going to probably do it again just because someone tells us not to. However, cautionary you know how bad it hurt the first time you touched it. Therefore, you are not going to touch it again.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 25, 2014 06:41 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
25 February 2014

Question 84: How does Janie react to the flirting that is going on in front of the store?

Answer: In this chapter, Janie is realizing that Jody’s unfair and ordering actions are due to the fact that he feels the need to always be in control. This need for control only restricts Janie from living the way she wants to and concludes that he is not who she thought he was. Outside the store, two men were having a very appealing conversation in which Janie found interesting. Eventually the talk turned into flirting and Janie found herself having a great time, until Jody came and interrupted. “There was one of those big blow-out laughs and Janie was wallowing in it. Then Jody ruined it all for her” (Hurston 69). This shows how controlling Jody can truly be towards Janie. She was truly enjoying herself until Jody came by to order her back inside.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 25, 2014 06:49 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
25 February 2014

QUESTION #91:
What does Janie do at the end of the chapter that she has never done before? What meaning is given to all the events in the chapter when Janie says "It's so easy to make yo'self out God Almighty when you ain't got nothin' tuh strain against but women and chickens?"

ANSWER:
At the end of the chapter, "Janie did what she had never done before, that is, thrust herself into the conversation" (Hurston 75). Janie is breaking the role of what a traditional woman usually does, which is to be silent and obedient. The significance of Janie's quote that pertains to this chapter specifically is how stupid the men feel when they become aware of how hard women work and how much knowledge women actually have.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 25, 2014 06:50 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
25.2.2014
Question #33
33:
Chapter 3: Why does Janie wait by the gate?
ANSWER:
The gate, which appears first in chapter 2, is a symbol of a new beginning. In the second chapter, Janie was waiting by the gate for no real reason, she was merely enjoying listening to nature and the day go by, until Johnny Taylor passed by and kissed her. Johnny’s kiss was significant to Nanny because it meant that Janie had grown up and needed to find “protection” (Hurston 15).
“So Janie waited a bloom time [spring], and a green time [summer] and an orange time [fall]. But when the pollen again gilded the sun and sifted down on the world she began to stand around the gate and expect things. What things? She didn’t know exactly.” (Hurston 25). In chapter 3 the gate appears again as a symbol of the change to come. This time change comes in the form Joe Starks, an ambitious man with a passion for self-growth. It is a search for passion, which drives Janie to leave her first husband, Logan Killicks.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 25, 2014 06:55 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
26 February 2014

QUESTION #101:
Chapter 8: what is significant about Janie’s personification of death?


ANSWER:
At first, the whole death situation comes in when the doctor told Janie. He said, “When a man’s kidneys stop working altogether, there is no way for him to live. He needed medical attention two years ago. Too late now.” (Hurston 83). That is when Janie starts talking about death. She says “Death, that strange being with the huge square toes who lived way in the West. The great one who lived in the straight house like a platform without sides to it, and without a roof. (Hurston 84). She also mentions that death is coming, and no one escape. No one can stand against death. Many people get frightened when the topic of death comes out.

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 25, 2014 08:43 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
25.2.2014
Question #98
98:
Chapter 98: Look at the image of Janie in the fifth paragraph of this chapter. What does the image suggest about her psychological state?
ANSWER:
The fifth paragraph states that:
“Then one day she sat and watch the shadow of herself going about tending store and prostrating itself before Jody, while all the time she herself sat under a shady tree with the wind blowing through her hair and her clothes. Somebody near about making summertime out of lonesomeness.” (Hurston 77).
In it, Janie is imagining what her life must look like from an outside perspective. She imagines herself running around the store, and if she is not tending to the store she is “prostrating [herself] before Jody.” The word “prostrating” is key in this paragraph, because Janie is beginning to see her respect taken from her, and instead being replaced with forced reverence for Joe.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 25, 2014 09:19 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
26 February, 2014


Question #87.Chapter 6: How does Mrs. Tony react to the piece of meat Joe offers her?

Answer:
This chapter is a proof of Jody need to control everything. He can’t for example accept the fact that other men look at Janie. He is trying to over control every situations. Therefore his action even if there are noble causes pain to people around him. When Mrs. Tony comes and begs his for a piece of meat, he accepts giving her the meat but he does not give her the meat for free. Mrs Tony reacts buy saying that chicken and women are the only thing that men disrespect in that City. The impression that Jody thinks he is more important and that he is a better person than people living around him is obvious when he forbids Janie to talk with people on the porch “Janie loved the conversation and sometimes she thought up good stories on the mule, but Joe had forbidden her to indulge.”(P.54 Hurston)

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 25, 2014 09:20 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA 01
26 February 2014

QUESTION #83:
Chapter 6: Based on Charlie Jones’ pick up lines to Daisy, would you say the way men try to pick up women has changed since the writing of this novel?

ANSWER: I do not think much has changed because when using pick up lines on Daisy, Charlie uses a way in which he is trying to bribe her and make it seem as though he has a lot more to offer than other Jim. “Uh lil ole steamship! Daisy, Ah’ll take uh job cleanin’ out de Atlantic Ocean fuh you anytime you say you so desire” (Hurston, 69). Men still do that now when they try to show that they are the better choice. The cheesy quote that Charlie first uses towards Daisy is different from today, “It must be uh recess in hebens if St. Peter is lettin’ his angels out lak dis” (Hurston, 68). In these times, men are more up front or use compliments to first talk to a girl than using cheesy quotes.

Posted by: rosa esquivel at February 25, 2014 09:51 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
25 February 2014

Question #97

Chapter 7: Why was Joe so upset?

ANSWER:

Men always put down women and expect them to take it. When Joe begins to insult Janie in the store, she attacks him back out loud for the first time. She tells him that he is nothing but a big voice and that that when he pulls his pants down that there is nothing there. Joe felt how his manliness vanished when she made him look so small.

"Laughing at him, and now putting the town up to do the same" (Hurston, 80). This short passage from chapter 7 shows how embarrassed Joe felt when Janie insulted him out loud in the store. He felt even more embarrassed since it happened in public in front of the people in town. They were now all laughing at him.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 25, 2014 09:59 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
25 February 2014

QUESTION #104:
Who told Joe that Janie is trying to poison him?

ANSWER:
I think Pheoby is the one who tells Joe that Janie is trying to poison him. The two women had a conversation had a conversation and Janie talked about poison him: “Ah just now got tuh bear de name uh poisonin’ him.” (Hurston 83).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 25, 2014 10:39 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 February 2014

QUESTION #106:
Chapter 8: How does Janie feel about Joe when he dies?

ANSWER:
When Joe dies, Janie “was full of pity for the first time in years” (Neale 87).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 26, 2014 12:24 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 February 2014
Question: #103
Why does Janie think Joe won’t eat her cooking anymore?

Answer:

Joe will no longer eat Janie’s cooking, because he believes that she is trying to poison him. "Tuh think Ah been wid Jody twenty yeahs and Ah just now got tuh bear de name uh poisonin' him! (Hurston 82-83). She is hurt that Joe would believe that she would try to perform such an act. She is having a hard time processing the situation.

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 26, 2014 01:17 AM

Will Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210-cl
2/24/14

88.) Chapter 6: What do we find out about the meat

Answer:
We found that the meat is of high importance to Janie and her children, and that Tony had yet to buy it. As hinted in chapter 6 (pgs. 73-74), Janie comes in begging Mr. Starks for the meat to feed her children, and he kindly gives it to her and adds it to Tony’s account. The customers of the store weren’t fond of her begging and demonstration, but she did what she had to.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 26, 2014 02:23 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
26 February 2014

Question: Why does Nanny say she would not marry anyone?

Answer: Nanny's sole reason for not marrying anyone was because she did not want anybody mistreating her baby whom she had hid out in the wilderness and already risked her life for. "Awh wouldn't marry nobody, though Ah could have uh heap uh times, cause Ah didn't want nobody mistreating mah baby. So Ah gt with some good white people and come down here in West Florida to work and make de sun shine on both sides of de street for Leafy" (Hurston 190).

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 26, 2014 07:03 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
26 February 2014

Question: Why did Joe throw Henry Pitts out of Town?

Answer: Due to the translation of the text it was slightly unclear but it seems Joe threw Mr. Pitts out of town because he was caught hauling off some of Joe's sugar cane. "Like one day after he caught Henry Pitts with a wagon load of his ribbon cane and took the cane away from Pitts and made him leave town. Some of them thought Starks ought not to have done that. He had so much cane and everthing else" (Hurston 213).

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 26, 2014 07:14 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
25 February 2014

QUESTION #95: Why does Janie let Joe’s comments go without responding to them?

ANSWER: Janie does not respond to Joe’s comments since “she saw he was hurting inside” (Hurston 78).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 26, 2014 07:49 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 February 2014
Question# 94: Chapter 7: Why does Joe always call Janie old now?

Answer: He constantly criticizes her for being old and ugly, hoping that by pointing out her flaws, he can distract others from noticing his own age and frailty. Janie fears that she is too old to run away. Janie realizes that Joe has become very old, and that he has become more abusive to her than ever before. Joe’s age is beginning to show – he’s about thirteen years older than Janie – and to avert people’s attention from it, Joe piles more and more ridicule on Janie, making her out to be old and haggard. He calls her an "ole hen" and stuff like that. When Joe continues to insult her, she hits him where it hurts, saying, "Talkin’ ‘bout me lookin’ old! When you pull down yo’ britches, you look lak de change uh life." (Huston Hutson 79.) This is showing Janie finally standing up to Joe,and treating him as he was treating her.

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at February 26, 2014 08:30 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
26 February 2014
Question #102:
Why does Janie think Joe is over-reacting?
Answer:
Janie thinks Joe is over-reacting because the same thing he is mad about her doing to him he did it all the time to her. In the text it says “Why must Joe be so mad with her for making him look small when he did it to her all the time?” (Hurston 81). Therefore Janie thinks Joe is over-reacting being so upset about the situation.

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 26, 2014 08:52 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
11, February 2014
Question #89
Chapter 6: What does Janie say to the men?
Answer:
At the store several men are gathered around on the porch, they talk about how they wouldn’t let their wives beg for food like Tony Robbins’s wife did in front of Jody. Janie replies speaking her truth about woman and that they do not know everything about women as they claim to. She scolds them saying “’Sometimes God gits familiar wid us womenfolks too and talks his inside business. He told me how surprised he was ‘bout y’all turning around so smart after him makin’ yuh different; and how surprised ya’ll is goin’ tuh be if you think you do. It’s so easy to make yo’self out God almighty when you ain’t got nothin’ to strain against but women and chickens.’” (Hurston 75).

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 26, 2014 09:19 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
26.2.2014
Question #145

145:
Chapter 12: What are Pheoby’s fears? Is Janie “takin’uh awful chance” with Tea Cake?
ANSWER:
Pheoby fears that Tea Cake might be taking advantage of Janie’s money. She compares Janie’s relationship with Tea Cake, with another woman to who ran off with a younger man, only to have spent all her money and been left. Pheoby compares Janie and Tea Cake to Mis’ Tyler and Who Flung. “Still Ah ain’t Mis’ Tyler and Tea Cake ain’t no Who Flung, and he ain’t no stranger tuh think about.” (Hurston 114).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 26, 2014 12:11 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
26 February 2014

QUESTION #142:
What does Janie tell Pheoby she and Tea Cake are going to do?

ANSWER:
Janie tells Pheoby that she and Tea Cake are going to get married. Quoth Janie to Pheoby: "Tea Cake don't talk dat way. He's aimin' tuh make hisslf permanent wid me. We done made up our mind tuh marry" (Hurston 113). At this time, Pheoby is making sure that Tea Cake is not with Janie only for her money, but Janie reassures Pheoby here by telling her that they are actually in love and planned to become married.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 26, 2014 04:37 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
27 February 2014

Question:Think about the way Janie thinks about Tea Cake compared to the way Janie thinks about Joe. How has Janie changed?

Answer: Janie has changed because she decides to live for herself and not her Grandma. On page 114 it says, "Ah done lived Grandma's way, now Ah means tuh live mine" (Hurston 114). Janie also more fondly of Tea Cake than she did of Joe. In supports of this she says, Tea Cake loves me in blue, so Ah wears it. Jody ain't never in his life picked out no color for me" (Hurston 113)

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 27, 2014 10:45 AM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
27 February 2014

Question #140
Why does Janie say she never went around before?

Answer:
Janie had finally done what she had never had the courage to do which is adding herself into a conversation. Throughout the entire story Janie, chooses to be the silent girl out of everyone in her group of friends. She never decides to speak her mind or say, how she feels to others even if she really wants to because she is afraid they will judge her by the way she personally feels about a situation. This line is important to the story because at this point she finally decides to stand up and speak out on what she thought for once. “You gettin’ too moufy, Janie” (Hurston 112).

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 27, 2014 02:59 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
27 February 2014

Question #129 What does Tea Cake think about this? See Question above.

Answer:
Tea Cake didn't like it and pursued her anyways.They both ended up together (Hurston 103).

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at February 27, 2014 07:26 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
28 February 2014

QUESTION #134: Why does Tea Cake attract Janie? What is the magic that makes him so appealing? In what ways are their personalities alike.

ANSWER: Tea Cake attracts Janie because he allows her to be herself, and say what she wants. He allows her to be free, and it is the first time Janie feels that she can be herself. “He set it up and began to show her and she found herself glowing inside. Somebody wanted her to play” (Hurston, 96). Tea Cake treats her better than her grandmother, Logan, or Starks ever did. The magic that makes him so appealing is the freedom he allows her to have and the attention he gives her. Tea cake did all he could in order to prove to Janie that he truly loved her and wanted to be with her. After she made him to leave one night, he came right back the next morning to repeat everything he said to her the night before. "Sho is. You needs tellin' and showin' and dat's whut Ah'm doin'" (Hurston, 107). They both like to do fun things such as fishing, and cooking together that is why they enjoy each other so much.

Posted by: Rosa esquivel at February 27, 2014 08:21 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
27 February 2014

Question #123

Chapter 7: Why doesn’t Hezekiah want Janie walking home with Tea Cake?

ANSWER:

Janie is worried that the man named Tea Cake is only using her for her money. Even though he is treating her very well, she believes he is still too young for her. One night Tea Cake was walking Janie home, which Hezekiah was not very happy about. He warned her not to hang out with this man during late nights. He thinks Tea Cake is too low for a woman like Janie, but Janie does not care and continues seeing him.

“And nobody wouldn’t marry Tea Cake tuh starve tuh death lessen it’s somebody jes lak him – ain’t used nothing”. This statement made by Hezekiah proves that Tea Cake is not able to offer the same life style that Janie is used to live. Hezekiah believes that she can find someone that is better for her and can offer the life style she would be happy with.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 27, 2014 08:30 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
28 February 2014

QUESTION #143:
Chapter 12: why had Janie said that she and Tea Cake need to leave town?

ANSWER:
In the beginning of the chapter it seemed that Tea Cake and Janie are understanding each other’s.
“Tea Cake and Janie gone to Orlando to the movies. Tea Cake and Janie gone to a dance. Tea Cake making flower beds in Janie’s yard and seeding the garden for her.” (Hurston 110). This shows how he cared for her. I believe that the reason she and Tea Cake wanted to leave town is that Pheoby had said, “Janie, everybody’s talkin’ ‘bout how dat Tea Cake is draggin’ you round tuh places you ain’t used tuh. Baseball games and huntin’ and fishin’.” (Hurston 112). This had put Janie in a difficult situation. I agree with what Pheoby said. Tea Cake is forcing Janie to do things that women usually do not do with men.

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 27, 2014 08:51 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
27 February 2014

QUESTION #131:
How many days is Tea Cake gone after the first time he and Janie get together?

ANSWER:
Tea Cake decided to come to Janie after seven days early in the afternoon: “[Tea Cake] He waited a week exactly to come back for Janie’s snub.” (Hurston 100).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 27, 2014 10:56 PM

Will Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
2/27/14
Eng. 210-CL

Question: Why does Sam think Tea Cake is Dating Janie?

Answer:
As stated in both chapters 11 and 12, Janie and Tea Cake begin to spend more time with each other, and Janie herself becomes quite fond of him. Sam gets whiff of their time spent together, just everyone else does, and tries to get phoeby to talk her out of it (pgs. 110-111). He does not want her to end up like Ms. Tyler, a widow, and would rather see her in better hands.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 27, 2014 11:35 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 February 2014

QUESTION #132:
Chapter 11: How does Tea Cake say he feels about Janie?

ANSWER:
Tea Cake says he loves Janie several times in the chapter five. First he says that “De thought uh mah youngness don't satisfy me lak yo' presence do" (Hurtson 105). He also said about the age that “"Things lak dat got uh whole lot tuh do wid convenience, but it ain't got nothin' tuh do wid love” (Hurtson 105).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 28, 2014 12:09 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
28 February 2014

QUESTION 146: What does Janie mean when she says “Ah done lived Grandma’s way, now Ah
means tuh live mine?”

ANSWER: Janie says this statement when she is having a conversation with Pheoby about her relationship with Tea Cake and their plans (Hurston 113-114). When Janie says this statement, she is meaning that she had followed what Nanny told her to do concerning a big aspect of her life (marriage), but she has decided to make her own plans for what she will do now. In the beginning of the story, Nanny had mentioned Logan Killicks, Janie’s first husband, as being “decent” (Hurston 13). Also, Nanny told Janie, “Nothin’ Ah been through ain’t too much if you just take a stand on high ground lak Ah dreamed,” telling Janie what she wants her to do, in regards to marrying (Hurston 13, 16). Later in the story, when the statement in the question was said, Janie remembers that Nanny wanted her to “Git up on uh high chair and sit dere” (Hurston 114). She is expressing that she does not want to live in this way, therefore she will not follow what she is told this time (Hurston 113-114).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 28, 2014 12:12 AM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
28 February, 2014


Question: What does Tea Cake Represent to Janie that she had wanted so many years?

Answer:
Tea cake represents the partner Janie would have chosen if she had the choice. She feels that there is a real attraction with him. Therefore no matter what he does, she feels like it is impossible for her to get mad. Janie might be simply experiencing true love. I believe she does not know how to deal with that “Tea Cake stood there mimicking the tuning of a guitar. He frowned and struggled with the pegs of his imaginary instrument watching her out of the corner of his eye with that secret joke playing over his face. Finally she smiled and he sung middle C, put his guitar under his arm and walked on back to where she was.”(p.100 Hurston) That is what Tea Cake does after going for week.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 28, 2014 12:21 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 February 2014

Question# 122
Why does Janie like going fishing in the middle of the nights?

Answer:

Janie enjoyed fishing at night, because it made her feel like she was going against the rules. It was so crazy digging worms by lamp light and setting out for Lake Sabelia after midnight that she felt like a child breaking rules (Hurston 102). The idea of doing something, which should not be done, may sometimes get people excited.

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 28, 2014 03:13 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
28 February 2014
Question #120:
Why has Janie decided not to be nice to Tea Cake anymore?
Answer:
Janie decides not to be nice to Tea Cake anymore because he leaves for a week after being with her; she suspects that he is playing with her emotions. “She adored and hated him at the same time. How could he make her suffer so and then come grinning like that with that darling way he had?” (Hurston 108).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 28, 2014 09:16 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
27, February 2014
Question #138
Why do the townspeople think Tea Cake is spending money on Janie?
Answer:
The town believes that Tea Cake is a phoney. Not only does they think he wants Janie for her money but is playing her for a fool with out a conscious. Pheoby tells Janie “’Janie, everbody’s talkin’ ‘bout dat Tea Cake is draggin’ you round tuh places you ain’t used tuh. Baseball games and huntin’ and fishin’. He don’t know you’se useter uh more high timecrowd than dat. You always did class off’” (Hurston 112). Being her good friend, as well as confiding the town’s real thoughts, Pheoby’s sense of protectiveness for Janie is shown as a strong belief in Tea Cake wanting more from Janie to eventually gain the rest of her money.

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 28, 2014 09:22 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
28.2.2014
Question #188

188:
Chapter 16: Why does Tea Cake decide not to tell off Mr Turner?
ANSWER:
Tea Cake feels bad for Mr Turner, Hurston writes that;
“One day Tea Cake met [Mr] Turner and his son on the street. He was a vanishing-looking kind of man as if there used to be parts about him that stuck out individually but now he hadn’t a thing about him that wasn’t dwindled and blurred. Just like he had been sand-papered down to a long oval mass. Tea Cake felt sorry for him without knowing why. So he didn’t blurt out the insults he had intended.” (Hurston 144).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 28, 2014 12:13 PM

Franck, Danielle, Kara
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
28 February, 2014
Chapter 4: “Janie pulled back a long time because he did not represent sun-up and pollen and blooming trees, but he spoke for far horizon. He spoke for change and chance.”

Janie is having a conversation but thinking about Jody. She says that, “he did not represent sun-up and pollen and blooming trees” this is a reoccurring idea of Janie’s romantic desires. She desires a romantic, sensual experience with a man. Her Nanny has almost thought her that that doesn't matter that she needs someone to take care of her materialistically. Janie is willing to sacrifice this romance for change. Jody spoke change and he represents that concept in the novel.

Posted by: Franck, Danielle, Kara at February 28, 2014 08:07 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
3 March, 2014


Question: #173 How is Janie’s life different?

Answer:
Janie’s life is different because she lives the love story she always dreamed with Tea Cake. Her life is really different from what she used to have with Jody or Logan. He controls her, for example he makes Janie work on her on will “Janie fussed around the shack making a home while Tea Cake planted beans.”(p.130 Hurston) The only big difference is that Janie now knows how it is to be in love with someone. She can’t live without Tea Cake because he is using the cliché “absence make the heart grow fonder” to make her want him more.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at March 1, 2014 10:11 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
1 March 2014

Question #172

Chapter 14: How is Janie’s life similar to when she was in Eatonville.

ANSWER:

Jeanie's life in Eatonville compared to her life in Jacksonville is very different. She goes from a fancy lifestyle surrounded by classy people, to a country life surrounded by people wearing blue denim overalls.

One big similarity that I can see between Janie’s life in the Eatonville and Jacksonville is that she is very dependent on her husbands. She takes a lot of crap from them and does everything to keep the relationship good. She chooses to work alongside with both Joe and Tea Cake. In the end of the chapter, I believe that Janie realizes that the people are not that different from each other even though they belong to different classes. The men in town is having argumentations like back home in Eatonville, but just with a different meaning and bigger understanding for each other.

“The men held big arguments here like they used to do on the store porch. Only here, she could listen and laugh and even talk some herself if she wanted to” (Hurston, 134).

You can clearly tell that Janie feels more comfortable and confident around the people in Jacksonville. She even dares to participate in the discussions as a woman without being judged.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at March 1, 2014 10:22 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
1 March 2014

Question #140
What did the people think about Janie originally?
Answer:
Janie is a very independent woman in this book. When she meets Tea Cake she finally begins to feel that she is finally seeing real love. The townspeople that knew Tea Cake did not approve of Janie seeing him. They consistently gossiped about Janie. Janie was continuously getting the back end of the negative things they would say about her from other people. These people feel that Janie was not doing what she needed to and that she needed to do better. Being the independent woman she is, Janie does not care about how they feel because for the first time in her life she feels she finally has found love, and finally knows real love.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at March 1, 2014 11:20 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
03 March 2014

QUESTION #179:
Chapter 16: what is different about Mrs. Turner’s appearance?


ANSWER:
“Mrs. Turner was a milky sort of a woman that belonged to child-bed. Her shoulders rounded a little, and she must have been conscious of her pelvis because she kept it out in front of her so she could always see it.” (Hurston 139). From reading the appearance of Mrs. Turner, it shows that she had a unique look. I believe that she could be identified from a far distance. Then the author goes, and explains Mrs. Turners shape. “Mrs. Turner shape and features were entirely approved by Mrs. Turner. Her nose was slightly pointed and she was proud. Her lips were an ever delight to her eyes.” (Hurston 140). Indeed, she had a unique appearance just from reading the context I can imagine her in my mind

Posted by: Hosameddine at March 2, 2014 07:20 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
2 March 2014

QUESTION #176:
What does Tea Cake do to stop Nunkie?

ANSWER:
Tea Cake puts the blame on Nunkie when Janie catches the two of them together. Tea Cake explained that Nunkie grabbed his working tickets out of his shirt pocket and that she ran away with them (Hurston 137). He says this to show that he is not cheating on Janie and he also says this for Nunkie to stop chasing him.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 2, 2014 10:04 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
3 March 2014

QUESTION # 180: Why did Mrs. Turner like Janie?

ANSWER: Mrs. Turner, a woman whom Janie went to spend time with while the season was not going on, is talking with Janie at the beginning of the sixteenth chapter (Hurston 139). Mrs. Turner, who does not like Negroes, likes Janie since she has, features similar to those of a white person: “coffee-and-cream complexion and her luxurious hair” (Hurston 140). The narrator mentions that Mrs. Turner “didn’t cling to Janie Woods the woman. She paid homage to Janie’s Caucasian characteristics as such. And when she was with Janie she had a feeling of transmutation, as if she herself had become whiter and with straighter hair” (Hurston 145). Clearly, Mrs. Turner is fond of Janie since she looks similar to a white person, and therefore makes Mrs. Turner feel as if she is closer to being a white person when she is with Janie (Hurston 140, 145).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at March 2, 2014 10:38 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
3 March 2014


QUESTION# 189:
Why does Mrs. Turner think it is okay for Janie to be rude to her?

ANSWER:
Mrs. Turner allows Janie to be rude to her because she is so infatuated with the way Janie looks. Mrs. Turner herself is a woman with “white” characteristics, therefore she finds Janie appealing for the color of her skin and her beautiful hair. “That was why she sought out Janie to friend with. Janie’s coffee-and-cream complexion and her luxurious hair made Mrs. Turner forgive her for wearing overalls like the other women who worked in the fields” (Hurston, 140).

Posted by: rosa esquivel at March 2, 2014 10:45 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 March 2014

QUESTION #175:
Chapter 15: Why is Janie jealous?

ANSWER:
Janie is jealous because she feels like her husband is getting close to another girl. More than that, Janie feels like he loves the other girl: “You still love ole Nunkie?” (Hurtson 138)

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at March 2, 2014 11:01 PM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 March 2014

Question #167
Why does Tea Cake say he comes home?

Answer:

Tea Cake states that he comes home because he gets lonely while working in the fields. Now, naw, Janie. Ah know better'n dat. But since you got dat in yo' head, Ah'll have tuh tell yuh de real truth, so yuh can know. Janie, Ah gits lonesome out dere all day 'thout yuh (Hurston 133). He simply misses Janie; he wants to be around her more. Tea Cake works the fields for most of the day, hence, seeing Janie often is not possible. Tea Cake wants Janie to come help work in the fields, that way he can see her.

Posted by: Devon Bell at March 3, 2014 12:01 AM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
2 March 2014

QUESTION #169:
What is Janie’s reaction to Tea Cake’s proposal?

ANSWER:
Janie naturally laughed at Tea Cake when he is asks her to work. However, she decides to work along with him the following morning: “So the very next morning Janie got ready to pick up beans along with Tea Cake.” (Hurston 133).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at March 3, 2014 12:01 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
3/3/2014

Question: what is Mrs. Turner's "idol"? What are the results of such a god?

Answer: Mrs. Turner's "idol" is white people. Evidence to support this statement is when the narrator says, "She paid homage to Janie's Caucasian characteristics as such" (Hurston 145). The results of such a god are punishment and suffering. Proof of this can be found on page 145 when the narrator says, "Her god would smite, would hurl her from oinnacles and her in deserts..." (Hurston 145)

Posted by: Marie Ryan at March 3, 2014 12:17 AM

Devon Bell, Trey Griseck, Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 March 2014

2. Chapter 2
Janie saw her life like a great tree in leaf with the things suffered, things enjoyed, things done and undone. Dawn and doom was in the branches

Close Reading:
Janie seeing her life as a great tree is a rather interesting way to state it. She is simply saying the tree represents her life. The leaves on the tree characterize her life in a good and bad sense. The leaves falling off a tree could show that she is suffering in some sort of negative way, while the leaves changing colors could display different moods, green being her mood while she is happy. Dawn and doom was in the branches is stating that; there are difficulties in her life which are enclosed in her. These problems are deep inside her and she is having trouble with breaking away from them.

Posted by: Devon Bell at March 3, 2014 01:12 AM

Alison Schucht, Rosa Esquivel, Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 March 2014

QUOTE:
“You know, honey, us colored folks is branches without roots and that makes things come round in queer ways. You in particular. Ah was born back due in slavery so it wasn’t for me to fulfill my dreams of whut a woman oughta be and to do.”

ANSWER:
At this moment of time, Nanny is speaking to Janie about her past in context of Janie complaining that she does not want to marry Logan Killicks. Nanny is telling Janie that she had no guidance when she was Janie's age, that she grew up into slavery and that was a good portion of her life. She is trying to make Janie appreciate the fact that she does not have the same roots as she once did, she is also trying to make Janie appreciate the fact that the guidance from her is available, even though it might not be the guidance she truly desires.

Janie does as Nanny tells her so she does not disappoint her. This foreshadows Janie continuously not getting what she desires throughout the course of the novel, which is love. Although, there may be a chance that Janie one day may find love. When she does find this love, will it last? Will it be everything that she envisioned?

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 3, 2014 07:36 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
1 March 2014
Question #184:
Why Does Mrs. Turner want Janie to meet her brother?
Answer:
Mrs. Turner wants Janie to meet her brother because she wants them to get married. “She didn’t forgive her for marrying a man as dark as Tea Cake, but she felt that she could remedy that. That was what her brother was born for” (Hurston 140).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at March 3, 2014 08:06 AM

Brianne M. Waller, Allison Grohovsky, Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 February, 2014

Quote #6: “Ah wants things sweet wid mah marriage lak when you sit under a pear tree and think. Ah.”

Answer: In this quote Janie is talking to Nanny about her idea of what she wants her marriage to be like. This quote shows Janie’s naivety in her perception of marriage, especially for her time period. She has been married to Logan for a little while (maybe a few months as discussed in class), and things have not panned out the way she thought they would. He is mean and the work on the farm is hard and laborious. She describes her idea of marriage as being like, “lying under a pear tree”. The pear tree reference can mean a couple of things, but in this incident we believe it simply means that she wants her marriage to be a fairy tale. When first sitting under the pear tree Janie, “…the first tiny bloom had opened. It had called her to come and gaze on a mystery” (10). We believe it applies to this quote given to us because in this instance it refers to her new idea of marriage, and once you have an idea you can no longer forget it. The seed has been planted.

Posted by: Brianne Waller, Allison Grohovsky, Marie Ryan at March 3, 2014 08:35 AM

Shamera Bryant,
Meshayla Williams,
Will Fumero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
1 March 2014
Chapter 2:
“Ah wanted to preach a great sermon about colored women sittin’ on high, but they wasn’t no
pulpit for me.”
Answer:
In comparison to the rest of the text, the statement is saying that everyone has a voice, and their voice should be heard despite their ethnicity. In this text, the character explicitly says I am a colored woman, and I want to preach on a sermon. She is implying "under some conditions, her being able to preach on this sermon is not happening. Knowing that the character was already a slave led us to know that she had no freedom or right of her own, so the new content of her wanted to preach on the sermon led our expectations to believe that she wanted to be heard. Many activist back in slavery times wanted to be heard, but this gesture was considered illegal in some places, what the character is experiencing can relate to this. She wants to speak out as many activists did but is unable to for whatever reasons. Questions that are unanswered would be why was there not a pulpit for her to preach? We are lacking the information to whom she wants to preach to exactly. A lot of a new question surface when reading a statement such as that one with little being said about the context.

Posted by: Shamera Bryant, Meshayla Williams, Will Fumero at March 3, 2014 09:00 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
28, February 2014
Question #166
Chapter 14: Why does Janie think Tea Cake is coming home during the day?
Answer:
Janie realizes that Tea Cake leaves work when he is lonely and comes home at frequent and spontaneous times during the day. She thinks he keeps coming home because he wants to make sure he’s not unfaithful to him. “’Tain’t no boogerman got me tuh study ‘bout. Maybe you thin ah ain’t treatin’ yuh right and you watchin’ me.” (Hurston 133).

Posted by: Peter Grana at March 3, 2014 09:30 AM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
3 March 2014

Question #229
Why has Janie begun to fear Tea Cake?
Answer:
Janie has begun to fear Tea Cake because throughout their relationship Janie feels in a way that Tea Cake is only pretending to love her because Janie is wealthy. Janie fears that he is going to take her money and leave. In this chapter, Janie does not tell Tea Cake about the diagnosis that the doctor has given. Tea Cake finds out that she refused to tell him and goes insane. This I believe scares Janie because she has never before seen Tea Cake this mad to the point where Tea Cake pulls a gun on her. In her defense, Janie has no choice but to take his gun and shoot him. She is upset because at one time she felt that she had truly found love in Tea Cake and now things just feel the same as before.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at March 3, 2014 03:06 PM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
3 March 2014
Question #234:
Why do the people say Janie was not convicted?
Answer:
People say Janie was not convicted because Tea Cake was to kind to her and vice versa. In the text, Mr. Prescott says “Tea Cake was a good boy. No nigger woman ain’t never been treated no better” (Hurston 186). People were well aware of this, that’s how they knew Janie was innocent. She had no reason to want to harm or kill Tea Cake.

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at March 3, 2014 04:34 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
4 March 2014

QUESTION #243:
This chapter circles back to the scene of the first chapter. How is love like the sea, according to Janie?

ANSWER:
According to Janie, "'Love is lak de sea. It's uh movin' thing, but still and all, it takes its shape from de shore it meets, and it's different with every shore'" (Hurston 191). In other words, love truly has endless possibilities and just like the sea, the concept of love is deep. Love is expressed differently between every person, which is how love is different with every shore, according to Janie.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 4, 2014 09:41 AM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
05 March 2014

QUESTION #221:
Chapter 19: what ended up happening to Motor Boat?

ANSWER:
When the storm took place, many people had died. Tea Cake and Janie had realized that many people had survived including Motor Boat while the storm took place. When Janie and Tea Cake saw the lake got closer, they decided to flee. On the other hand, Motor Boat decided to stay home, and sleep. They tried convincing him Joe said, “De lake is comin’!” Motor said, “Aw, naw it ‘taint.” “Yes, it is so comin’! Listen! You kin hear it way off.” (Hurston 163.) What ended up happening to Motor Boat is that he decided to go to Nassau. Tea Cake had said to him “Good bye, then, Motor. Ah, wish you all de luck. Goin’ over tuh Nassau fuh dat visit widja when all dis over.” (Hurston 164.)

Posted by: Hosameddine at March 4, 2014 06:05 PM

Devon Bell, Marie Ryan, Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 March 2014

Group #6
Dis ain't no business proposition, and no race after property and titles. Dis is uh love
game. Ah done lived Grandma's way, now Ah means tuh live mine.

Response:

My members and I came to the conclusion that this is a quite significant section of the story. What is being stated here is that Janie is expressing the desire to feel a real love. She does not want to live her life with a man for what he has. She is done with her grandma’s way of things. In her eyes, people must be able to cohabit properly amongst each other. Two individuals should enjoy the company of each other; there should be no putting up with it because one has too. Janie wants to feel her pear tree love. She is ready to live life the way she finds pleasurable.

Posted by: Devon Bell at March 4, 2014 07:31 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
5 March, 2014


Question: #230 What Happened to Tea Cake and why?

Answer:
After the hurricane Tea Cake’s health becomes really bad “About the middle of the fourth week Tea Cake came home early one afternoon complaining of his head” (p.186 Hurston). Janie tries everything to help him get better but Dr. Simmons can’t do anything while it is obvious that Tea Cake is dying. It is probably the beginning or the end of Janie’s adventure, her last hope of knowing love is disappearing.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at March 4, 2014 08:07 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 March 2014

QUESTION #227:
What did Janie find under the pillow?

ANSWER:
Janie found a pistol that belongs to Tea Cake under the pillow: “It was then she felt the pistol under the pillow. It gave her a quick ugly throb, but she didn’t ask him about it since he didn’t say.” (Hurston 181). Tea Cake probably took this decision because of his growing madness caused by the disease.

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at March 4, 2014 08:28 PM

Chelsea Dickenson, Group 3
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
4 March 2014

In Chapter 9 of Their Eyes Were Watching God, Janie is beginning her process of mourning the death of her second husband, Jody. On the outside, Janie expresses grief and depression for her loss but on the inside, she feels relief. One of the more significant passages from this chapter is found on page 90 when Janie’s feelings towards her love life, and now lack thereof, is brought to the surface. “Besides she liked being lonesome for a change. This freedom feeling was fine. These men didn't represent a thing she wanted to know about. She had already experienced them through Logan and Joe” (Hurston 90). This passage shows that Janie is finally at a place in her life that she truly wants to be. Her past relationships were all perfect examples of what she did not want in love. She didn’t want to be involved in the situations that she was once in with Logan and Joe. So for once in her life, Janie doesn’t feel trapped, she feels the freedom of independence and is taking this time to embrace it. From this, the narrator is perhaps implying the fact that Janie would much rather be alone and take time to appreciate herself. Knowing prior to this passage that Janie wanted out of her relationship with Jody, it’s not a surprise that she feels a great sense of release. This novel does a great job illustrating how woman’s rights have evolved. In modern times, individuals are able to marry whomever they choose based solely upon their personal wants. As shown in Janie’s relationships in the novel, marriages were prearranged and more times, than none did not fulfill the woman’s depiction of what love is. It is no surprise that Janie is genuinely more content with her life after her husband’s passing because of the fact that it wasn’t anything that she pictured. This passage from the novel sheds more light on Janie and is a moment of realization for her. This realization being that Janie will take being alone and happy over any man, image, or stability.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at March 4, 2014 09:15 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Trey Griseck
Franck Bayebanen
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
4 March 2014

GROUP 4 – CHAPTER 10:

“He set it up and began to show her and she found herself glowing inside. Somebody thought it natural for her to play. That was even nice. She looked him over and got little thrills from every one of his good points. Those full, lazy eyes with the lashes curling sharply away like drawn scimitars. The lean, over – padded shoulders and narrow waist. Even nice!” (Hurston, 94). This paragraph is important to the chapter because Janie is finally feeling free and able to enjoy herself with another man. Tea Cake shows her what it is like to be happy and what it is like to be loved. Tea Cake also teaches her how to play checkers, where previously Jody just wanted to sit there and look pretty. This paragraph foreshows Janie’s next relationship with true happiness and her finding true love.

Posted by: rosa esquivel at March 4, 2014 09:50 PM

Alison Schucht/Denzel Williams/Anthony Jannetta/
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 March 2014

In-Class Close Reading Activity #2 - Chapter 11

We chose the last paragraph of chapter 11: “"Janie, Ah hope God may kill me, if Ah'm lyin'. Nobody else on earth kin hold uh candle tuh you, baby. You got de keys to de kingdom" (Hurston 109).
This passage happens after Janie tells Tea Cake she feels like he is playing with her and that he is seeing other women. After hearing that, Tea Cake feels hurt, and he tells Janie the truth: that he loves her.
We think this is a significant passage because Janie finds what she wants (a lover). Indeed she has her image of perfect love and she did not have the chance to find anyone representing this image yet (neither Logan nor Jody were lovers). With Tea Cake, she finally finds someone she is connected with, someone who makes her laugh, someone who treats her as his equal, someone who respects her.
When Tea Cake says, “Nobody else on earth kin hold uh candle tuh you” we feel like he says she is unique, and that nobody is like her.
When he talks about the keys, we feel like he says this is the beginning of something new, that there is a connection between them.
This passage shed more light on Tea Cake because we feel like he is the chosen one for Janie. We know that she loves him, but she did not trust him (maybe because of her experiences with men). When he tells her what she wants to hear, it seems like Tea Cake might be the one representing her ideal image of love.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at March 4, 2014 11:07 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 March 2014

QUESTION #223:
Chapter 19: What do we find out about the dog that bit Tea Cake?

ANSWER:
We find out about the dog that bit Tea Cake that it was a “mad dog” (Hurston 189). In other words, the dog that bit him was sick, and it transmitted its sickness to Tea Cake. I would say that the dog transmitted the rabid to Tea Cake.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at March 4, 2014 11:20 PM

Group #2
Kara, Bri, and Peter
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 March 2014

QUESTION #1
What might this passage mean in context of the whole work?

ANSWER:
"Come heah people! Jody is dead. Mah husband is gone from me" (Hurston 87). We chose this quote to some up chapter eight. In chapter eight, Jody dies and Janie is finally free from his control. After his death she takes her hair out of the rag he made her wear. She grew as a woman with more relationship experience, finally realizing who she really might belong with. "The young girl was gone, but a handsome woman had taken her place" (Hurston 87)

Posted by: Kara Marino at March 4, 2014 11:32 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
4 March 2014

Question #236

Chapter 19: What caused the people to forgive Janie?

ANSWER:

When Janie explained her love for Tea Cake in court, all white people including the men, found her innocent. These voices plus the royal burial Janie did for Tea Cake made the people in her surroundings to realize that she really was a trustworthy woman, and they all forgave her. The passage below from chapter 19 proves her love for Tea Cake. She buries him with care.

“Janie buried Tea Cake in Palm Beach. She knew he loved the Glades but it was too low for him to lie with water maybe washing over him with every heavy rain” (Hurston, 189).

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at March 4, 2014 11:43 PM

Paige Fowler
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
3rd March 2014
Chapter 19: Question 222
What has happened to Tea Cake?
Tea Cake ends up getting bit from a dog on his face while trying to get Janie out of the water. Tea Cake caught rabies and became severely sick. “ then befo’ he could git his rest he had tuh come get me out de water agin and fightin’ wid big ole dawg and de dawg bittin’ im in the face and everything”. (Hurston 176)

Posted by: paige fowler at March 4, 2014 11:57 PM

Paige Fowler
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
3rd March 2014
Chapter 4: Question 40
How did Logan act when Janie asks what he would do if she ran away?
Janie’s question took Logan by surprise and stroke fear into him. He starts to belittle Janie in hopes to diminish any thoughts of her running away. He scorns her saying hurtful remarks like no one is foolish enough to want her. Logan knows that it is a possibility that she will leave him at this fragile age in his life. “The thought put a terrible ache in Logan’s body, but he thought it was best to put on scorn”( Hurston 56) is evidence from the passage that shows Logan’s reaction to Janie’s question.

Posted by: paige fowler at March 4, 2014 11:58 PM

Paige Fowler
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
3rd March 2014
Chapter 7: Question 92
The narrative says that Janie got nothing from Joe except what money can buy.
What does Janie probably want?

This quote gives the impression that Janie is still not happy with the person she is with. She has material things but no emotional aspect as to what love really is. Beyond the physical attraction and material goods she still didn’t gain anything emotionally. There was no chemistry between Jodie and Janie after the physical attributes went away so Janie felt deprived of true love. “if Ah don’t, life won’t be nothing but uh store and uh house” ( Husrton page 7).

Posted by: paige fowler at March 5, 2014 12:00 AM

Paige Fowler
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
3rd March 2014
Chapter16: Question 185
How Janie does reacts to that?
Janie reacts in disapproval to Mrs. Turner proposal in regards to meeting her brother. Janie says she has a husband already and tends to stay married to him even though he is darker than Mrs. Turner’s brother. “Yeah, maybe so. But, Ah is married now, so aint no use in considerin”. (Hurston page 143)

Posted by: paige fowler at March 5, 2014 12:02 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
5 March 2014

Question 238: What evidence is there in the narrative that Janie is once again separated from herself during the stressful experience of being arrested?

Answer: The evidence to support this when the narrator says, "First thing she had to remember was she was not at home. She was in the court house fighting something and it wasn't death. It was worse than that. It was lying thoughts" (Hurston 187). This quotation shows that Janie was separated from herself because she has to think about the fact that she is in a court house. Therefore, her heart and mind are not in the same place.

Posted by: Marie Ryan at March 5, 2014 01:06 AM

Question:
Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
03 March 2014

What kind of activities do Janie and Tea Cake do together?

Answer:
Janie and Tea Cake go hunting, fishing, to baseball games, and to the movies.
“Janie, everybody’s talkin’ bout how dat Tea Cake is draggin you round tuh places you ain’t used tuh. Baseball games and huntin’ and fishing” (Hurston,12).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at March 5, 2014 01:13 AM

Question:
Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
01 March 2014

Question#234 What does Tea Cake decide about Mrs. Turner?

Answer:

Tea Cake decides that he hates Mrs. Turner and she can’t be hanging around his house, because she tried to break the relationship up between him and Janie.
“Tea Cake made a lot of fun about Mrs. Turner’s shape behind her back. He claimed that she had been shaped up by a cow kicking her from behind” (Hurston, 139).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at March 5, 2014 01:14 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
01 March 2014
Question#235 Why did Janie invite Sop to the funeral?

Answer:

She knows him and his friends are angry at her, and she wants to show her apology and sympathy through Sop.
“Sop and his friends had tried to hurt her but she knew it was because they loved Tea Cake and didn’t understand. So she sent Sop word and to all the others through him. So the day of the funeral they came with shame and apology in their faces” (Hurston, 189).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at March 5, 2014 01:17 AM

Meshayla Williams, Allison G,Paige F, Sam E
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
04 March 2014

Response:

"Naw, Ah ain’t no young gal no mo’ but den Ah ain’t no old woman neither. Ah reckon Ah looks mah age too. But Ah’m uh woman every inch of me, and Ah know it. Dat’s uh whole lot more’n you kin say. You big-bellies round here and put out a lot of brag, but ‘tain’t nothin’ to it but yo’ big voice. Humph! Talkin’ ‘bout me lookin’ old! When you pull down yo’ britches, you look lak de change uh life” (Hurston,79).

Both Joe and Janie start attacking each other verbally, calling each other names. Janie, talks about Joe’s manhood, and his pride in front of people. Joe insults Janie about her looks and how she is getting older, and lost all of her characteristics. This is significant to the story because it implies the relationship and attitude they are beginning to have towards each other.

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at March 5, 2014 01:23 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 March 2014

Question #224
What does the doctor say will happen to Tea Cake?

Answer:
The doctor shares with Jaine that Tea Cake is going to die "Janie, I'm pretty sure that was a mad dawg bit yo' husband. It's too late to get hold of de dawg's head. But de symptoms is all there. It's mighty bad dat it's gone on so long. Some shots right after it happened would have fixed him right up." "You mean he's liable tuh die, doctah?" "Sho is (Hurston 177). A dog, which most likely had rabies, bit tea Cake; it is too late to save him. There is a good chance that he will die.

Posted by: Devon Bell at March 5, 2014 02:23 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
5.3.2014
Question #240
240:
Chapter 20: Why did they run Mrs Turner’s brother off the muck?
ANSWER:
In chapter 19 (before Mrs Turner’s brother is run off the muck) it says that, “Sop and his friends had tried to hurt her [Janie] but she knew it was because they loved Tea Cake.” (Hurston189). Then in chapter 20, in order to regain their self-respect Sop and his friends blamed their bad treatment on Mrs Turner’s brother. “Because they loved Janie just a little less than they had loved Tea Cake, and because they wanted to think well of themselves, they wanted their hostile attitude forgotten. So the blamed it all on Mrs Turner’s brother and ran him off the muck again. [. . .] Even if it wasn’t his fault, he had put himself in the way.” (Hurston 190).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 5, 2014 07:26 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
11, March 2014
Question #237
Chapter 19: Why do they decide to leave the town? What attitudes do they reveal about white people? Why is this issue important when they have not discussed it previously?
Answer:
Janie and Tea Cake decide to leave town because of the state of the destroyed town of Palm Beach and the treatment of the two white men with rifles. “While Tea Cake was standing and looking he saw two men coming towards him with rifles on their shoulders. Two white men, so he thought about what Janie had told him and flexed his knees to run but in a moment he saw that that wouldn’t do him any good. They had already seen him and they were too close to miss him they shot. Maybe they would pass on by. Maybe when they saw he had money they would realize he was not a tramp.” (Hurston 169). Negative attitudes are revealed because of they way the white men treat Tea Cake. As Tea Cake tries to avoid the encounter he finds he cannot because of their close proximity. The white people are shown to be aggressive towards him, as they want him to clean up the corpses around the area. This is important because the southern white people are engaging and notorious for being intimidating black civilians in the south which wasn’t necessarily encountered previously.

Posted by: Peter Grana at March 5, 2014 09:18 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 March 2014

QUESTION #233 chapter 19 what lies were the coloreds telling about Janie?

ANSWER:
A man named Mr. Prescott testifies against Janie, saying that Tea Cake always treated her well and that she left Tea Cake for another man while her husband was sick. Mr. Prescot stated that "soon as he got a little fever from the water,she took up with another man. Sent for him to come there from way off. Hanging was too good." (Hurtson 186) This quote also fits in with what Tea Cake believed was happening with Janie also; that she was seeing someone else even though it was not true.
When Janie gives her testimony, she makes a point of telling the truth as she knows it and not pleading to anybody. "It was not death she feared. It was a misunderstanding." (Hurston 188) She was worried no one would understand why she did what she did, and she tried to portray that in court.

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at March 5, 2014 09:18 AM

Brianne M. Waller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 March 2014
Tea Cake

Question 226, Chapter 19: Why does Tea Cake get jealous?

Answer: Tea Cake gets jealous because he is afraid Janie is going to run off with someone else. He also gets bitten by something and contracts rabies making him even more delirious than he was before. A great fear had took hold of him as best said in this quote, “What was this thing that set his brains afire and grabbed at his throat with iron fingers?”.

Posted by: Brianne M. Waller at March 5, 2014 09:21 AM

Chris Lavie
Kara Marino
Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 March 2014

CHAPTER #15:
Which form(s) of love best fit(s) your group’s chapter, and why? What charatcters?

ANSWER:
In chapter 15, a passionate fight filled with anger turns in to erotic love filled with passion, “ ‘You done hurt my heart, now you come wid uh lie tuh bruise mah ears! Turn go mah hands!’ Janie seethed. But Tea Cake never let go. They wrestled on until they were doped with their own fumes and emanations; till their clothes had been torn away; till he hurled her to the floor and held her there melting her resistance with the heat of his body, doing things with their bodies to express the inexpressible; kissed her until she arched her body to meet him and they fell asleep in sweet exhaustion.

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at March 5, 2014 10:40 AM

Marie Ryan, Peter Grana, and Sam EL nehmani
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
5 March 2014

Chapter 18: "So he didn't kill the dog with one stoke as he intended. But the dog couldn't free himself either. They fought and somehow he managed to bite Tea Cake high up on the cheek-bone once. Then Tea Cake finished him off and sent him to the bottom to stay there" (Hurston 166)

This is an important passage because it foreshadows the death of Tea Cake.This is because the dog that bit him was mad, and therefore, by biting Tea Cake the disease it had was given to him. this passage also shows the love Tea Cake has for Janie since he willing to risk his life to save hers.

Additional question: Which form(s) of love fits your group's chapter, and why? What characters?

Answer: In this chapter there is philia love between Motor Boat, Tea Cake, and Janie. Tea Cake and Janie also display erotic love as defined by Phadreus.

Posted by: Marie Ryan, Peter Grana, Sam El nehmani at March 5, 2014 10:51 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Pauline Helgesson
Trey Griseck
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5.3.2014
Group Work #3
GROUP WORK.
Chapter 20: Significant passage in chapter 20.
ANSWER:
In chapter 19 “Sop and his friends had tried to hurt her [Janie] but she knew it was because they loved Tea Cake.” (Hurston189). However, in chapter 20, the opening statement is “Because they loved Janie just a little less than they had loved Tea Cake, and because they wanted to think well of themselves, they wanted their hostile attitude forgotten.” (Hurston 190). This along with the quote (also on chapter 20) “they had begged Janie to stay on with them and she had stayed a few weeks to keep them from feeling bad” (Hurston 191) shows the contrast between Janie and the rest of them. It highlights the contrast of the “Self-love” shown by Sop and his friends wanting to make amends with Janie because THEY wanted their hostile attitude forgotten, and Janie’s selflessness by acting upon others’ feelings, and not her own.
These two quotes are proof that Janie is on a high level of mentality, that she might have been feeling Heavenly/Divine love, not just for Tea Cake, but also for those who treated her badly.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 5, 2014 12:08 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
5 March 2014

QUESTION #241: Why did Janie leave the muck?

ANSWER: Janie had just had Tea Cake buried at this point in the story (Hurston 189). Janie then decides to leave the muck because “the muck meant Tea Cake and Tea Cake wasn’t there. So it was just a great expanse of black mud” (Hurston 191). Janie obviously is very upset about the fact that Tea Cake is not alive anymore (Hurston 189). Even for his funeral, “She went on in her overalls. She was too busy feeling grief to dress like grief” (Hurston 189). The reader can definitely tell that she is heart-broken at her husband’s being dead, therefore, she decides to leave the muck (Hurston 189, 191).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at March 5, 2014 12:56 PM

Alison Schucht, Allison Grohovsky, Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 March 2014

PASSAGE:
"Mrs. Turner, like all believers had built an altar to the unattainable--Caucasian characteristics for all. Her god would smite her, would hurl her from pinnacles and lose her in deserts, but she would not forsake his altars. Behind her crude words was a belief that somehow she and others through worship could attain her paradise--a heaven of straighthaired, thin-lipped, high-nose boned white seraphs. The physical impossibilities in no way injured faith. That was the mystery and mysteries are the chores of gods. Beyond her faith was a fantacism to defend the altars of her god. It was distressing to emerge from her inner temple and find these black desecrators howling with laughter before the door. Oh, for an army, terrible with banners and swords!" (Hurston 145)

ANSWER:
At this moment during the novel, Mrs. Turner shares her great criticism toward dark-skinned people, Tea Cake in particular. She builds this standard that she has for all people, that is, all people should be Caucasian. She has an idea of racial purity in which she believes she truly is a part of. The context at this point is Mrs. Turner attempting to talk Janie into meeting her brother, who is supposedly a part of this "racial purity." Mrs. Turner also shares her criticism of Tea Cake because of how dark his skin is. However, Janie refuses to leave Tea Cake because she truly loves him. Even when Janie does find love, she is continually receiving some sort of "guidance" that she does not wish for. This concept reoccurs throughout the entire course of the novel.

The type of love that best fits this chapter is narcissism, the self-love of Mrs. Turner. She is obsessed with her features since she has Caucasian features, as described on page 145. With love comes hate, and it is clear that she has a hatred for people with dark-skin due to her constant criticism and remarks about Tea Cake.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 5, 2014 06:09 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs


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Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 6, 2014 08:04 PM

Emma De Rhodo, Franck, and Brianne
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
6 March 2014

QUESTION: Which forms of love best fit your group’s chapter, and why? What characters?

ANSWER: In Chapter 19, Janie and Teacake portray eros of the lover and beloved. In this chapter, Janie takes care of Tea Cake while he is sick, and she eventually wants to find him a doctor when she does not believe she will be able to take care of him in any way that would be helpful to him anymore (Hurston 182). This action shows the dedication to him as his lover. Furthermore, the main quotation the group chose to demonstrate Janie and Tea Cake’s lover and beloved relationship comes into the story right after Janie kills Tea Cake with the pistol (Hurston 184). The narrator mentions, “Now she was her sacrificing self with Tea Cake’s head in her lap” (Hurston 184). Janie had noticed “Tea Cake was gone;” she knew he was basically “dead,” in a certain way because of the dog inside of him (Hurston 181, 187). She might have been, through killing him, been giving him up or letting him go, in a way, because she saw that he was in such a bad condition and was not himself (Hurston 179,181, 187). This action, Janie thought, was done out of love for Tea Cake; she did this in an attempt to stop his sickness (Hurston 187). The narrator mentions “that Tea Cake couldn’t come back to himself until he had got rid of that mad dog that was in him and he couldn’t get rid of the dog and live;” therefore, Janie decided to kill him in order for Tea Cake not to have “that mad dog” inside of him anymore (Hurston 187). Overall, in this specific chapter (Chapter 19), the reader can see that the eros is defined as lover and beloved with Janie as the lover and Tea Cake as the beloved.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at March 6, 2014 09:09 PM

Chapter 14: “Naw, naw, Janie. Ah know better,n dat. But since you got dat in yo’ head, Ah gits lonesome out der all day, thout yuh. After dis, you betta come git uh job uh work out dere lake de rest uh de women- so ah wont be losin’ time comin, home.” (Hurston 133)
We thought this piece was significant to the chapter because this shows the amount of love that Tea Cake has for Janie. Not just materialistic/physical love but truly genuine/unconditional love for her. This quote shows that Tea cake cannot go couple hours without thinking or being around Janie portraying the role of a ‘Lover’. The relationship between Tea Cake and Janie can be expressed as the Lover and the Beloved. Tea Cake is the Lover because he tries to provide everything for Janie and love her in every way possible. Janie is seen as the Beloved because she receives/takes in the relationship. The type of love Tea Cake shows Janie also made her have a different perspective about doing work. In her previous relationships Janie refused to do work and did not want to be mistaken for a mule. However, the love Tea Cake expressed to Janie and the reason he presented to make her work was the difference between the previous relationships and the one between her and Tea Cake. He actually missed her and didn’t just saw her as a Mule.

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Question 14 was/is an assignment from 5 March 2014. This assignment is missing the MLA format heading at the top (Name of Writers/Name of Instructor/Full Course Title and Course ID/Date

Posted by: Paige Fowler, Will Fumers, Denzel Williams, Anthony Jannetta at March 6, 2014 11:40 PM

Kara K. Marino
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 March 2014

QUESTION #43
Chapter 4: Describe Joe Starks. Does he seem like a good risk for Janie? What suggests that she may be unhappy if she chooses to go with him? What details suggest that she may be happy with him?
ANSWER:
Janie hears Joe whistling, walking by, “It was a cityfied, stylish dressed man with his hat set at an angle that didn't belong in these parts. His coat was over his arm, but he didn't need it to represent his clothes. The shirt with the silk sleeveholders was dazzling enough for the world. He whistled, mopped his face and walked like he knew where he was going” (Hurston 27).
Joe Starks is an older, rich, powerful, and persuasive man. Her life seems like it might be good with him because he promises all these wonderful things to her. "De day you puts yo' hand in mine, Ah wouldn't let de sun go down on us single. Ah'm uh man wid principles. You ain't never knowed what it was to be treated lak a lady and Ah wants to be de one tuh show yuh” (Hurston 29).

Posted by: Kara Marino at March 6, 2014 11:53 PM

Kara K. Marino
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 March 2014

QUESTION #105
Chapter 8: What does Janie complain Joe did to keep them from getting close?

ANSWER:
Janie complains that Joe did nothing but try and change who she was, “You changes everything but nothin' don't change you—not even death. But Ah ain't goin' outa here and Ah ain't gointuh hush. Naw, you gointuh listen tuh me one time befo' you die. Have yo' way all yo' life, trample and mash down and then die ruther than tuh let yo'self heah 'bout it” (Hurston 86). Janie confronts him on his deathbed to make him aware, but he wants nothing to do with it.

Posted by: Kara Marino at March 7, 2014 12:05 AM

Kara K. Marino
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 March 2014

QUESTION #105
Chapter 8: What does Janie complain Joe did to keep them from getting close?

ANSWER:
Janie complains that Joe did nothing but try and change who she was, “You changes everything but nothin' don't change you—not even death. But Ah ain't goin' outa here and Ah ain't gointuh hush. Naw, you gointuh listen tuh me one time befo' you die. Have yo' way all yo' life, trample and mash down and then die ruther than tuh let yo'self heah 'bout it” (Hurston 86). Janie confronts him on his deathbed to make him aware, but he wants nothing to do with it.

Posted by: Kara Marino at March 7, 2014 12:05 AM

Kara K. Marino
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 March 2014

QUESTION #192
Chapter 16: What do you think is revealed about the characters of Janie and Tea Cake that they are unaffected by Mrs. Turner's problem, and simply make trips to various beaches as the season rolls in again without worrying about the issues she worries about? Why do you think the character of Mrs. Turner is introduced at this point in the novel?

ANSWER:
The fact that the characters Janie and Tea Cake remain unaffected by Mrs. Turner’s problem shows how in love with each other that they are and that they do not care what other people think. In a way Janie shrugs her off, “But Ah is married now, so 'tain't no use in considerin'” (Hurston 143).

Posted by: Kara Marino at March 7, 2014 12:20 AM

Kara K. Marino
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 March 2014

QUESTION #244
Chapter 20: Interpret the final image of the novel: “She pulled in her horizon like a great fish-net. Pulled it from around the waist of the world and draped it over her shoulder. So much of life in its meshes! She called in her soul to come and see.”

ANSWER:
When Janie talks about pulling in her horizon like a great fish-net signifies that she got everything she was dreamed for. She cast that net out their hoping to find something and when she pulled it in she found the love that she had for Tea Cake. The net had been wrapped around the world symbolizing how unattainable they were until she was able to achieve them and bring that net down to earth. Janie finds peace, “Here was peace” (Hurston 193).

Posted by: Kara Marino at March 7, 2014 12:30 AM

Devon Bell, Shamera Bryant, Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
7 March 2014

Group 6
"What kinda man is you, Turner? You see dese no count niggers come in heah and break up mah place! How kin you set and see yo' wife all trompled on? You ain't no kinda man at all. You seen dat Tea Cake shove me down! Yes you did! You ain't raised yo' hand tuh do nothin' about it."

Response

This piece of the passage is quite interesting. Mrs. Turner is upset because Tea Cake and herself got into an argument, to this Mr. Turner sat down and smoked his pipe. She believes he should have gotten up and interfered with the two of them. She asked him what kind of man is he, simply trying to make him look down on himself. This does not bother him one bit, She is only making herself look foolish. She is upset because she fell down, she is trying to blame it on Tea Cake, but it was an accident. Mrs. Turner best reflects Narcissistic Love. She cares about herself in this situation; She doesn’t want to look bad.

Posted by: Devon Bell at March 7, 2014 02:28 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 9, 2014 07:42 PM

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