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January 17, 2013

Writing about Epiphany and Turning Points in Narratives


Image Source: http://www.epiphanybullterriers.com/images/definition.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 17, 2013 03:10 PM

Readers' Comments:

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
24 February 2014

QUESTION #14:
In your own words, explain how writer James Joyce defines the "epiphany" in the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero. Then, show at least one instance how the "epiphany," according to Joyce's understanding of it, is manifested in Plato's "Allegory of the Cave."

ANSWER:
In the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero, James Joyce defines the "epiphany" as a spiritual manifestation of which an object or action achieves as a result of the observer's understanding of its significance. One instance how the "epiphany," according to Joyce's understanding of it, is manifested in Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" is through the shadows which are casted against the walls in front of the prisoners. This is because, to a normal person, shadows are quite meaningless. However, to the prisoners, shadows are all that their lives revolve around, in a sense; shadows are all that they see.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at February 24, 2014 10:58 AM

Bianca T. Smith
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
25 Feb. 2014

Question #13- In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the "epiphany" in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the "epiphany," according to Wheeler's understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov's The Bear.

Answer- Wheeler defines "epiphany" by telling us that it presents and displays itself and that its a manifestation of something, for example, God. In Chekhov's "The Bear," Popva is letting her dead husband manifest in her mind. She is determined to show him what real love is even though he was unfaithful to her and treated her badly. "He'll see how much I loved him. . .Oh I know he treated me badly-I don't have to tell you about it. He was mean and . . .and even unfaithful. But I intend to be faithful to the grave and show him what real love means" (Chekhov 3).


Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at February 25, 2014 05:01 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
25 February 2014

Question: In your own words, explain how editors M H Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the 'epiphany' in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least on instance of how the 'epiphany', according to Abram's and Harpham's understanding of it, is manifested in the Chekhov's The Bear.

Answer: According to editors M. H Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham 'epiphany is defined as the following: "Epiphany means ' a manifestation' or 'showing forth,' and by Christian thinkers was used to signify a manifestation of God's presence within the created world" (Abram Harpham 111). An 'epiphany' takes place in Chekhov's "The Bear", according to Abram's and Harpham's understand, when Popova realizes that she likes Smirnov and shouldn't just stay in her house thinking of her dead husband anymore. This can be said because it took a man coming to her home to receive a debt for Popova to realize she has to stop what she was doing.

Posted by: sawyer hand at February 25, 2014 07:36 PM

James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
25rd February 2014

Question #4 - In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance of how the “epiphany,” according to Abrams’s and Harpham’s understanding of it, is manifested in the Gogol’s “The Overcoat.”

Answer – They define an epiphany as a “Manifestation” (Abrams & Harpham 112-113), whilst also stating that it was often used by Christian writers to portray “God’s presence” (Abrams & Harpham 112-113) within the world. A manifestation in my eyes is something abstract, something that is not quite real. In terms of how this extract explains it, it is something, either an event, an object, or even an action, that embodies something. An example of this being used by Gogol in “The Overcoat” is “wondering what God would send him to copy” (Gogol 3). Gogol was a Ukrainian writer, and when this book was released in 1842 that area of the world was very religious, having strong beliefs in Christianity. So naturally, Gogol uses God’s presence within his writing. In the excerpt from “A Glossary of Literary Terms”, it tells us of how James Joyce adapted the term to signify the “sense of a sudden radiance and revelation that occurs during the perception of a commonplace object” (Abrams & Harpham 112-113). This is basically just furthering the earlier definition to something not necessarily religious, allowing the term to be used by a wider range of people.

Posted by: James Jessop at February 25, 2014 09:40 PM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
25 February 2014

Question 11:
In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums.”

Answer:
An epiphany is a moment where the character experiences revelation or insight about something. In the book, The Chrysanthemums, Elisa had a moment of revelation concerning herself. Her epiphany was the conversation with her husband when Elisa realized that she is a strong, beautiful woman (Steinbeck 8-9). When she heard her husband call her strong, it sounded that Elisa did not see herself like that before and felt confident talking of the idea of her being strong.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at February 25, 2014 11:19 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
25 February 2014

Question #3: In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the "epiphany" in excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance of how the "epiphany", according to Abram's and Harpham's understanding of it, is manifested in Gogol's "The Overcoat".

Answer: The word epiphany is defined "showing forth". Basically what Harpham and Abram said was when someone is able to see something and realize it. They also said that Christians can view this word "to signify a manifestation of God presence within the created world" (Abram , Harpham 1). In "The Overcoat", the narrator uses an epiphany to show us that the main character, Akaky, who was a clerk, realizes that he lives a miserable life and how most people in his life are not worth his time. Soon after realizing that, he gives up on life.

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at February 26, 2014 12:03 AM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 February 2014

Question #2:
In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Abrams’s and Harpham’s understanding of it, is manifested Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums.”

Answer:
Abrams and Harpham describe an epiphany as an idea or thought of a forthcoming event. In the story "The Chrysanthemums" as Elisa talked more and more to the man in the wagon, she realizes that she is way better off than him in life. He tells her of his troubles and how he goes some nights without dinner. Elisa realizes that she should do something to help the man out. She stands up and say to him "maybe I can find something for you to do" and she hurriedly goes to her house to search for a pot or pan for him to fix.

Posted by: Berlin Waters at February 26, 2014 01:12 AM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
25 February 2014

QUESTION #8:
In you own words, explain how editors Karl E. Beckson and Arthur F. Ganz define the "epiphany" in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the "epiphany," according to Beckson's and Ganz's understanding of it, is manifested in Gogol's "The Overcoat."

ANSWER:
Beckson and Ganz define the "epiphany" as a "showing forth" which can be in other words defined as to manifest, publish, or proclaim (Beckson & Ganz, 1). One instance how the "epiphany" is manifested in Gogol's "The Overcoat" is when the Person of Consequence had been hearing stories around town that the ghost of Akaky Akakyevitch had been going around stealing citizens overcoat. He had gotten worried because of how he treated Akakyevitch that one day in his office. He couldnt get it off his mind until one night after going out he was on his way to see a lady friend who was in another quarter of the town when the ghost of Akakyevitch appeared to take his overcoat. He knew it was bound to happen with the way he last treated Akakyevitch about his overcoat.

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at February 26, 2014 10:10 AM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
26 Feb. 2014

Question 10:
In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave.”

Answer:
Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines "epiphany" as "a manifestation of God's presence in the world." (Roberts 2)

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at February 26, 2014 10:21 AM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 March 2014

Question:
In your own words, explain how editors Karl E. Beckson and Arthur F. Ganz define the “epiphany” in
the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,”
according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear

Answer:
In the reading about epiphany it is defined as “a showing forth a term used by James Joyce to refer to s sudden spiritual manifestation which an object or action achieves as a result of the observers apprehension of its significance”(Beckson 2). One example in “The Bear” is by asking for asking for the debt and Popova’s stylish attitude makes him fall in love with her. He madly loves her like a student. Popova also begins to like him. Instead of fighting, they are drawn close to each other.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at March 4, 2014 03:35 PM

Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
15 October 2014

Question #21:
In your own words, explain how writer James Joyce defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Joyce’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.”

Answer:
James Joyce defines epiphany as “a sudden spiritual manifestation” (Joyce 2) which is when an object or action achieves as a result of the observer’s apprehension of its significance. An example of how epiphany is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever” is when the secret of the letter was revealed, which was written to Mrs. Ansley. She did not realize that this letter was going to be so significant because she did not even think about Mrs. Ansley replying to it. Which lead to her and Delphin having a kid that she not have any clue about until this day.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at October 15, 2014 12:53 PM

Elizabeth Brown
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
14 October 2014

Question #16:
In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.”
Answer:
In Professor L. Kip Wheeler’s “Literary Terms and Definitions,” he defines “epiphany” as a flare into revelation and insight that changes the person’s entire world-view of the person involved. In Wharton’s “Roman Fever,” Mrs. Slade had an epiphany when she realized that Mrs. Ansley had in fact written back to the “fake” letter she received, and had in fact met up with Delphin. She realized that she had been thinking that they never met her whole life, but they did.
"Came? How did he know he'd find you there? You must be raving!"
Mrs. Ansley hesitated, as though reflecting. "But I answered the letter. I told him I'd be there. So he came."
Mrs. Slade flung her hands up to her face. "Oh, God—you answered! I never thought of your answering.... "
"It's odd you never thought of it, if you wrote the letter." (Wharton, page 9).

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at October 15, 2014 01:32 PM

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
October 14, 2014


QUESTION #8:
Explain how Beckson and Ganz define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Show at least one instance how the “epiphany” is manifested in Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums.”


ANSWER:
They define an epiphany as a sudden realization of the true meaning of an object or situation. The epiphany can be a “symbol of a spiritual state…as a result of awareness of its meaning” (Beckson 2). True meaning comes with complete understanding of all that is going on, including both objects and situations. The strongest example in “The Chrysanthemums” comes at the very end of the story when Elisa Allen realized the salesman’s true motives for talking to her. She thought that she was having a nice conversation with a man that actually noticed her and gave her a different kind of feeling than her husband did. Later in the day, her husband took her out and “far ahead on the road Elisa saw a dark speck. She knew” (Steinbeck 10). She saw the dumped over pot of chrysanthemums on the side of the road, and she immediately knew that she had been used and tricked. It was not the kind encounter that she previously thought it had been.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at October 15, 2014 01:37 PM

Roslyn Thomas
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing CA07
15 October 2014

Question #19
In your own words, explain how writer James Joyce defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Joyce’s understanding of it, is manifested in Gogol’s “Bierce’s Occurrence at owl creek bridge.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer:
In the story of Bierce’s Occurrence at Owl Creek bridge the epiphany in the story would be at the end when the man is actually dead and has been hung already, so when you read the whole story you find out he’s dead so who really was telling the story. And epiphany is a manifestation.

Posted by: Roslyn Thomas at October 15, 2014 01:59 PM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
15 October, 2014

Question #20:
In your own words, explain how writer James Joyce defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Joyce’s understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.
Answer:
James Joyce says that it’s a term that refers to “a sudden spiritual manifestation.” That has action or a result of the observer’s apprehension of its significance. (Joyce 2) It perceives as a symbol of a spiritual state. It would signify the sense of a sudden radiance and revelation that occurs during the perception of an object. (Joyce 1) The epiphany is that all men aren’t bad. She can fall I love again. (Chekhov 30)

Posted by: Zachary Gary at October 15, 2014 02:11 PM

Danielle Kluender, Gianna Anderson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
15 October 2014

Question #27:
You previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “La Parure” [“The Necklace”] by Guy de Maupassant. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany.

Answer:
In “The Necklace” Mathilde believes that she is being held back from the life that she deserves because she is not wealthy and her appearance does not fit the image that she has in her mind. For example in the story, it says, “She had no dresses, no jewels, nothing. And she loved nothing but that; she felt made for that.” (de Maupassant 54). When she borrowed the necklace, she felt happy and graceful because she looked the part that she wanted to which was wealthy. This was all until the end of the story when she had run into Mrs. Forestier ten years later, and they discuss how she had lost in ten years ago and she has spent the past years paying back everything. Mrs. Forestier said, “You say that you bought a necklace of diamonds to replace mine?” Then she said, “Oh, my poor Mathilde! Why, my necklace was paste. It was worth at most five hundred francs!” (de Maupassant 60). Mathilde then realized that she had to change her whole life and had been paying back all this money for the past ten years for nothing.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender, Gianna Anderson at October 15, 2014 02:16 PM

Sam Witte, Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing 2
15 October 2014
Question #22:
Your previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least, six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “The Greatest Gift” by Philip Van Doren Stern. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany.
Answer:
The most important epiphany in the story is that George realizes his life has meaning and he impacted a lot of people close to him in a positive way. (Stern 7)
“I understand right enough,” the stranger said slowly. “I just wanted to make sure you did. You had the greatest gift of all conferred upon you—the gift of life, of being a part of this world and taking a part in it. Yet you denied that gift.”

Posted by: Zachary Gary, Sam Witte at October 15, 2014 02:17 PM

Trejon Baynham, Rashard Knowles
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 07
15 October 2014

QUESTION:
In your own words, identify the epiphanies experienced by characters in Edgar Allen Poe’s Masque of the Red Death. Finally decide on which epiphanies (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany.

ANSWER:
One of the epiphanies experienced by Prince Prospero within the text of Edgar Allen Poe’s Masque of the Red Death occurs when he is finally confronted with the killer. “When the eyes of Prince Prospero fell upon this spectral image,” Death, “he… convulsed with either terror or fear… next [reddening] with rage” (Poe 8). Soon after, Prince Prospero demanded his followers to apprehend Death, given that he -- at this point in the story – is still under the deception of his power. The chief epiphany of the story is that regardless of social standing, death is an inevitable aspect of human life. Prince Prospero finally realizes this when -- after ordering his courtiers to seize Death -- they all died before his eyes (Poe 9).

Posted by: Trejon Baynham, Rashard Knowles at October 15, 2014 02:18 PM

Roslyn & Alyssa
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing
15 October 2014

Question #22
Your previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least, six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “Araby” by James Joyce. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer:
The chief epiphany would be that she wasn't as great as he thought she was he started realizing the real in the situation with her. In the beginning he that she was basically a god and she could do no wrong but in the in re realized it wasn't like that for example. “The tone of her voice was not encouraging; she seemed to have spoken to me out of a sense of duty.” (Joyce, 5)

Posted by: Roslyn Thomas at October 15, 2014 04:54 PM

Trejon Baynham
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 07
15 October 2014

QUESTION:
In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums.”

ANSWER:
According to Professor L. Kip Wheeler in James Joyce’s “Definition of Epiphany”, “epiphany” is modernly defined as “a revelation of such power and insight” that the cognition of a character is altered in a major way. In Steinbeck’s The Chrysanthemums, the central character – or protagonist -- of the text, Elisa, comes to one of these revelations. When riding with her husband she sees the flower she had given to another important character in the story, the tinkerer, discarded beside the road without the pot it was provided in (Steinbeck 10). Elisa realizes that she had been conned.

Posted by: Trejon Baynham at October 15, 2014 10:29 PM

Elizabeth Brown, Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
14 October 2014

Question :
Your previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least, six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in Roman Fever. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF

Answer:
In Professor L. Kip Wheeler’s “Literary Terms and Definitions,” he defines “epiphany” as a flare into revelation and insight that changes the person’s entire world-view of the person involved. In Wharton’s “Roman Fever,” Mrs. Slade had an epiphany when she realized that Mrs. Ansley had in fact written back to the “fake” letter she received, and had in fact met up with Delphin. She realized that she had been thinking that they never met her whole life, but they did.
"Came? How did he know he'd find you there? You must be raving!"
Mrs. Ansley hesitated, as though reflecting. "But I answered the letter. I told him I'd be there. So he came."
Mrs. Slade flung her hands up to her face. "Oh, God—you answered! I never thought of your answering.... "
"It's odd you never thought of it, if you wrote the letter." (Wharton, page 9).

Posted by: Stephanie Vera, Elizabeth Brown at October 16, 2014 10:45 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 March 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how editors Karl E. Beckson and Arthur F. Ganz define the epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: According to Beckson and Ganz an epiphany is when a character recognizes the significance of an object or action. “Stephen perceives it as a symbol of a spiritual stare; the action achieves an epiphany as a result of his awareness of it’s meaning.” (Beckson and Ganz 78) The epiphany is not the spiritual state itself; the epiphany is the recognition of the meaning of the spiritual state. In Chekhov’s play “The Bear,” the two main characters both reach an epiphany. Smirnoff’s epiphany occurred when Popova went off to get her late husband’s pistols to kill each other they were so angry. When Popova gets back, she asked Smirnoff to teach her to shoot it so she can kill him. She changes her mind about wanting to kill him when he declares his irrational love for her, and he stops him from getting up to leave. In the midst of all of their anger, they fall for each other, and the story ends. “I’m asking you to marry me! Yes or no? Will you? Yes or no? No? Fine! (Gets up and heads quickly toward the door) “Wait a minute…” (Chekhov 32)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at March 2, 2015 12:13 PM

Aderias Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic writing 2
3 March 2015
Question 10: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums.”
Epiphany is a revelation of such power and insight that it alters the entire world-view of the thinker who experiences it. One instance how the “epiphany,” is used in Chrysanthemums is about Elisa’s husband. A bland sort of husband, likely one who has never been in a theatre in his life, being so astonished at the sight of his taken-for-granted wife suddenly appearing in ‘‘a kind of play’’ that he speaks, on the spot, his spontaneous rancher's ode. (In the story it confirms on pg 1. Elisa is bored with her husband and with her life. Pg 2. I thought how it's Saturday afternoon, and we might go into Salinas for dinner at a restaurant, and then to a picture show.) Even though their marriage is good, she tired of doing the same thing.

Posted by: aderias ewing at March 3, 2015 07:14 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
3 March 2015

“Epiphany”

Question #21: In your own words, explain how writer James Joyce defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Joyce’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.”

James Joyce defines an epiphany as a manifestation. In the short story, “Roman Fever” an example of an epiphany is when Mrs. Slade told Mrs. Ansley, "Yes, I was beaten there. But I oughtn't to begrudge it to you, I suppose. At the end of all these years. After all, I had everything; I had him for twenty-five years. And you had nothing but that one letter that he didn't write." (Wharton page 9) Then, Mrs. Ansley finished off by saying: “I had Barbara” and walked off. (Wharton page 10)

Posted by: Selena Hammie at March 3, 2015 07:36 PM

Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II
3 March 2015

Question:
Give an example of the epiphanies experienced in “Masque of the Red Death.” Explain the main epiphany.
Answer:
Epiphany is seen through the characters when they decide to lock themselves away. Then they attempt to try to cheat death and escape the virulent disease that is caused from the Red Death. This all takes place towards the end of the story. The characters are then forced to acknowledge the presence of the Red Death, which is in front of them. Then they finally come to conclusion that even the richest and most powerful of humans are not capable of cheating death. “And Darkness and Decay and the Red Death held illimitable dominion over all.”

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at March 3, 2015 09:25 PM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
3 March 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.”
Answer: Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines “epiphany” as an eye-opening experience that completely changes his perception of life. An epiphany is shown in “Roman Fever” when Mrs. Ansley says “I Had Barbra” (Pg. 10) to Mrs. Slade. Mrs. Ansley’s statement makes Mrs. Slade realize she lost their life long war because she finds out she thought she had everything but in actuality she had nothing.

Posted by: Rachel Addington at March 3, 2015 10:29 PM

Jorge Braham

Dr.Hobbs

Academic Writing II CA123

3 March 2015

Concept of Epiphany

Question:

Your previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least, six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, and then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “La Parure” [“The Necklace”] by Guy de Maupassant. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text— properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer:

I would say that there are a couple epiphanies in the short story, but I would say they are mostly negative. Such as when she lied to Madame Forestier and bought a new one that was more expensive. “Madame Forestier, deeply moved, took her two hands. "Oh, my poor Mathilde! But mine was imitation. It was worth at the very most five hundred francs!" (Maupassant Pg. 10) I'm not a 100% sure about this but when Mathilde was saying how she never goes out very poor family, and she doesn’t have anything but then her husband brings her everything to make her happy. I would say that this is a positive epiphany. The chief epiphany though is when they lost the necklace and then tried to pay it off. I say that because it changed their whole outcome.

Posted by: jorge braham at March 4, 2015 01:11 AM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
3 March 15

Epiphany Discussion Question

Question 26: In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany.

Answer: In “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” the epiphany experienced by the characters are when the grandmother realizes that she isn’t a prim and proper, old-fashioned, southern women. In fact, she realizes that she truly is a sinner. Once she is staring death in the eyes, she has come to the realization in regards to her true inner self. “And her face staring up at the cloudless sky” (O’Connor 12). The only epiphany experience in this short story is that scene; therefore there is no chief epiphany.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at March 4, 2015 01:43 AM

Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 March 2015

Question: 5. In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance of how the “epiphany,” according to Abrams’s and Harpham’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.
Answer: In this text authors shows spiritual interior of speaker. Authors pointed it in Thomas Aquinas works. “For a long time I couldn't make out what Aquinas meant. He uses a figurative word (a very unusual thing for him) but I have solved it. Claritas is quidditas. After the analysis which discovers the second quality the mind makes the only logically possible synthesis and discovers the third quality. This is the moment which I call epiphany.” As well, in Roman Fever epiphany is showed as a symbol, which symbolizes the passion that drives the plot. “As the sun sets, Alida reminds her friend of her delicate throat. The evening chill could cause her to come down with Roman fever or pneumonia. But Grace says, "Oh, we're all right up here. Down below, in the Forum, it does get deathly cold, all of a sudden... but not here.".......Alida says whenever she looks at the Forum, it reminds her of the story about her friend’s “dreadfully wicked great-aunt.””

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak at March 4, 2015 09:24 AM

Alison Colon
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122 CA12
3 March 2015

1. Question: In your own words, explain how editors Karl E. Beckson and Arthur F. Ganz define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Plato’s “Allegory of the


6. Beckson’s and Ganz’s defined “epiphany” as a “sudden spiritual manifest”. (Beckson’s and Ganz 1) Where an object or action can lead to the result of someone’s’ apprehension. When listening (or watching), it is a “symbol of a spiritual state”. In my opinion an epiphany is when the character or a person has that moment of realization and everything either becomes clear to them or they're try to understand what just occurred . It's a big event in a persons life when they have that epiphany about something or someone and it makes them understand . However, an action causes the “epiphany” to become clearer to ones awareness. The way the “epiphany” manifested in Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave was when Socrates is speaking with Glaucon about if one of the prisioners had gotten their freedom, what it would do to them, and how difficult it would be for them to apprehend what exactly is happening. The following quote demonstrates the moment of realization and overwhelming emotion that the prisoners felt when they were free, this was their ephiphany on what their lives would now be like ; “At first, when any of them is liberated and compelled suddenly to stand up and turn his neck round and walk and look towards the light, he will suffer sharp pains; the glare will distress him, and he will be unable to see the realities of which in his former state he had seen the shadows; and then conceive some one saying to him, that what he saw before was an illusion, that now, when he is approaching nearer to being and his eye is turned towards more real existence, he has a clearer vision” (Plato 2)

Posted by: Alison Colon at March 4, 2015 10:09 AM

Mallory Delay, Diego Garcia, Emily Buckley and Emma Riemer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
4 March 2015

Question: What epiphanies are in the story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long"?

Answer: The main epiphany of the story is when the mother of the story realizes that she cannot love David like an actual biological child. Aldiss mentions "She had tried to love him," (Aldiss 1) but it’s the little things he goes that makes her realize this. When David is standing in the pool looking at the flower, she can't take him anymore. She tells him "do you have to be so awful?" (Aldiss 1) She realizes how much she wants a real child when she gets a call telling her that her and her husband won the parenthood lottery. She was once in despair because of David but now she can go and "conceive a child at once!" (Aldiss 7)

Posted by: Mallory Delay at March 4, 2015 11:56 AM

Kathleen Sholl, Amber Dunlap, and Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA 12
4 March 15

Epiphany: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Discussion Question

Question: What is the epiphany in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”?

Answer: The epiphany in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” is that Benjamin’s dad does not accept the fact that he is an old man when he is born. For example, when Benjamin is born, his father states, “where in God’s name did you come from? Who are you?” (Fitzgerald 4) Benjamin’s dad realizes as his son’s life progresses that Benjamin will never have a normal life like other individuals. His dad states, “You liar! You’re an imposter!” (Fitzgerald 4) The second epiphany that the character experiences is when Benjamin finally reaches his final newborn baby years. After being an elderly man, he then realizes when he is a toddler that he cannot remember his life that he lived in the past. “He did not remember clearly whether the milk was warm or cool at his last feeding or how the days passed” (Fitzgerald 18). He merely forgot everything that he grew up knowing as it slowly faded from his memory.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl, Amber Dunlap, and Kaitlin Murphy at March 4, 2015 04:17 PM

Rachel Addington, Selena Hammie, and Alison Colon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 March 2015

In the short story “The Storm” the epiphany occurs when Claxita realizes she hasn’t missed out on anything and loves her husband and enjoys spending time with her family more than having an affair with another man. “"Shrimps! Oh, Bobinôt! you too good fo' anything!" and she gave him a smacking kiss on the cheek that resounded, "J'vous réponds, we'll have a feas' to-night! umph-umph!" Bobinôt and Bibi began to relax and enjoy themselves, and when the three seated themselves at table they laughed much and so loud that anyone might have heard them as far away as Laballière's.” (Pg. 5)

Posted by: Rachel Addington Selena Hammie Alison Colon at March 5, 2015 03:46 PM

Aderias, Amanda, and Ian
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
3/5/2015
Group Work- Question: What is epiphany in Juliette by Claude F. Cheninssie?
The epiphany is when the reader finds out that Juliette in the story is a car and not a woman. In the story on pa4 it says, “I let myself sink into a delicious idleness, compounded of English tobacco and Juliette’s perfume.” And how he fell for Juliette three years ago. We found she was a car on pg7 “When the salesman tried to talk to him about trading his old model for a new one.”

Posted by: aderias & amanda & Ian at March 5, 2015 08:20 PM

Rously Paul, Vallinqiue Martin, Charis Lavoie, and Jorge Braham
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 March 2015

Question: Epiphany in Young Goodman brown

Answer: In “Young Goodman Brown,” an instance of epiphany occurs when Brown stumbles upon the dark ritual his clergy is involved. Brown is overwhelmed with new information that those whom he trusts are heathens and is warped by this revelation to a bitter and stoic man until his death just as Hawthorne writes: “… he scowled and muttered to himself, and gazed sternly at his wife, turned away. (Hawthorne Page 17 paragraph 2)

Posted by: Rously Paul, Jorge Braham, Vallinique Martin, and Charis Lovoie at March 6, 2015 08:56 AM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
09 October 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the "epiphany" in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance of how the "epiphany," according to Abrams's and Harpham's understanding of it, is manifested in the Chekhov's The Bear. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: According to editors M.H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham, epiphany is when a sudden discovery is triggered by events leading up to it. In other words, I think of it as when someone sparks up a sudden idea and bursts out and says what they've wanted to say or when something finally makes sense. Also, when I illustrate it in my head, I think of when the light bulb appears above the person's head. In Chekhov's, "The Bear" epiphany shows up at one visible part of the story. While Popova and Smirnoff were arguing, they finally decided to fight in a duel, and at some point Smirnoff had to show her how to use a pistol. For some reason he realized he liked her and described her as a "spitfire." Chekov states, "(Aside) What amazing eyes she's got! What a little spitfire!" (Chekov 31). Then, Smirnoff was about to leave the house, and he stops to turn around and Popova and him look at each other. That was when I noticed that Smirnoff had suddenly realized that he is love with Popova. Next, Smirnoff attempts to approach her, and Popova threatens to shoot and proceeds to tell him that he needs to leave. Then finally, Popova comes to her senses and realizes that it been six months that she has been a widow and wanted love again. Chekov states," Yes, yes, just go! (Screams) Where are you going? Wait a minute . . . . Oh, come on back. Oh, I'm so mad! Stay away from me! Stay away from me!" (Chekov 33). Therefore, they both had realized that they loved each other.

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at October 9, 2015 01:55 PM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
10 October 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how editors Karl E. Beckson and Arthur F. Ganz define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis

Answer: Epiphany according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s is defined as “a showing forth”. In Chekhov’s The Bear, epiphany is at the end of the story after Smirnoff kisses Popova, she realizes that she liked Smirnoff as much as he likes her. She is not going to keep her promise to her dead husband anymore. Popova says, “Get away from me! Get your hands off me! I… I hate you! I want to fight the d-d-duel!” Right after, Smirnoff then goes in for a kiss, and it all changes from there.

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at October 10, 2015 08:15 PM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
10 October 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how editors Karl E. Beckson and Arthur F. Ganz define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis

Answer: Epiphany according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s is defined as “a showing forth”. In Chekhov’s The Bear, epiphany is at the end of the story after Smirnoff kisses Popova, she realizes that she liked Smirnoff as much as he likes her. She is not going to keep her promise to her dead husband anymore. Popova says, “Get away from me! Get your hands off me! I… I hate you! I want to fight the d-d-duel!” Right after, Smirnoff then goes in for a kiss, and it all changes from there.

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at October 10, 2015 08:15 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 October 2015

Question #22

QuestionYou will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “The Greatest Gift” by Philip Van Doren Stern. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany.


Answer: An epiphany is “to signify the sense of a sudden radiance and revelation that occurs during the perception of a commonplace object” (Joyce 1). The first epiphany George has is when he goes to examine the tree, “He straightened up with an odd, sinking feeling in his stomach.” (Stern 3). This is when he comes to the realization that everything the little man said, could be true. If there was no scar than then the act of him hitting the tree never happened. If he never hit the tree, then his past as he remembers it never happened. Another epiphany would be when George found the hair brush he had sold his wife in another life, there on his sofa (Stern 8). He realized then that it wasn’t a dream and the little man had come by the house and given that brush to his wife. These two epiphanies, I feel, are equally important and both the major ones of this story.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at October 11, 2015 01:07 AM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
10 October 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Abrams’s and Harpham’s understanding of it, is manifested in Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave.”

Answer: In A Glossary of Literary Terms, the editors, M. H. Abrams, and Geoffrey Galt Harpham defined epiphany as "a sudden radiance and revelation that occur during the perception of a commonplace object" (111). In the Allegory of the Cave, Plato explains to his apprentice, Glaucon, the importance of the truth in knowledge. He utilizes a cave as a "prison-house is the world of sight," and the light of the fire is the sun—the truth and reality (Plato 3). Plato describes the journey of a prisoner who discovers the light. First, he sees the shadows of the objects created by the puppeteers which resembles the common assumption and knowledge of the ignorant because they limit themselves to only the shadows of the real objects. Then when he turns around, he will see the truth of the real objects, and the light might hurt and blind his eyes—the denial and hesitation to believe in the truth. Eventually, the prisoner passes from seeing shadows to seeing the real shape of objects and situations and grows accustomed to the light to the point where it would hurt his eyes if he ever returned to the darkness. Plato interpreted this "journey upward to be the ascent of the soul into the intellectual world" (3); a realization that every man must come to eventually. The epiphany in the story is found in the revelation of the prisoner as if it were a God given dream.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at October 11, 2015 11:25 AM

Cannelle Samson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
11 October 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis


Answer: According to Beckson and Ganz epiphany is “a term used by James Joyce in Stephen Hero to refer to ‘a sudden spiritual manifestation’ which an object or action achieves as a result of the observer’s apprehension of its significance” (Beckson/ Ganz, 2). This means that epiphany is in the reader’s hand. When the reader understand a deeper meaning in the story an epiphany is created. In the short story, “The Chrysanthemums”, Elisa, the main character, wishes to be more than she is. She wishes to be more beautiful, graceful, and important than she is. For example, throughout the story Elisa is described and given the compliment to looking strong. This bothers Elisa because she would like to be seen as beautiful not strong. As she dresses up for an evening out with her husband, Elisa dresses up and makes herself pretty. In the passage, there is a description of when Elisa is seen and described by her husband, “Henry came banging out of the door, shoving his tie inside his vest as he came. Elisa stiffened and her face grew tight. Henry stopped short and looked at her. "Why—why, Elisa. You look so nice!" "Nice? You think I look nice? What do you mean by 'nice'?" Henry blundered on. "I don't know. I mean you look different, strong and happy." "I am strong? Yes, strong. What do you mean 'strong'?" He looked bewildered. "You're playing some kind of a game," he said helplessly. "It's a kind of a play. You look strong enough to break a calf over your knee, happy enough to eat it like a watermelon” (Steinbeck, 9). This passage shows that Elisa is not happy that her husband has described her as strong. She would like to feel more delegate. Elisa also believes she lacks importance. In “The Chrysanthemums” Elisa meets a stronger and gives him some chrysanthemums for a friend. At that moment, Elisa feels important, as if she is making a change. However, as she is on her way on her evening out with her husband, she finds the flowers thrown away on the side of the road. At this moment she realized that she will never amount to anything important.

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at October 11, 2015 11:39 AM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 October 2015

Question: Your previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least, six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life.
In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “Araby” by James Joyce. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany.
As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text— properly cited in MLA format— to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: The short story “Araby” by James Joyce depicts the timeline of a crush in a teenager’s life. In “Araby,” there are a few epiphanies that occur. Take for example when the narrator goes to the mail center for his aunt. There, he realizes that “her image accompanied [him] even the places most hostile to romance,” as the journey through a cramped street (Joyce 2). The narrator feels that he has reached an epiphany when he talks to Mangan's sister. If he brings her a souvenir from the bazaar, he will receive her attention (Joyce 3). However, the chief epiphany occurs when the narrator barely makes it to the Araby bazaar. As he looks at the last merchant’s items, he realizes that whatever he brings, if anything, will be meaningless to show Mangan’s sister his interest. He compares this realization to the interest that the merchant has in him as a possible customer. “I lingered before her stall, though I knew my stay was useless, to make my interest in her wares seem the more real” (Joyce 6).

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at October 11, 2015 03:10 PM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee Hobs
ENG122 – Academic Writing II CAO3
October 11, 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance of how the “epiphany,” according to Abrams’s and Harpham’s understanding of it, is manifested in the Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: An epiphany is a sudden, intuitive perception of or insight into the reality or essential meaning of something Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums” exemplifies an epiphany in which the main character struggles to find her identity. Steinbeck describes Elisa Allen, a lonely farmer’s wife. Elisa is introduced as a very manly looking individual with a little hint of feminism “Her figure looked blocked and heavy in her gardening costume.” She wore “a man’s black hat, clod-hopper shoes and heavy leather gloves.” She was also wearing “a figured print dress almost completely covered by a big corduroy apron” (Steinbeck 1).

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at October 11, 2015 05:02 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 October 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how writer James Joyce defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Joyce’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: According to Joyce, an epiphany is a term used to refer to a sudden “spiritual manifestation which an object or action achieves as a result of the observer’s apprehension of its significance” (Joyce). In the text Roman Fever, Alida reveals that she used a similar method to eliminate the competition she believed existed between herself and Grace when, as young women in Rome, they both were in love with Delphin Slade. She cruelly reveals that she wrote a note to Grace imploring a rendezvous in the Colosseum by moonlight, and signed it with Delphin’s name. Alida’s jealousy and hatred are rekindled as she realizes that she has failed to humiliate Grace Ansley, especially when Grace states that she feels sorry for Alida because her cruel trick had so completely failed.

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at October 11, 2015 07:50 PM

ENG 122 CA03
“Epiphany”
11th October 2015

Question: n your own words, explain how editors Karl E. Beckson and Arthur F. Ganz define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Steinbeck’s “The Chrysanthemums.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.
Answer: In the story “The Chrysanthemums”, the literal meaning of “Epiphany” is portrayed. This is “when the salesman comes and Elisa has a chance to show her knowledge and be the one in control. She feels like a part of her hard work is being brought beyond her farm and out into the world. She feels important because she can do something that another couldn't and she got to show her expertise” (P.3 Steinbeck). In this story, Elisa portrays the literal meaning of “epiphany.”

Posted by: Tannor Berry at October 11, 2015 09:09 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
11 October 2015

Question: Explain Wheeler’s perception on epiphany, give an example from Plato’s “allegory in the cave.”

Answer: This moment of realization, when a person sees reality in a new light, is called an epiphany. Epiphany moments occur frequently in literature; writers use them to show the growth of a character. The cave is an awakening, turning to the light after thinking life is only a reflection, or shadow.

Posted by: lady hernandez at October 11, 2015 09:28 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 October 2015

“A term used by James Joyce in Stephen Hero to refer to “a sudden spiritual manifestation” which an object or action achieves as a result of the observer’s apprehension of its significance. Sometimes, when observing a trivial incident or listening to a fragment of conversation, Stephen perceives it as a symbol of a spiritual state; the action achieves an epiphany as a result of his awareness of its meaning.” (Roberts 2)


Question #20: In your own words, explain how writer James Joyce defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Joyce’s understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear.

Answer: Joyce defined the epiphany in the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero to refer to it as “a sudden spiritual manifestation” which an object or action achieves as a result of the observer’s apprehension of its significance.
One instance of how the epiphany manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear according to Joyce’s understanding of it would be, “It’s just not right, missus. You’re letting yourself fall to pieces. Cook and the maid have gone berry picking, every living thing is out enjoying the sunshine, even your cat, now, he’s out there trying to catch himself a bird, and here you sit, shut up in the house all day long, like some kind of nun.”

Posted by: Hana Lee at October 11, 2015 09:39 PM

Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09
11 October 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: In the reading, Professor Kip defines epiphany in the text by: “Christian thinkers used this term to signify a manifestation of God's presence in the world. It has since become in modern fiction and poetry the standard term for the sudden flare into revelation of an ordinary object or scene. In the story Roman fever, epiphany from Wheelers understanding was used when Grace replies to Alida that she had Barbara and moves ahead of her toward the stairway.

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at October 11, 2015 10:18 PM

Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobbs
English Academic Writing II CA09
October 12, 2015

Question: Your previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least, six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text— properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: In Flannery O’Connor “A Good Man is Hard to Find”, the grandmother had several epiphany moments. One of these epiphany moments were when her and the child had convinced her son to turn down a dirt road so that she could see an old plantation. “’It's not much farther,’ the grandmother said and just as she said it, a horrible thought came to her. The thought was so embarrassing that she turned red in the face and her eyes dilated and her feet jumped up, upsetting her valise in the corner… The horrible thought she had had before the accident was that the house she had remembered so vividly was not in Georgia but in Tennessee,” (O’Connor 6). The grandmother also had another epiphany when she found out that the people who came to them after the accident were the misfits. “The grandmother shrieked. She scrambled to her feet and stood staring. "You're The Misfit!" she said. ‘I recognized you at once!’” (O’Connor 8).

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at October 12, 2015 12:03 AM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09
October 11, 2015


Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.”

Answer: According to Professor L. Kip Wheeler, the term epiphany is a moment in time when there is an achievement in the realization that could benefit the person or stand as a path to new knowledge. Professor Wheeler uses James Joyce’s definition of epiphany to understand better the term. Wheeler translates Joyce’s statement to his own. “He means to say that even insignificant things in our life can suddenly inspire in us an awareness that can change our lives for good.” (Wheeler Epiphany Literary Devices). Wharton’s Roman Fever includes these moments in time through certain scenes that lead to new knowledge. In the story Roman Fever, one instance of epiphany is the final line in the story, “I had Barbara” (Wharton pg. 10). Mrs. Ansleys final line was the shocking moment that revealed Barbara Ansley is the daughter of Delphin Slade. Their conversation had lead to this moment, Mrs. Ansley had a romantic night the day she went to the Coliseum. This occurrence explains how she became ill, and her mother took care of her; she was pregnant. “Yes. And you got well again—so it didn't matter. But I suppose it struck your friends—the reason given for your illness. I mean—because everybody knew you were so prudent on account of your throat, and your mother took such care of you.... You had been out late sightseeing, hadn't you, that night” (Wharton pg. 6).

Posted by: zekeriya kayaselcuk at October 12, 2015 01:29 AM

Luis Bautista
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
10 October 2015
Question: In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance of how the “epiphany,” according to Abram’s and Harpham’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.
“A term used by James Joyce in Stephen Hero to refer to “sudden spiritual manifestation” which an object or action achieves as a result of the observer’s apprehension of significance”(Abram and Harpham 2).
Answer; Epiphany refers to manifestation that Christian thinkers used to indicate the presence of God. Abrams and Harpham indicate several example of revelation literature, such as “The Two April Mornings” and “The Solitary Reaper”. A perfect example of epiphany can be taken from Roman Fever when at the last sentence, ‘‘I had Barbara.’’ To Mrs. Slade, it is the most sudden life-changing moment that she would never forget. She always thinks she is better than Mrs. Ansley except that she thinks Barbara is the daughter that she wants. But now, the daughter she wants is the daughter of her husband, she loses the war to Mrs. Ansley completely. She thinks that Mrs. Ansley doesn’t have anything but a fake letter, but she has more than that but Delphin’s daughter. This is a perfect example of manifestation and illumination. For Barbara, this is a sudden spiritual manifestation, which would help her to achieve the significance.

Posted by: luis Bautista at October 12, 2015 08:41 AM

The chief epiphany in "The Necklace" is when the old woman told the miss that the necklace Mathlide borrowed was cheap. This was an epiphany because the entire story there was a slow but steady build up to the character of paying off the missing necklace. Mathilde and her husband even had to change their lifestyles in order to pay it off. Other small epiphanies was when her husband got invited to a ball because it was unexpected and received negative feedback. Another small epiphany was when the young woman's reaction was stunned then angry because we believed that she would feel delighted to feel like loyalty for a night. But she did not because she wanted a dress and jewelry. "Epiphany is defined as showing forth and a sudden spiritual manifestation." (James Joyce)

Posted by: Brad McAvoy at October 12, 2015 09:38 AM

Sabrina and Lois
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
12 October 2015

Question: What are the epiphanies in your group’s story? What is the chief epiphany and why?

Answer: The main epiphany in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” is the birth of an elderly son because when the father goes from nurse to doctors he was told and implied that something is wrong with his child. He even asks about his wife because he thought that it might have been a health case problem, but no, he realized his son was just old and that radically changed his life. What led to the epiphany was the misconception that the baby might have had health problem rather than some condition.

Posted by: Sabrina and Lois at October 12, 2015 10:15 AM

Matt Beebe, Alexis Clayton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 – Academic Writing II CAO3
October 12, 2015

Question: What are the epiphanies in O’Connor’s “A good man is hard to find”? What is the chief epiphany? Why? Explain.

Answer: In O’Connor’s Story “A good man is hard to find” The Grandmother ha d her first unselfish thought in the Story causing her to make a real human connection. The grandmother says "Why you're one of my babies. You're one of my own children" to the Misfit (O’Connor). This is an emotional reaction to the Misfit in the story to contrast her attitude throughout the rest of the story. The second epiphany in the story is when the Misfit shoots and kills the grandmother. He concludes that “there is no real pleasure in life” (O’Connor). This contrasts to the his earlier thought that the only pleasure he had was “meanness”.

Posted by: Group 5 at October 12, 2015 11:05 AM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.”

Answer: Wheeler defines epiphany as, "the standard term for the sudden flare into revelation of an ordinary object or scene" (Wheeler 2). In Roman Fever, the most significant moment of epiphany is the very last sentence when Mrs. Ansley tells Mrs. Slade, "...'I had Barbara'" (Wharton 10). This is the moment when Mrs. Slade realizes that her husband not only loved her, but loved Mrs. Ansley as well and she had not won him.

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at October 12, 2015 12:18 PM

Freddie Williams
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CAO9
October 12, 2015

In your own words please explain how professor Wheeler defines “epiphany the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then show at least one instance how “epiphany” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Plato’s Allegory of the Cave.

Professor defines epiphany as “that moment in the story where a character achieves realization, awareness or a feeling of knowledge after which events are seen through the prism of this new light in the story.” (Wheeler Literary Devices Epiphany). This happens in Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” when they describe what would happen to the prisoners if they were to be let free and how they would act with their freedom. “See what will naturally follow if the prisoners are released and disabused of their error. At first, when any of the prisoners are liberated and compelled to suddenly stand up and turn his neck around and walk and look towards the light, he will suffer sharp pains; the glare will distress him, and he will be unable to see the realities of which in his former state he had seen the shadows” (Plato pg 2). This I believe is a perfect example of epiphany because the moment the prisoners were shown the true reality of things they couldn’t handle it because they couldn’t handle the realization of what it truly means to be alive.

Posted by: Freddie Williams at October 12, 2015 02:12 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

Question: Your previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least, six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany.

Answer: In the short story “Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allen Poe the chief epiphany in the story comes about when Price Prospero and his elite citizens within the castle walls realize that the erotic figure that had entered the party was in fact the red death that everyone feared so much. “And now was acknowledged the presence of the Red Death. He had come like a thief in the night. And one by one dropped the revellers in the blood-bedewed halls of their revel, and died each in the despairing posture of his fall” (Poe 10). Prince Prospero was the first to realize what the figure intruding on the party was and he was the first to die then after his death everyone else realized that the red death had arrived. Coming to an epiphany of what was really at the party, just like Prince Prospero had, tried to flee the red death but no one could escape it and everyone at the party died.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at October 12, 2015 02:18 PM

Peyton Farrier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
12 October 2015

Question: Explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the "epiphany" in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the "epiphany", according to Wheelers understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov's The Bear.

Answer: Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines epiphany by a point in the story where a character comes to the realization of an unknown feeling after an event is seen through a prism of new light. Epiphany that is used in Chekhov's story The Bear, was when Smirnoff is talking to Luka. He tells him "What a woman! She got all flushed; her eyes were flashing fire; she accepted my challenge without even thinking! By God, that's the first time this has ever happened to me!" (Chekhov 30). He realizes that he is in love with her "Now that's a women I understand! That's a real woman! She's not one of your sissies, nothing wishy-washy about her. (Chekhov 30)

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at October 12, 2015 02:52 PM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015
Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Gogol’s “The Overcoat.”
Answer: As explained by Professor Wheeler, the modern literary concept of “Epiphany” is an event, triggered by an object, event (or “scene”), or character that completely alters the worldview of a character. In Gogol’s The Overcoat, the main Akaky is a very simple man with no pleasure in life aside from his work as a copyist. He is so introverted and disconnected from the world that he doesn’t notice anything at all, and doesn’t even make any attempts to entertain himself outside of work “Akaky Akakyevitch did not give himself up to any amusement. No one could say that they had ever seen him at an evening party. After working to his heart’s content, he would go to bed, smiling at the thought of the next day and wondering what God would send him to copy.” (Gogol 3). When Akaky’s overcoat is ruined, he is forced to obtain a new one from a tailor living in his building (being in northern Russia, to go without an overcoat would be to doom oneself to sickness and even death during wintertime). The handcrafted overcoat is so amazing in quality that it changes Akaky’s worldview, for the first time in his entire life Akaky is happy “Meanwhile Akaky Akakyevitch walked along with every emotion in its most holiday mood. He felt every second that he had a new overcoat on his shoulders, and several times he actually laughed from inward satisfaction.” (Gogol 8). Akaky is invited to a party in his honor (or rather to honor his new coat), and goes simply to wear the coat again. Not only does he partake in festivities, something he never would have done before, he wanders St. Petersburg at night and finally gets to see the city for what it really is, instead of walking about in a haze.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at October 12, 2015 02:54 PM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
11 October 2015

Question: Your previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least, six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “La Parure” [“The Necklace”] by Guy de Maupassant. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text— properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: In “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant there is one epiphany. The epiphany is when Matilde pays off the necklace that she lost. Even though she wasn’t the richest person at the party she attended and she worked to pay back the necklace that she lost and was fake. She realized that being in the financial situation that she was in wasn’t as bad as it could have been and that she should be thankful she doesn’t have to work like she did.” …when her husband was at work she would sit down near the window and look out admiring that evening…”(Maupassant 59).

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at October 12, 2015 03:30 PM

Group 6: Hana Lee, Daniel
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015


Question: Epiphany for Chopin.

Answer: One instance of an epiphany in Chopin’s, “The Storm” is “Alcee clasped her shoulders and looked into her face. The contact of her warm, palpitating body when he had unthinkingly drawn her into his arms, had aroused all the old-time infatuation and desire for her flesh.” That is a bit of epiphany in Chopin’s story. (Chopin 3)

Posted by: Hana Lee at October 12, 2015 04:20 PM

Group 2
Jorge , Necdet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

Question:
Epiphany about Eudora Welty "The Worn Path"?
Answer:
The epiphany of the story is when she is walking through the path and she stopped by the hunter and she realizes that there is a nickel on the floor and she put her foot on it before the dogs get to her. She fools her way out of tough situations because she is so much wiser than other people that have confronted her. She even fooled the nurse to get the extra 4 pennies so that she could make a dime so that she could buy her Grandson a paper Windmill. Phoenix overall epiphany is that she tricks people into what she wants to do but she is very clever about it.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at October 12, 2015 04:21 PM

Group 8: Maria Gonzalez
Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

Question: Identify any epiphanies that occur in the story. From those, present is the chief epiphany within the story.

Answer: In “The Chrysanthemums,” by John Steinbeck, there are a few epiphanies. The first one that occurs is by the trinket man. He keeps asking if Elisa has something he can repair. When she refuses him for the second time, his look falls to the ground and sees the chrysanthemums (Steinbeck 5). He asks about the flowers, and she responds positively. When he notices that “The irritation and resistance melted from Elisa's face,” he has an epiphany that if he compliments her flowers, she’ll give him something to repair. However, the chief epiphany occurs when Elisa realizes that no matter how hard she tries, she can’t overcome the traditional female role in her society (Steinbeck 11).

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at October 12, 2015 04:24 PM

Group 5 Sidnee Yaeger Peyton Farrier
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

What are the epiphanies in a story? Where are they? Are there more than one? If so, which one was more important?

There are two epiphanies in Chekhov The Bear. They are both towards the end; one being on page 30 and the other one on page 33. The first epiphany is when Smirnoff realizes that he fell in love with Popova, “Yes, what a women! She got all flushed; her eyes were flashing fire; she accepted my challenge without even thinking! By God, that’s the first time this has ever happened to me!.... Now, that’s a woman I understand! That’s a real woman! She’s not one of your sissies, nothing wishy-washy about her..” (Chekhov 30). The second epiphany is when Popova was falling for Smirnoff during a kiss (Chekhov 33). Without Smirnoff’s epiphany, Popova would not have had her epiphany of also falling for Smirnoff during a kiss. Therefore, Smirnoff epiphany is more important than Popova.

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger, Peyton Farrier at October 12, 2015 04:29 PM

Group 9
Brittany Cordero, Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

Question: Identify the major epiphanies in the story. Choose the main epiphany from the story. How do we know that they are happening?

Answer: The play Trifles, by Susan Glaspell, has a main epiphany that is the turning point in the story. The epiphany is revealed when the two women first discover the dead bird wrapped up in a piece of silk in Mrs. Wright’s sewing box. They both come to the realization that the dead husband, Mr. Wright, has killed his wife’s bird. “Their eyes meet. A look of growing comprehension of horror” (Glaspell 8). Both women are convinced that Mrs. Wright killed her husband because they come to the realization that he was killed in a manner similarly to how the bird was killed. They were both choked to death.

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at October 12, 2015 08:09 PM

Group 6 Jaclyn, Tannor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
13 October 2015

Question: What are the epiphanies in your groups story? What is the chief epiphany and why? Explain. Author (Tanizaki)

Answer: Throughout this story Seikichi has been tattooing for a long time and enjoys the feeling of the pain that others feeling as he goes through the long process of the tattoo. But he wanders and looks for a long time to finally tattoo the perfect woman. Suddenly there was a small epiphany where Sekikchi gets a glimpse of a woman’s milky white foot which he says is just as expressive as a face. As you continue through the story it wasn’t until the spring that he saw the face that went along with the foot he had saw months ago. At this point was the epiphany when he had the realization that this was the woman he had been searching for, for many years and this was the woman he was going to tattoo.

Posted by: Group 6 at October 13, 2015 01:44 PM

Zeida Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
10 October 2015
Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms: A Dictionary. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton’s “Roman Fever.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: Professor L. Kip Wheeler describes “epiphany” as “A manifestation of God’s presence in the world” (Wheeler, 2). In Wharton’s “Roman Fever”, according to Beckson’s and Ganz’s understanding of “epiphany”, an “epiphany” manifested when Alida told Grace that she sent her the letter from her husband, Delphin, when they were younger. Grace then tells her she had received a letter back from Delphin and they had ended up meeting at the Forum that night and had Barbara. “But now she turned slowly toward her companion. “But I didn’t wait. He’d arranged everything. He was there. We were let in at once,” she said” (Wharton, 9).

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at October 13, 2015 06:49 PM

Group 4: Zeida Alvarez and Zach Pottle
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
12 October 2015
Question: In Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death” What are the epiphanies in your group’s story? What is the chief epiphany and why? Explain. What led to it?

Answer: In the Edgar Allan Poe’s, “The Masque of the Red Death”, an epiphany that occurs is the striking of the ominous clock at the peak of the hour. The reason being, The characters always stop and get immensely scared, which they could continue with the party, but they choose not to. “[…], there came yet another chiming of the clock, and then were the same disconcert and tremulousness and meditation as before” (Poe, 6). The chief epiphany in the narrative is that cloaked figure was the Red Death, and the entire story they were trying to avoid it, but at the end they had to face it. “And now was acknowledged the presence of the Red Death” (Poe, 10).

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at October 13, 2015 06:50 PM

Lady Hernandez & Luis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
13 October 2015

Question: Find epiphany in the story “Juliette.”

Answer: “After all, she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine.” The doctor is trying to tell the policemen that he is over his “relationship” with the car. The car dealer also tried convincing him to trade her in for a newer model but the man refused to give her up. Every day after that he just saw her as the love of his life.

Posted by: lady hernandez at October 13, 2015 07:04 PM

Yaribilisa, Johnny
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
10/14/2015

QUESTIONS:

How is Epiphany used in the story “Araby?”


“Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger.”


ANSWER:

In the short story “Araby”, the author uses epiphany in the ending of the story. All throughout the story this young boy basically holds this girl that he likes up on a pedestal. The way Joyce uses epiphany is basically a moment of sudden enlightenment. In this story specifically, the moment is in which the narrator finally sees the world for what it actually is, and he finally discovers the truth.

Posted by: Yaribilisa Colon at October 14, 2015 09:03 AM

Shania Bienaime, Brayden Mcavoy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
13 October 2015

Question: What is the epiphany in “The Greatest Gift”?
Answer: The brush salesman gave George a job to sell brushes and become a door to door salesman. This is an epiphany because he would not have a job and he wouldn't be able to make money and mold his life with the choices he made with money. It also teaches him about responsibility. Second epiphany is when his little brother was in an ice-skating accident and perished of his older brother that George wasn't there to save him (Stern 5). I believe that this is one because it's a small incident where people need George. Third epiphany is when the angel casts a spell on George and he sees his life before his eyes and how everybody went down different paths and changed because he was never born (Stern 3 and 5) This epiphany is the major because it shows that George desiring suicide is very selfish and that his life mattered to so many people and he was really stunned by that.

Posted by: Shania Bienaime, Brayden Mcavoy at October 14, 2015 09:48 AM

Group 5 Sidnee Yaeger Peyton Farrier
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

What are the epiphanies in a story? Where are they? Are there more than one? If so, which one was more important?

There are two epiphanies in Chekhov The Bear. They are both towards the end; one being on page 30 and the other one on page 33. The first epiphany is when Smirnoff realizes that he fell in love with Popova, “Yes, what a women! She got all flushed; her eyes were flashing fire; she accepted my challenge without even thinking! By God, that’s the first time this has ever happened to me!.... Now, that’s a woman I understand! That’s a real woman! She’s not one of your sissies, nothing wishy-washy about her..” (Chekhov 30). The second epiphany is when Popova was falling for Smirnoff during a kiss (Chekhov 33). Without Smirnoff’s epiphany, Popova would not have had her epiphany of also falling for Smirnoff during a kiss. Therefore, Smirnoff epiphany is more important than Popova.

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger, Peyton Farrier at October 14, 2015 10:04 AM

Michael Mooney, Lawrence Wright
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 October 2015
Question: Identify any and all Epiphanies in Aldiss’ “Supertoys last all summer long”, which is the most important epiphany?
Answer: Near the end of Aldiss’ short story several components of the story come to a head as “Character Revelations”, or epiphanies. Throughout the story David is questioning of his own existence, wondering whether or not he is “real” or not (a robot or a real boy). He is also questioning of his parents, and whether or not they or “real” as well. In the very end of the story, David eventually realizes that his parents are real but doesn’t fully embrace his discovery, and in a way this could be seen as denial ““Teddy - I suppose Mummy and Daddy are real, aren’t they?” Teddy said, “You ask such silly questions, David. Nobody knows what ‘real’ really means. Let’s go indoors.”” (Aldiss 7). David’s questioning of his existence ties into his trouble communicating with his mother. This trouble with communication is noticed by his mother, but she cannot figure out why David acts the way he does. It is only when she finds David’s letters that she realizes his existential crisis “Dozens of pieces of paper lay inside. Many of them were written in crayon in David’s clumsy writing, with each letter picked out in a color different from the letter preceding it. None of the messages was finished……Monica dropped the pieces of paper and burst out crying. In their gay inaccurate colors, the letters fanned out and settled on the floor” (Aldiss 6). She finally realizes that David’s communicative issues stem from him not believing himself to be her “real” son.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at October 14, 2015 01:17 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk, Anayah Mckenzie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
October 12, 2015

Question: Epiphany of Hawthorne “Young Goodman Brown”

Answer: During the story Young Goodman Brown and the devil came across Goody Cloyse. Goodman Brown did not want Goody Cloyse to see him with the devil. This woman was Goodman’s religious mentor. Surprisingly, he observed Goody Cloyse and the devil having a friendly conversation and how Goody Cloyse vanished along with the serpentine staff; Goodman was astonished. “That old woman taught me my catechism” (Hawthorne pg. 74). At this moment, Goodman had observed the true nature of Goody Cloyse not being for their religious beliefs. The chief epiphany must when Young Brown got to the meeting spot and saw almost all of the church member at the meeting spot. “Either the sudden gleams of light flashed over the obscure fields, bedazzled Goodman Brown, or he recognized a score of the church members from of Salem village, famous for their especial sanctity.” (Hawthorne 79). This was the turning point of the story. It caused him to not trust the people he once trusted at the beginning of the story.

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at October 14, 2015 03:05 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk, Anayah Mckenzie

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09

October 12, 2015

Question: Epiphany of Hawthorne “Young Goodman Brown”


Answer: During the story Young Goodman Brown and the devil came across Goody Cloyse. Goodman Brown did not want Goody Cloyse to see he was with the devil. This woman was Goodman’s religion mentor. Surprisingly, he observed Goody Cloyse and the devil having a friendly conversation; Goodman was startled. “That old woman taught me my catechism” (Hawthorne pg. 74). At this moment, Goodman had observed the true nature of Goody Cloyse, all along she was evil. “What if a wretched old woman do choose to go to the devil, when I thought she was going to heaven!” (Hawthorne pg. 75).

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk at October 14, 2015 03:08 PM

Freddie Williams & Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CAO9
October 12, 2015


The epiphany for “The Three Strangers” is when the townsfolk find out that the first stranger was the criminal. “I have done nothing; my crime is that the condemned man is my brother”(Hardy pg.20). The townsfolk realised that the third strangers brother was the first stranger. All along, the first stranger was the criminal and the wrong person was captured.

Posted by: Freddie Williams & Conner Knarsboro at October 14, 2015 03:20 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA 06
24 February 2016

Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave.” As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: Professor L. Kip Wheeler mentions the concept of epiphanies was common among Christian thinkers and is common in poetry and modern fiction. He states that Christian thinkers used epiphany to represent God’s manifestation and currently poetry or modern fiction uses the word epiphany a sudden revelation. Wheeler, in fact, describes a epiphany as “revelation of such power and insight that it alters the entire world-­ view of the thinker who experiences it (Wheeler 9).” His definition of epiphany can be seen in “Allegory of the Cave”, written by Plato. The prisoner experiences an epiphany when he escapes from the cave. He sees sunlight and can witness “the reflections of men and other objects in the water, and then the objects then he will gaze upon the light of the moon and the stars and the spangled heaven (Plato 3).” By experiencing the real world, the shadows which were projected onto the wall are no longer what he think is real. He suddenly realizes what is real and this is an epiphany he experiences. His view of the world is changed because of stepping out of this cave. This sunlight that is outside the cave symbolizes the prisoner being enlightened with knowledge he was not expose to when he was in the depths of the dark cave.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 24, 2016 11:17 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
24 February 2016

Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: In the excerpt, “Literary Terms and Definitions”, Wheeler opined that Christian thinkers utilize the word Epiphany when there is a manifestation of God’s presence in the world. In the play, “The Bear”, Smirnoff experienced epiphany, which was used to show a sense of growth. Smirnoff visited Popova, who was mourning the death of her husband at her home. He requested that Popova pays him the money that her husband owes him because he mortgage payment his due the following day (Chekhov 23). However, Popova told him that she does not have any cash with her, and her manager will pay him the day after tomorrow. Smirnoff was disturbed by Popova’s response, which led to a series of arguments between the two. His anger took complete control of him, and he proposed a duel, which Popova accepts (30). However, before the duel, Smirnoff began admiring Popova’s defiant nature and suddenly falls in love with her. He reveals to the audience that he clearly understands Popova and that she is a real woman because of her personality and willingness to fight him (30). He could not resist telling her how he feels, and pointed out that his love for her is unconditional, unlike the love he once had for previous women (32).

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
24 February 2016
Question: In your own words, explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Terms and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: In the excerpt, “Literary Terms and Definitions”, Wheeler opined that Christian thinkers utilize the word Epiphany when there is a manifestation of God’s presence in the world. In the play, “The Bear”, Smirnoff experienced epiphany, which was used to show a sense of growth. Smirnoff visited Popova, who was mourning the death of her husband at her home. He requested that Popova pays him the money that her husband owes him because he mortgage payment his due the following day (Chekhov 23). However, Popova told him that she does not have any cash with her, and her manager will pay him the day after tomorrow. Smirnoff was disturbed by Popova’s response, which led to a series of arguments between the two. His anger took complete control of him, and he proposed a duel, which Popova accepts (30). However, before the duel, Smirnoff began admiring Popova’s defiant nature and suddenly falls in love with her. He reveals to the audience that he clearly understands Popova and that she is a real woman because of her personality and willingness to fight him (30). He could not resist telling her how he feels, and pointed out that his love for her is unconditional, unlike the love he once had for previous women (32).

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 25, 2016 01:37 PM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
26 February 2016

Question: Your previously assigned theory readings included short definitions of the “epiphany” concept as expressed by, at least, six different writers: Abrams and Harpham, Beckson and Ganz, Wheeler, and Joyce. You will recall, then, that an epiphany is, when applied to narrative, can be described as a sudden insight or moment of understanding about oneself or one's situation in life. In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany.

Answer: The chief epiphany of “A Good Man is Hard to Find” is when Goodman Brown finds out his wife died and follows the work of the devil. The narrator states, “’My Faith is gone!” cried he, after on stupefied moment. “There is no good on earth; and sin is but a name. Come devil! for to thee is the world given” (Hawthorne 77). From this moment on, he would follow in the footsteps of devil, instead of his holy path.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 26, 2016 11:03 AM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
25 February 2016

“Writing about Epiphany”

Q: #22 In your own words, identify the epiphanies experienced by the character(s) in “The Greatest Gift” by Philip Van Doren Stern.

A: An epiphany in literature is a moment of sudden realization or understanding a character or characters experience. In Stern’s short story, “The Greatest Gift,” the main character needed a rude awakening and received one by the old stranger. George wishes he was never born, and the stranger grants his wish. The first major epiphany would be when George visits his house and seeing a picture of his younger brother, comments that he may have met him before. Shaking his head, George’s father replies, “You couldn’t have met him. He was drowned the day that picture was taken” (Stern 5). George then remembers that day, and how he saved his brother from drowning. However, if he had never been born, his brother would have had no one to save him resulting in his death. After this saddening epiphany, George races through the town seeing all the other things that have happened because of his absence. After many more upsetting epiphanies, he realizes his selfishness and wishes to have his life back.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at February 26, 2016 11:18 AM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA06
26 February 2016

Epiphany/Bear

Question 20: In your own words, explain how writer James Joyce defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from his novel Stephen Hero. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Joyce’s understanding of it, is manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear.

Answer: James Joyce describes an epiphany as “the soul of the commonest object, the structure of which is so adjusted, seems to us radiant. The object achieves its epiphany” (Joyce 5). The biggest epiphany of “The Bear” is when Smirnov realizes he actually likes Popov. Right before their duel he beings to say, “that’s a woman for you! A woman like that I can understand! A real woman! Not a sour-faced nincompoop but fiery, gunpowder! Fireworks! I’m even sorry to have to kill her!...I positively like her! Positively! Even though she has dimpled cheeks, I like her!...Wonderful woman!” (Chekhov 361). I’ve always pictured an epiphany as being that light bulb that goes off over your head.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 26, 2016 01:00 PM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
24 February 2016

Question: In your own words, identify the epiphanies experience by the character/s in “La Parure” [“The Necklace”] by Guy de Maupassant. Finally, decide on which epiphany (if there are multiple ones) is the CHIEF epiphany.

Answer: A couple epiphanies from the necklace is that Madame Loisel had a necklace that Mathilde wanted to use in at a party. Another is the necklace being lost. Mathilde working for 10 years to pay back for the necklace and to find out it was fake all along. The main epiphany I think is that she worked for ten long years to pay for the necklace thinking it was real the whole time. She came to find out it was fake, and I bet she felt horrible and that she wasted ten years being a servant for no reason.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at February 26, 2016 02:25 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
26 February 2016

Question: In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Abrams’s and Harpham’s understanding of it, is manifested in Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave.”

Answer: According to Abrams and Harpham, the definition of epiphany means to “show forth.” The idea of epiphany came to light through Christianity and the idea that God manifests within the world. In Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave,” an epiphany was shown when the man in the cave finds the light when breaking out of the chains.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at February 26, 2016 02:42 PM

Randawnique Coakley, Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
29 February 2016

Question: What is the main epiphany?

Answer: The epiphany could be that he can’t drive her anymore because she is getting older and older. It is shown when he said, “I heard myself answer: “After all, she was nothing but a machine, a beautiful machine (Cheinisse 7)…” He’s repeating what the salesmen told him before. “It’s nothing but a machine, Doctor. A beautiful machine (Cheinisse 7).” When he repeats it he realizes that Juliette is a damaged machine and he has to let her go figuratively. Even though his realization was at the end of the story the reader can still speculate that overtime the doctor can get accustomed to the new car and can eventually let go of Juliette.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at February 29, 2016 11:00 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
March 1st 2016

Question 21) In your own words, explain how writer James Joyce defines the "epiphany" in the exert from his novel Stepher Hero. Then, show how the "epiphany" according to Joyce's understanding of it, is manifested in Wharton's "Roman Fever".

Answer 21) In the exert of the novel, James Joyce defines an epiphany as a "sudden spiritual manifestation" and he backs this up by saying it could be a gesture or action or speech in a memorable moment in time. In "Roman Fever" I believe the epiphany is put into the story through emotion and speech, when Alida reveals that she used the method of roman fever to eliminate her competition with herself and Grace when they were both in love with the same person.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at March 1, 2016 04:13 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
2 March 2016

Epiphany

Question: What is the epiphany in “Super Toys Last All Summer Long”?

Answer: According to the text, an epiphany is “a sudden flare into revelation of an ordinary object or scene” (Abrams, Harpham 1). The epiphany in “Super Toys Last All Summer Long” is after Monica and Henry have sex (Aldiss 7). They look out the window and see Teddy and David. It is then that they realize that they don’t have to keep David anymore. They can throw him out and start over again. They don’t take any responsibility for how David turned out, blame it on malfunctioning hardware, and have already put son no. 1 on the back burner while they focus on creating son no. 2.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at March 2, 2016 01:06 AM

Phil Moss, Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
29 February 2016

Question: What is the epiphany from the character in the story?

Answer: The epiphany of Tessie Hutchinson from “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson is she did not agree with what the town was doing. Before Tessie was going to be stoned from the lottery, she finally came to the realization that this was a cruel way to reduce the number of people in the town. Tessie states, “It isn’t fair, it isn’t right,’ Mrs. Hutchinson screamed, and then they were upon her” (Jackson 7). She did not believe what was happening is not fair, and the town should stop this. Many of the citizens heard other cities stopped the lottery and thought they were crazy. Tessie believed they should follow their example and stop this tradition in the town.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at March 2, 2016 10:32 AM

Matt Scharr Justin Robinson Travis
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA6 Academic Writing II
2 March 2016
Question: Epiphany in The Araby
Answer: The Epiphany in this story is when the boy realizes that he can do something nice for his crush by bringing something back from the Bazaar. This is the main epiphany in the story because the start of the story we see the boy fawning over the girl across his street but he is too shy to do anything to pursue her. When he has a conversation with her she tells him that she cannot go to the bazaar because of an obligation. This is the point in the story where the boy realizes if he goes to the bazaar and brings her back something it would show the girl that he cares for her and that he is interested in her. If the boy never approached the girl about attending the bazaar the reader might never have found out how the boy would go about pursing the girl.

Posted by: Matt Scharr, Justin Robinson, Travis at March 2, 2016 02:08 PM

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