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January 22, 2013

What's Being Watched in Arthur C. Clarke's "The Sentinel"?


Image Source: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-qMFbZSsVq6Q/TtqBCmXdffI/AAAAAAAAB4w/7JHrryG_xm8/s1600/ACCTheSentinel03.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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Posted by lhobbs at January 22, 2013 11:25 AM

Readers' Comments:

Chris Lavie
Dr Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
17 February 2012

QUESTION 29: Clarke is known for his scientific facts in his writing. Give two examples from this story that give it verisimilitude.

ANSWER: Clarke gives many details of this journey on the moon. For example he gives precise numbers when he talks about the diameter of an area called the Sea of Crises:” the Mare Crisium-the Sea of Crises, three hundred miles in diameter”. He also gives an example of the difference of weightlessness in the Moon:” Even with my space-suit, I weighed only forty pounds here”.

Posted by: Chris Lavie at February 17, 2013 02:29 PM

Christopher Burke
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing

In Arthur C. Clarke’s short story “The Sentinel”, An Alien artifact on the moon is discovered. When touched by the Astronaut narrator, what suddenly occurs?

The Artifact stops signalling into space.

Posted by: r Burke at February 17, 2013 08:35 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
17 February 2013

Question: 25. What literary device is Clarke using when the narrator says, “and so escaping from the Earth,
our cradle.”?

Answer: The literary device Clarke uses is a metaphor. A metaphor is a comparison that gives a direct meaning to something without using like or as. The Earth is not literally a cradle, but the author wants you to view it as something that holds us all safely, like a cradle.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at February 17, 2013 10:35 PM

Jose Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA04 Academic Writing II
17th, February 2013
Question:
5. The narrator says everything felt so normal except for what two things?
Answer:
5. In Clark’s The Sentinel, the narrator is explaining the conditions of which they live, as well as their daily routines. As the narrator depicts the sounds of razors shaving and the smell of sausages cooking in the morning, a sense of normalcy and comfort is exposed. This leads the narrator to say, “ It was sometimes hard to believe that we were not back on our own world-everything was so normal and homely, apart from the feeling of decreased weight and the unnatural slowness with which objects fell.” The quote expresses that everything about their mission was normal and home-like except for the change in weight and the speed at which things fell due to gravity. This ironically is a sure sign that they are not home, and is what I believe a subliminal contradiction to what the narrator and other crew members feel.

Posted by: Jose Garcia at February 17, 2013 11:43 PM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA02 Academic Writing II
18th of February 2013

Question: “What is his dire prediction when the narrator says, “Perhaps they wish to help our infant civilization. But they must be very, very old and the old are often insanely jealous of the young.”? What does he mean?”

Answer: The narrator is expressing his fear that the extraterrestrials who left the beacon in the story may try and take advantage of mankind when they come to revisit us. What he means is that because the civilization that left the beacon must be so old, they may view Earth and its inhabitants with contempt, and may even try and wage war with us.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at February 18, 2013 03:51 AM

Briyana Aiken
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 The Sentinel
18 February 2013
Question: How did the narrator say they kept a sense of normalcy on the moon.
The narrator described how they would take turns making breakfast every morning.
"Then
one of us would prepare breakfast, there would be a great buzzing of electric razors, and someone
would switch on the short-wave radio from Earth. Indeed, when the smell of frying sausages began
to fill the cabin, it was sometimes hard to believe that we were not back on our own world -
everything was so normal and homely, apart from the feeling of decreased weight and the unnatural
slowness with which objects fell." (Clarke, 2)

Posted by: Briyana Aiken at February 18, 2013 09:26 AM

Vintoria Hopps
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
18 Feb 2013
Question: How much did the narrator weigh even with his space suit on?
Answer: In the short story “The sentinel” The narrator only weighed forty pounds in space even with his suit on. (Pg. 4)

Posted by: Vintoria at February 18, 2013 10:41 AM

Jordan Miller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
18 Feb 2013

Question 16: What did the narrator notice that set his “scalp crawling”?
Answer: In “The Sentinel” the main character states, “And then I noticed something that set the scalp crawling at the back of my neck-something so trivial and so innocent that many would never have noticed it at all. I have said that the plateau was scarred by meteors; it was also coated inches-deep with the cosmic dust that is always filtering down upon the surface of any world where there are no winds to disturb it (Clarke, 4).” When the main character see’s the dust and craters around the pyramid, he becomes so shocked at what he sees that he makes that statement. Not only did he just discover the fact that life exists outside of humanity, but now with this protective sphere, now he realizes that they are intelligent. His whole life has just been changed and shocked and this is the pivotal moment of everything in the story.

Posted by: Jordan Miller at February 18, 2013 10:56 AM

Jennifer Evans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA 08 The Sentinel
18 February 2013

Question: 13. Quote the line where the narrator describes the object when he first sees it.

Answer: On page two, sixth paragraph down.

"I was turning away when my eye caught a metallic glitter high on the ridge of a great promontory thrusting out into the sea thirty miles to the west. It was a dimensionless point of light, as if a star had been clawed from the sky by one of those cruel peaks, and I imagined that some smooth rock surface was catching the sunlight and heliographing it straight into my eyes."

Posted by: Jennifer Evans at February 18, 2013 11:29 AM

Brynn Laverdure
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA08
February 18, 2013

Question: On the Moon how long does it take in Earth time before nightfall?

Answer: It is about one week of "earth time" before nighfall. In the story it is written, "We had begun our journey early in the slow lunar dawn, and still had almost a week of Earth-time
before nightfall"(Clarke 1).

Posted by: Brynn Laverdure at February 18, 2013 11:31 AM

Habib Balde
2/17/13
Dr Hobbs
English 122 CA04

Question 9: Some would describe the narrator as adventuresome or a risk taker. Sight two examples to back this up.
Answer: I believe that the narrator is extremely adventuresome because of the way he narrated speculates that for millions of years (evidenced by dust buildup around its forcefield) the artifact has been transmitting signals into deep space, but it ceases to transmit when, sometime later, it is destroyed "with the savage might of atomic power". He also uses words such as “forcefields” and such.

Posted by: Habib Balde at February 18, 2013 11:36 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA 08
Feb 18, 2013

4) How did the narrator say they kept a sense of normalcy on the Moon?

A: They kept a sense of normalcy on the Moon by keeping Earth time and the smell of sausages at breakfast. On page two in the first paragraph it says "We kept Earth-time on the tractor, and precisely at 22.00 hours the final radio message would be sent out to base and we would close down for the day." It also says "Indeed when the smell of frying sausages began to fill the cabin it was sometimes hard to believe that we were not back on our own world- everything was so normal and homely, apart from the feeling of decreased weight and the unnatural slowness with which objects fell."

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 18, 2013 11:37 AM

Jade Lowe
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122 CA08
18 February 2013

Question:The narrator says everything felt so normal except for what two things?

Answer: According to the narrator, everything felt normal except for the feeling of decreased weight and the unnatural slowness in which objects fell.

Posted by: Jade Lowe at February 18, 2013 01:43 PM

Jose Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA04 Academic Writing II
17th, February 2013
CORECTION
Question:
14. At first, how does he think this structure got there?
Answer:
14. In Clarks’ The Sentinel, the narrator discovers a glaring structure past the mountains and horizon. The glaring structure first appears when the light of the sun is refracted into his eyes which results in a mission to find out what it is. At first the narrator could not analyze what he was seeing, because he was overwhelmed with the discovery. The narrator first believed it was a building, but there was no sense of easy access, next he used his knowledge of archaeology to compare the structure to any cultural or civilized structure. “The Egyptians could have done it,” thought the narrator but as he took a closer look towards the handiwork realized the moon held intelligence. At first the size of the structure caused the narrator to believe that it was built by a life form less advanced than ours. The fact that the moon held intelligence at all was too much to grasp, and the narrator’s pride wouldn’t let him believe the discovery. It wasn’t until he noticed that the natural debris on the moon only outlined the structure instead of affecting it, causing the narrator to believe the structure is not human made.

Posted by: Jose Garcia at February 19, 2013 12:28 PM

Analisa Johnson
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122-CA 08
19 February 2013

Question: What happened when the narrator thew the pebble at the pyramid?

Answer: The pebble had vanished at an invisible barrier and hit a smooth, hemispherical, surface and slide gently to the ground (Clark, 5).

Posted by: Analisa Johnson at February 19, 2013 07:11 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA04
20 February 2013

Question: The narrator tells us that after 20 years, atomic power was used to shatter the object. What is his reaction to this? Explain why he reacts as he does.

Answer: His reaction to the fact that atomic power was used to shatter the object is that he is anxious, afraid of what will happen then. He reacts as he does because he thinks that the fact of shattering the pyramid has sent a message back to the “strangers” who put the sentinel on the moon: “I can never look now at the Milky Way without wondering from which of those banked clouds of stars the emissaries are coming. If you will pardon so commonplace a simile, we have set off thefire-alarm and have nothing to do but to wait” (Clarke, 6).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 19, 2013 08:10 PM

Octavio Herrera
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II
17 February 2013

Question: If you stood on the moon’s surface, you would be able to see the details of objects hundreds of kilometers away. On Earth, objects at that distance would appear fuzzy or out of focus. Explain this difference in visibility. Why do things appear nearer on the moon?

Answer: On the moon the narrator is able to see objects that are at a great distance unlike on earth. On the moon there is nothing to get in the way seeing objects that are far away. “On the Moon, of course, there is no loss of detail with distance-none of that almost imperceptible haziness which softens and sometimes transfigures all far-off things on Earth” (Clarke 2).

Posted by: Octavio Herrera at February 19, 2013 08:31 PM

Jazmine Dixon
Dr.Hobbs
English 122 CA04 Sentinel
18 Feb 2013

Question: Define sentinel. What makes the title significant?

Answer: Sentinel means a soldier or guard whose job is to stand and keep watch. This is significant to the title because in the story it explains how the object is surrounded by a spherical force field.

Posted by: Jazmine Dixon at February 19, 2013 08:52 PM

Jillian Stolzenburg
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
19 February 2013

Question: What is the narrator’s guess as to the purpose of the pyramid?

Answer: The narrator's guess of the purpose of the pyramid is that it is a signal left from another itelligence. "So they left a sentinel, one of millions they have scattered throughout the Universe, watching over all worlds with the promise of life" (Clarke 6). A sentinel is basically a watch gaurd. So Clarke is saying that it was put there to watch earth to see if any life forms evolved.

Posted by: jillian at February 19, 2013 09:07 PM

Marquisa Turner
ENG 122-CA04 Academic Writing II
Dr. Hobbs
19 February 2013

Question: How does the narrator speculate that the aliens placed it on the Moon? How was this set up as a test?

Answer: “….the belief came to me that it was as alien to the Moon as I myself” (Clarke) this quote shows when the narrator made the conclusion that a alien placed it on the moon. He came to this conclusion by thinking about who could have actually constructed something of that kind. “They would be interested in our civilization only if we proved our fitness to survive -by crossing space and so escaping from the Earth, our cradle. That is the challenge that all intelligent races must meet, sooner or later. It is a double challenge, for it depends in turn upon the conquest of atomic energy and the last choice between life and death” in this quote Clarke showed that the aliens or who ever made the pyramid wanted to know that humans had advanced in life to make it to the moon.

Posted by: Marquisa Turner at February 19, 2013 09:28 PM

Angie Fortunak
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
19 February 2013

Question: While he was preparing breakfast one morning, what did the narrator notice?

Answer: It was any other morning, as the narrator describes, except there was one thing that was out of the ordinary. He was staring at the peaks of the mountain but "I was turning away when my eye caught a metallic glitter high on the ridge of a great promontory thrusting out into the sea thirty miles to the west" (2). He described this unnoticeable object as if it was a star from the sky. A day that was ordinary soon turned to be a day of discovery.

Posted by: Angie Fortunak at February 19, 2013 10:06 PM

Jasmine Lowe
Dr.Hobbs
ENG-122-CA08
February 19, 2013
Question: Who is telling this story? What is the narrator of the story doing on the moon?
Answer: A geologist named Wilson is telling the story. He is on the moon because he is exploring the southern region of the Mare.

Posted by: Jasmine Lowe at February 19, 2013 11:06 PM

Lauren Irish
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
20 February 2013

Question: 19. What conclusion does the narrator come to now?

Answer: The narrator believes that the sentinel was left on the moon for different species that might develop on earth. For years the narrator thinks that the artifact has been transmitting signals into space.

Posted by: Lauren Irish at February 20, 2013 10:02 AM

Marlie Gonzalez
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
20 February 2013

Question: Some would describe the narrator as adventuresome or a risk taker. Sight two examples to back this up.

Answer : One of the things is that he is in space first off all and second he starts of the story or states in the second paragraph on the first page about "their expedition"

Posted by: Marlie Gonzalez at February 20, 2013 10:28 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
February 15, 2013
8. After the narrator shares his sighting with the other men, what do they argue about all morning?
They argue about there being life on the moon “It was absolutely certain, my companions argued, that there had never been any form of intelligent life on the Moon” the others argue, the only living things on the moon are some primitive plants

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at February 20, 2013 10:53 AM

Sade Loiseau
Dr. Hobbs
18 February 2013
Eng 122

Question 10: On the Moon what is the difference in weights?


Answer: On the moon there is definitely a different in the weights from earth to the moon. Arthur C. Clarke’s says: At first sight, those cliffs seemed completely unsalable, but to anyone with a good head for heights, climbing is easy on a world where all weights are only a sixth of their normal value. The real danger in lunar mountaineering lies in overconfidence; a six-hundred-foot drop on the Moon can kill you just as thoroughly as a hundred-foot fall on Earth (page 3). The moons different in weight is six times more the value.

Posted by: Sade Loiseau at February 20, 2013 12:00 PM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
11 October 2013

Question: Define sentinel. What makes the title significant?

Answer. a sentinel is something that is left behind for a significant purpose; the title is significant because it watches over the worlds throughout the universe and it was a beacon for later ages to realize that there was a signal that no one has discovered the sentinel

Proof: "So they left a sentinel, one of millions they have scattered throughout the Universe, watching over
all worlds with the promise of life. It was a beacon that down the ages has been patiently signaling
the fact that no one had discovered it"

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at October 11, 2013 01:32 PM

Michael Ossolinski, Luis Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
11 October 2013

Question: What in your opinion, is a them present in Carter's short story, "Cathedral"? Can you think of any others? Explain your theory.

Answer: the main theme is a that all people are created equal. Other themes that are present in the story can be actions speak louder than words, symbols often tell stories and give understanding, and the difference between looking and seeing. Our theory is that even though the man is blind he is still equal to those who can see

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at October 11, 2013 02:02 PM


Ti’rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
11 October 2013
Question: How did the narrator say they kept a sense of normalcy on the Moon?
Answer: They cook foods that would bring them back to earth in their minds. The sausage and hot cooked meals brings them that normalcy.

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at October 11, 2013 02:11 PM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
11 October 2013

Question: What happened when the narrator threw a pebble at the pyramid?

Answer: When the narrator picked up the pebble and threw it at the pyramid, the pebble had not vanished like the narrator expected it to do. Instead of the pebble dissolving and not hitting at the pyramid at all, it actually hit the pyramid. Then, the narrator describes it as it just sliding down the huge surface and went straight down to the ground. However, this whole time, the narrator was expecting the rock to just vanish into the air, and to not hear or see the rock do anything to change the pyramid. During this time of the rock hitting the period, the narrator was surprised because he got the complete opposite effect of what he expected to happen to the pyramid as a whole when he threw the pebble.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at October 11, 2013 11:26 PM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
11 October 2013

Question #23: "What evidence leads the narrator to believe that the object is very old, and not from the Earth or moon?"

Answer: We first start to realize that there is something special about this item when Clarke writes, "And then I noticed something that set the scalp crawling at the back of my neck-something so
trivial and so innocent that many would never have noticed it at all" (Clarke 4). Further on in the story, the narrator begins to realize that there is a special force protecting this unknown object from being effected by the different substances on the moon. The narrator says, "Then I went back toward that circle in the dust. I picked up a fragment of splintered rock and tossed it gently toward the shining enigma. If the pebble had vanished at that invisible barrier I should not have been surprised, but it seemed to hit a smooth, hemispherical surface and slide gently to the ground. I knew then that I was looking at nothing that could be matched in the antiquity of my own race" (Clarke 5).

Posted by: Madison Owens at October 13, 2013 03:55 PM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
10 October 2013

Question: How much did the narrator weigh even with his space suit on?
Answer:
When the narrator has his space suit on, he only weighs forty-five pounds. The narrator says, “Even with my space-suit, I weighed only forty pounds here, so I pulled myself up hand over hand without bothering to use my feet” (Clarke 4).

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at October 14, 2013 12:20 AM

Taina Valcarcel
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
September 14, 2013

Question: After the narrator shares his sighting with the other men, what do they argue about all
morning?

Answer: What the narrator and the other men are arguing about is whether the narrator should explore an unknown mountain by himself, but his companions are trying to persuade him not to, since it was dangerous. One example of this is, "'If you don’t break your neck,” said Garnett, 'you’ll be the laughing-stock of the expedition when we get back to Base. That mountain will probably be called Wilson’s Folly from now on'" (Clarke, 3). This example shows the team's concern for the narrator on exploring a mountain at his age and condition.

Posted by: Taina Valcarcel at October 14, 2013 11:11 AM

Luis Martinez
Dr.Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
14 October 2013

Question- The narrator says everything felt so normal except for what two things?

Answer- The narrator states that "feeling of decreased weight and the unnatural slowness with which objects fell." are the only things that felt different in this new environment.

Posted by: Luis Martinez at October 14, 2013 11:27 AM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
14 October 2013

Question: What does the narrator say is the real danger in lunar mountaineering?

Answer: The narrator in the story “The Sentinel” mentioned that, “The real danger in lunar mountaineering lies in overconfidence; a six-hundred-foot drop on the moon can kill you just as thoroughly as a hundred-foot fall on Earth” (Clarke 3).

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at October 14, 2013 12:42 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
14 October 2013

Question #16: What did the narrator notice that set his “scalp crawling”?

Answer: The narrator mentions that the plateau which is found “was also located inches-deep with the cosmic dust that is always filtering down upon the surface of any world where there are no winds to disturb it”(Clarke 4). Furthermore, the narrator is stunned because there is a circle around the plateau which seemed as if it “was protecting it from ravages of time and the slow but ceaseless bombardment from space;” this circle was made of the dust mentioned above and the scratches which came from meteors(Clarke 4).


Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at October 14, 2013 12:47 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 February 2014

QUESTION #19:
What conclusion does the narrator come to now?

ANSWER:
The narrator now comes to the conclusion, at the end of the story, that the builders of the crystal pyramid "were not concerned with races still struggling up from savagery. They would be
interested in our civilization only if we proved our fitness to survive -by crossing space and so
escaping from the Earth, our cradle. That is the challenge that all intelligent races must meet,
sooner or later. It is a double challenge, for it depends in turn upon the conquest of atomic energy
and the last choice between life and death" (Clarke 6). In other words, the crystal pyramid solely exists as a challenge posed by an ancient civilization to all other forms of life, much like a test, to discover whom will be the first to explore all that is out there and break free of their comfort zone.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at February 26, 2014 04:38 PM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

Question:
How does the narrator speculate that the aliens placed it on the Moon? How was this set up
as a test?

Answer:
The narrator speculates at one point that the mysterious aliens who left this structure on the Moon may have used mechanisms belonging "to a technology that lies beyond our horizons, perhaps to the technology of para-physical forces (Clarke 5). The narrator speculates that for millions of years the artifact has been transmitting signals into deep space, but it ceases to transmit when, sometime later, it is destroyed with the savage might of atomic power (Clarke 5). The narrator hypothesizes that this sentinel was left on the moon as a warning beacon for possible intelligent and spacefaring species that might develop on Earth.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at February 27, 2014 04:27 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

Question: Explain what Clarke means when the narrator says, "it is a double challenge, for it depends in turn upon the conquest of atomic energy and the last choice between life and death."

Answer: Near the end of "The Sentinel" the narrator says the following quote: "It is a double challenge, for it depends in turn up the conquest of atomic energy and the last choice between life and death." (Clarke 6). The author had the narrator says this because the superior race that was looking for another intelligent species set this up on the moon for a reason. If they were just looking for any species they would have just put it on the earth where they knew species existed. Instead they put it on the moon with the thinking that if a species was intelligent enough to travel to the moon knowing that the Earth may not always be around and they should learn about the outside universe then that species would be worthy of finding out about. You can tell this with lines such as , " Perhaps you understand now why that crystal pyramid was set upon the Moon instead of on the Earth. Its builders were not concerned with races still struggling up from savagery. They would be interested in our civilization only if we proved our fitness to survive-by crossing space and so escaping from the Earth, our cradle" (Clarke 6). These lines further explain the life and death comments in the quote from the question. A species shouldn't just be content with what they have, but should want to strive to last longer than other species were able to.

Posted by: sawyer hand at February 27, 2014 05:19 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

Question:
What happened when the narrator threw a pebble at the pyramid?

Answer:
When the narrator threw the pebble he hit an object and when he picked it up he discovered that it was a pyramid. This quote shows the exact moment of his discovery, “but it seemed to hit a smooth, hemispherical surface and slide gently to the ground.” (Clarke 6).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at February 27, 2014 05:56 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

Question #29: Clarke is known for his scientific facts in his writing. Give two examples from this story that give it verisimilitude.

Answer: Clarke uses a lot of scientific facts throughout this story which makes it interesting to read. One example that stood out to me was, "Those mountains were ten thousand feet high, and they climbed steeply out of the plain as if ages ago some subterranean eruption had smashed them skyward through the molten crust" (Clarke 2). Not only does it use scientific facts, but he also used strong imagery which makes it very realistic. Another example is "On the moon, of course, there is no loss of detail with distance- none of that almost imperceptible haziness which softens and sometimes transfigures all far-off things on Earth" (Clarke 2).

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at February 27, 2014 10:41 PM

James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
27th February 2014

Question #20 – What fear does the narrator have concerning his own safety?

Answer – The narrator has the fear of death in the story. “These forces, whatever they might be, were still operating, and perhaps I had already come too close” (Clarke 5) is a quote about his fear that he may have been poisoned or something of that nature. This fear makes him over think his situation, making him more and more afraid/concerned for his safety. Running through his mind was the thought of “all the radiations man had trapped and tamed in the past century” (Clarke 5), and how damaging/dangerous they could be to people had they come into contact with them. He feels that he may be “irrevocably doomed” (Clarke 5).

Posted by: James Jessop at February 27, 2014 11:23 PM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 February 2014

Question #28:
What is his dire prediction when the narrator says, "Perhaps they wish to help our infant civilization. But they must be very, very old, and the old are often insanely jealous of the young."? What does he mean?

Answer:
The narrator suggests that an alien race far away must have put the pyramid on the moon in hopes that one day life on Earth would find it and they would be able to send signals out to notify the creators. His quote is referring to the alien species and how their civilization is probably thousands or even millions of years older than Earth's, which would make them jealous of our youth and recent upcoming in the universe.

Posted by: Berlin Waters at February 27, 2014 11:26 PM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
27 Feb. 2014

Question 21:
What is the narrator’s guess as to the purpose of the pyramid?

Answer:
The narrator believes that the purpose of the pyramid was to send signals out to space and that it was created by aliens long ago. (Clarke 6)

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at February 28, 2014 12:04 AM

Bianca T. Smith
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
28 Feb. 2014

Question #16- Contrast the author's tone and the narrator's mood at the opening of the story with the tone and mood at the end. How does the change in style reflect the change that has occurred in the narrator?

Answer- In the opening of the story, the narrator is very informational and has a neutral and mellow mood. He is very informational when it comes to talking about the moon and the journey and adventure on the moon. Towards the end of the story, the narrator is hopeful and curious that the sentinel was left as a warning beacon for the possibility of intelligent life that might be on Earth. The change in style reflects the change that has occurred in the narrator by how the story is presented and how the narrator's mood changes along with the story.

Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at February 28, 2014 12:26 AM

NEW ONE WITH CORRECT QUEST. !!!!
Bianca T. Smith
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
28 Feb. 2014

Question # 23- What evidence leads the narrator to believe that the object is very old, and not from Earth or the moon?

Answer-They know that the kind of technology they found was not from Earth. " They are meaningless. The mechanisms-if indeed they are mechanisms-of the pyramid belong to a technology that lies far beyond our horizon, perhaps to the technology of para-physical forces"(Clarke 5).


Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at February 28, 2014 01:02 AM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

QUESTION #22:
Define sentinel. What makes the title significant?

ANSWER:
Sentinel is a soldier or guard whose job is to stand and keep watch. This makes the title so significant because of how the sentinel was the major object in the story that sparked interest within the narrator. This one sentinel was watching over all worlds with a promise of life (Clarke 6).

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at February 28, 2014 08:34 AM

Sarah Ellis
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 February 2014

Question 25:
What literary device is Clarke using when the narrator says, “and so escaping from the Earth, our cradle.”?

Answer:
When Clarke calls the Earth a cradle, he was using an allegory. It is saying that we started on earth but people cannot stay there forever that there are others worlds that need exploring. With the cradle, the child cannot stay there forever and eventually has to be updated to a bigger bed. People are the same way with the universe, people have to eventual leave the ‘cradle’ and explore the rest of the universe.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at February 28, 2014 09:40 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 6, 2014 08:48 PM

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