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March 02, 2013

Unearthing Satrapi's Own Story in her "City of the Persians"

Image Source: http://blog.mlive.com/james_sanford/2008/02/large_persepolis_011.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at March 2, 2013 10:17 AM

Readers' Comments:

20 October 2010

Please submit your extra-credit essay on the Hero's Journey in _Persepolis_ in the comment box below. Your essay will not appear in the comments below after you hit submit until I have approved it (which may take a few days).

OPTIONAL Extra Credit Assignment (See Handout Distributed in Class)

(If done to my satisfaction, your completion of this OPTIONAL assignment will replace your lowest reading check quiz score with a 25). Instructions:

1. See poster for the SLU Film Society’s screening of the film adaptation of Persepolis.
2. Attend the screening of the film Persepolis at 7:00pm Thursday, October 21, in Crawford Hall, Room 8.
3. Stay afterwards for the discussion of the film. Remember that a hero/heroine’s transformation (always required for a monomythic character to be considered a hero/heroine) is a kind of “personal development” (one of SLU’s core values).
4. In your journal, write a 1-2 page paper explaining the hero/heroine’s journey found in the narrative of the film Persepolis. Refer to the handouts I’ve given you in class. You’ll need to identify as many of the steps of the journey as you can (take notes* during the film, write the paper later, after the discussion). The paper should be in an essay form (not in the form of a list).
5. Type the paper and submit the paper digitally (by cutting and pasting) to my website, the English-blog. The link you’ll need to post it (as a comment) is:
http://www.english-blog.com/archives/2010/10/_persepolis__and_the_heros_journey.php

(or) just go to www.english-blog.com and click on the top blog entry which is about Persepolis and the Hero’s Journey. It will be due by the beginning of class on Tuesday (October 26, 2010). Be prepared to discuss it in class if you attended.

*Here are some things you should identify, in the order given, before you begin writing your paper:

A. The Hero/Heroine (Who is it?):
B. The Ordinary World (what/where is it?):
C. Explain the steps of the SEPARATION/DISCOVERY phase (See handouts)
D. What was the call to adventure?
E. Was there a refusal of the call? Where?:
F. Were there any helpers/aids/enablers to make the hero decide?
G. What/Where is the threshold (gate) into the special world?
H. The Special World (what/where is it?):
I. INITIAION/EXPLORATION PHASE/Road of Trials: What was the belly of the whale phase of this story?
J. Were there any enemies (or new friends) in the Initiation phase?
K. What was the supreme ordeal/climax/final battle in the initiation phase of the journey?:
L. Was there any useful gift/lessons learned in the initiation phase? If so, what?:
M. Was there a refusal of the return? If so, where?
N. In the return phase (crossing of the threshold out), was there a gatekeeper? Did the hero have a “magic flight” out or did they have to be rescued? Explain:
O. How did the hero change/transform into a “better” person either while in or after leaving the special world (this is the apotheosis stage)? Explain:
P. Did the hero “heal the land” in anyway?
Q. Is there any indication that the hero is now a master of two worlds? How?:
R. Is there any indication that the hero’s story is now over or that there might be some hint of prepping for a new adventure? If so, what, do you think from evidence given in the story, will be the hero’s new adventure? What’s his/her next challenge/adventure/quest?

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Brandon Medeiros
ENG 122 CA02
Dr. Hobbs
Persepolis

Persepolis is a French animated film about the life of Marjane Satrapi. The film begins with Marjane waiting in an airport, unable to board a plane to Iran. She begins to remember what her life was like growing up in Tehran. The beginning of the film flashes back in time to when she was 9 years old. Growing up Marjane was a young, curious, outspoken girl, with dreams of change for her country. Her parents are middle class workers who participate in rallies and protests, with hopes of change to their society. Marjane’s world as she knows it is falling apart around her. As a young child growing up during the Islamic revolution she does not fully understand the situation around her, but becomes increasingly interested in its future.
When Islamic Fundamentalists win the election, this forces the Iranian society into deep depression. People are ordered to obey to laws that strip away one’s independents. Women are required to dress appropriately with hijab’s or face execution. During her early childhood the Iran-Iraq war begins and Marjane see’s firsthand the terror and senseless killings around her. During this time she begins to rebel and find herself getting into trouble. As the war around her is starting to creep closer to her surroundings, Marjane find comfort in heavy metal music such as ABBA and Iron Maiden. She begins to dress in punk attire such as denim jackets that read “Punk is Ded”. Marjane rebellious attitude is a cry out for attention. Her feelings toward the situation is hard for her to process, listening to heavy metal helps her forget about what is happening around her.
Marjane parents are seeing a real change in her personality, so they decide to send her to a French Lycee in Vienna, Austria. This leads her to wonder why she needs to move. All she has ever known was her country and now she is forced to move. She becomes confused, after all her parents were always breaching and protesting themselves. At first she is reluctant to move but decides to follow her parent’s wishes. Upon arrival to a place where she can become free and find herself, she becomes increasingly isolated to her new foreign land. She has a hard time making friends and adjusting to a new country. She meets friends but is embarrassed to tell them where she is from. Marjane refuses to tell people who she is, hiding everything she is to her new friends. Ultimately she meets a guy that she falls passionately for. She finally feels that she belongs and enjoys his company. But what goes up must fall down. The man whom she thought was the perfect person; Marjane catches him cheating on her with another woman. This puts her into deep depression and Marjane finds herself living place to place, which leads her to become homeless. Living on the cold, wet streets Marjane becomes very sick and ultimately gets sick with bronchitis. This near death encounter and the conclusion of the war would mean she could safely return home. When she returns home her family is excited to hear all that has happened to her while being away. Reluctantly she obliges but feels depressed about her current situation. She feels tired and decides to go to sleep. While asleep she has a dream when God and Karl Marx speak to her. They both tell her how important she is and the importance to continue her life and dreams. After the dream she becomes more of the lively, ambitious girl she once was. She eventually goes back to school where she attends a university, starts to attend parties and eventually meets a fellow student which she begins a relationship with, and eventually marries.
Soon after she realizes that nothing much has changed. The Iranian society is still under control of every aspect of people’s way of life. She gets caught holding hands with her husband in public, which leads to a fine. Reverting back to her rebellious beliefs Marjane decides to speaks out in her universities forum about the sexiest double standards on public morality. During an encounter with a policeman Marjane finds herself falsely accusing a man sitting behind her of making obscene gestures. She returns home to talk with her grandmother about the way she fooled the policeman. She begins to tell her grandmother that she lied to save herself from punishment. Thinking her grandmother would side with her and congratulate her, her grandmother gets furious that she cost an innocent man his freedom. Her grandmother reminds Marjane that both her grandfather and uncle died supporting freedom and protecting the innocent people of Iran.
Everything around her is falling apart again. Her marriage is ending and a friend is killed when police raid a party. Her family decides the best thing for her is to leave again and never return. Marjane realizes that the best thing is to leave or face danger if she stays. Soon after departing, her grandmother dies. Being rejuvenated she leaves the airport and flags down a taxi. She sits in the back of the taxi and the driver says to her, where are you from? This time she speaks up and answers “Iran” with a big smile on her face. The movie ends with a memory of her grandmother placing jasmine in her bra to allow her to smell lovely every day.
The movie leaves people wondering what happens next. After watching I was curious to see what becomes of this girl. Being a foreign animated film with subtitles I had to pay close attention. The film was very comical and kept my attention until the end. Leaving I had a sense of connection with what she had gone through during her life. Many Americans take what they have for granted and become selfish. But after watching this film I have a greater appreciation for people in other counties, and what they have to go through.

Posted by: Brandon Medeiros at October 25, 2010 06:24 PM

Ryan Dailey
ENG 122
Persepolis
Persepolis tells the story of a girl, Marjane, that is struggling to find her identity while growing up in Iran. However, Marjane, or Marji, encounters many obstacles and has to overcome things that most youth have never had to deal with. Marji’s encounters with the harsh realities of life in Iran and her struggle of trying to find her identity elsewhere make up a fantastic, but not necessarily uplifting journey.
The heroine of the story is clearly Marji. Marji has a big heart and a loving family, but living under the oppression of Islamic fundamentalists, she rebels. However, Marji does not rebel using violence of force, she rebels in small ways such as listening to rock and roll (such as Iron Maiden in the scene where she buys tapes off of the street) and not following the dress code at school. All of these rules and guidelines make up the “Ordinary World” which, for Marji, is Iran.
There are several possible instances which could be looked at as “the call to adventure,” but I believe that the most prominent call to adventure was the incarceration of Marji’s uncle. Marji’s uncle was imprisoned because of his defiance of Iranian rules. Marji revered her uncle for being defiant, but was extremely saddened by his incarceration.
The imprisonment of Marji’s uncle prompted Marji to rebel further against Iranian authorities. However, Marji did go through a “refusal of the call”. Throughout the film, Marji is visited by God (presumably in her dreams). During these visits, God talks to Marji, once even asking her if she is “ready to be a prophet”. However, when God visits Marji following the incarceration of her uncle, she tells God to go away.
The “special world” in the film could be seen as Vienna, where Marji is sent to go to school. Marji’s parents believed that she would have a much brighter future in Vienna, but Marji has an extremely difficult time becoming accustomed to life away from Iran. It is in Vienna that Marji begins her “road of trials”. After having disputes with the nuns that were housing her, several boyfriends that break her heart, and difficulty discovering her identity, Marji ends up homeless and emaciated. This would be considered the “belly of the whale phase” in which things could not get any worse for Marji.
After her disaster in Vienna, Marji returns to Iran to bring order to her life. In the return phase, I would identify Marji’s grandmother as the gatekeeper. Marji returns to a cold Iran that did not mirror any of the good memories that she had as a child. The one person that seems to make her consistently happy is her grandmother. In this stage, the apotheosis stage, Marji is a much wiser person, but also seems very jaded and complacent.
The end of the film stops abruptly, leaving you wondering where Marji’s life journey will take her next. I believe that the story ends directly before Marji is to start a new adventure to establish herself as an adult.

Posted by: Ryan Dailey at October 25, 2010 08:04 PM

Bethany Penzo
Extra Credit Assignment
October 24, 2010

Persepolis
Saint Leo University on October 23 healed a special viewing of the film Persepolis. A 2007 French animated film that’s place during the 1970’s Iranian Revolution. That focuses on a young Muslin woman named Marjane Statrapi; who experienced the devastating effects of the new Islamic rule first hand. In order to better understand what this character had to endure the film goes back in time to the beginning of Marjane journey.
Marjane Statrapi was only a young girl when the Islamic Fundamentalist began taking over Iranian and although she was not more than eight-years old she understood what was happening around her. The films young heroin, Marjane was able to stand firm in refusing to conform to a corruptive society. Standing strong in what she believes to be right even though the pressure to adhere to was great.
A turning point in Persepolis came when Marjane was forced to leave her world. The world she had come to know was no longer safe and set forth to France. France became her new home or rather holding place away from her loved ones: Parents, Grandmother, friends and extra. For they all would remain in Iran unable to escape from the evil. Pushing the films forward in the pursuit for a better, happier, and safer live for Marjane. But this journey she had embarks on for a better life turns sour when getting kicked out of her place of residence and ends up on the cold, dark, and frightening streets of France. A closes call to death leads her to reject her call for a better life in France to return home.
Mr. and Mrs. Statrapi were very worried about their daughters well being agreed to let Marjane come back to her home land in Iran. Not expecting to a full grown young women standing in front of them are shocked. For their little Marjane has grown up to a beautiful twenty years old who was happy to be home. Surrounded my love ones Marjane still was expressing sins of depression and tries to commit suicide but luckily with the help of God begins to experience life again.
A wakened from here misery Marjane began taking classes at the Iran University. Where she soon realizes that Iran has changed a great deal from the time she was a little girl. The new Islamic rule had succeeded in passing the new laws. That gave very little right to the Muslim people especially there woman. She becoming outraged even more when the Careers begin taking away students rights in learning about Art and Literature Marjane stands up against their demand. Running home to tell her Grandmother of her eventful day of how she stud up to the Careers.
Marjane and her Grandmother become even closer as the years pass on. Her grandmother a wise, funny, and kind old women helps support her granddaughter in her chooses to marry, divorce, and stand up for what is wrong. The Grandmother even convinces Marjane that the best thing for her would be to movie back to France permanently this time. As the film end to a close the Grandmother dies but not before sending Marjane back to her journey in staying true to herself and never conforming to what you are told to do. Marjane takes her grandmothers advice and returns to France.

Posted by: Bethany Penzo at October 26, 2010 12:24 PM

Nick Campana
Persepolis
English 122 CA-01
In the movie Persepolis the heroine was a girl named Marji. Marji’s ordinary world was in Iran during a time of great corruption. What separated Marji was that her family were considered rebels and publically disagreed with the government. Marji joined her family’s views and even went as far as to terrorize the government official’s children. There was a call to action that came to Marji in a dream. God came to her in a dream and told her to forgive people and not to be such a rebel. There was a very strong refusal of the call after a fixed election lead to more strict laws on women and what they could wear. When the heroine heard this, she went back to her old rebel ways. There was some assist to the call to action before Marji’s refusal. A friend of hers was released from prison after serving a sentence for acting out against the government and tried to talk her out of making the same mistakes that he did. The crossing the threshold moment in this story was when Marji’s family sent her to Australia to go to school and to keep her from getting arrested. The road of trials and enemies she faced when she entered the new world was dealing with the new people in Australia. The students and nuns at her new school stereotyped Marji causing her in future social situations to lie about where she was from. From this experienced she learned that she would rather live a quieter life with her family in Iran then be forced to live anywhere else because of her actions. There was no refusal for Marji to leave the new world and return to Iran. Marji actually need to be saved because she was homeless and sick. When she returned home she had another visited from god in her dreams that acted as a meeting with goddess moment. After this dream, Marji was awakened from her depression and had a new energy and excitement towards life. Marji was not a master of two worlds but her trip through the new world taught her how to be a master of her old world. If the movie continued Marji’s new adventure would be finding a way back to Iran to visit her family after she left again.

Posted by: Nicholas Campana at October 26, 2010 02:56 PM

"Persepolis" is a touching story that revolves around Marjane Satrapi. It is the story of a whole generation of Iranian seeing through the eyes of a girl. Marjane is young precocious girl who has an early age is caught in the net of the Islāmic revolution. Through propaganda at her school, Marjane sees the Iranian royal family as divinely chosen. During the beginning of the revolution, Marjane’s parents finally explained to her the origin of the rulers. Furthermore, Marjane has since become a very outspoken girl against this system.

Through the young eyes of Marjane, we see the misery and hardship of a nation. The people’s hopes dashed as fundamentalists take power. Marjane’s uncle is sent to prison again, while being once very outspoken against the Shah’s oppression. This new oppressors forced men and women to be subject to religious fundamentalism, while imprisoning any dissenters. This situation went against Marjane’s beliefs, and she even became more outspoken. While there is a banned on foreign influence, Marjane discovers musical bands like Iron Maiden and ABBA under the complicit eyes of her mother.

Marjane has developed such a boldness resulting from her life experience, that her parents decide she would be safer outside the country. Being such, an outspoken kid did not fit well with the new religious fundamentalist. Therefore, at age fourteen, they make the difficult decision to send her to school in Austria. This turning point in Marjane’s life marks her initiation stage. She started to get a glimpse at the outside world, a world where she can speak her mind freely. Nevertheless, she is confronted to a world where too much freedom can be as dangerous as the lack of it. While in the outside world, Marjane first encounters rejection. Although, she finally made some friends, Marjane often had to hide her real origin. One of the biggest ordeals Marjane had to face was sentimental. Marjane gains acceptance overtime and even experienced love. The relation ended terribly wrong, and sent her life downhill. At first Marjane refused to go back home and tried to face her calamity on her own. At the end, she had to ask her parents for help. While going back home she had to face an officer at the immigration, this was the first encounter of Marjane with the fundamentalist republic. Marjane was asking quickly to properly arrange her scarf. This gatekeeper clearly gave Marjane a glimpse of what to expect of her returning.

The decision to return home was one of the biggest decisions taken by the hero. Coming back to Iran meant the acceptance to live in a tyrannical society. Nevertheless, Marjane decided to return to Iran to be close to her family. The adjustment to Iran was difficult, but at the end, Marjane overcame it. Nevertheless, Marjane continue to speak against the hypocrisy and tyranny of the religious fundamentalist. At the end, she realizes that while Iran is her home, she cannot live there. Marjane realizes that Iran is no longer as welcoming as she would want. Finally, at the age of 24 she unwillingly leaves Iran. She went to France hoping for a better future for her country Iran. Marjane past tells us that she is willing to speak and fight for what she believes. Therefore, as long as tyranny still exists in Iran, our hero will have a quest to finish.

Posted by: David Tilias (ENG122 CA03) at October 26, 2010 03:00 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for the assignment shown above this message has now passed. Any comments listed below this message are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 27, 2010 04:56 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
31 January, 2013

Question:What causes Marji to feel so ashamed? Why?

Answer:Marji is now old enough to understand the difference between social classes. She is an avid reader, so when she looks at the stories of children as young as three working to support their families, she realizes how better off she and her family are. The author of those stories "was Ali Ashraf Darvishian, a kind of local Charles Dickens (pg. 33)."

Marji also wishes she could do something about it, something more than just attend protests. However, Marji knows that just as she cannot attend the protests, she knows that she cannot do much to stop needless suffering.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at January 31, 2013 09:00 PM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 – The Graphic Novel
1 February 2013

Question: According to Marji's dad, why will the Middle East never have peace? What do you think?

Answer: Marji's dad said that the Middle East will never had peace as long as it has oil. I think that peace in the Middle East will continue to be hard to come by until the cultural revolution that has been witnessed recently, like the Arab Spring, has totally affected the region and results in a truly liberal region.

Question: Who is Anoosh? How does Marji feel about him? Why?

Answer: Anoosh is Marji's uncle who was imprisoned. Marji loved him immediately because she thought that he was a genuine war hero unlike her parents.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at February 1, 2013 01:22 PM

Joseph Schwartz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300
2/1/2013

Section 6: Question 1: What lesson does Marji learn from her mother?
In the Persepolis chapter six “The Party,” we see a young Marji caught between the footholds of a revolution and a society that accepts violence as a means of justice. Throughout Persepolis Marji is faced with numerous stories of violence and death, usually because of the tyranny of the Shah’s reign. As a young child Marji cannot fully understand the consequences of violent conflict, and thus sees it as a “game” with no finality. Marji’s mother confronts her about this, after witnessing her running around with nails in-between her fingers with her friends. After asking Marji what she is doing, she explains that her and her friends are going to enact revenge against a classmate’s father for his role as an assassin in the Shah’s secret police. Marji’s mother teaches her daughter later on that senseless violence is not an appropriate means of justice because it is not for them to decide penance for sins. Instead they must learn to forgive those around them who have caused harm to others.

Section 8: Question 1: Who is Anoosh? How does Marji feel about him and why?
Anoosh is Marji’s uncle who was a political prisoner and a long lost relative of the family. Marji is immediately attracted to Anoosh because her father is not a hero. Marji defines a hero, by becoming a political prisoner against the Shah’s reign. She is ashamed of her father because he did not endure like the rest of his friends. At school Marji frequently creates stories about her father, some of which are fantastical, to hide her shame. Anoosh delights Marji because his stories are full of action and adventure, she is proud to finally have a family member who actually paid a price for protest. Anoosh seemingly has all of the qualities her father lacks. Marji expresses her discontent for her father in this way. Marji doesn't fully understand the reality of prison life and the unspeakable horror of torture. This lack of understanding confuses and frightens her and that is why she uses Anoosh and his stories to disquiet the misperception.

Posted by: Joseph Schwartz at February 1, 2013 01:58 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
1 February, 2013

Question: What did bilingual represent to the new regime?

Answer: "They are symbols of capitalism (pg. 4)." Capitalism was seen as a product of the Western world; the regime was determined to keep their country and ways seperate from the Western world.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 1, 2013 05:38 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
1 February, 2013

Question: What two lessons does Marji learn from her mother?

Answer: Do not punish someone for what their father did ("His father did it. But it's not Ramin's fault (pg. 46).") and "we have to learn to forgive (pg. 46)."

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 1, 2013 06:25 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
1 February, 2013

Question: What does the illustration on pg. 77 reveal about Marji’s feelings about the vacation?

Answer: Marji feels that the vacation was magical; it took her and her parents away from their troubles for three weeks. Italy and Spain are foreign places to her, so these places would have been very exciting for her to visit.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 1, 2013 06:42 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
1 February, 2013

Question:Who does the government recruit to serve on the front lines of the war? How do they
persuade them? Can you think of another time when this practice has been used?

Answer: "The key to paradise was for poor people. Thousands of young kids, promised a better life, exploded on the minefields with their keys around their necks (pg. 102)." A key given to them in exchange for war duty, key that would get them to heaven with "plenty of food, women, and houses made of gold and diamonds (pg. 100)." Prior to the Protestant Reformation, if the Catholic Church needed some extra change, they would sell indulgences, guaranteeing the buyer a spot in heaven.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 1, 2013 07:37 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
1 February, 2013

Question:Why did Marji’s family continue to hold parties despite the danger?

Answer: They hold parties in order to deal with their difficult lifes. "Without them it wouldn't bepsychologically bearable...Without parties, we might as well just bury ourselves now (pg. 106)."

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 1, 2013 07:53 PM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
04 February 2013
Section 6-10 Questions
Question 18: Why do Marji’s parents subject themselves to a political upheaval and refuse to leave Iran? What is their opinion of those who left?
The answer to this question can be found on pages 62 and 64 of The Complete Persepolis. On page 64, Marjane's family discusses the possibility of leaving the country. However, Marjane's father rejects the idea with a snide remark about how they could be forced into a lower social position, saying "so that I can become a taxi driver and you a cleaning lady" (Satrapi 64). This reveals that the family is concerned about losing what they have. Also, on page 62, Marjane's father and Anoosh are having a political discussion, one where Anoosh states that "the religious leaders don't know how to govern. They will return to their mosques" (Satrapi). Another thing from page 64 is the father's assertion that "everyone who left will come back. They're just afraid of change. (Satrapi). This reveals that Marjane's family hopes that the current troubles with the religious regime will blow over soon and that their lives can return to normal under the new regime.
Question 22: What do the fundamentalist students do? How does this event affect Marji’s plans?
At the very start of the chapter titled "The Trip," the fundamentalist students captured the U.S. embassy and held the staff hostage. Because of this, Marji is unable to go to America to visit Kaveh.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 3, 2013 05:07 PM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
04 February 2013
Section 11-15 Questions
Question 8: What criticism does Marji’s mom make of capitalism? What confusing thing does she suggest as they leave the store?
While the mother doesn't make a specific comment about capitalism per se, she does deride the greed of the other shoppers, saying that "if stores were closed for a single day, [they'd] probably eat each other" (Satrapi 87). Here, the materialist impulses of the other shoppers to hoard food in a time of crisis is being cast as a negative, yet in the final panel of the page, Marjane's mother says "we'll go to the store across the street and try to get more [rice boxes]" (87). After having mocked the other shoppers for hoarding, the mother decides to check the store across the street so she can hoard more food for her family.
Question 22: Name one violation that Marji’s dad is guilty of at the traffic stop. How does his wife respond to the situation? What is a condition of their release?
The father is guilty of at least two violations, first, he had been drinking alcohol, second, he was wearing a tie, which was forbidden. The wife asks the soldier to be lenient, citing how young he is and the closeness of age between him and her daughter, Marjane in an attempt to reinforce the soldier's status as a child. Eventually, Marjane's dad is able to buy off the soldiers with money.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 3, 2013 07:28 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
4 February 2013

Question: Why was a picture of mom in the paper? How did she respond? Why?
Answer: A photographer took a picture of her when she was at a demonstration and it spread to all of the popular magazines and newspapers. She wasn’t happy when she heard that it had happened because she could be put in prison or killed.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 4, 2013 12:47 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
4 February 2013

Question: What did Marsi do for 6 months to help Mehri? Why?
Answer: She wrote love letters for her because Mehri couldn’t write and Marsi wanted her to be able to write back to her love.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 4, 2013 12:49 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
4 February 2013

Question: Besides their possessions, what else have refugee families lost?
Answer: Some of them have lost their family members and pride because of what the police have done to them.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 4, 2013 12:51 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
4 February 2013

Question: What injustices do the parents see in the education system?
Answer: The teachers start telling the children the opposite of what they were saying before. The universities start closing because the government thinks that the people don’t need them anymore.


Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 4, 2013 12:55 PM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 – Graphic Novel
1 February 2013

Question: Who is Zarathustra, and what are his three rules for living?

Answer: Zarathustra was the first prophet of Iran before the Arab invasion. His three rules for living are: Behave well, speak well, and act well.

Question: Why did Marji's parents react to her statement about the Shah (hint: her family history)?

Answer: Marji's parents reacted in the way they did because she was regurgitating what she had been told in school, which was not a true version of events. The true version includes the fact that her great grandfather was the prince that was overthrown in favor of the Shah.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at February 4, 2013 01:56 PM

What injustices do the parents see in the educational system? Which restriction is particularly ironic?
In chapter thirteen “The Key,” we see Marji’s family reacting against the educational system in Iran. After the nation has been attacked by neighboring Iraq, the people are seemingly at a standstill. With most striving there attention to the war effort, many are finding that the benefits of staying home can be costly, even deadly. With frequent bombings and false news reports, the parents of Marji do not know what to believe. In earlier chapters there is a great disillusion between Marji’s parents and the newly enforced government of Iran. The new fundamentalist regime has instilled an older more crude value system that is at odds with modern day advances in beliefs and technology. The parents of Marji are angry at the injustices the school system creates. They are angry at the fact that the female children are forced to adorn customs that have sense gone extinct in modern culture. Examples of this, is that girls have to wear a hooded veil, they must learn “fundamentalist” teachings, and there education is focused on the war effort. Not education. A particular situation I found that was ironic, was the fact that boys are taught to die for their country and that they will receive a reward of paradise. Paradise includes wealth, food and women. The ironic part is most of the boys they are teaching are under fourteen, which means they haven’t even hit puberty yet.
What did the survival of the regime depend upon? What was the human cost of this survival?
In chapter fifteen “The Cigarette,” there is a significant amount of conflict and rebellion that seems to never find a resolution. The regime is still at war with Iraq and although they are losing the regime still hasn’t surrendered. It is revealed later that Iraq and Saudi Arabia have both proposed peace, and Iraq has denied it. It is becoming increasingly obvious now that the regime supports the war because it is making the ideology of the fundamentalists survive. The regime supported the mass murder of its civilians while simultaneously unearthing people who opposed there rule. The war allowed the regime to thrive because it focused the people onto something other than the totalitarian state they were living in. The war was a distraction to the real trouble that was brewing within the government. The perpetual state of war kept a stranglehold on the people and the ideals of democracy.

Posted by: Joseph Schwartz at February 4, 2013 02:19 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
5 February, 2013

Question: How does Marji’s mother attempt to protect her daughter? How does Marji discover
the truth? What does the last frame on page 142 reflect?

Answer: Marji's mother tries to change the subject to their taped windows and "When we walked past the Baba-Levy's house, which was completely destroyed, I could feel that she was discreetly pulling me away (pg. 142)." Marji discovers Neda's turquoise bracelet attached to what is left of her corpse. The last panel represents final death of Marji's innocence of the Iraqi-Iranian conflict. Past this panel, she no longer talks about how Iran should remember its proud history of repelling invaders.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 5, 2013 05:47 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
5 February, 2013

Question: What is her grandmother’s advice to her?

Answer: "Because there is nothing worse than bitterness and vengeance... Always keep your dignity and be true to yourself (pg. 150)." Marji's grandmother knows that Marji will have to go through trials and tribulations in Vienna by herself, so Marji needs to rememeber to be true to herself in order to survive.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 5, 2013 07:42 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
5 February 2013

Question: What problem do Marji’s parents face on their return from Istanbul? How does her mom show her ingenuity?
Answer: They have posters with them that aren’t allowed across the border. If they are caught with them then they can be arrested or executed. Marji’s mom figures out that she can sew the posters into her husband’s coat.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 5, 2013 10:28 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
5 February 2013

Question: How did Marji’s life change after Neda’s death? How did she behave in school?
Answer: After Neda died, Marji started rebelling in school and talking back to teachers. She went to another school and challenged the teacher on what they were saying. Her life completely changed because her parents decided to send her to Vienna.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 5, 2013 10:34 PM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
06 February 2013
Questions for sections 15-19
Question 15: People in need of hospital care face a dilemma: describe this problem.
Many of the managers of the medical infrastructure are untrained, and the caregivers available are short on vital medical resources. This forces critically ill patients, such as Uncle Taher, to attempt to leave the country to obtain medical assistance, but the process for obtaining a visa to leave the country is lengthy, and Taher dies before even an illegal forgery can be completed. Preventable deaths are occurring as a result of bureaucracy and incompetence.
Question 35: What happened to Niloufar? Why? How do you know? What is Marji’s reaction?
In an earlier chapter, it was revealed that Niloufar had been executed. However, in the chapter titled "The Dowry," it is revealed that Niloufar was forced to marry a guard, raped, and then executed because, as Marji's mom says, "it's against the law to kill a virgin" (145). Proof of this is supplied in that Niloufar's parents were paid 500 Tumans after Niloufar's death (note that is about five U.S. dollars). At first, Marji refuses to believe her parents about the rape, but after hearing about the dowry payment, she realizes that her parents were telling the truth. Marji is shocked by the revelation, and comes to the conclusion that the martyrdom espoused by her society was not a positive thing when innocent girls were being raped and executed.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 6, 2013 01:36 PM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 – Graphic Novel
4 February 2013

Question: Does Marji's father intend to fight against the Iraqis? Why?

Answer: Marji's father does not intend to fight against the Iraqi's because he feels the real damage has come from his own government.

Question What is one of the ramifications of the nation's political conflict?

Answer: A shortage of supplies that families need in order to be properly fed and taken care of.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at February 6, 2013 01:38 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
7 February, 2013

Question: How did the revolution exert power and influence over so many people,
including many educated and middle class people like Satrapi’s parents? Why
did so many people leave after the revolution? Why do you think Marji’s parents
send her off to Austria while they stay in Tehran? Why don’t they leave/escape
as well?

Answer: Overtime, the political party in power would develops different restrictions that slowly made people conform. People left the country to avoid being forced into a conformist mold and a possible genocide of their sons as soldiers or aerial bombing. Marji's parents want her to have a chance at a free life that she might not have in Tehran. They stay because they can handle living under the Iranian government and they may not be able to leave.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 7, 2013 05:57 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
7 February, 2013

Question: What kinds of captivity and freedom does the author explore in Persepolis?
What stifles or prevents people from being completely free? How do they
circumvent and defy the rules imposed on them and attempt to live ordinary
lives despite revolution and war? Give some examples of their small acts of
rebellion.

Answer: The government required people to accept the Theocracy and employ the help of secret police ("guardians of the revolution" (pg. 132)). The people defy their government by having parties, drinking alcohol, and buying pop culture items off the black market.
"In spite of all the dangers, the parties went on... We had everything. Well, everything that was forbidden. Even alcohol, gallons of it (pg. 106)."
"...The growth of the black market. However, finding tapes was a little more complicated. On Gandhi Avenue you could find them sometimes pg. 132)."

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 7, 2013 08:01 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
7 February 2013

Question: Give some examples of how citizens enjoyed life despite oppressive regime. What made you laugh? How does Stratopi add comic relief? How are these relevant to stories as a whole?
Answer: The main thing that citizens did during that time was still throw parties with their friends and family. They also snuck things over the border that weren’t allowed. I thought it was funny how the kids reenacted what was going on with the war when they went to school. This is the comic relief in the story. It is almost showing that what the country is doing is childish. It is relevant to the story because it shows how what was happening to families and schools at the time were affecting kids.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 7, 2013 09:28 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
7 February 2013

Question: What is the role of women in the story? Compare and contrast various women, Marji, mom, grandma, school teacher, maid, neighbor, guardian of revolution.
Answer: Marji’s mother and school teacher have similar qualities. When the education system changes and the teacher has to start teaching exactly opposite of what she was preaching the day before, Marji thinks that she is being a hypocrite. The same can be said for when Marji is out with her mother and the see two people fighting over food. Her mother starts saying that if they only took what they needed then everyone would be happy. However, right after that statement she decides to go buy more rice after she had bought two bags. The Guardians of the Revolution are more strict and want to hold Marji back. This is similar to Marji’s mother when she is a teenager. Her grandmother seems to be the only one who is most similar to her because she wants her to just be happy to be Iranian.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 7, 2013 09:51 PM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
08 February 2013
Persepolis Questions 10 and 23
Question 10: What does Satrapi say regarding disparity between the classes before and after the Iranian Revolution? Discuss some examples that Marji witnesses and contemplates.
Early on in Satrapi's Persepolis, in the chapter titled "The Letter," Satrapi comments on the division of the social classes in Iran, mentioning that she felt "ashamed to sit in [her] father's Cadillac" (33). The shame Satrapi feels is largely attributable to just how deprived the lower classes were during the Shah's reign of Iran. After the revolution, however, the balance of power between classes shifts considerably. At one point, it is revealed that vital tasks related to health care are being left to an uneducated former window washer, creating fatal delays in the health care system. Under the new regime, the previously privileged classes, with their money and education, are now at the mercy of those who were once members of the lower class. Oddly enough, although most members of Marji's family are middle class or upper class, there are communists in her family, such as her uncle Anoosh.

Question 23: In the book Persepolis, Satrapi explores the different kinds of captivities and freedoms people face in their lives. What stifles or prevents people from being completely free? How do they circumvent and defy the rules imposed on them? How do people attempt to live ordinary lives despite revolution and war? Give examples of specific acts of rebellion from the book, from the world, or from your life.
Throughout Persepolis, there are many factors that prevent different characters from being completely free. One consistent restrictor of freedoms in the book is the government, whether said government is being run by the Shah or by the fundamentalist regime. Under the Shah, citizens were forbidden to engage in protests against the government, but they protested anyway, despite the harsh, violent government responses to the protests. Under the fundamentalist regime, the citizens were forbidden a great many things considered inappropriate in the fundamentalist interpretation of the Qur'an. Women in the new regime were forced to wear veils to cover their heads and protect men from the refracted light that drove them to intense sexual desire. The government organized groups to monitor citizens in public and accost those who would flaunt the dress code. Marji runs afoul of one such patrol on pages 132-4, and it is revealed that the group had the authority to hold Marji "for hours or for days. [She] could be whipped" and Marji says that "they didn't have to inform my parents" (134). Despite the severe restrictions of the new regime, individuals do resist some of the rules, some by skipping class, some by protesting (which ends violently, see page 76), and some people secretly flaunt the rules, buying the goods they want illegally on the street, such as when Marji buys the Kim Wilde tape on page 132. Under the fundamentalist regime, simple actions such as purchasing music have become illicit acts of subversion and rebellion.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 8, 2013 02:19 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
8 February, 2013

Vocabulary word-Juxtaposition: To place one thing right next to another, as in comparing two subjects in a paper or putting two rocks next to each other for a visual contrast.

Question: According to Basu, what two subjects does Satrapi carefully juxtapose in
her memoir?

Answer: Satrapi juxtaposes her story and personal experiences in life with different events from contemporary Iranian history. She does this to show us the history of her country and help us understand what is going on in the story.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 8, 2013 10:51 PM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
11 February 2013
Definition and Question #2
Apotheosis—according to the dictionary, apotheosis has two meanings:
1. An elevation of a person to the rank of God
2. An ideal example or epitome of a concept or object
In other words, a person can undergo apotheosis as an action, a verb, to become God, or it could mean that the person could exist in a state of absolute perfection of an ideal or trait, for example, being the apotheosis of skill in a particular sport.

Question 2: What, according to Basu, is “the overwhelming perception of Iranian women” and how does Satrapi “creatively counter” it? (1) Explain how this worked/works.
In the article "Crossing Cultures/ Crossing Genres: The Re-invention of the Graphic Memoir in Persepolis and Persepolis 2" by Lopamudra Basu, Basu makes the argument that Satrapi was countering the "overwhelming perception of Iranian women as oppressed subjects of Islamic religious orthodoxy" (1). One way in which Satrapi counters the popular image of Iranian women is to display some of the restrictions placed upon both genders, showing that women were not the only ones being oppressed by the new fundamentalist regime. Also, as Basu notes, "Even when the veil becomes an inescapable requirement of public dress, there are a myriad ways in which women defy the authority of the regime" (Basu 16-7). In other words, although the regime has placed restrictions on the women in the society, those women still find ways to subvert and resist the oppression of the fundamentalist authority.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 11, 2013 01:45 PM

Question 9: How, exactly, does Persepolis distinguish “itself from traditional [western]
autobiography”? (5) What is Basu’s understanding of the western
autobiographical style and how is it different from Satrapi’s?

In Marjane Satrapi’s “Persepolis” there is a different interpretation of the traditional western hero. The traditional western hero follows a template that is defined by genre. Bsau in his article "Crossing/Crossing Genre: The Re-invention of the Graphic Memoir in Persepolis and Persepolis 2” describes the traditional western hero as a male-dominated genre with an exclusive formula. The genre is structured in the third person and follows a growth through hardship. Satrapi is defying the bildungsroman by establishing female growth as the main subject matter. Marji is the voice within the story that captures this literary rebellion through the historical setting of Iran. Marji’s growth coincides with her countries; both show the rebellion against patriarchal dominance of not only fiction but history. Persepolis can be viewed as a modern retelling of the legendary Persian queen Scheherazade in the One Thousand and One Knights. Like the legendary queen, Satrapi is criticizing the patriarchal dominance of society by using the method of storytelling. Bsau differs from Satrapi’s interpretation because of the graphic novel form. Bsau argues that the visual subjectivity of the novel and use of the “third person” enables it be a partial (hybrid) interpretation of the traditional western hero.

Posted by: Joseph at February 11, 2013 02:41 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
12 February, 2013

Vocabulary word: Dialectic-A logical discusion or argument, presents two sides of a situation in stead of trying to come up with a solution.

Question: Explain how, according to Davis, “gaps in the narration of comics” are a “constitutive aspect of the renewed process of seeing.” How
do these gaps left by the writer work for the reader?

Answer: The reader understands that each story can stand alone or be connected with other stories in the author's recollection. For example, one story of Satrapi's childhood could be followed by a story that occured one year later. Also, she may intersplice a history lesson or a flashback in the story to help explain what is going to happen next.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 12, 2013 12:31 AM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
11 February 2013

Question: According to Davis’s abstract (page 264) what two theories does he employ in the analysis that follows it and what are the two major parts of his thesis. After reading the entire article, explain how Davis was or wasn’t successful in supporting these two claims.
Answer: Davis wants to analyze Stratopi’s use of comics and how they worked with her memoir. He also wants to argue that her memoir can be told through the genre and that a ‘book’ isn’t needed to tell the story.

Inflection: The change in the emphasis of a word to show a different mood or tense in the sentence.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 12, 2013 10:40 PM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 – Graphic Novel
6 February 2013

Question: In what ways has Marji become an adult?

Real Answer: She is finding more mature ways to cope with her problems. For example, she smokes cigarettes as a way of taking out her frustration with her mothers. This is better compared to what she used to do when she was younger, where she would go after kids who had parents involved with the conflict.

Question: What happened to Iran's economy during the war? Is this unusual?

Answer: The value of the Iranian currency lost all of its value. There are often economic implications of war. Most notably, domestic spending by the government is diverted toward military ends in order to win the conflict.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at February 13, 2013 01:36 PM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
13 February 2013
Definition and Answer for Davis Article
Panoply— the dictionary has two basic definitions of this term: A full array or display of some type of item, and a protective covering or suit. For example, a panoply of games would likely involve a display of numerous categories and types of board games, video games, and party games.
Question 7: Page 265. What is challenged by “transcultural autobiographies,” according to Davis, “as they gesture towards new perceptions of cultural texts and choices”? After identifying the answer, explain why this seems to be either a valid or invalid assumption.
According to Davis, "transcultural autobiographies challenge the generic scripts prescribed by Euro-American autobiography" (265). But, to understand the assertion Davis is attempting to make, one should first decipher what Davis means when he uses the term transcultural. Does he mean that term as it is defined in the dictionary, meaning a work that extends "across cultures or involving more than one culture" (Encarta)? As it turns out, he is using a definition of transcultural given to him by another person, his professor, who he credits in his notes on page 277. Unfortunately, Davis never directly states what his professor said the meaning of transcultural was, so the reader must infer the meaning of the term based on how it is used in the essay.
Also, Davis only ever read the first book of Persepolis in the writing of his essay, and the narrator is in Iran for the entire duration of that book, so she never directly interacts with other cultures in the portions of the book that Davis researched. As a result, while certain themes of the book can be interpreted as transcultural, such as a rebellion against the established authority, the first book of Persepolis might address the presence of other cultures but it does not truly involve the other culture; it merely highlights the use of another culture's products as a means of escaping from or resisting the oppressive influence of the author's own Iranian government and the culture of fear it was creating.
Ultimately, Davis fails to sort out his own definition of transcultural autobiographies enough to allow this question to be answered in a satisfactory manner. In effect, this renders Davis' assumptions invalid because the reader would have too much difficulty in interpreting the meanings of Davis' terms as Davis applies them.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 13, 2013 01:49 PM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 - Graphic Novel
8 February 2013

Question: One of the ways Satrapi seeks meaning in her life is through education. What links would you say are there between education and people's lives? You can start with yourself as an example before generalizing about others that you know.

Answer: I believe education plays an intrinsic role in how people choose to live their lives. The more knowledge that a person acquires either through formal education or life experience is often applied to the choices that they will make in the future. And these actions or decisions can have repercussions that affect others. For example, knowledge that I have gained as a part of my formal education has directly affect economic and political decisions I have made. For example, I have learned a lot over the years about economic and polictical theories, and I have voted in elections based on the knowledge I have have gained. I believe that this is the case for many people.

Question: Do you think this book attempts to change or shape public attitudes? On what do you base your opinion?

Answer: I do not think that this book attempts to change or shape public attitudes. I think that Satrapi is simply portraying her life experiences and she remembers it. Any political ramifications are simply accidental and perceived by the reader. But, I do not believe it was her intention to sway public opinion.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at February 13, 2013 01:50 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
14 February, 2013

Question: On pg. 354, Malek says that Persepolis is a "blend the genres of memoir and graphic novel." Then she gives more words that are used in place of the term graphic novel. Why does she find it important to include these terms?

Answer: Malek may have wanted to make her point clear about Persepolis being a graphic novel. Any one of these terms may also be more familiar to some of her intended audience. Malek might have been trying to subtly point out that the graphic novel is an important genre that is not just a passing fad like beehive hairstyles.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 14, 2013 02:32 AM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
14 February 2013
Discussion Question for the Malek Article
Question: How, as Malek states, may Naficy say that a foreign cultural product considered an "exilic 'threat'" (356) be defused by popular culture?
According to Malek, Naficy states that: "By appropriating 'exilic world views and artifacts,' the dominant culture neutralizes the specificity of their content and thus mutes as mere difference or style any exilic opposition…[they] then become part of the larger 'ethnic diversity' trend" (356). In other words, a larger, mainstream culture such as what exists in the U.S. would appropriate the elements of a smaller culture-in-exile, such as the Iranian writers, and subsume them as a part of the mainstream. By forcing an identification as mainstream, the exilic content of the work loses strength as a countermeasure to the mainstream even as it finds acceptance by the larger society. In essence, the rebellious counter-cultural element of the exilic work is defused by absorption into mainstream culture.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 14, 2013 03:32 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
14 February 2013

Question: How do exiles play a role in keeping cultures intact?
Answer: When they go to different cultures, they will adapt their new culture and blend in to them and the old culture will be rid of them because they didn’t want to conform to their ways. This is where hybridity comes in. The exiled ones keep some of their old culture and also adapt to their new culture.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 14, 2013 10:27 PM

Kevin Michael Schuster
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 – ST: Graphic Novel
15.2.2013
Malek – Pages 269-70
Question: How does Malek feel that Persepolis and Persepolis 2 are able to cross cultural boundaries and instill a sense of personal connection within all of the readers of the text?

Answer: It is Malek’s opinion that the story of exile – and Satrapi’s attempts to fit in while in Austria as well as her various identity crises – and return – and the struggles that Satrapi endures trying to reintegrate herself to her native culture – and the final exile resonate throughout readers from any culture.

Posted by: Kevin Michael Schuster at February 14, 2013 10:56 PM

Travis N. Rathbone
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 300
15 February 2013

Discussion Question for the Malek Article

Q: Near the end of the essay “Memoir as Iranian Exile Cultural Production: A Case Study of Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis Series,” Amy Malek states the following: “One of the major successes of Persepolis . . . is that it ‘teaches by stealth’” (378). Interpret the meaning of this claim.

A: Persepolis is engrossing in such a way that even if a reader is unfamiliar with the historical or social aspects of Iranian culture prior to reading the graphic narrative, he will come away from the experience with a “wealth of information” at the completion of the tale (378).

Posted by: Travis N. Rathbone at February 15, 2013 12:14 PM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
Eng 300
15 February 2013

Malek Article Pg. 355-56

Question:
According to Naficy, “the exilic state is based on the condition of inbetweenness” (Malek 355). What does this state of inbetweenness entail? How does the exile gain a unique perspective?

Answer:
The exile is in a unique position between two worlds, which allows him/her to question previous authorities, identities and cultural practices. Exiles can create a new expression and culture. Deterritorialization helps them to create this new understanding of the world, one that is more distinctly individual and not as influenced by their homeland. They are actually granted the opportunity to replace their codes and values and increase cultural diversity.

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 15, 2013 01:17 PM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
17 February 2013
Question and Answer for Segall Article
Question: According to Kimberly Segall, how does Persepolis I become "an integrated, repeated act of symbolizing the lost innocence of children" (40).
In her article "Melancholy Ties: Intergenerational Loss and Exile in Persepolis," Kimberly Segall notes a repetition of tragic events, saying that "the story of Uncle Anoosh and Marjane in the jail cell parallels another father and (surrogate) daughter story… Later, her mother realizes that her father has been destroyed by the state" (40). Both Marjane and her mother have suffered a loss of innocence as a result of loved ones being persecuted by the authorities. This repetition of tragedy is what makes Persepolis I "an integrated, repeated act of symbolizing the lost innocence of children" (40).

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 17, 2013 11:21 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
16 February, 2013

Question: On page 39, Segall say that “portraits of grief refuse the idea of the rational, controlled narrator.” After reading the book from beginning to end, does the adult Satrapi (telling the whole story) seem like a rational, controlled narrator?

Answer: Satrapi is a rational, controlled narrator because she is telling the story with years of retrospective that allow her to make a clear point in a way that she could not have done as a child or in the heat of the moment. Without the portraits of grief, the story would be less personal and harder to relate to.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 17, 2013 06:29 PM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 - Graphic Novel
13 February 2013

Question: In addition to the chief narrator of Persepolis (Satrapi herself), who are the other key storytellers? There are several. Explain what these different storytellers represent according to Basu and Walter Benjamin.

Answer: According to Basu, two of the other very important storytellers in Persepolis are Marji's grandmother and Uncle Anoosh. Both of these characters educate Marji on the history of Iranian politics. For Basu and Walter Benjamin, these different storytellers create a type of chain in which traditional knowledge is passed down from one generation to another. And, according to Benjamin, this chain comes to a conclusion where all the stories form in the end.

Question: Define imbue.

Answer: To inspire with opinion.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at February 17, 2013 11:09 PM

Kevin Michael Schuster
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 – ST: Graphic Novel
18.2.2013
Segall - p. 9
Question: Segall suggests that Marjane lost her sense of identity during her time in Austria. How does Segall suggest this happened and when does Segall believe that Marjane rediscovered this sense of identity?

Answer: Segall suggests that Marjane lost her sense of identity during exile through her association with various groups of people that misidentified themselves. She feels that misidentification caused Marjane to lose track of who she was. That sense of identity was regained after she returned to Iran and her grandmother chastised her for falsely accusing a man of harassment simply to avoid getting into trouble for her own attire.

Posted by: Kevin Michael Schuster at February 18, 2013 10:36 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
19 February, 2013

Question: Figures 1 and 2 on pages 229 and 230 each display something from both volumes of Persepolis. What is the object and how does this plant grow in importance from Persepolis to Persepolis II.

Answer: The tulip, it grows from an abundant flower that blooms in Iran during the spring to a plant sown and reaped from a martyr's blood.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 19, 2013 12:05 AM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
19 February 2013
Question and Answer for "Estranging the Familiar" Article
Question: According to the authors of "Estranging the Familiar: 'East' and 'West' in Satrapi's Persepolis," how does the West provide Marjane "a way out of her predicament" (238) when she is confronted by the guardians of the revolution?
In relation to the specific instance referenced by the authors, it is Marjane's "familiarity with western cultural figures [that] provides her with a way out of her predicament" (238). Marji makes the claim that her button is an image of Malcolm X, not of Michael Jackson, and as the narrator, she notes that Jackson was still black at that time. Here, Satrapi has demonstrated her awareness of not just pop music icons, but also cultural leaders of the West. The authors of the "Estranging the Familiar" article have picked up on Satrapi's worldly knowledge demonstrated within that scene and identified it as a key element in her attempt to evade punishment for her transgression of wearing a pop culture pin.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 19, 2013 05:09 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
21 February, 2013

Question: On page 98, what aspect of Persian culture is referenced in Satrapi's technique? What scenes are they usually depicting?

Answer: Satrapi references ancient Persian miniatures, murals, and friezes. She usually saves this style to depict the public protests and executed corpses.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 21, 2013 08:32 PM

Kevin Michael Schuster
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 ST: Graphic Novel
22.2.2013
Chute: p. 106-107

Question: Chute discusses the critical acclaim that the film version of "Persepolis" received as well as the recognition it earned at the Cannes Film Festival. What kind of reaction did the film receive from the Iranian government?

Answer: The film received a negative reaction from the Iranian government because they felt that it was "anti-Iranian" and attempting to "sabotage Iranian culture."

Posted by: Kevin Michael Schuster at February 22, 2013 11:36 AM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
22 February 2013
Question and Answer for Chute Article
Question: According to Hillary Chute, how does Satrapi "directly [engage] her readers" (96) and what effect does that have?
As Chute says in her article:
Here Satrapi uses spacing within the pictorial frame as the disruption of her own characterological presence. We do in fact, clearly, "see" her-just not all of her-but her self-presentation as fragmented, cut, disembodied, and divided between frames indicates the psychological condition suggested by the chapter's title, "The Veil." An icon of a single eye, directly engaging the reader, dangles over the book's very first gutter, reminding readers at the outset that we are aligned with Satrapi's penetrating vision and enabling retracing of that vision. (96).
In short, the caricature on the first panel directly confronts the reader with her gaze, which draws in the reader and makes the reader not only a witness to the narrative, but a participant.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 22, 2013 12:10 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
21 February 22, 2013
Question: At the end of The Cigarette, Marji thinks she is an adult. Why do you think at the last page it shows her passing prisoners about to be executed?

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 22, 2013 01:11 PM

Joseph Schwartz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300
2/22/13

Pages 94-95
Questions for the article The Texture of Retracing in Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis
What does Hillary Chute mean when she states “And while its content is keenly feminist, I will argue that we may understand the text as modeling a feminist methodology in its form?” And how does this coincide with her thesis?
What is the psychological condition suggested by the chapter’s title “The Veil?” And how does that relate the actual “framing” of the narrative?

Posted by: Joseph Schwartz at February 22, 2013 02:20 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
8 February, 2013

Vocabulary word-Juxtaposition: To place one thing right next to another, as in comparing two subjects in a paper or putting two rocks next to each other for a visual contrast.

Question: According to Lopamudra Basu in “Crossing Cultures/Crossing Genres-The Re-invention of the Graphic Memoir in Persepolis,” what two subjects does Satrapi carefully juxtapose in her memoir?

Answer: Satrapi juxtaposes her story and personal experiences in life with different events from contemporary Iranian history. She does this to show us the history of her country and help us understand what is going on in the story.

Basu, Lopamudra - "Crossing Cultures/Crossing Genres- The Re-invention of the Graphic Memoir in _Persepolis

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 22, 2013 09:01 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
12 February, 2013

Vocabulary word: Dialectic-A logical discussion or argument, presents two sides of a situation instead of trying to come up with a solution.

Question: In “A Graphic Self: Comics as Autobiography in Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis,” Rocio G. Davis says that “gaps in the narration of comics” are a “constitutive aspect of the renewed process of seeing.” How do these gaps left by the writer work for the reader?

Answer: The reader understands that each story can stand alone or be connected with other stories in the author's recollection. For example, one story of Satrapi's childhood could be followed by a story that occurred one year later. Also, she may intersplice a history lesson or a flashback in the story to help explain what is going to happen next.

Davis, Rocio G. - "A Graphic Self: Comics as Autobiography in Marjane Satrapi’s _Persepolis_"

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 22, 2013 09:11 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
14 February, 2013

Question: On pg. 354 of “Memoir as Iranian Exile Cultural Production: A Case Study of Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis,” Amy Malek says that Persepolis is a "blend the genres of memoir and graphic novel." Then she gives more words that are used in place of the term graphic novel. Why does she find it important to include these terms?

Answer: Malek may have wanted to make her point clear about Persepolis being a graphic novel. Any one of these terms may also be more familiar to some of her intended audience. Malek might have been trying to subtly point out that the graphic novel is an important genre that is not just a passing fad like beehive hairstyles.

Malek, Amy - "Memoir as Iranian Exile Cultural Production: A Case Study of Marjane Satrapi’s _Persepolis"

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 22, 2013 09:20 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
16 February, 2013

Question: On page 39 of “Melancholy Ties-Intergenerational Loss and Exile in Persepolis,” Kimberly Wedeven Segall say that “portraits of grief refuse the idea of the rational, controlled narrator.” After reading the book from beginning to end, does the adult Satrapi (telling the whole story) seem like a rational, controlled narrator?

Answer: Satrapi is a rational, controlled narrator because she is telling the story with years of retrospective that allow her to make a clear point in a way that she could not have done as a child or in the heat of the moment. Without the portraits of grief, the story would be less personal and harder to relate to.

Segall, Kimberly Wedeven - "Melancholy Ties- Intergenerational Loss and Exile in _Persepolis_"

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 22, 2013 09:40 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
19 February, 2013

Question: In “Estranging the Familiar-‘East’ and ‘West’ in Satrapi’s Persepolis” by Nima Naghibi and Andrew O’ Malley, figures 1 and 2 on pages 229 and 230 each display something from both volumes of Persepolis. What is the object and how does this plant grow in importance from Persepolis to Persepolis II.

Answer: The tulip, it grows from an abundant flower that blooms in Iran during the spring to a plant sown and reaped from a martyr's blood.

Naghibi, Nima and Andrew O'Malley - "Estranging the Familiar- 'East' and 'West' in Satrapi’s _Persepolis

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 22, 2013 09:54 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
21 February, 2013

Question: On page 98 of “The Texture of Retracing in Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis” by Hillary Chute, what aspect of Persian culture is referenced in Satrapi's technique? What scenes are they usually depicting?

Answer: Satrapi references ancient Persian miniatures, murals, and friezes. She usually saves this style to depict the public protests and executed corpses.

Chute, Hillary - "The Texture of Retracing in Marjane Satrapi's _Persepolis_"

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 22, 2013 10:03 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 CA01 ST: Graphic Novel
22 February, 2013

Question: In "Autographics: The Seeing 'I' of the of the Comics" by Gillian Whitlock, on page 971 he informs the reader about Satrapi's occupation. What is the quote and how does it hint at the creation of Persepolis?

Answer: She "works with the French collective L'Association in Paris, that specializes in the French tradition of the bandes dessinées comics for adults (971)." Since she works in a company that makes adult comics, having her story told as a graphic novel would have been easy for her to do and she could shown the reader exactly what she is talking about without censor.

Whitlock, Gillian - "Autographics: The Seeing 'I' of the Comics"

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 22, 2013 11:35 PM

Kathleen Weldon
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 300: Graphic Novel
41 February 22, 2013
Question: In ‘Autographics: The Seeing “I” of the Comics, Whitlock says on page 972, “The intensity of this loss of the self and its place in the world engenders a resurrection through memoir as a Western metropolitan intellectual and a diasporic subject with a troubled and ambivalent relation to a lost homeland and to contemporary Iranian culture and Society.” Explain how Stratopi does this.
Answer: Stratopi keeps herself separate from Iran not only when she is sent abroad but when she lives there as well. She doesn’t want to wear the veil and she always buys music that would get her arrested. When she does go to a different country she makes friends who she doesn’t always feel connected to and she is homeless at one point.

Posted by: Kathleen Weldon at February 24, 2013 11:20 PM

Kevin Michael Schuster
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 – ST: Graphic Novel
15.2.2013
Malek – Pages 269-70
Question: How does Malek feel that Persepolis and Persepolis 2 are able to cross cultural boundaries and instill a sense of personal connection within all of the readers of the text (370)?

Answer: It is Malek’s opinion that the story of exile – and Satrapi’s attempts to fit in while in Austria as well as her various identity crises – and return – and the struggles that Satrapi endures trying to reintegrate herself to her native culture – and the final exile resonate throughout readers from any culture.

Posted by: Kevin Michael Schuster at February 25, 2013 10:28 AM

Kevin Michael Schuster
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 – ST: Graphic Novel
18.2.2013
Segall - p. 9
Question: On page 46 Segall suggests that Marjane lost her sense of identity during her time in Austria. How does Segall suggest this happened and when does Segall believe that Marjane rediscovered this sense of identity?

Answer: Segall suggests that Marjane lost her sense of identity during exile through her association with various groups of people that misidentified themselves. She feels that misidentification caused Marjane to lose track of who she was. That sense of identity was regained after she returned to Iran and her grandmother chastised her for falsely accusing a man of harassment simply to avoid getting into trouble for her own attire.

Posted by: Kevin Michael Schuster at February 25, 2013 10:30 AM

Kevin Michael Schuster
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 ST: Graphic Novel
22.2.2013
Chute: p. 106-107

Question: Chute discusses, on page 106, the critical acclaim that the film version of "Persepolis" received as well as the recognition it earned at the Cannes Film Festival. What kind of reaction did the film receive from the Iranian government?

Answer: The film received a negative reaction from the Iranian government because they felt that it was "anti-Iranian" and attempting to "sabotage Iranian culture."

Posted by: Kevin Michael Schuster at February 25, 2013 10:30 AM

Kevin Michael Schuster
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 ST: Graphic Novel
25.2.2013
Whitlock: p. 975

Question: On page 975, what does Whitlock believe Satrapi is trying to do with the art style of Persepolis?

Answer: Whitlock believes that Satrapi is attempting to "subvert the tendency of the 'other ones' to dehumanize veiled women." The fact that she is doing so in a black-and-white graphic novel is interesting, but the subtle touches of personality in each individual, even when veiled, shine through in the little things they do to rebel against the system that forces them to wear the veil.

Posted by: Kevin Michael Schuster at February 25, 2013 10:37 AM

Sarah Coffin-Karlin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300
25 February 2013

Section 1, Question 2: What did the veil symbolize?

The veil--a significant part of Islamic culture--symbolized either a return to religious roots or a repression of freedom, depending on whether you supported or protested it. Marji's family, which is very modern, was highly against it; her mother even ended up in international newspapers.

Section 4, Question 1: According to Marji, how was a king chosen? What was her rationale?

Marji believed that a king was chosen by God; at age 10, she believed it because it was written in her schoolbook and because her teacher said so (19). When she attempts to explain this to her family, her father explains to her why her rationale is wrong, regaling her in the family history of opposition to the Shah's rule.

Posted by: Sarah Coffin-Karlin at February 25, 2013 11:03 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 – Graphic Novel
25 February 2013

Question: In “Autographics: The Seeing 'I' of Comics,” Gillian Whitlock refers to how Marianne Hirsch argues for the importance of visual images. What specifically does Hirsch argue and what does she mean? Give the example that Whitlock uses herself and explain how it relates to Hirsch's argument.

Answer: Hirsch argues that it is necessary to consider visuality and visual-verbal conjunctions in literature in today's environment. What this means is that it is necessary to understand the relationship between visual images and the transmission of memories of trauma and violence, especially in a time rampant with wars, like the Iraq War. Whitlock uses the images of the Abu Ghraib prison as support for this idea. The Abu Graib incident is an example of how a government tried to control images that it knew to be damning because they did not want citizens to have an understanding of the atrocities that were taking place as a result of the war. In other words, the government knew about the importance of relating images with ideas, as Hirsch affirms, and therefore tried to avoid having the pictures released.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at February 25, 2013 11:20 AM

Pgs. 353-54
What is the thesis of Amy Malek’s article “Memoir as Iranian Exile Cultural Production: A Case Study of Marjane Satrapi’s Peresoplis Series?” And how is it connected to her view of Iranian diaspora?
Amy Malek’s thesis revolves around the idea that the Iranian community has a lost a sense of identity. This is because of the lack of research conducted by both the Iran government and western outsiders, on what quantifies the true “diaspora” of Iran. Amy Malek’s uses a “qualitative approach” to scrutinize a country that has been placed in a cultural exile. Using Marjane Satarpi’s Persepolis as fictional source of this internal struggle, we as a scholar and reader, have a fictional memoir of a female Iranian who explores the themes of this struggle through the loss of cultural identity.

Posted by: Joseph Schwartz at February 25, 2013 11:21 AM

Pg. 40-41
In Kimberly Segall’s “Melancholy Ties: Intergenerational Loss and Exile in Persepolis,” there is an exploration of religion and its relationship to Persepolis. What is Marji’s relationship with god in the novel? And how are they connected to familial loss?
In the article, Segall explores the nature of religion and its impact on Marji and her cultural roots. As a young girl Marji (at-least in the beginning) has a very close relationship with God. She is consistently depicted in God’s arms safe from the retribution of her world. Her dreams are to become a prophet and fight for the revolution. Although God does listen, he eventually leaves causing a great deal of doubt in Marji’s life. This creates a “detachment of her closeness to God,” which also connects with the destruction of the revolutionary movement in Iran. As destruction and violence occur within her culture, the sense of alienation and loss is disseminated among the families. This sense of loss, and detachment, coincide with loss of religious beliefs in the Iranian family unit.

Posted by: Joseph Schwartz at February 25, 2013 11:21 AM

Pg. 225-226
In the article “Estranging the Familiar: “East” and “West” in Satrapi’s Persepolis,” what is the distinction between the literary and popular? According to the article, can the “comic-book” form be viewed as literary?
In the article there is an exploration of the literary canon, as it pertains to “high” and “low” brow society. With this discussion, there are other areas that concern the nature of Persepolis and its impact on the canon itself. Persepolis can be defined by several different genres: popular fiction, children’s autobiography, young-adult literature, and middle-eastern history. These different categories give Persepolis a unique view on what can be proposed as literary and popular. Because most literary texts are separated from popular fiction, Persepolis causes problems within the make-up of what our definition of literary. In the article the distinction between literary and popular is defined by western culture. In the western culture, the comic book has traditionally been labeled as a “popular” yet “unliterary” form. This has been contested (mainly by the Pulitzer Prize winning work-Maus by Art Spiegelman) and slowly this negative notion surrounding the comic book genre is being revaluated.

Posted by: Joseph Schwartz at February 25, 2013 11:22 AM

Pg. 94-95
Questions for the article The Texture of Retracing in Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis
What does Hillary Chute mean when she states “And while its content is keenly feminist, I will argue that we may understand the text as modeling a feminist methodology in its form?” And how does this coincide with her thesis?
In her thesis, Hilary Chute, demonstrates a clear knowledge of what the feminist ideology entails. She is aware that as a form, the comic-book is dominated by the male gender. She is also aware that feminists largely ignore the “graphic-novel” as an essential form in feminist literature. Although that field of thought is slowly growing, there is still quite a divide between male and female authors in the graphic novel genre. Persepolis is defined by Chute, as a novel that is clearly feminist, and can be understood more effectively by its modeling of feminist methodology in its form. Persepolis’ form as a comic-book depicts the author in a dimension that has never been quite understood. Persepolis is not just an autobiography it is a self-portrait that can be visually seen, something that feminist literature has never before tried to use as content for their methodology.

Posted by: Joseph Schwartz at February 25, 2013 11:22 AM

Pg. 966-67
What is the definition of the term “auto-graphics” in Gillian Whitlock’s “The Seeing “I” of Comics?” And how is its definition important in the use comic book imagery?
The thesis in Whitlock’s article asks many questions that still to this day occur when discussing comic books: How can we consume images as passive observers? And how can we govern the terms of visual representation? In the article, the answers to the questions rely on the interpretation of visual art and how it pertains to the autobiographical nature of its authorship. The definition of auto-graphics is as following: “By coining the term “auto-graphics” for graphic memoir I mean to draw attention to specific conjunctions of visual and verbal text in this genre of autobiography, and also to the subject positions of the narrators negotiate in and through comics----features of discursive frameworks” (Whitlock 966). This definition can be simplified, auto-graphics is a term used to define the authors intentions as a narrator while creating visual recreations of his history. The complexity of the terms derives from this “re-creation” of past history. The importance of such a concept is the changing dissertations of the perceived “self.” This shows us the shift between life stages, while also showing us the shift between the limits of how an autobiography can be written. Auto-graphics and is important in defining visual imagery, because it pushes the limits of visual interpretation. Because auto-graphics are specific in its recreation of events and narratives, the interpretation by the reader can be something different or wholly connective. The relationship between the reader and the author has now changed. Instead of “imagining” an author’s purpose or “recreating” an author’s purpose, as a reader, auto-graphics offers us a visual image of the author’s purpose. Even though it may be different from the author’s original conception, a reader gathers a greater connection to the author through this visual stimulation. Cultural and societal connections are felt because the reader now is now not only free to explore the author but his inquiry into the human condition. "…..seemed to say what couldn't otherwise be said, perhaps what wasn't permitted to be said or imagined, defying the ordinary processes of thought, which are policed, shaped and re-shaped by all sorts of pedagogical as well as ideological pressures. . . . I felt that comics freed me to think and imagine and see differently"(Whitlock 967).

Posted by: Joseph Schwartz at February 25, 2013 11:23 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 - Graphic Novel
25 February 2013

Question: In “Estranging the Familiar: 'East' and 'West' in Satrapi's Persepolis,” Nima Naghibi and Andrew O'Malley state that Satrapi's work has radical potential. What gives her work radical potential according to the authors?

Answer: What gives Persepolis radical potential is its inability to be seamlessly interpreted by Western readers. Naghibi and O'Malley write that Satrapi's text has ideas recognizable to Western readers, but those ideas then lead into a different meaning that are not embedded in the framework of the Western reader.

Question: What imagery do Naghibi and O'Malley use as an example to support their idea that Persepolis is filled with content both familiar and unfamiliar to the Western reader?

Answer: Naghibi and O'Malley refer to the image on the front cover of Persepolis that shows Marji in a context of Iranian culture through its use of the veil. This is contrasted with the image of her self-portrait on the back flap of the dust jacket that shows her as hip and very Western. This is an example of how Satrapi's work shows something the Western reader is unfamiliar with (Iranian culture) and something they are familiar with (Western attire).

Posted by: Diego Pestana at February 25, 2013 11:38 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 300 - Graphic Novel
25 February 2013

Question: In “Memoir as Iranian Exile Cultural Production: A Case Study of Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis Series,” Amy Malek cites Carolyn G. Heilbrun and the reason why she believes memoirs have been gaining popularity recently. What is it that Heilbrun states?

Answer: Heilbrun says that memoirs have been gaining popularity because it has a mandate to reveal circumstances in the author's life that support the claims the author makes about the world. She also states that oftentimes these writers are women.

Question: What does Malek attribute the popularity of Iranian memoirs to (Hint: page 362)?

Answer: Malek states that the post 9/11 atmosphere has ignited a feeling of curiosity toward Iran that was never satisfied when sparked in the 1980s. Malek states that Americans and others around the world wish to gain an insight into the country that has been labeled “evil” and Iranian exiles have sought to examine and illustrate their experiences of the country.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at February 25, 2013 11:48 AM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
ENG 300
30 January 2013
Question #4 & 2

4. How do the women respond to the veil?

Some women do not mind wearing the veil, but others are very offended by it. The school age girls make fun of the veil and play games with it. They do not understand the meaning behind it or why they should wear it.

2. How does Marji’s relationship with God begin to change?

Marji no longer sees herself as a possible prophet of God, and does not feel as much comfort and solace in her reflections of him.

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 25, 2013 11:51 AM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
ENG 300
4 February 2013
Question #1 & 8

1. How does the Shah attempt to appease the people? Why did he fail?

He attempts to please the people by appointing a prime minister. This does not appease them because it is “too little too late.” Also, he is still the one who is choosing the prime minister.

8. According to Marji, what makes a hero?
Marji believes a hero is someone who is willing to fight and die for a cause. She admires those who are tortured by the government for what they believe in, like her grandfather. Such extreme courage is heroic in her eyes.

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 25, 2013 11:51 AM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
ENG 300
6 February 2013
Question #6 & 14

6. Where had Siamak and Mohsen been for the last several years? Why?

They were in prison for participating in communist revolutionary acts. They endured horrific torture in the prisons by Iranians trained by CIA members.

14. What gift does Anoosh give to Marji? What might it symbolize?

Anoosh gives Marji a swan he made in prison. According to Celtic myth, swans symbolize the theme of unity. Anoosh feels unity toward Marji and entrusts her with carrying on their family memories.

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 25, 2013 11:52 AM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
ENG 300
8 February 2013
Question #16 & 20

Question #16 Satrapi realizes that freedom of thought and action accompanies adolescence and adulthood. Yet, as we know, with freedom comes real costs and responsibility. Contemplate the balance between freedom and responsibility in your world.

Everyone has a responsibility to use their freedom in a way to benefit their society. They should make sensible choices that are not going to cause harm to others. They also should be careful not to become an “innocent bystander.” Innocent bystander are not truly innocent; they bear the guilt of not intervening for what is right.

Question #20 What is the human cost of war and political repression?

Death is the highest and most obvious cost. Other costs include broken families, traumatized individuals, loss of faith in religion, government, and humanity in general, intolerance, and deprivation of childhood innocence. People are robbed of their freedoms and their identities. In Persepolis, Marji’s mother is attacked for wearing her veil and has to life about praying because of her intolerant government.

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 25, 2013 11:52 AM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
ENG 300
11 February 2013
Question #15

In Basu Lopamudra Basu’s article "Crossing Cultures/Crossing GenresThe Re-invention of the Graphic Memoir in Persepolis and Persepolis 2,” what does Basu mean when she says, “Marji and Reza begin their relationship with romanticized perceptions about each other”? Explain.

Romantic attachment can cause one to have misconceptions about the person that they attach themselves to. Often they will amplify the desirable qualities and ignore the distasteful ones. This is why Marji draws 2 panels representing herself. One is the way she really is, and the other is how Reza sees her. The contrast between these images presents her either as a feminine, submissive wife or as a masculine, rebellious woman. As Basu states, “This visual contrast reinforces the notion of the limitations of the romantic perspective and how any perception is ultimately partial” (16). Romantic attachment changes one’s perception. It’s not until the initial attraction wears off that they begin to see each other for who they truly are.

Facile means to have superficial knowledge, especially by ignoring the complexity of an issue. This can be applied to an argument or to a person. Facile can be used to describe something that is easily obtained or simplistic. It can also be applied to describe one who is working with ease and fluency.

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 25, 2013 11:53 AM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
ENG 300
13 February 2013
Question #10

“Comics,” claims “Will Eisner, in his germinal work, Graphic Storytelling and Visual,” are “at the center” of what twentieth-century (and onwards) phenomenon? What reason/s does he give for the paradigm shift in “the definition of ‘literacy’ ”? Explain.

He explains that graphic storytelling and visual are at the center of the phenomenon of the growth of technology. Visual literacy has increased extensively in popularity because of the images that are constantly shown with text which offer a more effective communicant. The combination of words and pictures allows for more “flexibility in the manipulation of meaning” (266). Significant ideological meaning is able to be expressed through visual literacy in the comic art form.

Ostensible means that something appears to be true but is not necessarily true. It can also mean that something is intended for display.

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 25, 2013 11:54 AM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
Eng 300
15 February 2013
Malek Article Pg. 355-56

Question: Amy Malek’s article "Memoir as Iranian Exile Cultural Production: A Case Study of Marjane Satrapi’s _Persepolis” describes “the exilic state [as] based on the condition of inbetweenness” (355). What does this state of inbetweenness entail? How does the exile gain a unique perspective?

Answer: The exile is in a unique position between two worlds, which allows him/her to question previous authorities, identities and cultural practices. Exiles can create a new expression and culture. Deterritorialization helps them to create this new understanding of the world, one that is more distinctly individual and not as influenced by their homeland. They are actually granted the opportunity to replace their codes and values and increase cultural diversity.

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 25, 2013 11:54 AM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
ENG 300
20 February 2013
Naghibi 225-226

Question: Naghibi and O’Malley in “Estranging the Familiar: “East” and “West” in Satrapi’s Persepolis” claim that the universality of the protagonist Marji’s experiences and the similarities that make “her” and “us” human…can be understood as liberal and humanist (225). Describe why this is true.

Answer: Satrapi Western-normalizes her text, so that Westerners are able to relate to her and her experiences, especially since she is part Western herself in a way. The radical difference between the East and the West is infused in the character of Marji.

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 25, 2013 11:59 AM

Nicole Natoli
Professor Hobbs
ENG 300
25 February 2013
Midterm Pg. 970

Question: In Gillian Whitlock’s "Autographics: The Seeing 'I' of the Comics," Whitlock poses the question, “Can [comic book authors] use the distinctive technologies of comics to engage with cultural difference and the legacies of trauma?” (970). I pose a similar question. Does Satrapi express the trauma and censorship of Iranian culture successfully through the medium of the graphic novel?

Answer: Whitlock points out that the graphic novel frees readers to think and imagine the cross-cultural relations between Iran and the West differently. For example, the figures of the cartoons express censorship more acutely through the veiled bodies of women than a text could. The visual depiction of women’s bodies that are covered and set in distinctive black and white shows how dehumanizing censorship can be. However, Satrapi depicts women in her cartoons who are against the stereotypical silent Muslim women. Satrapi’s female characters still retain their individual identities, even with the restrictive veils. The veils become part of their identities without defining them. This shows how she is able to help the West to understand the resistance of some Iranian women, so she is using the distinctive technologies of comics to engage with cultural differences successfully (976).

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 25, 2013 11:59 AM

Douglas Phillips
Burgsbee Hobbs
Graphic Novel
25 February 2013
Question and Answer for the Whitlock Article
Question: In Gillian Whitlock's article, "Autographics: the Seeing 'I' of Comics," why, according to the author, does the French government approve the inclusion of Persepolis into the literary curriculum and what effect does it have?
According to Whitlock:
Persepolis 1 was published in France in 2000, at a time when the country was struggling with the debate over veiled Muslim girls in public schools. In fact, the French Ministry of Education has approved the book for inclusion in the literary curriculum of private schools in France, where it is promoted as an educational tool to represent and foster a liberal viewpoint on Muslim cultural practices. (973)
In other words, the publication of Persepolis coincided with a major national controversy which were paralleled in the book. Beyond that, Satrapi's work provided a crucial method for reinterpreting the veil not only as a symbol of an alien culture, but as an object that helped to explain the experiences of members of the other culture. The inclusion of Persepolis as a text for French private schools allows them to mediate the otherness of the veiled Muslim girls in their schools and increase tolerance of them in the class environment.

------------------

Submitted after deadline:

Sarah Coffin-Karlin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 300
25 February 2013
Whitlock Article, page 969

Q: According to Whitlock, Iraqi blogger Salam Pax tried to read Persepolis twice before he finally got through it. Why does he change his mind about the book? How does Whitlock say that his change of heart is “important for thinking about the pleasures and pains of reading autographics” (969)?

A: Pax explains his change of heart by saying that he has seen the similarities between Iranians and Iraqis. He says he initially “winced” at the book (he does not explain why, but presumably because of its format), but after reading it in one fell swoop discovered its value and beauty. “I had the urge to start translating it and throwing copies of it in the streets of Baghdad,” he claims. He explains his change of opinion by saying that he discovered the similarities between Iraqis and Iranians, especially with what was happening in Iraq in 2003. “Why can’t we learn from other people’s mistakes?” he asks.

According to Whitlock, his change of heart is significant because it demonstrates the power of relating to autobiographies. We as the reader need to find closure within the comic itself; comics provide a unique format because the breaks are provided for us in the form of the gutters, or spaces in between panels. Space and time can fluctuate from panel to panel: we can be in one place, but in the next panel we’re somewhere else four years later. In this way, we are also exposed to different cultures and ideals because we need to move through them in sequence.

Posted by: douglas phillips at February 25, 2013 01:14 PM

Ashtan Richey
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
30 March 2015

"The Veil"
How do women respond to the veil?

"In 1979 a revolution took place. It was later called the 'Islamic Revolution.' Then came 1980: The year it became obligatory to wear the veil at school (Marjane Satrapi, The Complete Persepolis, Ch.1, Pg. 3)."

The Shah had previously modernized Iran, and some women were not used to wearing the veils. Marjane and her classmates especially are not used to being under the control of tradition in this way, since they were enrolled in a French non-religious school, at the time before all bilingual schools were closed down. The girls complain about the discomfort and react in a way that all children would in a sudden oppression, as they did not understand it. "We really didn't like to wear the veil, especially since we didn't understand why we had to (Satrapi, pg. 3)." Satrapi says that there was a mixture of people for, and against, the veils; her mother demonstrating against them.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at March 30, 2015 07:54 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet
1 April 2015

Question: According to the introduction, what stereotypical image is Satrapi trying to dispel?

Answer: By writing Persepolis, Satrapi is attempting to dispel the stereotypical image that the Iranian people have been subjected to; the image that all Iranians are either terrorists or some sort of religious extremists. Satrapi writes, “I believe that an entire nation should not be judged by the wrongdoings of a few extremists” (Satrapi 2). Satrapi is aware that every nation has a small sect that commit crimes against humanity, but she believes that no nation should be subjected to a negative stereotype because of the actions of a few. Instead, Satrapi is attempting to show that the majority of Iranian people are civilized and normal humans like much of the rest of the world.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 31, 2015 06:38 PM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
1 April 2015

Question 15 (The Water Cell): According to Marji, how was a king chosen? What was her rationale?

Answer: In a discussion with her father, Marji tells him that God chooses who will be king. She bases this on “My teacher and God himself” (19); she further explains that the first page of her text book says that the king is chosen by God. When her father tells her “that’s what they say” (19), he’s referring to the government and its control over the dissemination of information.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at March 31, 2015 09:23 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
31 March 2015

Question #3, "The Letter": What did Marji do for six months to help Mehri? Why?

Answer: Marji writes love letters for Mehri because "like most peasants, she didn't know how to read and write... My mother had tried to teach her, but apparently she was not very talented" (Satrapi 35). Marji willingly did this because she was devoted to her maid.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at March 31, 2015 10:12 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 413 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
1 April 2015


Question: #2
“Introduction”: The author indicates two motives for writing Persepolis what are they? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis states that the two motives for writing the novel are to explain how the nation of Iran should not be represented by “fundamentalism, fascism, and terrorism (2). Persepolis also informs the masses about those who “lost their lives for freedom, defended their country, and suffered under various regimes” (2). Satrapi uses the graphic novel form to enforce and enhance both of the qualities expressed above. Persepolis beautifully narrative and visually stimulates the overall message of the novel: “One can forgive but one should never forget” (2).

Posted by: Emily Finck at March 31, 2015 10:20 PM

Shawn DeJesus
ENG 410 Reading The Planet
Dr. Hobbs
1 April 2015

5) “The Veil”: What did bilingual schools represent to the new regime? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Before the Islamic Revolution, all of the kids attended a French non-religious school, where both boys and girls were together. Following the revolution in 1980, it was declared that all bilingual schools were “symbols of capitalism and decadence.” (Marjane Satrapi, page 2 ) The Islamic Revolution was synonymous with a “cultural revolution.” All previously established pro-western ideologies were stripped away, and replaced with anti-western attitudes imposed by the new theocratic government.

Posted by: Shawn DeJesus at April 1, 2015 08:11 AM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
1 April 2015

Question: “The Veil”: Describe the symbolism and conflict represented in the picture on the topleft on page 6. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with the page number in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The picture on page six shows Marjane split between her own deep, personal religious beliefs and her family’s modern and “avant-garde” way of living. This is significant because it foreshadows possible conflict between Marjane’s own beliefs and the beliefs of her family. As seen in the classroom scene, the other children laughed at Marjane for her desire to become a prophet and when asked by her parents what she wanted to be she lied and said a doctor. When confronted by God, Marjane’s response was “no, no, I will be a prophet but they mustn’t know” (Satrapi 9). Suppressing her natural wish will surely cause some sort of conflict within the future.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at April 1, 2015 08:20 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
1 April 2015

Persepolis Question #9
“The Veil”: Why does Marji want to be a prophet? (3 reasons) Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Marji wants to be a prophet because she could then be “justice, love, and the wrath of God all in one (Satrapi 9).” This desire to be a prophet is significant because of the turmoil and war that are going on around her. She feels connected personally to God, saying that “every night [she] had a big discussion with God (Satrapi 8).” Marji probably felt as though being a prophet would be the best place for her because she could then express her faith, maintain a balanced idea and perception about the world while showing compassion for those in need of it and correcting the wrong-doers. Though this is not expressly stated, it can be inferred based upon rudimentary definitions of justice, love, and the wrath of God.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 1, 2015 08:39 AM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Duncan
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
1 April 2015

How do others respond to Marji’s religious calling? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

While her grandmother is very supportive of her religious calling, her parents and teacher do not have the same mentality. When Marji told the class what she wanted to be when she grew up, the response back from the other children was laughter. The teacher, instead of seeing this calling and career as a good thing, she had a conference with Marji’s parents saying, “You child is disturbed. She wants to become a prophet” (8). As for the parent’s response, they seemed to view it as a childish whim, and when asking Marji about what the teacher said, she responded simply by saying “I want to be a doctor” (9). The irony and significance of the reactions come into play with the entire fact that Islam was in a state of unrest because of religion. Even within herself, Marji is having a battle between expectations of herself, society, and family when it comes to religion. She wants to be a prophet of God being “justice, love and the wrath of God all in one,” even in her childish perspective of the world (9). She can see the wrongs of the world while not understanding fully the significance, while the rest of the world (adults) sees the wrongs and understands them but does nothing of significance to change it. And in the end, if someone wishes for change, such as Marji wanting to be a prophet of God, it is ridiculed and seen as a joke by society as a whole, no matter which side of the argument society is on (very hypocritical view of the world).

Posted by: Kristen Collins at April 1, 2015 09:10 AM

Daniel Menezes and Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet CA01
1 April 2015

Question #10: Epiphany- An epiphany is a sudden realization/insight/cognition that is so important, it is almost like a turning point in the narrative for a character. Picture the "a-ha!," "eureka!," moment of some cartoons, or the proverbial light bulb turning in one's mind. An epiphany is a kind of mini-enlightenment moment. What new epiphanies occur for any of the characters, particularly the protagonist, in this chapter?

Answer: In chapter ten of Persepolis the characters that are present are Marjane, her father, her mother, and her grandmother, there are no new characters introduced in this chapter. All three characters would be considered mentors to Marjane. It is first person because it is told through Marjane. The setting of this chapter is Iran and Madrid when the family takes a vacation. The main conflict that arises in this chapter is fundamentalism verses modernism. A major theme is this chapter is Marjane's attempt to move away from the Islamic fundamentalists. The veil that women are forced to wear is a symbol of fundamentalism trying to take over and control. The major epiphany in this chapter is when Marjane realizes that she cannot be like her idol Marie Curie.

Posted by: DJ and Dalton at April 1, 2015 10:11 AM

Emily Finck & Rebecca Moldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
3 April 2015


Question: #7
Theme: A theme is a major idea that recurs over and over again. What new themes emerge in this chapter? What themes, introduced in the earlier chapters, continue in this particular chapter?


Answer:
In Marjane Satraip’s graphic novel Persepolis, one recurring theme is the idea of glorifying the martyr and the perception that the martyr is a “hero” (54). Marjane, from previous chapters, views those who have been arrested for political reasons as a type of hero. Her attraction to the hero/martyr is based on the “stories” from her Uncle Anoosh’s time as a “prisoner of war” (55-59). The exploration of prisoners of war explains Marjane’s fascination/enthrallment in the stories of Siamak Jari and Mohsen Shakiba (47). Marjane becomes enraptured by the idea of hero and martyrdom, for a time.

Posted by: Emily Finck at April 1, 2015 01:11 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
3 April 2015


Question: #79 “The Cigarette”: What was Marji’s motive for breaking her parents’ rules? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
In Marjan Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis, Marji’s motive for breaking her parents’ rules is to rebel against the “dictatorship” of her mother (113). Marji had recently skipped class a few hours before coming home; and, the school called, and she was caught red handed. Her mother lectured her about the importance of education (even during war time/regime), and thus, became known as the “Guardian of Revolution in the House” (Satrapi 113). In order to show her disdain towards childhood and the rules that follow with being a child, Marji, smoked a cigarette to show her “adult” side (117). The anecdote is significant because it shows Marji’s perceptivity and critical thinking abilities to the world around her, thus, paralleling the war and the regime that is happening around her. The cigarette is also a metaphor meant to show the adaptability/coping side of society during wartime.

Posted by: Emily Finck at April 1, 2015 01:56 PM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
24 March 2015

Question: “The Veil”: Who is Zarathustra, and what are his three rules for living? Why is this
significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to
support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: Satrapi wrote that Zarathustra’s three rules for living were “behave well, speak well, act well” (7). Marjane’s mention of him was vital to the story because this prophet put an emphasis on kindness. He was the first prophet, and he lived before the Arab invasion, so his appearance in the book was a reminder of the peace and goodwill that existed before the war. Zarathustra's stress on compassion was something that Marjane did not see or understand during her lifetime at that point. Zarathustra's rules demonstrated Marjane’s true nature and desire for unity among her people. There were other prophets to mention, but she thought he was the most important and that primarily added to her character development.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at April 2, 2015 12:28 AM

Lorie Jewell and Shaina McSweeney
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
3 April 2015

Question: Summarize Chapter 5 “The Letter,” describing characters, perspective, setting, conflicts, theme, symbolism, tone/mood and any epiphanies.

Answer: Characters present in this section include Marji and several family members, including her mother, father, grandmother, uncle; the family’s maid, Mehri; Mehri’s sister; Hossein, the neighbor boy; and Ashraf Darvishian, Marji’s favorite author. Most of the characters to this point are round, with the exception of Mehri’s sister, Marji’s uncle, and the author. Mehri’s sister instigates conflict when she reveals Mehri’s love letter writing campaign to Hossein; Marji gets sucked into it when her dad confronts her about her role in writing the letters for Mehri. The chapter is told largely in first person, from Marji’s point of view, although there are a few scenes that are shown through an omniscient view – the gossipers, the dad confronting Hossein, for example. Most of the chapter takes place in Marji’s home, with some concluding action at the demonstration. The conflicts in the chapter include Marji getting caught writing Mehri’s love letters to Hossein; Mehri’s sister vying for Hossein’s love by ratting out Mehri; Marji’s dad telling Hossein he has been getting letters from the family maid; and Mehri and Marji going to the demonstration on Black Friday. The overall theme of the chapter is class/social status and Marji’s realization that despite her attachment to Mehri, they will always be separated by a class barrier.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell and Shaina McSweeney at April 2, 2015 08:58 PM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
3 April 2015

Question 62 (The Jewels): What criticism does Marji’s mom make of capitalism? What confusing thing does she suggest as they leave the store? Why is this significant?

Answer: After watching two women fight over a box of food in the grocery store, Marji’s mom complains about the “every man for himself” stance she sees capitalism creating: “If everyone took only what they needed, there would be enough to go around” (87), she says to no one in particular. Then she asks Marji how many boxes of rice they managed to get; when Marji tells her they have two, Mom suggests they go to the store across the street “and try to get more, you never know” (87). Marji seems confused by this statement because her mother just got done saying that everyone should take only what they need and if they have two boxes of rice, maybe they have enough for now. The statement is significant because it makes Marji’s mom seem like a hypocrite; she is sending a mixed message to her impressionable daughter.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at April 2, 2015 09:27 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet
6 April 2015

Question: How long were the borders of Iran closed? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: According to Satrapi, the borders of Iran were closed for three years, from 1980 to 1983. While speaking about his son living in Holland, whom he sent abroad before the borders were closed, Taher states, “How many times did I say to my wife ‘Come on, let’s join him.’ She didn’t want to. She invoked her country, her family, etc., etc.” (Satrapi 118). Taher’s statement shows the significance of the borders being closed. Citizens of Iran who oppose the regime are not able to leave the country to escape the brutality, so they must either conform or suffer punishment. The closed borders further the isolation that many Iranians feel because they are unable to be themselves in public and have no way of escaping their suppression.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at April 3, 2015 09:09 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
4 April 2015

Question #97: What problem do Marji’s parents face as they return from their trip to Istanbul? How does Marji’s mom show her ingenuity? Why is this significant?

Answer: Marji's parents have to figure out how to smuggle the posters they bought past customs at the Tehran airport. Marji's mother hides them in the lining of a coat that Marji's father owns. This is significant because Marji thinks her dad came up with the idea:
"Dad, you're a genius."
"Thank your mother. It was her idea."
"Thank you mom" (Satrapi 130)!
Marji favors her father over her mother because he is more lax about the rules, so it does not occur to Marji that her mother would do something like that for her.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at April 4, 2015 09:47 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
4 April 2015

Summarize the Chapter

In chapter 5 of "Persepolis" (The Letter), a new round character is introduced: Mehri. Also, a few flat characters such as Ali Ashraf Darvishian (a local Charles Dickens), Mehri's parents, and the neighbor's son. Mehri is both a maid for Marjane's parents and a sister figure for Marjane. The entire chapter is told in first person by Marjane with short panels of dialogue between thee other characters. The events of the chapter take place in Tehran, Iran in 1978 with the majority of the scenes occurring in Marjane's apartment. The theme is the conflict is man vs. man as Marjane openly protests against the difference between social classes as represented by her father and his Cadillac. Also, when Mehri and Marjane return from protesting on "Black Friday," the hand prints on their faces made by Marjane's mother symbolize how Iran slaughtered it's own citizens who were protesting.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at April 4, 2015 11:06 PM

Kristin Collins and Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
5 April 2015

Group Work: Chapter 8 – Moscow
Summarize the chapter.

Answer:
In Chapter 8 of “Persepolis” entitled ‘Moscow,’ a lot of characters are shown. Of these characters, the main round ones are Mari, Uncle Anoosh, and Fereydoon. During this chapter all other mentioned or shown characters act as flat characters even if they are round characters otherwise. For Mari, Uncle Anoosh is a mentor character educating her about the political unrest of the world. Fereydoon, though he does not meet Mari and is only told of in a story, would be a distant ally to her. This chapter is told from Mari’s perspective of a story being told to her by Uncle Anoosh. The setting is a little unclear in terms of ‘when’ these events are taking place, but they are divided between Mari’s house and the story Uncle Anoosh is telling of Azerbaijan and Moscow. The plot of this chapter is mostly exposition, but it helps show Mari that there are heroes out there fighting for the same thing she is. The theme of this chapter is similar to the boy who cries wolf. On page 54, Mari is telling a tall tale to her friends about her father enduring dismemberment and torture, which is a lie. Then on page 61 she is telling her friends about her Uncle Anoosh’s adventures and they don’t believe her because she had already lied about her father. Possible symbols for this chapter are Mari’s comic book of communism and the bread swan Uncle Anoosh gives her. The comic book makes Mari’s ideas of communism relatively silly and naïve as she does not have the full picture. The Swan is a bond she and Anoosh share of his time in prison and will reappear later in the book when Anoosh is sent to prison again. It is hard to determine the mood or tone as the faces are all drawn similarly, though the most prevailing mood is reflection as this chapter is mostly a story being told to Mari. The epiphany that Mari experiences in this chapter is that not everyone suffers the same way for the things they believe in and this variation is what can define the heroism of those individuals to others.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 5, 2015 03:15 PM

Ashtan Richey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
5 April 2015

67.“The Key”: Comment on the picture on page 95. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

"I too tried to think only of life. It wasn't always easy, at school, they lined us up twice a day to mourn the war dead. They put on funeral marches, and we had to beat our breasts (Marjane Satrapi, The Complete Persepolis, Ch.13, Pg. 95)."

During the war, Iran was very public about how many men have died, and turned the killed soldiers into war martyrs. In order to "remember" the martyrs, the school girls are required to hit themselves in the chest "on the heart" (96). Marji explains that "Hitting yourself is one if the country's rituals" (96), and is usually done during religious ceremonies. It is almost a form of self-sacrifice, by causing yourself pain to show devotion. The girls at Marji's school didn't understand the importance of beating their chests; "After a little while, no one took the torture sessions seriously anymore" (97).

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at April 5, 2015 08:12 PM

Ashtan Richey, Marcus Chisholm
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
5 April 2015

The Party.
6.) Plot: To discover the plot of a narrative, you must identify the conflicts. Conflicts should be framed in a "___ vs. ___" format, e.g., "man versus nature," or "man versus man," etc. What is the plot of this chapter? Start by pointing out and explaining each conflict in the chapter.

People versus the Shah: The beginning of the chapter shows the revolts against the Shah, and the massacres that follow the revolts. Both which foreshadow the end of the Shah's reign.

Man versus man: With the end of the Shah's ruling the people began to take sides. The hegemony develops between those of whom were "martyrs" in the sense that they fought against the Shah and have now persevered, such as Marji's neighbors who lie about the scar on the wife's face in order to seem like they sacrificed their safety for this revolution, and those who were loyal to the Shah and are now prosecuted, such as Ramin's father who was part of the Shah's secret police and is now hated.

Moral versus immoral: This chapter ends with Marji's mother telling her to find acceptance for Ramin's father, as she tells Marji "you have to forgive" (46). Just because the power has shifted, is it right to have hatred for those who previously were doing the "right thing"? Marji's mother's advice is to forgive Ramin's father for whatever he had done while working in the secret police, and also to forgive Ramin.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey, Marcus Chisholm at April 5, 2015 08:33 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
6 April 2015

Question: How does Marji reflect the common stereotypical thinking of other Iranians? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: Marji reflects the commons stereotypical thinking of other Iranians in the way she reacts when the Iranians bomb the Persians. She is eager and ready to rush in – or rather have her government rush in – and bomb the Iranians back. “We have to bomb Baghdad!” she proclaimed (Satrapi 82). In fact, even when she is at the office with her father she expects him to go in a fight. “Are you going to war? Are you going to fight? We have to teach those Iraqis a lesson!” (Satrapi 81). The Iraqi have the mentality that the years of fighting in the past are still very much cause for fighting today. As well, they still harbor the idea of Persia being their life long enemy. This is all reflected within Marji.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at April 6, 2015 08:15 AM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
5 April 2015

Question: “The F-14s”: How does Marji reflect the common stereotypical thinking of other Iranians? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: While Marji acts as if she has grown into a young woman who did not have stereotypes and preconceptions pushed onto her, she is wrong. She has a deep hate for the Iranians and wishes her government would bomb Bagdad, their most important city. When her father tells Marji that he will not fight in the war, she replies, “How can you say that? The Iraqis have always been our enemies they want to invade” (Satrapi 81). She continues to call the Iraqis “assholes” and consistently degrade their entire race throughout the chapter. Her pure hate for Iraqis helps the reader discover something important about Marji; she is just as tainted as every other character in the book.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at April 6, 2015 08:48 AM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
5 April 2015

Question: “The Cigarette”: How would you describe the relationship between Marji and her mother? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: Marji and her mom, like most mother-daughter relationships at this age, began to have different views on what was important. Marji became obsessed with the war and, naturally, very influenced by others. Marji’s mother, however, cared more about Marji’s safety than the war. For instance, after she found out that Marji skipped classes, Marji’s mom lectured her, “Now is the time for learning. You have your whole like for fun! What are you going to be when you grow up? In this country, you have to know everything better than anyone else if you are going to survive” (Satrapi 113). Marji is taking her mother to be overly harsh and similar to a “dictator,” but she does not fully understand how dangerous the world is during this time. This chapter plays an important role; it foreshadows the rebelliousness Marji is about face, and it shows the reader the mother’s fear and love for her child. Marji’s mother wants her to be better, to escape this darkness that consumes their country, but Marji does not understand that and she will not for a while. Their relationship mocks a typical twelve-year-old daughter and mother relationship, but only with heightened tensions.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at April 6, 2015 09:07 AM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
06 April 2015

“The Trip”: What do the fundamentalist students do? How does this event affect Marji’s plans? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

The fundamentalists close down all of the universities for two years because they belief the education system will lead the people away from the “True path of Islam” (73). To make sure this does not happen, the universities are closed for a reformation of the system. During this time, Marji has aspirations to be some sort of scientist, to be able to study at the university would mean she could be “an educated liberated woman”, more specifically, Marie Curie (73). Unfortunately this dream goes “up in smoke” with the fundamentalist movement going through and oppressing the society to older traditional values. With all of these changes, two distinctive groups emerged, the fundamentalists and the modern.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at April 6, 2015 09:17 AM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
1 April 2015
16. “The Water Cell”: Why did Marji’s parents react to her statement about the Shah (hint: her family history)? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
In the beginning of the chapter, Marji states, “As for me, I love the king, he was chosen by God” (19). Marji’s parents do not react with anger, but rather try to explain the history of the Shah. Even afterwards, Marji has her doubts: “Maybe God helped them nevertheless” (22). It is at this point that Marji’s father reveals the emperor that was overthrown was Marji’s grandfather. This revelation makes the history of the Shah more real to Marji. Marji’s parents want Marji to understand the corruption of the Shah not only because of their own personal political beliefs, but because of personal family history as well.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at April 6, 2015 10:05 AM

DJ and Dalton
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
6 April 2015

Question: #68

"The Key"
Why was Marji’s generation so rebellious? What does the teacher blame? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji's generation is so rebellious because they knew secular schools. "I think that the reason that we were so rebellious was that our generation had known secular schools". The parents blame the teachers for not allowing their children to play like the kids they are and cover them head to toe in clothing. The teacher blames the children for having no self control and says that they must obey the laws.

Question: #69
What injustices do the parents see in the educational system? Which restriction is particularly ironic?Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer:
The children, particularly the boys, are being given keys to signify that they will get them into the kingdom of heaven. The children have no freedom and are restricted by religion. They must obey the oppression of the school or face expulsion. With parents looking out for the academic future such as college, they must follow this insane system and laws.

Posted by: DJ and Dalton at April 6, 2015 10:20 AM

Lorie Jewell, Shaina McSweeney, Deirdre Rowan
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
6 April 2015

Question 34 “The Heroes”: According to Marji, what makes a hero? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Based on what she overhears of the adult conversation, Marji comes to believe that a hero is someone who has been tortured in prison but who cannot confess. This is significant for a few reasons, beginning with how this information erodes some of her childhood innocence; she pictures an iron, for example, as something you use for taking the wrinkles out of clothes – “I never imagined that you could use that appliance for torture” (53). It is also significant because at that point in the post-revolution, nobody – let alone a child such as Marji – could really give an objective definition of what constitutes a hero. Neighbors, or even members of a family, might have very different political opinions that color their view of heroism, so Marji’s definition of a hero might very well change as she grows older and forms her own opinions. Another significant point is that based on her view of heroism, which is heavily influenced by Laly telling her that “my father is a hero,” Marji realizes she cannot say the same about her own father; “My father was not a hero” (52) she says to herself as she walks home.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell, Shaina McSweeney, Deirdre Rowan at April 6, 2015 10:58 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
5 April 2015

Question #105
“The Shabbat”: What did the sirens signify? What did Marji realize for the first time? What does this show? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
When the sirens went off, it meant that bombs or missiles were being sent to Iran. As Marji put it, the sirens “meant [they] had three minutes to know if the end had come (Satrapi 136).”What this statement means and what Marji realized at that moment was exactly how dangerous it was in the world at that time. This realization is significant because it meant a missle could strike Marji's house and she and her family could die at almost any time. The uncertainty of the future in those three minutes of waiting is what truly showed Marji how much danger she and her family faced.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 6, 2015 11:32 AM

Ashtan Richey, Shawn DeJesus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
6 April 2015

59.“The F-14s”: What does Pardisse describe in her paper? How does Marji try to console her friend? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Marji's class is asked to write a summary of the war. Marji writes her version of the history of the war, and the teacher doesn't seem impressed. Marji's friend Pardisse also shares her paper, which she has written as a letter to late father explaining that she will take care of her mother and little brother in his absence, "...Pardisse's report was by far the best" (86). Marji's father was one of the pilots who were recently released from prison in order to fight against the Iraqis. Pardisse's father was killed in a battle following his release. Marji tries to console her friend by telling her "your father acted like a genuine hero, you should be proud of him" (86).

60.“The F-14s”: What is Pardisse’s response? What does Marji learn from this experience? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Pardisse is not comforted by Marji's attempt at justifying her father's death. Pardisse replies to Marji "I wish he were alive and in jail rather than dead and a hero" (86). The idea of her father being a war martyr does not comfort Pardisse enough to justify his death. Pardisse stating that she would rather have her father alive must have meant a lot to Marjane. At the time, the war martyrs had been in the papers and dying in the war had been made out to be a great honor. This is the first time Marjane shows that the deaths are a negative thing, contrary to how the revolution leaders want the dead to be thought of; showing the impact that the lost soldiers have on families, making it more personal than a picture of a man, next to hundreds of others, in the paper.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey, Shawn DeJesus at April 6, 2015 12:38 PM

Ashtan Richey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
6 April 2015

135. “The Vegetable”: Explain the scene where Marji lies about her actual heritage and pretends to be something that she’s not. Why is this problematic? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the
part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Marjane is at a party at school when she meets Marc. She introduces herself and when he repeats her name back to her, as "Marie-Jeane"(195), Marjane decides to go with his suggestion and tells him that she is French; "I should say that at the time, Iran was the epitome of evil, and to be Iranian was a heavy burden to bear" (195). Marjane immediately feels remorse for her lie, as Marc can tell that she is not telling the truth "Oh really? You have a funny accent for a French girl" (195). Marjane immediately thinks about her grandmother's advice to "'always keep your dignity and be true to yourself'" (195), and feels ashamed for her lie.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at April 6, 2015 03:18 PM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
8 April 2015

Question 143 “Hide and Seek”: Who is the first boy Marji meets at school that she likes, and what is the problem? What do they decide? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: At school, the first boy Marji feels a romantic interest in is Enrique; she meets him through Dieter, one of her former housemates. Given that her former housemates were all gay, that should have been a clue. Eventually, they sleep together but do not have sex; Enrique tells Marji that after not feeling any desire for her physically, he is pretty sure he is gay because “if it didn’t work with you, it wouldn’t work with anyone” (214). At first, Marji is upset but quickly accepts it and tells Enrique she is happy for him. They promise to always be friends, which does not happen. “I gave my word but I was too young to keep it. This chaste love affair frustrated me more than it satisfied me. I wanted to love and be loved for real” (214). The significance of this is that even though she is young, Marji is learning and deciding for herself what she wants in a relationship, what she wants from life.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at April 6, 2015 04:53 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
1 April 2015
27. “The Party”: How does the Shah attempt to appease the people? Why did he fail? Why is this significant? Explain.
Because of the revolution, the Shah made an announcement that he wanted to become a democracy. Marji’s father was disgusted with this announcement: “After all he has done!” (40). Marji’s statement reflects the opinion of the people. The more the Shah attempts to work towards democracy, the more fake he seems due to his past actions. The Shah had done too much damage; he could not appease the people: “the people only wanted one thing: his departure” (41).

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at April 6, 2015 06:21 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
8 April 2015


Question: #118 “The Soup”: Why is Marji no longer staying with Zozo, the friend of her mother’s? What happened? Where is she now? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
In Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis, Marji (herself) is no longer staying with ZoZo and her friend because Zozo and her husband constantly fight and are the verge of divorce. However, they tell Marji “the apartment is too small” and drop her off at a boarding house run by nuns (Satrapi 158). The reason that this is significant is because Marji had left the secular and radically religious Iran, for a freer “Europe” (Satrapi 155). However, she, in fact, experiences a religious stronghold in Europe as she had in Iran.

Posted by: Emily Finck at April 6, 2015 06:59 PM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
7 April 2015

Question: To what sound does Marji wake up to every morning? Is this problematic? Why or why not? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: Marji wakes up every morning to the sound of Lucia’s hair dryer. Marji found this to be quite annoying as she was woken every morning at 6:30. Later on, when Lucia asks her to spend the holidays with her, Marji accepts the offer only on the condition that Lucia quit waking her up so early with the hairdryer. However while on the trip, Marji became very close to Lucia and her family. “As opposed to my school friends’ favorite subjects of conversation, we never touched on war, or death” (Satrapi 172). “I had a new set of parents…Lucia was my sister” (Satrapi 172). It’s significant because Marji has managed to overlook a minute detail in the grander scheme of their friendship.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at April 7, 2015 05:28 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
7 April 2015

Question #151: Where does Marji decide to live after her stay in the hospital? What events lead to this decision? Why is this significant?

Answer: Marji decides to move back to Iran after her stay in the hospital because she cannot stand life in Vienna anymore without her family: "I don't really have an address in Vienna" (Satrapi 242). With Markus' infidelity known, her finances gone, and having no real friends to fall back on in Vienna, Marji realizes that despite having all the freedom she had wished for, it is not worth it without her family to support her.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at April 7, 2015 10:18 PM

Kristen Collins, Emily Finck, and Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
07 April 2015

“Moscow”: What gift does Anoosh give to Marji? What might it symbolize? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Annosh gives Marji a bread swan that he had made in prison. For Annosh, it could symbolize freedom and the ever-present desire to escape the clutches of Shah’s regime. Instead of eating the bread, Annosh created a swan to embody a symbol of hope while he must stay in the prison; the significance of the bread being made into an animal with wings also an important point. For Marji, the swan is a symbol of Annosh’s heroism/martyrs. It becomes a physical representation of Marji’s family’s own version of “heroism” in Marji’s perspective. Marji does not see the bread swan for what it truly means to Annosh because to her child-mentality, the swan is ultimately a trophy.

“Here, take this swan I made in prison. Out of bread.” – Annosh giving Marji the swan.

“There are lots of heroes in my family. My grandpa was in prison, my uncle Annosh too. For nine years! He was even in the USSR. My great-uncle Fereydoon proclaimed a democratic state and he was…” – Marji telling her family’s heroism to her friends.

Posted by: Kristen Collins, Emily Finck, and Rebecca Maldonado at April 7, 2015 10:59 PM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
08 April 2015

“Pasta”: How does a nun insult Marji one night, and what is Marji’s response? What is the result of this confrontation? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

The nun insults Marji by calling her a stereotypical, uneducated Iranian just because Marji was eating in front of the television. This is ironic since before coming to Austria, Marji only ate at the table, but with seeing the people of Austria, she began to eat and have the same lax eating habits. At the insult, Marji responds back by saying “It’s true what they say about you, too. You were all prostitutes before becoming nuns!” (177). The response got Lady Superior so offended that she would not meet again with Marji, and instead sent her secretary to inform Marji that she was expelled from the nunnery. The closing line of the entire expulsion clearly shows the significance of religion with her saying “In every religion, you find the same extremists” (178). To emphasis this extremist and corrupt view of certain figureheads of religion, the letter send back to Marji’s parent’s show how the nun could not tell the true reason why the expulsion occurred, so instead, they completely lied about the reasoning.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at April 8, 2015 07:08 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
8 April 2015

Question:
People in need of hospital care face a dilemma: describe this problem. Why is this significant?

Answer:
People in need of hospital care often have to be transferred to a different country for care because the hospitals in their country are often unequipped and out of room. Those who need treatment then have to go through the process of getting a permit so they can get treated in the other country. This is significant because Marji’s uncle Taher requires open heart surgery and must get a passport to receive treatment. Taher ends up having to wait an extended period of time to get his passport and dies, “his real passport arrived the same day” (Satrapi 125).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at April 8, 2015 08:33 AM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
10 April 2015

Question 172 “The Convocation”: What are the results of Marji speaking her mind at art school? What does the Islamic Convention make her do? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: After giving administrators and the convocation lecturer a piece of her mind regarding appropriate clothing for women, Marji is summoned by the Islamic Commission – which she equates to “going to meet my executioner” (298). But it turns out that her ‘executioner’ is the religious leader who earlier gave her a passing mark on her ideological exam and he goes easy on her, telling her to read the sacred text and to come up with an example of a uniform that is both acceptable to women and meets the standards of the sacred text. The significance of this is two-fold – Marji creates a prototype that features a short veil and wide pants that makes everyone happy – “though subtle, these differences meant a lot to us (women)” (298) – and by taking a stand, she made her grandmother proud. Ultimately, Marji made herself happy – “this is how I recovered my self-esteem and my dignity” (298).

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at April 8, 2015 11:08 AM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
5 April 2015

Question: Marji and her mother go through a series of emotions during the mother’s visit. Why does this happen? How do they bond? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words
Answer: In this chapter, Marji and her mother had not seen each other in months. Immediately, Marji and her mother are overtaken with emotion once they see each other. They both become overwhelmed with the changes that they see in each other, “She hadn’t recognized me, and with good reason: I’d almost doubled in height and size. . . It felt strange to take her into my arms, our proportions had been reversed” (Satrapi 200). Despite the distance and time that was between Marji and her mother, their relationship still had the potential to be strong. Her and her mother rekindled their relationship: her mother took Marji to find a new place to live, she handmade Marji new clothes, and they spent several days shopping and laughing. Their love for each other brought light to the story during dark times. It also reminded the reader that Marji, despite her maturity, is still young and has basic needs, like needing her mother. It brought importance to the story because it gave Marji the strength to continue.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at April 8, 2015 02:41 PM

Hannah McCafferty, Ashley Gross
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
6 April 2015

Question: How does Marji feel about the new war? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: At the beginning at college, Marji is upset by the war because it is interfering with her dreams. For instance, she hopes to be a mini Madame Curie, but the war caused schools to close; thus, she cannot fulfill her dream. Marji is fascinated and excited by the war. She genuinely believes that she will go to war and win. She obsessed with honor—she would rather have everybody she loves die if it meant they left honor behind. She has almost a sickening pride for the war, but it tells the reader she does not fully comprehend the war. Marji writes, “I realized then that I didn’t understand anything. I read all the books I could” (Satrapi 32).

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at April 8, 2015 10:32 PM

Emily Finck, Kristen Collins, and Rebecca Moldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
10 April 2015


Question: # 2A: What are the elements of freedom in relation to freedom being negative in terms of the first revolt? The revolt as defined by Mikhail Bakunin is against the supreme of theology, God, religion, church, and divinity. Answers in your own words, by choosing any texts covered that reinforce this notion.


Answer:
Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, help to place this ideology of “freedom is negative” and the “revolt against the supreme tyranny of theology/God” in perspective (Bakunin 4). In Boulle’s novel Planet of the Apes, the apes rejected the ideas of God and religion and followed the pursuit of science and knowledge. From there the apes created a society that was not entirely free and enhanced this idea of “negative freedom,” by creating a cast system within the suborders of apes according to intellectual power. Thus, no ape is truly free because there is always someone above or below him or her.


In Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis, Marji the main protagonist is growing up in a world that is radically theology based. As a result at the beginning of the novel Marji has an “imaginary friend” relationship with “God” (Satrapi 8-9). As she begins to gain, knowledge about the world around her Marji begins to “talk” less and less to God (Satrapi 17). Until eventually, she realizes the ideal “idea” of God and religion is useless to her and the environment in which she is growing up. Marji’s environment creates a “negative sense of freedom” in the radical way religion is used to justify civil disputes and conflict. Thus, theology must be abandoned to achieve true freedom.

Posted by: Emily Finck at April 9, 2015 11:06 AM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
10 April 2015


Question: # 158
“The Joke”: What became very real for Marji while she visited her old friend Kia?
After Marji’s visit, what personal lesson did she learn? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
In Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis, Marji realized the intangibility of life and what it truly means to be oppressed. Better yet, she learns the importance of being able to come out of a harsh situation with dignity and a new outlook on life, which is to be grateful to be alive. Her personal revelation is this, “we can only feel sorry for ourselves when our misfortunes are still supportable…once this limit is crossed; the only way to bear the unbearable is to laugh at it” (Satrapi 266). Marji learns that it is not the misfortunes that define you, but the way one deals them, which makes them stronger. The revelation is significant because Marji realizes she has to come to terms with herself, religion, country, and her epistemology.

Posted by: Emily Finck at April 9, 2015 11:10 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
9 April 2015

Question #174: Identify, describe, and explain, at least, three challenges that Marji faced during her time at school. Why is this significant?

Answer: Two of the challenges Marji faces at school are during her anatomy course: the female students are not allowed to look at the men they are drawing and when they try to draw women, the subject matter is wearing a full body veil: "We tried, we looked from every direction and from every angle. But not a single part of her body was visible. We nevertheless learned to draw drapes" (Satrapi 299). A third challenge is trying to discreetly rebel against the regime: "Showing your hair or putting on makeup logically became acts of rebellion" (302). Even showing your wrist could mean being arrested, so Marji had to watch her every move.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at April 9, 2015 11:43 PM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
10 April 2015

“Skiing”: Why did Marji’s friends turn on her? What was the result? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Marji’s friends turn on her when she discussed her sex life with them at the ski resort: “So, what’s the difference between you and a whore???” (270). Their reaction to the news is very hypocritical since they changed their looks and attitudes to be more modern, “underneath their outward appearance of being modern woman, my friends were real traditionalists” (270). Even though they looked as if they embodied the modern woman with going out to clubs and wearing heavy makeup, the reality of it was that they would judge ant true modern woman for not sticking to traditional values. After losing another set of friends, ones that they thought she would be able to keep because of the long-standing relationship, Marji went into a state of depression. She tried to go into therapy but she went through bouts of suicidal thoughts and action: trying to cut her wrists, alcohol binges, and overdosing in pills. After so many attempt at her life, she “inferred from this that she was not made to die” (273). She took her life and future into her own hands, changing her looks (through removing unwanted hair and getting a perm) and becoming a aerobics instructor.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at April 10, 2015 06:43 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
9 April 2015

Question #146:
“The Croissant”: What major event must happen at the end of Marji’s final school year and how is it related to her rather strange dream? Summarize and explain the dream, and the bizarre/coincidental result of it. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
At the end of Marji’s final school year, she had to take the Baccalaureate, which is a French graduation exam. One night before the exam, she had a dream that God told her what the subject would be. Marji in turn called home and asked her mother to pray for her and the message was sent down the chain to God again and then to the examiner. According to Marji, “each time that [she] asked [her] mother to pray for [her, her] wish was granted (Satrapi 223).” As it turns out, the subject Marji dreamed about was the one on the exam. This is significant because it shows how strong some people’s faith can be and that sometimes good things can happen when they are needed. Marji had mentioned how she did not know everything and needed a “miracle (Satrapi 223)” to pass. The dream and subsequent test subject were this miracle and might have help Marji return to a path of faith similar to the once she had as a child wanting to grow up to be prophet.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 10, 2015 08:28 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
10 April 2015

Question:
According to Marji, how are parties in Iran different from parties in Austria? Why is this significant?

Answer:
According to Marji, parties in Iran involved a lot of dancing and eating where in Vienna, the people at the parties preferred to smoke and lie around. This was repulsing to Marji, who was “turned off by all these public displays of affection” (Satrapi 34). This reaction to people smoking and making out shows Marji’s traditionalist attitude, despite the fact that she is coming into many new and different situations in her life.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at April 10, 2015 08:45 AM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
10 April 2015
Question: Why does Marji suddenly feel great shame over her life in Vienna? Does she decide to disclose all of what happened to her there to her friends and family? Why, or why not? Ironically, how does this decision play into the results of the biography being publish? Why is this significant?
Answer: Marji feels great shame over her life in Vienna due to the tedious and somewhat simple nature of it compared the hardships her parents and country had faced while she was gone. “Next to my father’s report, my Viennese misadventures seemed like little anecdotes of no importance. So I decided that I would never tell them anything about my Austrian life. They had suffered enough as it was” (Satrapi 257). She never really goes on to tell them about her time in Vienna. Perhaps by not telling her family about it, Satrapi decided to make it such a large portion of the novel – after all, it was a large portion of her life as well.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at April 10, 2015 09:25 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
9 April 2015

Question #146:
“The Croissant”: What major event must happen at the end of Marji’s final school year and how is it related to her rather strange dream? Summarize and explain the dream, and the bizarre/coincidental result of it. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
At the end of Marji’s final school year, she had to take the Baccalaureate, which is a French graduation exam. One night before the exam, she had a dream that God told her what the subject would be. Marji in turn called home and asked her mother to pray for her and the message was sent down the chain to God again and then to the examiner. According to Marji, “each time that [she] asked [her] mother to pray for [her, her] wish was granted (Satrapi 223).” As it turns out, the subject Marji dreamed about was the one on the exam. This is significant because it shows how strong some people’s faith can be and that sometimes good things can happen when they are needed. Marji had mentioned how she didn’t know everything and needed a “miracle (Satrapi 223)” to pass. The dream and subsequent test subject were this miracle and might have help Marji return to a path of faith similar to the once she had as a child wanting to grow up to be prophet.

Question #164
“The Exam”: To what does Marji apply and what are the conditions for acceptance. What problems does Marji run into with this process and what are the results? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Marji applies to the College of Art and part of the exam is an artistic portion and an ideological portion. In the artistic portion, Marji recreates a famous image, but changes it to be about the war martyrs. The ideological portion was the real issue for her because it is meant to prove loyalties to the regime. For this section, Marji needs to “learn to pray in Arabic, the names of all of the Imams, their history, [and] the philosophy of Shiism (Satrapi 283).” Marji couldn’t understand it all so she prayed instead and answered the questions presented to her honestly. This is significant because it shows how strict the regulations were to do anything during the regime’s rule. The ideological portion of the exam asks for much more than Marji is able to learn or understand. As far as the reader knows, Marji doesn’t know Arabic and would then not stand a chance a passing this portion of her exam. The interviewer “really appreciated her honesty (Satrapi 284),” and it is for that reason that Marji says she passed.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 10, 2015 09:28 AM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
10 April 2015
169. “The Makeup”: Why is Marji’s grandmother so disappointed in her, and what is Marji’s counter reaction? Why is this significant? Explain.
Because she is wearing make up and is in danger of being arrested because of it, Marji lies and accuses an innocent man of being inappropriate with her as a distraction. The Guardians of the Revolution arrest him and Marji is saved. Later, Marji tells her grandmother what happens, and laughs. Her grandmother is not impressed. Instead, she yells at Marji: “What have I taught you? Huh? ‘Integrity!’ Does this word mean anything to you?” (291). This is the first time Marji’s grandmother had ever yelled at her. Marji “decided that it would also be the last” (291). Marji’s grandmother’s anger makes Marji rethink about the situation.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at April 10, 2015 10:18 AM

Marcus Shaina Jahiedy Group Work
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
10 April 2015

Freedom is social Element #1
• Marji is somewhat upper class-has a maid/ but she is still embarrassed by the fact that her father drives a Cadillac
• Marji rejects the idea of social classes even at a very young age/doesn’t like that the maid cannot eat with them
• So while she rejects the ideas she is still embarrassed by the social class she is within
• Reject society’s standards but not the people themselves
• People all must be free in order to experience freedom
• How do we define freedom? How does Marji define freedom?
• Marji is constantly fighting for freedom in different settings
• From the Shah, then the new religious government, her parents, her friends, and sometimes even herself

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at April 10, 2015 10:19 AM

Shawn DeJesus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading The Planet CA01
6 April 2015

134. “The Vegetable” Explain the inner struggle Marji was having, especially when she talks to her parents. Why does she feel that she is betraying them? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marji is in the middle of developing both physically and mentally through puberty, and she is struggling to find her real identity. While attending University, Marji is ashamed and embarrassed of her nationality, because Iran at the time was considered the “epitome of evil and to be Iranian was a heavy burden to bear.” (Satrapi 195) She changed her appearance, starting hanging out with the wrong crowd, a mixture of things that made her ashamed because she knew that her parents would not approve, so whenever she was on the phone with them she felt guilty. When Marji stands up to the women talking about her in the diner, she has an epiphany of freedom due to the fact that she had just redeemed herself, and “for the first time in a year, I felt proud.” (Satrapi 197)

Posted by: Shawn DeJessu at April 10, 2015 05:41 PM

Lorie Jewell, Shaina McSweeney, Deirdre Rowan
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
10 April 2015

Questions 241 and 243 “A Graphic Text”: 241. What particular incidents in the story do you think are conveyed more effectively in pictures than they could have been in words alone? What do you consider the main strengths of using images to tell this story? What are the main limitations of doing so?

Answer: One incident that is more effectively conveyed through Satrapi’s images, rather than just words, is in “The Key” chapter; Satrapi is showing the sharp contrast between how poor children and those from privileged families were treated during the war. The top illustration is harrowing and stark, depicting faceless young people getting blown up on minefields, with keys around their necks – “the key to paradise” – they were assured would guarantee them a happy afterlife for dying a martyr. The bottom illustration shows kids from well-to-do families dancing at a party; Satrapi notes that it was her first party and that she wore a necklace made of chain and nails, which gave her a punk rock look – “I was looking sharp” (102).

Another incident effectively portrayed through images is in “The Socks” chapter, in which Satrapi is telling of her art school experience. Her drawing of women wearing full-body “drapes” while posing for sketches of the human form instantly relays the ridiculousness of the laws governing women’s dress. But the students made the best of it – “We nevertheless learned to draw drapes” (299).

These two examples help demonstrate the strengths in using images to tell the story – the reader gets an instant message, without having to think too hard; images also have the power to convey stronger emotions than words alone. The main limitations in giving preference to images over words is that there is a limit to how much explaining the author can do regarding history or other types of background information that may be necessary for a reader to fully comprehend a situation.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell, Shaina McSweeney, Deirdre Rowan at April 10, 2015 07:40 PM

Ashtan Richey, Shawn DeJesus, Dalton Hart, Lorie Jewell, Craig Graves, Daniel Menezes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
6 April 2015

2C.) Revolt against society
Persepolis
Bakunin describes the revolt against society as ultimately a revolt against self because the individual is a product of the society. This applies to Marjane in many stages of her life. Specifically, in the latter half of the novel, as an adult Marjane rejects her self-image through rejecting her nationality. After this happens, Marjane remembers her grandmother telling her to never betray herself, linking her nationality as a piece of her identity. Marjane finds that lying about her nationality leaves her feeling depressed, and she decides to be proud of her heritage instead of denying "herself".
At the beginning of the novel, Marjane is born into a time of revolution and turmoil. Bakunin states that a man is a product of the society that he is born into. Applying this to Marjane, as a product of a society in revolution, she seems to become a person in constant turmoil. This is supported both by the example above, and through Marjane's struggles as she aged.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey, Shawn DeJesus, Dalton Hart, Lorie Jewell, Craig Graves, Daniel Menezes at April 11, 2015 05:25 PM

Ashtan Richey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reding the Planet CA01
11 April 2015

184. “The End”: What, exactly, is Marji’s final project for art school and who is her project partner? How do they get along for the project? Is this a mostly positive or negative experience? Does it really change anything for them? If so, how? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer, that appears in your own words.

Marji's final project for school is to create a theme park based on mythological heroes, and she is partnered with her husband Reza. Working together was a positive experience, but it did not ultimately change their relationship. "From June 1993 to January 1994, we were so busy that we didn't even fight once" (Satrapi 328). Before the project, Marji and Reza had begun to drift apart in their marriage and were fighting constantly. The project gave them a period of peace while they worked on something that they had a shared interest in. This passage of time is significant because it shows Marjane that her love is gone, and the project only delayed the end of their relationship. After the project, their relationship resumes to the negative way that it had been previously, and Marji and Reza separate.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at April 11, 2015 05:54 PM

Ashtan Richey, Shawn DeJesus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
12 April 2015

192. What information about the rise and fall of the Shah of Iran and the role of the US in this process do you need in order to make sense of the story that Satrapi tells?

This history of the Shah and how he came into power, and details of his reign, are necessary to understand the events at the beginning of the novel. There is some information presented in the introduction of the novel: such as "in the twentieth century, Iran entered a new phase. Reza Shah decided to modernize and westernize the country... (Satrapi 1). This information presented in the introduction is helpful, but extra outside research is needed for a better understanding.

198. Does reading this book make you think differently about the US’s relations with either Iran or Iraq? Why or why not?

Reading this novel educated our views on the US's relations with Iran and Iraq. Almost all of the events covered by this novel are new to us. The reasons behind the US's actions seem selfish in the sense that there was little or no regard to what happened to Iran, specifically speaking about the oil and the Shah's rise to power, instead the US, and other countries such as Great Britain, acted solely in order to gain for themselves. According to the introduction, when Iran began to take steps toward making things better for the country the US responded aggressively: "In retaliation, Great Britain organized an embargo of all exports of Iran. In 1953, the CIA... organized a coup against him" (Satrapi 2). These parts of history are either completely unknown and not taught to American's or little covered.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey, Shawn DeJesus at April 12, 2015 11:35 PM

Ashley Gross and Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
12 April 2015

Group Work:
Answer questions from the “memoir” section of the questions document.

Answer:
Instead of picking just two questions to answer from the memoir section, we decided to condense the answers into one paragraph. We both found that reading the book as a memoir made the events that take place in it more relatable. Also as a memoir, we can trust that Satrapi is being honest and not presenting any false information to the readers. William Zinsser says that “humor is the writer’s armor against the hard emotions” and Satrapi is no different in this regard. In many of her chapters there are funny anecdotes and a lot of the expressions on the characters involved help get the humor across. The stories that Satrapi tells from the points of view of other people serve as exposition to the overall narrative and to provide some background information about the character of those people. These stories and the stories Satrapi presents of others tend to mirror the society during the war. Many of these stories are like parts of the whole of society where each one is both separate from yet still connected to what is happening all over. The heroes of Satrapi’s story are the common people who are fighting for the things they believe in and showing bravery in the face of opposition by those in power. She also values the opinions of many thinkers during the time like Bakunin, Freud, and Marx. While Satrapi does show serious events of the war, she also shows some irony with her drug use. She was told by her parents on multiple occasions to make them proud even though she often feels like a let-down because she has dabbled in various kinds of drugs and smoking. Her health declined and a doctor told her to not smoke or else she risked dying. She disobeyed the doctor with the excuse that she’d “rather put herself in serious danger than confront her shame (Satrapi 244).” The irony here is her drug use after being ill as a result of her previous drug use coupled with her stint as a homeless person. All in all, Satrapi probably called her book “Persepolis” because that is a Greek word meaning “city of Persia.” In other words, Satrapi had named the book after her homeland because she is from Persia. And besides that, “Persepolis” is a really interesting name compared to another name.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 13, 2015 01:07 AM

Rebecca Maldonado, Kristen Collins, Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
10 April 2015

Questions 204: What are the roles for women in Iranian society as depicted in the book?
Answer 204: There are two major female roles in Iranian society in Marji’s story: The contemporary and the traditional. The traditional women spot Marji in her denim jacket rocking out to Kim Wilde and immediately reprimand her rather severely for it. Then there’s the contemporary woman like Marji and her mother. The contemporary one is the one we follow throughout most of the story and as a reader we really understand what Marji and her mother went through.
Question 205: How important is family in Iranian society?
Answer 205: Family in Iranian family is very crucial. While in Vienna, most of her friends and acquaintances were quite rude to their parents or had very little regard for them. Marji, however, was always conscious of her parents. The first time Marji participated in smoking marijuana she immediately felt regret and wondered what her parents would think of her. She had smoked a cigarette before as an act of defiance in her youth. “With this first cigarette, I kissed my childhood goodbye’ (Satrapi 117).

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at April 13, 2015 08:23 AM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
30 March 2016

Question: “The Party”: How does the Shah attempt to appease the people? Why did he fail? Why is this significant?

Answer: The Shah attempted to appease the people by starting a Democracy. Regardless of his attempts, “the more he tried Democracy, the more his statues were torn down” (Chapter 6, page 41, Satrapi translation). The people tore down and burned the statues of the Shah. This is significant because regardless of the Shah’s attempts, the people only wanted his departure.

Posted by: natalie Cassidy at March 28, 2016 04:13 PM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
29 March 2016

“Her jealousy was more than she could bear and she told Mehri’s story to my uncle, who told it to my grandma, who told it to my mom. That is how the story reached my father…who decided to clarify the situation” (Page 36, The Letter, Anjali Singh Translation).

Question: What is the outcome when the news of Mehri’s clandestine affair reaches Marji’s father? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji’s father was the one who “decided to clarify the situation” (36). He was not involved, but instead learned the story because “[Mehri’s sister] told Mehri’s story to [Marji’s] uncle, who told it to [Marji’s] grandma, who told it to [Marji’s] mom” (36). At first, Marji’s father believes that Mehri is the one conversing with the neighbor, but after reading the handwriting that is on the letters, he recognizes Marji’s handwriting and discovers that she was the one who wrote them.

Once Marji’s father discovers the truth, he confronts Marji and tells her that the love between Mehri and the neighbor “was impossible” because of the social class differences between them (Marji’s father says that “in this country you must stay within your own social class”) (37).

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at March 29, 2016 12:22 PM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
29 March 2016

“With this first cigarette, I kissed childhood goodbye. Now I was a grown-up.” (Page 117, The Cigarette, Anjali Singh Translation).

Question: What was Marji’s motive for breaking her parents’ rules? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji both feels the need to grow up as well as the ridiculousness of the war that her country is in. At the very beginning of the chapter, she speaks to her friends about how her people are convinced of how many American tanks and planes they destroy; however, Marji is able to deduce to her friends that “The Americans don’t have an army this big” (111).

When Marji returns home, she is confronted by her mother because she skipped class to spend time with her friends, which is a sign of independence and maturity. Despite her mother’s wishes to keep her daughter in school since “now is the time for learning,” Marji doesn’t see it as a meaningful use of time (113). Her desire to be on her own is shown even more once she goes to the basement and smokes her first cigarette, which turned her into a “grown up” (117).

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at March 29, 2016 12:45 PM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
29 March 2016

“I lost touch with Enrique, but his anarchist friends adopted me. My life was split between them, my school, and Frau Doctor Heller’s house” (Page 215, Hide and Seek, Anjali Singh Translation).

Question: How did Marji’s “first love of her life” change her and her values? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji refers to Enrique with the word “love” multiple times, such as during the anarchist rally that he brings Marji to and just after this (211). However, when he reveals to her that “[he] think[s] [he’s] gay,” it devastates Marji as her “life was split between them, [her] school, and Frau Doctor Heller’s house” following the incident with Enrique (215). She began to take drugs regularly, saying that “[she] tripped every weekend, and you could see it on [her] face” (215). By the end of the chapter, Marji herself becomes sort of the school’s “official drug dealer,” a result of the confusion she’s dealt with, including her various other boyfriends in the chapter and Dr. Heller calling Marji a prostitute (221, 222).

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at March 29, 2016 01:32 PM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
30 March 2016

“You know, my child, since the dawn of time, dynasties have succeeded each other but the kings always kept their promises. The shah kept none.” (Persepolis 27)

Question: 19. “Persepolis”: How did the new Shah’s rule compare to his father’s? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marji askes her grandmother about her grandfather’s imprisonment in chapter 4. Through their exchange, readers learn the history of the shah’s father. The shah’s father was a harsh leader, but he was not as cruel as the Shah (27). Marji’s grandmother tells her, “The shah’s father took everything we owned. I lived in poverty” (27). Embarrassed, Marji’s grandmother pretended to cook though she only had bread to eat (27). Marji’s grandmother confesses, “Yes, the father of the Shah was tough, but his son was ten times worse” (27). Though he promised the “people will regain their splendor,” he was the only one to live in splendor (27). While the Shah spent money on celebrations, the people of the country starved (28). Because of the poor job both shahs did, Marji’s grandmother was grateful that the revolution had removed the Shah from power (28).

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at March 30, 2016 05:53 PM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
30 March 2016

“It wasn’t just the basements. The interiors of homes also changed. But it wasn’t only because of the Iraqi planes.” (105)

Question 71. “The Wine”: How did the interior of their homes reflect the external changes that were occurring? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The bombings from the Iraqi planes forced the people to take shelter in their basements (103). The interior of the people’s houses changed because of their neighbors (105). Marji caught her mom making changes to the interior of their house and asked why she was doing. Her mother answered, “The masking tape is to protect against flying glass during a bombing and the black curtains are to protect us from our neighbors” (105). The neighbors across the street were devoted to the new regime and could turn the family in for breaking the law (105). Marji’s mother knew the threat that their neighbors posed and hung the curtains to protect her family. The black curtains show how the society changed during the time of the regime. Neighbor turned against neighbor.

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at March 30, 2016 06:31 PM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
30 March 2016

Question: “The Passport”: How long were the borders of Iran closed? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: The boarders of Iran were closed, “for three years between 1980 and 1983” (Chapter 16, page 118, Satrapi translation). This is significant because in those three years, family members were torn apart and not allowed to see each other.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at March 30, 2016 07:58 PM

Lauren Kilton

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation

31 March 2016

Question 20: “Persepolis”: Describe the symbolism of the image at the top of page 28. Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: The image at the top of page 28 is of the Shah using the Cyrus cylinder as a political symbol in celebration of Iranian monarchy and his reign, suggesting that his concept of human rights is somehow relatable to that of Cyrus. The body of Cyrus is featured underneath the Shah, and it appears that the deceased ruler is glaring at the Shah, as if to say that he does not consent. The Shah claims that he is “looking after Persia,” but Cyrus is probably turning over in his grave (28).

Question 72: “The Wine”: What two things did they need to protect themselves against? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: They must protect themselves against the bombing from the Iraqi planes and the new Iranian regime. They have to designate certain areas, such as basements, as shelters to which they can run “every time the siren [rings] out” (103). As if being attacked by outsiders were not enough, they have to hide forbidden possessions from the “Guardians of the Revolution Patrols,” who frequently enforce laws with violence.

Question 127: “Pasta”: What recommendation from Simone de Beauvoir does Marji try, and what is the result? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji tries to urinate while standing, on account of Simon de Beauvoir’s belief that it changes women’s perception of life, but she finds that her body is not made to do so successfully (without a mess.) Marji concludes that it is more urgent for her to “become a liberated and emancipated [Iranian] woman” on a larger scale than it is for her to urinate like a man (175). Acting like a man is not going to help the fact that she does not receive the rights of a man.

Posted by: Lauren Kilton at March 31, 2016 09:50 PM

Marie Umholtz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 - Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
31 March 2016
22.“The Letter”: What causes Marji to feel so ashamed? Why? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Marji explains, “The reason for my shame and for the revolution is the same: the difference between social classes” (Satrapi 33). As she realizes the harsh conditions peasant children grow up with, she realizes why she felt shame growing up in a rather privileged family (Satrapi 33). This realization is significant, because Marji sees such assigned social class as unjust (Satrapi 37). Because of this, she and Mehri decide to attend the demonstration (Satrapi 38). Marji cannot reconcile her conscience with the class system, and this moves her to action.

Posted by: Marie Umholtz at March 31, 2016 11:55 PM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
30 March 2016

Question: “The Horse”: Where does Marji’s mother find for her to live, and is this a downgrade or an improvement? What might be problematic about it? Why is this significant?

Answer: Marji’s mother found her a place to live at the
university with a woman named Frau. This was an improvement from her previous place where she lived with eight homosexual men. Marji enjoyed, “the big terrace that looked out on the garden” (Chapter 25, page 207, Satrapi translation). The new house was nice, besides the dog that pooped on her bed.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at April 1, 2016 03:37 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
31 March 2016

“Persepolis Pt. 1” Ripa translation

Question: Who are Che Guevara, Fidel, and Trotsky? (Look them up!) Why are they important? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Che Guevara and Fidel Castro were guerrilla military leaders who overthrew the Cuban dictator Batista. Guevara and Castro instituted a brutal communist dictatorship. Leon Trotsky was a Russian revolutionary who led the Red Army. These figures relate to “Persepolis” as Marji and her friends are filled with revolutionary fever and they pretend to be these figures (Satrapi 10). Even Marji’s family wanted to depose him, as her father explained, “‘2500 years of tyranny and submission. First our own emperors. Then the Arab invasion from the west. Followed by the Mongolian invasion from the east. And finally modern imperialism” (11). However, like the wars and movements these historical figures led, the new Iranian government was just as bad as the Shah’s government.

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 2, 2016 01:58 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
31 March 2016

“Persepolis Pt. 1” Ripa translation

Question: What is one of the ramifications of the nation’s political conflict? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: One ramification of the conflict is the food shortage (Satrapi 87). Marjane sees women fighting over food in the supermarket. Her mother yells at the women that, “If stores were closed for a single day, [they’d] probably eat each other alive!” (87). When people run low on food and other necessities, they begin to act uncivilized, and this causes even more conflict and hardship for civilians in wartime.

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 2, 2016 02:04 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
31 March 2016

“Persepolis Pt. 2” Ferris translation

Question: Who does Marji begin reading, again, to bone up on her friends’ interests? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marji begins reading Bakunin and Sartre to understand her friends’ interests. Bakunin rejects all authority, just like Marji’s rebel friends. However, Marji is a little lost on Bakunin’s philosophy, “as surely Momo didn’t either” (Satrapi 174). This shows that Marji has little respect for Momo, and she thinks he s full of himself for trying to educate her on something he likely has little grasp of. Marji finds Sartre, “a little annoying,” which mirrors how she feels when Momo lectures her on philosophy (173-4). Marji clearly does not like philosophy, but she really wants to fit in as she is in a foreign country with few friends.

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 2, 2016 02:13 PM

William McDermott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410

24.“The Letter”: What did Marji do for six months to help Mehri? Why? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Since Mehri was illiterate Marji helped write letters to Hossein, the boy across the street who Mehri had a crush on. Mehri’s lower class upbringing not only prevented her from learning how to read and write, but it also prevented her from having a relationship with Hossein, who was of a higher class. With Marji writing the letters, Mehri could make Hossein think that she was an educated woman of his class and allow the relationship to continue. After the relationship fell apart due to Hossein discovering Mehri was a maid, Marji’s father explains that “their love was impossible… because in this country you must stay within your own social class.” (37)

Posted by: William McDermott at April 2, 2016 03:51 PM

William McDermott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410

78.“The Cigarette”: What did the local news report about the war? What does Marji realize about this information? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

On page 111 Marji explains to her friends the discrepancies of how many Iraqi planes the Iranian news reported being destroyed, proving that the local news was making up the numbers as Marji claims that “Even the Americans don’t have an army this big.” (111) Recognizing that her government is flawed sets Marji on a rebellious path against her mother, seeing her as the “government” of her household.

Posted by: William McDermott at April 2, 2016 03:52 PM

William McDermott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410

129. “Pasta”: After the incident with the nun, who does Marji live with, and who does she never see again? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Marji goes to live with Julie and her family and never sees her roommate Lucia again. On page 175 Marji claims that through visiting Lucia’s family she “had a new set of parents” and claimed that Lucia was her sister. Having to move so far away from her family, struggle with being independent at a young age and experience living in a foreign country, Marji had found a sense of stability and comfort with how friendly and accepting Lucia’s family was of her.

Posted by: William McDermott at April 2, 2016 03:52 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
2 April 2016

"Then came 1980: The year it became obligatory to wear the veil at school."
(Page 3, The Veil, Anjali Singh Translation)

Question #4: “The Veil”: What did the veil symbolize? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The Veil represents the oppression of women in Iran and the power the regime had over the people. The Muslim regime thinks that everyone should have to follow their religion so they made they made the girls start wearing the veils so it would become normal for the younger generation to practice the faith the way they want them to.

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at April 3, 2016 06:18 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
2 April 2016

“Dad! Do you remember what you learned during your military service? Are you going to war? Are you going to fight? We have to teach those Iraqis a lesson!”
(Page 81, The F-14s, Anjali Singh Translation)

Question #54: “The F-14s”: Does Marji’s father intend to fight against the Iraqis? Why? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: No, her father does not intend to fight against the Iraqis. When she asks him if he is going to go to war, he replies, “What are you talking about? Of course, I’m not going to fight. Why should I fight?” (81). Then he goes on to say, “The real Islamic invasion has come from our own government.” (81). He seems to think the problem is with their government and he know fighting against the Iraqis would not fix that.

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at April 3, 2016 06:29 PM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
3 April 2016

Question 2: “Introduction”: The author indicates two motives for writing Persepolis. What are those motives? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marjane Satrapi wrote Persepolis to show that the image of Iran as a country of "fundamentalism, fantasicm, and terrorism is far from the truth." (Satrapi) She has lived in Iran more than half of her life, and the negative and dangerous image that is associated with Iran is not completely accurate, and that the "entire nation should not be judged by the wrongdoings of the actions of a few extremists." (Satrapi)

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at April 3, 2016 11:49 PM

Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
5 Apr 2016

Question #3 - From Chapter 1 “The Veil” How was education affected by the new regime? Why? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text(with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer – The new regime stated in 1980 that “all bilingual schools must be closed down” (4). Prior to this, Marji attended a French, non-religious school that boys and girls could attend together. But the new regime deemed that school to be “a symbol of capitalism” (4) and one of “decadence” (4). This is significant because it is the first time Marji has an understanding of the changes her country is going through. She witnesses her parents demonstrating against the new regime, and is also given books. She states her parents wanted “to enlighten me…about the revolutionaries of my country” (12).

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at April 4, 2016 01:04 AM

Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
5 Apr 2016

Question #74 From Chapter 14 “The Wine” – Why did Marji’s family continue to hold parties despite the danger? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer – Marji’s parents continued to hold parties because “without them, it wouldn’t be psychologically bearable” (106). Some believed “without parties, we might as well just bury ourselves now” 106). The parties were something for people to look forward to and have a good time at. It was also a way to celebrate special events within the family, like a birth. Without the parties, their lives would have little happiness.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at April 4, 2016 01:05 AM

Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
5 Apr 2016

Question #120 from Chapter 20 “The Soup” – What are Marji’s feelings about the boarding house, and how does she try to make the best of it? What are the positives? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quotes passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer – Marji was happy to go to the boarding house, because it meant she could escape “Zozo the Mean and Shirin the Inane” (158). Zozo fought constantly with her husband and her daughter Shirin was only concerned with material possessions and had no clue what was happening in their homeland. Marji makes the best of her new situation by accepting that she now “had a real independent adult life” (159). She rejoiced in all the choices of items available at the grocery store, like scented laundry soap. Making the best of school and her new situation is significant, because despite being apart from her family, Marji is at least safe from war and receiving a proper education.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at April 4, 2016 01:06 AM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
4 April 2016

Question 56: “The F-14s”: How does Marji reflect the common stereotypical thinking of other Iranians? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji reflects the common stereotypical thinking of other Iranians when she says to her father, "How can you say that? The Iraqis have always been our enemies. They want to invade us." (Satrapi 81) Marji is stating that all Iraqis, not just a few extremists, hate the Iranians. Also, Marji continues with, "the Arabs never liked the Persians. Everyone knows that. They attacked us 1400 years ago. They forced their religion on us." (81) Marji is using very broad/stereotypical terminology like "everyone", "they", etc.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at April 4, 2016 11:19 AM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
4 April 2016

“The harder I tried to assimilate, the more I had the feeling that I was distancing myself from my culture, betraying my parents and my origins, that I was playing a game by somebody else’s rules” (Chapter 24, 193)

Question: 134. “The Vegetable”: Explain the inner struggle Marji was having, especially when she talks to her parents. Why does she feel that she is betraying them? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Throughout “The Vegetable” Marji describes the difficulties she faced during adolescence. Though she gives readers a description of the physical changes, the focus of the chapter is on the abstract changes. Marji tries to fit in but the more she tries, the more she alienates herself from her culture and origins (193). When her parents call, she is reminded of her “cowardice and [her] betrayal” because they expect her to be “the child all parents dream of having” when she knows she is not (193). Marji lies about her identity because Iran was seen as evil at the time (195). The culture was labeled evil by the public, and it made Marji ashamed to be Iranian. Her shame brought back her grandmother’s advice: “Always keep your dignity and be true to yourself” (195). Marji did not feel comfortable with herself (197). All adolescents will feel something like this at one time or another, but Marji’s case of growing into herself was made more difficult because of the way all Iranians were falsely labeled.

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at April 4, 2016 11:56 AM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
4 April 2016

“The harder I tried to assimilate, the more I had the feeling that I was distancing myself from my culture, betraying my parents and my origins, that I was playing a game by somebody else’s rules” (Chapter 24, 193)

Question: 134. “The Vegetable”: Explain the inner struggle Marji was having, especially when she talks to her parents. Why does she feel that she is betraying them? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Throughout “The Vegetable” Marji describes the difficulties she faced during adolescence. Though she gives readers a description of the physical changes, the focus of the chapter is on the abstract changes. Marji tries to fit in but the more she tries, the more she alienates herself from her culture and origins (193). When her parents call, she is reminded of her “cowardice and [her] betrayal” because they expect her to be “the child all parents dream of having” when she knows she is not (193). Marji lies about her identity because Iran was seen as evil at the time (195). The culture was labeled evil by the public, and it made Marji ashamed to be Iranian. Her shame brought back her grandmother’s advice: “Always keep your dignity and be true to yourself” (195). Marji did not feel comfortable with herself (197). All adolescents will feel something like this at one time or another, but Marji’s case of growing into herself was made more difficult because of the way all Iranians were falsely labeled.

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at April 4, 2016 11:56 AM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
4 April 2016

Question: 159. “Skiing”: Why is Marji still depressed? Why don’t people understand her? Does she want them to? Why, or why not? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marji is still depressed because she has bottled up her emotions and refuses to tell her family about her experiences in Vienna though she wants to (267). She believed that moving back to Iran would make her feel better, but she still could not forget “the old days” and her past caught up with her (268). On a ski trip with some friends, Marji realizes that Iranians consider her a Westerner but Westerners view her as Iranian (270). Marji is left feeling that she has no identity and this revelation deepens her depression.

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at April 4, 2016 07:52 PM

Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
5 Apr 2016

Question #169 (Chapter 33 “The Makeup”) – Why is Marji’s grandmother so disappointed in her, and what is Marji’s counter reaction? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer – Marji’s grandmother is disappointed in her for having a man falsely arrested in the street. Marji was wearing lipstick in public, which is against the law, and a raid came. In order to protect herself from being seized, she distracted the guards by falsely claiming a man insulted her. She let him be taken away, even though he was crying “Miss, please, do something! Tell them that I’m innocent” (286). Marji at first seems shocked by her actions, but her boyfriend laughed at it. When she told the story to her grandmother, instead of finding it funny her grandmother called Marji “a selfish bitch” (291). Her grandmother had never yelled at her before, and Marji’s reaction is to vow that it would never happen again. This is significant because Marji realizes the great sacrifices her uncle and grandmother made by keeping their honor and integrity, which means she will try to do the same.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at April 5, 2016 12:26 AM

Giuseppe Donnian
ENG 425
Dr. Hobbs
30 March 2016

"The Veil" Why was a picture of Marji's mother published in the newspaper? How did her mother response? Why? How is this significant?

The picture of Marji's mother was published in the newspaper as a way of making an example out of her. Her mother responds by changing her image. She dies her hair and begins to wear sunglasses so she is not recognized in public. This is significant because it shows the oppression of females in Iran.

Posted by: Giuseppe Donnian at April 5, 2016 09:06 AM

Giuseppe Donnian
ENG 425
Dr. Hobbs
01 April 2016

"The F14's" The last frame on page 81 reflects an idea about war: describe what the illustration seems to say. Why is this significant?

The last frame reflects that war always takes one by surprise. At one moment Marji's mother was showering and in an instant her husband and daughter bashed in to deliver the news. This is significant because it shows how quickly life can change. Reading this as an American I can not begin to imagine what it was like to live in constant fear, but it paints a picture of how quickly things can change.

Posted by: Giuseppe Donnian at April 5, 2016 11:33 AM

Giuseppe Donnian
ENG 425
Dr. Hobbs
04 April 2016

"Tyrol" To what sound does Marji wake up to every morning? Is this problematic? Why or Why Not? Why is this significant?

Marji wakes up every morning to the sound of Lucia's hairdryer. This is problematic because it wakes Marji up much earlier than she would like. This is significant because it highlights the cultural differences in etiquette between the two girls.

Posted by: Giuseppe Donnian at April 5, 2016 11:45 AM

Giuseppe Donnian
ENG 425
Dr. Hobbs
06 April 2016

"The Exam" Why did Roxana stop talking to Marji? Why is this significant? Explain.

Roxana warned Marji that Reza is a ladies man and she should avoid him. Marji ignored Roxana's warning and the two hit it off. It turns out that Roxana did not want Marji to talk to Reza because Roxana's friend planned on talking to him that night. Roxana stopped talking to Marji after Marji hit it off with Reza at the party.

Posted by: Giuseppe Donnian at April 5, 2016 11:56 AM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
5 April 2016

“Long afterward my father admitted to me that he had always known that I would get divorced. He wanted me to realize by myself that Reza and I were not made for each other. He was right” (Page 313, The Wedding, Anjali Singh Translation).

Question: What were Marji’s parents’ individual reactions to her marriage to Reza? Why did they react as such? Why is this significant?

Answer: Marji’s father is the first parent who finds out about her marriage to Reza. He is supportive of her desire to marry, saying that Marji was “the only one who can know” what she wants (312). He, in addition, also invites Reza and Marji to a dinner immediately after Marji announced her decision to commit to the marriage a few days later. “After dinner,” Marji’s father speaks “as [Reza’s] future father-in-law” first, and then tells Reza three conditions he must follow in order to give him his blessing.

Marji’s mother, on the other hand, isn’t as supportive as her father. When she first learns of the marriage, she is away at Vancouver, and responds to the information with rapid questions such as “to whom” she is getting married to and accusing her of being “too young” (314). She appears to change her mind when she arrives home and after her father talks to her, after which she appears to happily proclaim that she would “make the arrangements” for the marriage (314). However, after the actual wedding ceremony, Marji is able to discover her mother’s true concerns for her. Her mother believes that the marriage will hold her down from the freedom that she truly believes her daughter wants and needs, saying that she had “always wanted for [Marji] to become independent, educated, cultured” and to “leave Iran” and “be free and emancipated” despite the fact that she is “getting married at twenty-one,” a clear problem for her (317).

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at April 5, 2016 01:24 PM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
5 April 2016

Question: Who is Reza? How did Marji meet him? Why is this significant?

Answer: Reza is a boy who fought in the war against Iraq. Marji meets him, “at a party” (Chapter 32, page 277, Satrapi translation). This is significant because Marji marries him two years later.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at April 5, 2016 07:10 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
5 April 2016

“Persepolis Pt. 2” Ferris translation

Question: What, eventually, becomes Marji’s opinion on divorce and how does this compare to her grandmother’s opinion about divorce? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marji is scared to divorce Reza after her friend tells her that men will assume she is a loose woman if she gets divorced (Satrapi 332-3). However, Marji’s grandmother tells her that divorce is not a big deal. Her grandmother assumes her that, “a first marriage is a dry run for the second. You’ll be more satisfied next time” (333). Marji realizes that if her grandmother could divorce her first husband decades ago and be happy, then she could one-day divorce Reza. However, her grandmother warned her not to rush the divorce, so Marji waited until she was sure they could no longer be happy together (338).

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 5, 2016 08:58 PM

William McDermott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
6 April 2016

172. “The Convocation”: What are the results of Marji speaking her mind at art school? What does the Islamic Convention make her do? Why is this significant?

When summoned to the Islamic Commission for speaking out on how Islamic culture was repressing the women while the men received no criticism, Marji ends up meeting the same man who gave her the religious morals exam for the national exam she took to get into art school. She ends up not being expelled, with the man telling her she was brave for speaking for herself, but that she just needed to understand the religion better.

Posted by: William McDermott at April 5, 2016 10:43 PM

Lauren Kilton

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation

5 April 2016

Question 171: “The Convocation”: Who are Marji’s friends at school? Provide, at least, one interesting fact about each of them. Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji’s friends at school in this chapter are all women because they are not allowed to mix with the men. The only friends of hers who are given names are Shouka and Niyoosha. Apparently, Shouka is very comical, but she will not be allowed to remain friends with Marji in the future because Shouka’s husband thinks that she is an “amoral person” (293). Niyoosha is the most pursued woman at the college because she has green eyes, and that is rare for an Iranian. Marji never seems to be very close with either of these women, or with most Iranian women for that matter, because her personality and life experiences are considerably unique, making it difficult for her to relate to them. Furthermore, they tend to look down on her for her sexual choices, as they like to appear in favor of Western norms but not fully adopt them.

Posted by: Lauren Kilton at April 6, 2016 09:30 AM

Nicholas Santos, Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
6 April 2016

"The internal war had become a bigger issue than the war against Iraq. Anyone showing the slightest resistance to the regime was prosecuted” (Page 118, The Passport, Anjali Singh Translation).

Question: Who are, if any, some of the new characters in this chapter? What is the context, developments, or plot points of this chapter? Is there a major epiphany, turning point, or revelation, and if so, what is it?

Answer: In terms of new characters, we are introduced most prominently to Uncle Taher, who is the main focus of the chapter. While there is no true “epiphany” or “revelation” in this chapter, much about the political status of Marji’s home is explored in this chapter’s plot.

Before this chapter, Uncle Taher had suffered from two heart attacks; the conflict from this chapter is a result of his third heart attack. It is evident that he smoked often, as this is evidenced by his wife telling him to “stop smoking” (118). Uncle Taher, as a result, is evidenced to be a stressful person, mostly because of the “internal war” that was taking place; he says that “the stress [he] gets from every gunshot [he] hear[s] is much worse for [him] than the cigarettes” he smokes (118). He worries about the conflict that surrounds his home, and has tried on multiple occasions to unsuccessfully convince his wife to join his son, who was “safely abroad” and away from all of the conflict (118).

While looking for Uncle Taher in the hospital, a secondary development is shown when Marji and her family are exposed to many deceased and heavily injured patients inside the hospital they visit; Marji, in narration, said that “there were so many of [the war wounded]” (120). It is this development that relates to Uncle Taher’s heart attack, which was the result of an attempt to “arrest some communists who were hiding” gone wrong;” a grenade was thrown to settle the dispute, and the resulting explosion gave Uncle Taher his heart attack (121).

Unfortunately, the hospital that Uncle Taher is stationed at is “not equipped,” and Marji’s family is told that “he has to be sent to England,” where the proper equipment is available, if he is to survive (121). Uncle Taher’s wife is told that a passport is required in order to deliver him to England, but the hospital director, a highly religious man, does not give authorization for a passport; he says, to help reconcile the situation, that “everything depends on God” (121). This, in addition to the actual act of a grenade being used to settle a communist dispute, greatly emphasize the poor state of political turmoil that Uncle Taher speaks of.

We are then introduced to Khosro, a fake passport printer, and Niloufar, an eighteen-year-old communist hiding with him. Khosro meant to create a fake passport for Uncle Taher, but after Niloufar is discovered and executed, he flees, leaving Uncle Taher to die as he has no way to get to England. In summary, it can be assumed that, were it not for the terrible state of political turmoil, it is possible that Uncle Taher’s life could have been saved.

Posted by: Nicholas Santos, Nicole Alvarez at April 6, 2016 06:13 PM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
7 April 2016

Question 122: In what way do some of Marji’s new schoolmates tease and trick her? Is this problematic? Why, or why not? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: In Tyrol, Marji is starting at a new school after moving into a boarding house run by nuns. All of the "cliques" of the school have been established, and she is trying to fit in as best as she can. However, Marji is struggling a bit with French and her new classmates have been teasing her for it. For example, Marji states, "my mistakes in French made me someone of interest. It had been three years since I'd practiced my French, after the closing of the bilingual schools by the Islamic government." (Satrap 165) Moreover, the students have taken an "interest" in Marji by teasing her for the language barrier between them.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at April 7, 2016 09:55 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
7 April 2016

“Okay! That’s enough. Let’s go!”
(Page 158, “The Soup”, Anjali Singh Translation)

Question #119: “The Soup”: What might be a true reason why Zozo puts Marji in a boarding house? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: It is possible that Zozo saw Marji as a threat to her marriage. Marji said that she saw Houshang as a “protector,” and he saw her as “an ally” but Zozo could have seen something there that Marji was too young to notice (158). There was clearly some trouble with their marriage because they were constantly fighting and maybe having this young girl living with them wasn’t making things any easier on them.

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at April 7, 2016 10:13 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
7 April 2016


Question #166: “The Makeup”: What does Marji do to impress Reza, and why? What are the results of this decision? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marji puts on lipstick to impress Reza because he would “criticize her physical characteristics”. She says that he would say things like, she wasn’t “elegant enough, not made-up enough” (285). In an effort to make him happy she risked going into public with make-up on and almost got caught by a surprise raid by the Guardians of the Revolution. It is significant because it shows the impossible situation she was in as a woman in Iran wanting to make their partners happy but it may not go with what their society wants from them.

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at April 7, 2016 10:37 PM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
8 April 2016

Question 162: “Skiing”: For what reason does Marji undergo therapy? What are the results? Was this a positive experience? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji undergoes therapy because she feels as though she cannot talk about the hardships that she faced in Vienna while her parents, family, and friends were also struggling in war-torn Iran. Marji states, "When I was in Vienna, my life didn't matter to anyone and that obviously had an effect on my own self-esteem. I was reduced to nothing. I thought that in coming back to Iran, this would change." (Satrapi 271) Marji has been concealing her horrible experiences she faced in Vienna, and feels like she has done nothing with her life because of it.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at April 8, 2016 10:25 AM

Leona Hunt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature CA01
4 April 2016

Question 35: “Moscow”: Who is Anoosh? How does Marji feel about him? Why? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words. (Persepolis: The Story of Childhood, Marjane Satrapi, Ripa Translation)

Answer: Anoosh is Marji’s uncle who was a war hero because he went to prison for nine years since he supported Fereydoon and the idea of independence (that threatened the Shah). When the police came for him, he fled to the U.S.S.R and studied Marxism-leninism, but he tried returning to his country and was caught at the border. (57-62) Marji is very impressed by him, and he becomes a leading influence in her life (that can arguably be one of the figures who helped install the importance of rebellion throughout her later life). Anoosh’s words of wisdom follow her into adulthood such as “family memory must not be lost” which brings the audience back to the fact that they are reading a memoir.

Posted by: Leona Hunt at April 9, 2016 08:15 PM

Leona Hunt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature CA01
4 April 2016

Question 97: “Kim Wilde”: What problem do Marji’s parents face as they return from their trip to Istanbul? How does Marji’s mom show her ingenuity? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words. (Persepolis: The Story of Childhood, Marjane Satrapi, Ripa Translation)

Answer: Marji’s parents have trouble figuring out a way to sneak Kim Wilde and Iron Maiden posters through customs because they are not allowed into their country. Marji’s mom, however, creates secret pockets in her husband’s shoulder pads and rolls the posters into them so that they don’t get folded (131). The action is significant because it shows that Marji’s mom disagrees with the strictness and censorship of her country, and she is “permissive” for an Iranian mom during this time (134).

Posted by: Leona Hunt at April 9, 2016 08:17 PM

Leona Hunt and Daniella Zacarias
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature CA01
6 April 2016
.
Question 150: “The Veil”: Why does Marji end up in the hospital? What is the result of her stay there? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words. (Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return, Marjane Satrapi, Ferris Translation)

Answer: Marji ends up in the hospital because, after her break up with Markus, she feels as if she had lost her emotional support. She runs away from her current home, sleeps on benches, smokes cigarettes on the ground, and eats out of trashcans (87-8). Eventually, the strain on her mentally and physically causes her to “cough a little, then a little more, then a little more strongly” (89) until she ends up in the hospital. While she is in the hospital, she realizes “it’s a banal story of love that almost carried me away” (90) despite all the external war scenarios she survived as a child. It is a significant passage because it shows how not having an emotional support was more difficult for her to endure than living in an oppressed society (that she decided to return to at the end).

Posted by: Leona Hunt at April 9, 2016 08:20 PM

Leona Hunt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature CA01
6 April 2016

186) “The End”: Once divorced, how did men treat Marji? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words. (Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return, Marjane Satrapi, Ferris Translation)

Answer: When Marji got divorced, there wasn’t much explanation about how men treated her. Her parents offered her support and admitted that they expected her marriage to end in divorce. However, before she got divorce, her friend, Farnaz, told her about what happened to her sister when she got divorced: “The butcher, the pastry chef, the baker, the fruit and vegetable seller, the itinerant cigarette seller, even beggars in the street, all made it clear they’d like to sleep with her.” (178) Divorced women were not treated properly because everyone knew they were no longer virgins and judged them for it. It is a significant passage because of the insight provided about the stigmas related to divorce for the culture.

Posted by: Leona Hunt at April 9, 2016 08:22 PM

Leona Hunt and Daniella Zacarias
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature CA01
6 April 2016

Group 9: “Moscow”

(Persepolis: The Story of Childhood, Marjane Satrapi, Ripa Translation)

A new character introduced in the chapter is Anoosh, who is Marji’s uncle. Basically, the chapter shows how Marji learns about her uncle, how he becomes an important influential figure in her life, and how she brags about him to her friends. The most important information that is revealed is Anoosh’s background and his guidance: he tells her “family memory must not be lost. Even if it’s not easy to for you, even if you don’t understand it at all.” (60) The following quote basically sets up the importance of the story which is to recollect the past and her memories during her time. The major epiphany in the story is that Marji discovers there is a hero in her family because of his progressive beliefs.

Posted by: Leona Hunt at April 9, 2016 08:28 PM

Amber Clidinst
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
7 April 2016

Question: “Introduction”: According to the introduction, what stereotypical image is Satrapi trying to dispel? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The stereotype of Iran is one of “fundamentalism, fanaticism, and terrorism,” but Sartrapi wishes to prove otherwise. This is important because the image of Iran and the Iranian people make a difference to how people interpret their stories and lives. By breaking down the stereotypes set around her people she opens the door to others understanding the truth behind what has happened in Iran and can make the world a safer place for those who have unfounded prejudices.

Posted by: Amber Clidinst at April 9, 2016 09:41 PM

Amber Clidinst
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
9 April 2016

Question: “Introduction”: According to the introduction, what stereotypical image is Satrapi trying to dispel? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marji’s mother being wrapped in a towel, fresh from the shower, is amusing because it is such a sigh of relief after the tension and worry cause by the bombings. This change in tone allows one to see the amusement of the situation that they find her mother in. She was unaware of what was happening and being in a comical situation, wet and naked and hugged by her family is an amusing scene.

Posted by: Amber Clidinst at April 9, 2016 09:42 PM

Amber Clidinst
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
9 April 2016

Question: “The F-14s”: What is humorous about the sequence at the bottom of pg 81? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marji’s mother being wrapped in a towel, fresh from the shower, is amusing because it is such a sigh of relief after the tension and worry cause by the bombings. This change in tone allows one to see the amusement of the situation that they find her mother in. She was unaware of what was happening and being in a comical situation, wet and naked and hugged by her family is an amusing scene.

Posted by: Amber Clidinst at April 9, 2016 09:43 PM

Amber Clidinst
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
9 April 2016

Question: “The Soup”: Why is Marji no longer staying with Zozo, the friend of her mother’s? What happened? Where is she now? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: This chapter does not give a clear reason for Marji being moved out of Zozo’s house, but Zozo made it clear that the family was having some issues with money and she seemed to disapprove of Marji’s presence the moment she arrived, Marji “detected something unkind in the look” Zozo gave her (156). Marji was quickly moved to a boarding house fun by nuns and now she is living among a number of German speaking girls. This scene is important because Marji believed she was leaving a strict, religious Iran for a free and fun Europe, but she is still stuck and is not living the free life she expected to.

Posted by: Amber Clidinst at April 9, 2016 09:44 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures

8 April 2016

“Later we learned they crossed the border, hidden among a flock of sheep” (Satrapi 66)
Question: “The Sheep”: What is the significance of the title? How does it help to characterize the people of Iran? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Not only does a family try to escape the country by crossing the border with a flock of sheep, but the stereotypes of sheep also apply to the people of Iran at the time (66). As the fear of the impeding government bears down on Iran, people begin to run. Where some run more will follow, much how like sheep operate. Marji tells the reader that “a good part of my family also left the country” after her friend leaves (64). Her father says that people are “just afraid of change” (64). Another characteristic of sheep is ignorance. Marji’s father also says “’Did you hear that, Anoosh? Do you realize how ignorant our people are?’” (62). A boy she knows says that “’nobody realizes the danger’” (63).

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at April 10, 2016 12:47 AM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
8 April 2016

Persepolis: Question 94

“’The Germans sell chemical weapons to Iran and Iraq. The wounded are then sent to Germany to be treated. Veritable human guinea pigs’” (Satrapi 122)

Question: “The Passport”: Where did many of the seriously wounded travel for treatment? Why is this ironic? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The wounded ended up being treated at the vary place responsible for their injuries (122). Even though it was slightly indirect, the Germans weren’t using chemical weapons against the Iranians, they were still providing Iran’s enemies with the means to kill Iran. To stay in accordance with human rights acts, Germany probably wasn’t allowed to test the effects of chemical warfare on normal people. However, if they let their technology get used and then receive the victims exposed to the chemicals, they are getting free test subjects. As the text put, they were “guinea pigs” (122).

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at April 10, 2016 12:48 AM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
8 April 2016

Persepolis: Question 150

“’So, you had severe bronchitis without getting treatment. I forbid you to smoke. One single cigarette and you will put yourself in serious danger’” (Satrapi 242)

Question: “The Veil”: Why does Marji end up in the hospital? What is the result of her stay there? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji ends up in the hospital because she is homeless (238). Marji stated that she “spent more than two months on the street in the middle of winter” (240). She developed a cough that got worse and worse until she passed out and was taken to the hospital (241). After getting her back to health, the doctor states that she had bronchitis and to never smoke again (242). What results because of her stay is that she calls in a favor from Zozo who then relays to her that her parents have been phoning for her (243). After calling her parents, she asks if she can go back to Iran and they say yes so she returns (244).

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at April 10, 2016 12:53 AM

Daniella Zacarias Kattán
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 CA01 Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
6 April 2016

“I really didn’t know what to think about the veil. Deep down I was very religious but as a family we were very modern and avant-garde.” (“The Veil” page 6).

8. “The Veil”: Describe the symbolism and conflict represented in the picture on the top left of page 6.Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: The illustration, on the top left corner of page 6, is divided along the middle to represent the division of Marji’s life. Part of her is tied to her religion’s traditions, and the other half is reluctant to wear the veil as a symbol of oppression (which is what the regime is indirectly making the veil represent). She grew up with parents who probably did not instil the use of the veil as a regular part of life, who instead were teaching her to balance progress in her studies with the help of religion.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at April 10, 2016 05:14 PM

Daniella Zacarias Kattán
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 CA01 Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
6 April 2016

“Ok, enough of that. The real invasion has come from our own government.” (“The F-14s” page).

57. “The F-14s”: How does Marji’s dad cut through her propaganda induced thinking? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: On page 81, middle right panel, Marji’s father has commented to Marji that he has had enough of her propaganda induced comments. Instead, he offers the possibility to believe that their own government has failed its people by drilling the population with less progressive ideas in education and instead focusing on dismantling the public life by demanding “religious” ideals.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at April 10, 2016 05:38 PM

Daniella Zacarias Kattán
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 CA01 Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
6 April 2016

“In Tehran, Zozo was her husband’s secretary, in Vienna, she became a hairdresser. . . As for Houshang, Zozo’s husband, he was a CEO in Iran, but in Austria, he was nothing.” (“The Soup” page 157).

117. “The Soup”: What is the struggle for people in regards to their careers when they leave Tehran to live in another country? Marji’s father mentions it earlier to his wife when she suggest them moving to America. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Zozo and her husband, Houshang, are the exact same thing Marji’s parents feared would happen to them as immigrant in a foreign country. Marji’s father feared he would no longer be able to maintain the family’s current lifestyle in their home country in another country. This is because he believes the most he could do in a foreign country is become a taxi driver; in their country he is able to maintain a higher social and economic status, anywhere else they will be viewed as nothing more than immigrants.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at April 10, 2016 05:54 PM

Daniella Zacarias Kattán
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 CA01 Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
6 April 2016

“ Ihave always wanted for you to become independent, educated, cultured. . .and here you are getting married at twenty-one. I want you to leave Iran, for you to be free and emancipated. . .” (“The Wedding” page 317).

179. “The Wedding”: What were some of the foreshadowing signs in this chapter that Reza and Marji’s marriage was in trouble? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The quote above is being said by Marji’s mother (upper right panel) to Marji after she and Reza have gotten married. Marji comforts her mother by telling her she knows what she is doing, but this attitude quickly changes four panels later (lower right panel). Marji explains that “. . . when the apartment door closed, I had a bizarre feeling. . . I was already sorry! I had suddenly become ‘a married woman.’ I had conformed to society, while I had always wanted to remain in the margins. In my mind, ‘a married woman’ wasn’t like me. It required too many compromises. I couldn’t accept it, but it was too late.” (317). Marji’s thoughts coincided with the idea that she felt trapped, not just in her marriage, but also within the society which surrounded her. She had become a part of society, and she had lost herself in it.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at April 10, 2016 06:05 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
30 March 2016

Question 8: “The Veil”: Describe the symbolism and conflict represented in the picture on the top left of page 6. Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: The picture at the top of page six of Persepolis depicts a 10-year-old Marjane trying to make sense of the veil. She thinks, “I really didn’t know what to think about the veil. Deep down I was very religious but as a family we were very modern and avant-garde” (Satrapi 6). Marjane is torn between her religion (wearing the veil) and her modern values (not wearing the veil). The Iranian government at the time depicted citizens as either fundamentalist or sacrilegious. The government deliberately erased the middle, where Marjane fell, in order to strengthen their ideology and turn citizens against one another. This false dilemma is embodied by the veil. Even Marjane depicts wearing the veil and not wearing the veil as a dichotomy; the side with the veil is flowering and elegant to represent sentiment and tradition while the side without the veil has tools and cogs to represent logic and reason (Satrapi 6). This is a false dichotomy; in reality, one can be both religious and modern.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at April 11, 2016 11:17 AM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
4 April 2016

Question 124: “Tyrol”: Why doesn’t Marji go home during the holiday break, and where does she go, instead? What does she like and dislike about it? Why is this significant?

Answer: Marji cannot go home for the holiday break because passage to and from Iran is extremely difficult. Even if Marjane was able to go back to Iran, she most likely wouldn’t be able to return to Europe again. Instead, she visits her roommate Lucia’s family in Tyrol. Tyrol is in southwest Austria, a very traditional region. Lucia’s father even wears leather lederhosen. At first, Marjane has a difficult time understanding the family since they have such strong accents, but they still try to communicate with her. Marjane dislikes the long Catholic mass, but attends because Lucia’s family takes her. Marjane loves the family’s warmth and kindness. The family knows she’s from Iran, but instead of being prejudiced, they are interested in her story. Marjane remembers, “Lucia’s family had never seen any Iranians. I was therefore invited over every day by an uncle and an aunt who wanted to get to know me” (Satrapi 172). As Marjane prepares to leave, Lucia’s family showers her with gifts, including a handmade frame. Marjane calls them “a new set of parents” and Lucia a sister (Satrapi 172). Because of their warmth and kindness, Marjane feels wholly happy and accepted for the first time since leaving Iran.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at April 11, 2016 11:43 AM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
6 April 2016

Question 157: “The Joke”: Who does Marji’s mother suggest that she visit, and why? What happens to their friendship later on? Why is this significant?

Answer: Marji’s mother suggests she visit her old friends in order to lift her spirits. Marji remembers her childhood friends Arash and Kia. Marji’s mom warns her that Kia was disabled on the front lines of the war, but Marji decides to visit him anyway. The next day, she arrives at Kia’s apartment to find Kia bound to a wheelchair and missing an arm. Kia can tell that Marji feels sorry for him so he tells her a joke about a soldier on the front lines. The soldier is hit by a grenade and rushed to the hospital, where they put all his pieces back together. Later on, the soldier is married to a beautiful woman. On their honeymoon night, the wife is horrified to see that his penis is attached to his hip. The soldier answers, “It’s no big deal. It still works!” The woman shouts that she wants a divorce. The soldier points to his armpit and yells, “Kiss my ass!” (Satrapi 265-6). Marji and Kia immediately burst into laughter.

Marji and Kia’s friendship is rekindled and they talk for hours. Later on, Marji reflects, “That day, I learned something essential. We can only feel sorry for ourselves when are misfortunes are still supportable… Once this limit is crossed, the only way to bear the unbearable is to laugh at it” (Satrapi 265-6). Marji has definitely adopted this life policy. Even though Persepolis deals with harsh life themes and sorrows, she always keeps her sense of humor. She and Kia see one another again several more times before he leaves for the United States. They eventually lose touch, but she always remembers his lesson.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at April 11, 2016 12:06 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
8 April 2016

Persepolis: Question 150

“’So, you had severe bronchitis without getting treatment. I forbid you to smoke. One single cigarette and you will put yourself in serious danger’” (Satrapi 242)

Question: “The Veil”: Why does Marji end up in the hospital? What is the result of her stay there? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Marji ends up in the hospital because she is homeless (238). Marji stated that she “spent more than two months on the street in the middle of winter” (240). She developed a cough that got worse and worse until she passed out and was taken to the hospital (241). After getting her back to health, the doctor states that she had bronchitis and to never smoke again (242). What results because of her stay is that she calls in a favor from Zozo who then relays to her that her parents have been phoning for her (243). After calling her parents, she asks if she can go back to Iran and they say yes so she returns (244).

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at April 11, 2016 12:33 PM

Nicole Alvarez & Annie Hays
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
Dr. Hobbs
4 April 2016
204. What are the roles for women in Iranian society as depicted in the book? How do Marjane and her mother and grandmother both play into and resist those roles?
• Iranian women were second-class citizens who mostly existed to get married, have children, and be subservient to their husbands. Marjane did not fit in with the average woman because they were very outspoken. Marjane could not connect with her friends because they wanted to get married while she wanted to study. Marjane’s mother and grandmother were also outspoken and did not want to wear the veil. Marjane’s mother was married to Marjane’s father while the grandmother and Marjane were comfortable with getting divorces. Marjane’s grandmother had gone through two marriages and Marjane had a divorce.
• They did still wear veils while in public, helping them fit in with society.
205. How important is family in Iranian society, according to Satrapi?
• Family is very important. The family is the support system, and are the only people that women can take their veils off around. Divorce is taboo, especially for a woman wanting to divorce her husband. People were encouraged to get married young and begin their own families. Family is central within society; people are loyal to their family first. Marjane’s family often stand on Marjane’s side as well.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at April 11, 2016 01:42 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
1 April 2016

Question 66: “The Key”: What might be the purpose of publishing Iran’s “martyrs”? Why is this significant?

Answer: Marji remembers how Iran was publishing the names of all of the “martyrs,” young men who died in Iran’s wars. She asks if her mother has seen the list of the dead. In response, her mother says, “How can I not see? They’re doing all they can to show how many people have died” (Satrapi 94). The purpose of publishing the “martyrs” was to glorify death and honor the fallen soldiers. The Iranian government was spreading propaganda that war was noble and to die in war is the highest honor.

In a way, honoring the “martyrs” is a reference to Iran’s past. For centuries, Iran (and before that, Persia) has had a long history of martyrs and legendary heroes. This was even more emphasized after the Islamic Revolution since there are many famous Muslim martyrs including Hamza and Sumayyah. Marjane often references the heroes of Iran in Persepolis; later on in the book, she even designs a theme park based on Iran’s heroes (Satrapi 328-9). The idea of war and martyrism is heavily drawn from Iran’s cultural identity.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at April 11, 2016 02:06 PM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
28 March 2016
Question 15:
Question: “The Water Cell”: According to Marji, how was a king chosen? What was her rationale? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marji believed that the king was chosen by God. Marji tried to explain to her parents that she knew the king had been chosen by God because “It’s written on the first page of our schoolbook” (19). Since her school taught that the king was chosen by God, Marji believed that it was true, especially since it was written down in her textbooks to be true. This is significant because it shows that truth is in the eye of the beholder and not necessarily the whole truth or the actual truth.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at April 12, 2016 12:53 PM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
30 March 2016
Question 67:
Question: “The Key”: Comment on the picture on page 95. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The image on page 95 is significant because this is where all of the girls are “lined up twice a day to mourn the war dead” (95). The girls were taught that they had to beat their breasts in memorial of the soldiers who had died. However, they were never taught the significance of beating their breast. On the next page, Marji explains the very first time she was lined up to mourn the dead soldiers. Her teacher only showed them what they had to do with no further explanation. The only other explanation that Marji gives on that same page is that “Hitting yourself is one of the country’s rituals” (96).

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at April 12, 2016 01:04 PM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
1 April 2016
Question 135:
Question: “The Vegetable”: Explain the scene where Marji lies about her actual heritage and pretends to be something that she’s not. Why is this problematic? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The scene where Marji completely denies her heritage takes place where she is at a party and is meeting a new guy who asks her where she is from. Marji lies and says “I’m French” (195) instead of saying she is Iranian. She justifies this to herself with the thought that at that time “Iran was the epitome of evil and to be Iranian was a heavy burden to bear” (195). This is problematic for Marji because she remembers her grandmother’s words about having dignity and being true to one’s self right after this event. This makes Marji feel like she is betraying herself and her parents and causes her deep shame.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at April 12, 2016 01:16 PM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
4 April 2016
Question 180:
Question: “The Satellite”: What was the new phenomenon that people bought, but couldn’t reveal that they had? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The new phenomenon that people bought but couldn’t reveal that they had were satellite antennas. The antennas were able to pick up broadcasts such as MTV and Eurosport (324). This meant that people who could afford it or who had friends with satellite antennas were able to watch shows that had nothing to do with the government’s indoctrination. Marji herself became addicted to watching television after her parents bought a satellite antenna, so much so that she stopped doing much else like reading or keeping up with local news.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at April 12, 2016 01:28 PM

Erin Gaylord
ENG 415: Comparative Global Literature
Dr. Hobbs
12 April 2016

Question: “The Water Cell”: Why does God return after a long absence? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: God returns after a long absence while Marji is feeling very empathetic for her grandfather. She is taking a bath to feel what it was like for her grandpa while he was imprisoned (24). I think this is significant because he shows up when she’s in a low place and putting herself in someone else’s shoes, not when she is in a high place and thinks she has power. This is showing that she should be more humble, and that is what he wants from her as a prophet.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at April 12, 2016 09:29 PM

Erin Gaylord
ENG 415: Comparative Global Literature
Dr. Hobbs
13 April 2016

Question: “The Key”: What injustices do the parents see in the educational system? Which restriction is particularly ironic? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: The schools are telling the children to hit themselves and be self-harming. Sometimes this goes so far as people getting seriously injured or killed because they are trying to be more “macho” (Page 96). Another important thing is the key people started passing out at school. They tell the young boys that it’s the key to paradise, and that if the boys die at war, they will have a good afterlife. They are telling the boys to go and get killed for their country to die a good death. The sad thing is, many boys did go and did die.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at April 13, 2016 09:39 AM

Seger Sipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
4 April 2016

“Your pal has gone to Hell! Go on, Put on your veils!” (“The Socks,” page 310, Anjali Singh translation).
Question 175: Who is Farzad, what happens to him, and why? What events led to this? What was the aftermath? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: Farzad is a young man who attends a party, being in the company of peers that are both men and women. When a patrol made up of the Guardians of the Revolution arrive at the residence in which the party is taking place at, the men at the party, including Farzad, try to flee by running across rooftops. During the chase, Farzad falls to his death. Afterwards, one man remarks, “I’m not coming to any more parties. It’s too frightening!” (311). Another man argues, “You’re wrong. That’s exactly what they want! To stop us from living! Nothing bothers them more than to see us happy!” (311). Farzad’s death is significant because it brings up the questions whether it is too risky to live the life that doesn’t abide by the laws in society. After Farzad’s death, Marjane attends a party and drinks, not wanting to sacrifice her freedoms.

Posted by: Seger Sipe at April 13, 2016 01:09 PM

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