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January 12, 2013

Estranging Hardy's “The Three Strangers”


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Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 12, 2013 07:31 PM

Readers' Comments:

Alicia Roddenberg
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA16
01.14.09

Thomas Hardy’s The Three Strangers
In Thomas Hardy’s The Three Strangers, the way he introduces his characters helps to predict the outcome he intends to capture. Slowly Hardy brings the strangers whom arrive at the Shepard’s desolate cottage into the story. When the first and second strangers arrive, there is no sign of conflict or main objective in the story, yet the plot only beings to unravel with the entrance of the third and final stranger. With all guests having been introduced, Hardy allows for the conflict between justice and injustice to become blatantly clear. The author I believe is looking to show to the reader that things are not always as they seem, that a stranger’s intentions may be different than what you’ve expected, which inescapably can make someone feel deceived and mislead.
The story begins with the description of the Shepard’s cottage as a quaint and quiet home. It depicts the Shepard and his wife as reliable respectable citizens of a town they are hardly affiliated with. This is easily portrayed when the first stranger arrives and the Shepard does not think twice about allowing the intruding guest into his home. While the guest warms himself near the fire, the second guest arrives; he enters with more confidence about him which concerns the Shepardess. “He flung back his long drab greatcoat, revealing that beneath it he wore a suit of cinder-gray shade throughout, large heavy seals of some metal or other that would take a polish, dangling from his fob as his only personal ornament.” (Roberts 213) A bond between the first and second guest begins to form, as they converse and share a mug of mead.
Finally the tale all begins to become clear as the third stranger knocks. With his shaking knee he arrives and leaves within the same breath, which forces the guests of the cottage to look deeper into his purpose for stopping. This is where it is clear what the authors point is, that believing that everyone is genuine just makes you naïve. When the third stranger flees, the guests of the cottage all go in search after him when they learn of an escaped criminal from the neighboring jail. Yet once all the men leave, the first and second strangers return for more cake and mead, which just emphasizes the fact that neither of their intentions where pure and for the justice of the law.
Once the third stranger is cornered it brings the story to a close. He confesses that the first and third strangers are brothers, and the first stranger is actually the escaped criminal not the third. The way the first stranger deceives the Shepard shows how easy it is to be fooled by someone you don’t know the intentions of. “But the intended punishment was cruelly disproportioned to the transgression, and the sympathy of a great many country-folk in that district was strongly on the side of the fugitive.” (Roberts 221) Everyone was fooled, even the second guest who was the scheduled hangman for the criminal. This story just shows that believing that everyone is honest and genuine is the easiest way to be misled.
When Thomas Hardy’s The Three Strangers begins the story is lacking in a direction for remainder of the story to proceed. Hardy develops his characters well which allows the reader to form their own opinions pertaining to them. This concludes his moral to the short story by proving that even the audience can be fooled by their own opinions. Hardy’s lasting point is that the Shepard welcomed in the drifters without thinking of the hazards of their entry and left the Shepard awestruck by a lesson that will forever be etched in his memory.

Posted by: Alicia Roddenberg at January 19, 2009 08:23 PM

The Three Strangers: Close Reading
In the short story The Three Strangers, the narrator starts off by describing where the events of the story take place. As the narrator ends illustrating the setting of the story, he or she gets into the events of the story. Also, along with the setting and events of the story, the speaker begins to introduce many different characters. By starting with the very first event to the ending of the short story, the storyteller gives the reader information throughout the events to aid in brainstorming a conclusion or the climax of the story.
The narrator begins the story by introducing the setting of the story. The setting is in England where a small cottage is stationed no more than five miles from a country-town (Roberts, 208-08). The setting comes more into play during the climax of the story. The setting and the climax binds together to help create a conclusion. When the third stranger knocked on the door and became frightened of the first stranger and ran is where the climax and setting conjoins. The setting includes the cottage being near trees and uneven land, so when the third stranger ran off it was hard to find him in the dark with the trees scattered everywhere and the land being unequal.
The first of events of the story starts off begins with a party by Shepherd Fennel. “For that cheerful rustic was entertaining a large party in glorification of the christening of his second daughter.” (Roberts, 209) The next event was the first stranger appearing at the party. The first stranger claimed to be on his way home when he got caught in the rain near the Shepherd’s cottage. The event after that was the arrival of the second stranger, who was on a business trip and got caught in the rain. The third event was the appearance of the third stranger, who ran away from the cottage after seeing the first stranger in Shepherd Fennel’s cottage. The last event of the short is the capture of the so-called criminal and the ending of the story.
The most important characters of the story are the first, second, and third stranger. Stranger one was supposedly on his way home when he got in the rained and asked to wait at the cottage for a while. He appeared to have a supple frame, he might have been about forty years old, his clothes looked inexpensive, he was not more than five-feet eight or nine, he was dark in complexion and he had a deep rich voice. (Roberts, 211-12) The second stranger explained that he was on a business trip and got caught in the rain and asked to stay at the cottage for a while. “He was several years older than the first arrival, his hair was slightly frosted, his eyebrows bristly, whiskers cut back from his cheeks, and he had a full and flabby face and wore a suit of cinder-gray shade. (Roberts, 213) “The third stranger came and knocked on the door lightly. After seeing stranger number one, the third stranger began to tremble and shake and finally left the cottage quick.” (Roberts, 217)
The conclusion of the story ends with the narrator telling the reader about the gunshot the other two strangers and the people in the cottage heard after the third stranger ran away from the cottage. The gunshot was from the jail alerting people that a prisoner had escaped. The people at the house assumed stranger three was the escaped convict; they found him but soon learned he was not the prisoner. The third stranger than tells how he was going to the jail to visit stranger one but ran from the cottage when he recognized him at the party. After searching high and low, the first stranger was never found.

Posted by: Michelle Youngblood at January 27, 2009 01:46 AM

Katie Ganning
English 122 CA17
Dr. Hobbs
February 9, 2009

The Connection of Three Strangers

The overview of Thomas Hardy’s, Three Strangers, is a descriptive narrative that explains the 1800 English lifestyle, how simple people lived and enjoyed the nature surrounding them. During the story, a christening party is going on during a vicious storm and the people of the party are greeted by three suspicious characters that are passing by the small cottage. Each stranger is unknown, but by the end they ironically each have a strong connection. The narrator explains the story in two descriptive tenses, third-person limited-omniscient and omniscient point of view.

According to Robert’s text, Hardy uses a “mingling point of view” (Roberts 84). The narrator begins with their present time and explains in deep description of the small town in England. The narrator is unknown, but brings you to the conclusion they have listened to this story before and it has been passed down to him through the towns’ folk. Right away they recollect the past, of fifty years ago, and give you a specific scenic description about what the country and town look like, “Five miles of irregular upland, during the long inimical seasons, with their sleets, snows, rains, and mists, afford withdrawing space enough to isolate a Timon or a Nebuchadnezzar...” (Hardy 209). The narrator enforces the fact that the family who owned the cottage, which was a shepherd family, kept to themselves out in the country side and was very pleased with the small group of 18 attending their child’s christening party. Hardy’s language for the narrator is formal with the time the story was written and explained the characters voices as old English. They use explanation of the settings and emotions, rather than having the characters speak right away and throughout the scene.

Thomas Hardy has the narrator use a third-person omniscient limited and omniscient point of view. The narrator only speaks of the shepherd, shepherd’s wife and the three strangers’ thoughts and dialogue. The first two strangers do not speak a lot, but because of their mysterious appearances, continuous small talks and failure to give each stranger a name show that the narrator did not want you to forget about how creepy they interacted with the family and give away the connection between the three strangers. He emphasizes on the shepherd’s wife to be curious with both strangers “But what is the man’s calling, and where is he one of, that he should come in and join us like this?” (215). Once the narrator has exposed of who the second stranger is and explaining the third strangers quick escape out of the house, the point of view becomes omniscient. As the characters run to catch the third stranger, the first stranger returns to the cottage along with the second stranger. As they catch the third character, and the other two characters have already left, it is revealed of whom each stranger’s name.

Since the third-person speaker is presenting the story that happen almost fifty years ago, it is hard to understand if the story can be accurate or if the story was passed down. He/she seems to know enough information to make the reader believe that the shepherd family could possibly be apart of his family history. When the third stranger began running away from the cottage, you draw a conclusion that he is obviously hiding from someone, but ironically the first stranger was running away from the second stranger and knew all along whom the second stranger was.


Works Cited
Hardy, Thomas. “Three Strangers.” Edgar V. Roberts. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2006. 208-222.
Roberts, Edgar V. “Writing About Literature.” Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2006.

Posted by: Katie Ganning at February 10, 2009 09:20 AM

Terrance Browne
Ryan Nowotny
Dr.Hobbs
ENG122-CA 05 Academic Writing II
23 January 2013

Question:How does Hardy make us suspicious of the first stranger? Be
specific.

Answer: To me, I feel whenever a writer is trying to put enough emphasis on a character they are trying to foreshadow on something important on that person. For instance in this story the writer is going out of his way to describe everything about the first stranger, like describing his height and age. He also describes how when the stranger walked in with his black coat how "there was something about him which suggested that he naturally belonged to the black-coated tribes of men"(Hardy,6). This tool could be used to trick the reader towards the end so that they wouldn't be able to guess the ending of the story.


Posted by: Terrance Browne at January 23, 2013 10:09 AM

Alison Schucht
Colby Johnson
Alexandra Rivera-Vega
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05
23 Jan 2013

Question: What hints and clues suggest the real relationship among the three strangers? In other words, how was Hardy used foreshadowing?

Answer: The real relationship between the strangers is that the second and the third strangers end up being brothers and then the third one ends up having to kill the first stranger. Hardy used foreshadowing to describe these relationships by how he described their activity at the party.

Posted by: Alexandra RIvera-Vega at January 23, 2013 10:20 AM

Rannell Smith
Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 CA05
23 January 2013

Question: "What point of view has Hardy chosen to narrate this story? Was this effective? Why?"

Answer: Hardy has chosen to narrate this story in a third person, omniscient point of view. For example, "All this time the third stranger had been standing in the doorway. Finding now that he did not come forward or go on speaking, the guests
particularly regarded him." (Hardy 14) The author uses words like "he and "him" but never uses the word "I". This perspective Hardy chose was indeed effective because it arranges the narrative to make us sympathetic to his speaker's opinions about the stability and strength of the rough and unpolished shepherds in contrast to the intolerable second stranger.

Posted by: Rannell Smith at January 23, 2013 10:20 AM

Layth Faraj and Sarah Hatcher
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
23 January 2013

Question: What is the function of the first four paragraphs? Hows do they prepare the reader for the story that follows? Where does the introuduction actually end?

Answer: The first three paragraphs are just an introuduction of the background and setting, where does it take place, what are the dates, and what is happening during the story. The introduction ends at the end of the third paragraph and the actual story starts in the begining of the fourth paragraph. (P.3)

Posted by: Layth Faraj at January 23, 2013 10:20 AM

Jose Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
Eng122 CAO4 Academic writer II
23, January 2012

Question: What hints and clues suggest the real relationship among the three strangers? In other words, how has Hardy used foreshadowing?

"The Three Strangers" uses foreshadowing to disguise the true characters. For example, Thomas Hardy describes the first stranger as having a gaunt appearance, and being evasive when expressing himself to the shepard's wife. The foreshadowing also maximizes the suspense in the short story causing the reader to follow "false-paths" or "red-hairy's." This disguises the relationship between strangers, and misleads the reader.

Posted by: Jose Garcia at January 23, 2013 12:58 PM

Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
23 January 2013

Question: All regions have their own colloquialisms. How do local dialect and landscape contribute to the story’s atmosphere?

Answer: In the story some examples of different dialect are grassy, furzy downs, coombs,and ewe-leases (Hardy,3) which are forms of dialect used by the English during the time period. The local dialect is what is spoken by the people that live on that certain type of landscape. So say one farmer lives way out in the country and barely know proper English, leaves to go to the city for supplies, where he talks to the store owner, and the store owner speaks proper English and is educated because he lives in the city where society uses proper English.

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at January 23, 2013 06:56 PM

Marquisa Turner/ Jazmine Dixon
English 122-CA04
Dr. Hobbs
23 January 2013

Question: How does Hardy make us suspicious of the first stranger? Be specific.

Answer: Hardy makes us suspicious by the description he gives of the first stranger. With him describing him as “Notwithstanding the regularity of his tread, there was caution in it, as in that of one who mentally feels his way; and despite the fact that it was not a black coat nor a dark garment of any sort that he wore, there was something about him which suggested that he naturally belonged to the black-coated tribes of men” (Hardy 6). When Hardy used the word caution, that caused worry or suspicion from the beginning.

Posted by: Marquisa T & Jazmine D at January 25, 2013 10:24 AM

Alexia Chambers and Chris Burke
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
January 23, 2013
4. What point of view has Hardy chosen to narrate this story? Was this effective? Why?
The point of view hardy chose for this story is third person dramatic point of view we do not know what the people are thinking only what they say aloud and what they do. Yes, we believe this was effective it created more mystery since we did not go through their thoughts and just their actions and communication.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at January 25, 2013 10:59 AM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
12 September 2013

Question:What themes are present in the story? What aspects of the story suggest that Hardy is also concerned with theme?

Answer: some themes that are present in this story can be, "suspense is a way of understanding something that is mysterious" and "you can't judge a person based on the way he looks."; some aspects of the story may be that Hardy uses foreshadowing and use a mysterious tone to get the reader to believe that there is suspense going on that the reader feels when reading the story

Proof: "In his indecision he turned and surveyed the scene around. Not a soul
was anywhere visible" and (p.14, all of paragraph 1)


Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at September 12, 2013 12:56 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
13 September 2013

Question #14: “When do readers of this story get the first clue that the man in the chimney corner(who turns out to be the condemned man) was not being entirely truthful about himself?”

Answer: The readers of “The Three Strangers,” written by Thomas Hardy, get a clue that the man in the chimney-corner is not being completely honest about himself when he is talking to Mrs. Fennel about where he is from. When she says she recognizes his accent as one which people from her community had he immediately responds saying: “But you would hardly have heard of me”(Hardy 8). He explains why she would not have really known him by telling Mrs. Fennel that he was living in that community a long time before she was living there, flattering her(Hardy 8). This fast answer to Mrs. Fennel’s question concerning where the man is from leads the reader to become suspicious of the man in the chimney-corner(Hardy 8). This common question which the man did not directly answer leads the readers to believe that this man does not want people to know this information about himself. The readers then start to think the man has some secrets he does not desire to share.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 12, 2013 10:09 PM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
13 September 2013

Question: What brought the three strangers together to the shepherd’s cottage? Under what circumstances should they have met the next day?
Answer:
The three strangers were brought together in the shepherd’s cottage by the terrible rain storm that was taking place that evening. When the first stranger walks in, he says to the shepherd, “The rain is so heave, friends, that I ask leave to come in and rest a while” (Hardy 8). This quote lets us know that the first stranger was walking in the pouring rain when he came across the cottage and walked in, asking to stay a while, which is the same as the second stranger. The third stranger went to the cottage because he was lost. When the third stranger enters the cottage he says, “Can you tell me the way to –“ (Hardy 14). The third stranger did not say he was stopping in because of the rain, but the rain can be a reason as to why he was lost in the first place. The men were to meet the next day after they captured the man whom had broken out of jail. The prisoner on the loose was signaled to the men by shots fired at a certain interval. The man who fired the shots said, “pursue the criminal at once, with assistance, and bring him back here. He can’t have gone far” (Hardy 16). This quote tells us that the three strangers are to go out and find the criminal on the loose and return back to the shepherd’s cottage the next day.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 12, 2013 11:14 PM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
13 September 2013

Question: What was it that brought all three strangers together to the same place, i.e., the shepherd's cottage? Under what circumstances should they have met the next day?

Answer: What brought the strangers to the same place is the fact that they all needed shelter from the rain while they were attempting to travel in the dark. The next day the Wheelwright would have met his brother as a visitor and the man in the grey suit in a professional place.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at September 13, 2013 12:37 AM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
13 September 2013

Question: How does Hardy make us suspicious of the first stranger? Be specific.

Answer: Hardy makes the reader suspicious of the first stranger by describing the way the stranger looks before coming into the house where all the people are. Hardy also talks about the way, specifically, the stranger is dressed. The stranger is dressed in very dark clothing while he is outside in the rain, and as well, while he is looking for cover from the rain. When he knocks on the door, he is looking around the house to make sure no one is around and even says in a positive way how the house is laid out that no one could see him peeking into the home because of the dark interior. However, what is also suspicious about the first stranger is that whenever he hears of this birth christening, which is a big celebration, he starts to show the emotion of happiness and excitement. Hardy explains that the stranger’s whole attitude changes towards the people and the situation going on in the home, “His manner, which before entering had been so dubious, was now altogether that of a careless and candid man.” (Hardy 8) This makes the reader suspicious because as well the stranger goes on talking about certain episodes that has happened and how he does not want to disrupt his guests of these. This makes the stranger seem very intimidating and while reading this part about the first stranger, makes the reader uneasy about what this guy is capable of doing. By the way the author has described the stranger, he puts him in a negative light, as though he would do something bad to these good people inside the house having a good time. However, then the first stranger being happy is also a suspicion, because it is as though he is out to get something from these people, and will show any kind of emotion or feeling to get what he wants.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 13, 2013 01:04 AM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
13 September 2013

Question #13: "The hangman's riddle contributes to the suspense, but also reveals something about his character: explain."

Answer: The revelation of the hangman's character comes from his second verse of the riddle, "My tools are but common ones, Simple shepherds all—My tools are no sight to see: A little hempen string, and a post whereon to swing Are implements enough for me!" (Hardy 13). As you read on, the party guests begin to catch on to the fact that he is a hangman, and they seem terrified at this. Hardy writes, "O, he's the ——!' whispered the people in the background, mentioning the name of an ominous public officer" (Hardy 13). Where revealing his trade in the form of a riddle caused him to see more mysterious, once the truth was let out of who he truly was, the guests seemed to be terrified of this hangman.

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 13, 2013 10:22 AM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
12 September 2013

What is the function of the first four paragraphs? How do they prepare the
reader for the story that follows? Where does the introduction actually
end?

The first four paragraphs detail the physical attributes of the area and set up a very specific setting. They give the reader, whether or not they know anything about the English countryside, a good idea atmosphere of the story, not just what it looks like. They prepare the reader for the story by putting the reader in the right state of mind to accept the story that follows by giving it a sense of realism. It gives the sense that this is a “real place” and this “could happen.” It isn't until page 5 when Hardy stops describing the characters and moves to events, “But Elijah and the boy, in the excitement of their position, quite forgot the injunction.”(Hardy 5.)

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at September 13, 2013 11:57 AM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2014

Question:
Be sure you understand what irony is, especially in the dramatic sense
(dramatic irony) What are some of the major examples of irony in the
story?

Answer:
There are 3 major types of irony Verbal, Dramatic, and Situational. Verbal Irony and sarcasm is not necessarily the same thing, but sarcasm is sometimes considered a type of verbal irony.
Dramatic Irony is probably the easiest to understand. It takes place in a story or other narrative, and means that the spectator or reader is aware of some knowledge that one or more of the characters are not aware of. Situational Irony is probably most used and misused of the three. It means that an actual event differed from what was expected to happen. The main theme of irony in this story is the fact that the man that everyone condemned as a criminal was able to entertain the hangman. For the time being he was seen as an entertainer and not a criminal by the hangman.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at January 30, 2014 01:36 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2014

QUESTION #3:
What hints and clues suggest the real relationship among the three strangers? In other words, how has Hardy used foreshadowing?

ANSWER:
Within the short story, "The Three Strangers," Hardy uses foreshadowing by to suggest the real relationship among the three strangers, in my opinion, in numerous ways. The first stranger is described as "a gauntish fellow" (Hardy 6) and whilst talking with the shepherd's wife, tries not to reveal any personal details (Hardy 8). The second stranger reveals his identity a bit easier through the use of song and is confirmed by the guests stating "He's come to do it! 'Tis to be at Casterbridge jail to-morrow" (Hardy 13). As for the third stranger, "he stood before them the picture of abject terror-his knees trembling, his hand shaking so violently that the door-latch, by which he supported himself, rattled audibly; his white lips were parted, and his eyes fixed on the merry officer of justice in the middle of the room. A moment more, and he had turned, closed the door, and fled" (Hardy 14). In my opinion, this is revealing of his concern for his brother, rather than for himself.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at January 30, 2014 04:09 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2013

What is the function of the first four paragraphs? How do they prepare the
reader for the story that follows? Where does the introduction actually
end?

The first four paragraphs detail the physical attributes of the area and set up a very specific setting. They give the reader, whether or not they know anything about the English countryside, a good idea atmosphere of the story, not just what it looks like. They prepare the reader for the story by putting the reader in the right state of mind to accept the story that follows by giving it a sense of realism. It gives the sense that this is a “real place” and this “could happen.” It isn’t until page 5 when Hardy stops describing the characters and moves to events, “But Elijah and the boy, in the excitement of their position, quite forgot the injunction.”(Hardy 5.)

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield (corrected) at January 30, 2014 06:55 PM

Bianca T. Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 Jan. 2014

Question #11: What are the underlying attitudes of the guests towards the sheep-stealer (both before and after).

Answer: In the beginning of the story, the guests thought that the first stranger(sheep-stealer) was weird and being suspicious. He stated that he was a smoker, but he didn't have the materials to use to smoke with. He stated that he lost his pipe, baccy box, and tobacco. "I'll fill your pipe,' said the shepherd.
'I must ask you to lend me a pipe likewise.'
'A smoker, and no pipe about 'ee?'
'I have dropped it somewhere on the road.'
The shepherd filled and handed him a new clay pipe, saying, as he did
so, 'Hand me your baccy-box—I'll fill that too, now I am about it.'
The man went through the movement of searching his pockets.
'Lost that too? ' said his entertainer, with some surprise" (Hardy 9). The shepherd seemed very puzzled when the first stranger said this to him. When the shepherdess asked him questions, he felt very uncomfortable and avoided the question when she asked him what his name was."One of hereabouts?' she inquired.
'Not quite that—further up the country.'
'I thought so. And so be I; and by your tongue you come from my
neighbourhood.'
'But you would hardly have heard of me,' he said quickly" (Hardy 8). The first stranger seemed to be hiding something since he didn't want to give out his name to the shepherdess. Towards the end of the story, the guests' attitude towards the first stranger(sheep-stealer) was shocking expressions on their faces and they were surprised at the same time. Towards the end of the story, there was no hanging at the end.


Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at January 30, 2014 07:24 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
31 January 2014

Question: How does Hardy make us suspicious of the first stranger?

Answer: In Hardy's "The Three Strangers" the first stranger comes off as suspicious from the first time he is mentioned. The first talk of him is when he is making his way to the shepherds house. The author describes this in lines such as, "Not withstanding the regularity of his tread, there was caution in it, as in that of one who mentally feels his way; and despite the fact that it was not a black coat nor a dark garment of any sort that he wore, there was something about him which suggested that he naturally belonged to the black-coated tribes of me"(Hardy6).These lines make the reader instantly start to question who this character is. The first stranger continues to have a suspicious way about him once he first comes into contact with the rest of the characters in the story. This is show in lines like, "His hate, which for a moment he did not remove, hung low over his eyes, without concealing that they were large, open and determined, moving with a flash rather than a glance round the room. He seemed pleased with his survey, and, baring his shaggy head, said, in a rich deep voice, 'The rain is so heavy, friends, that I ask leave to come in and rest awhile'"(Hardy8). This shows that the character had a very shady way about him with everything that he did.

Posted by: sawyer hand at January 30, 2014 11:04 PM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
31 January 2014

Question 9:
What themes are present in the story? What aspect of the story suggest that Hardy is also concerned with theme?

Answer:
One of the themes of this story is to not hush to conclusions without the facts first. When the third stranger ran away, the law assumed that he was the criminal that they have been searching for, but the reasoning for running away was out of fear for who he saw. When the third stranger say the man in the chimney-corner, the stranger relieved that it was his brother, the same brother that he was planning on seeing in jail (Hardy 20). Another theme was to watch who is brought in to the house. The Shepherd allowed a sheep burglar into his house without thinking twice (Hardy 20). Hardy is concerned with themes by how he leads into these themes. These themes just don’t appear, the reader has to read carefully in order to find them.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at January 31, 2014 12:32 AM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
31 January 2014

Question #2:
What brought the three strangers to the Shepherd's cottage? Under what circumstances should they have met the next day?

Answer:
The strangers had been seeking shelter from the boisterous weather and found themselves at the Shepherd's cottage as it was at the corner of two footpaths (Hardy 4).
Little did the two strangers know, they were supposed to meet the next morning. The stranger who had been sitting in the chimeny-corner had apparently been accused of steeling sheep and therefore was to be hung the next day in the town of Casterbridge by his executioner who just so happened to be the man sitting next to him in the chimeny-corner, singing "a little hempen string, and a post whereon to swing" to describe to his onlookers his occupation and duties for the morning (Hardy 13)

Posted by: Berlin Waters at January 31, 2014 02:09 AM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2014

Question #6:
What point of view has Hardy chosen to narrate this story? Was this effective? Why?

Answer:
The story was written in third person. This was effective because by making the story this point of view you are able to see what is happening in the story as a whole. You get to see what all of the characters are thinking rather than just showing the point of view of one character. “Mrs. Shepherd Fennel assented, and made room for the self-invited comer, who, having got completely inside the chimney-corner, stretched out his legs and his arms with the expansiveness of a person quite at home.”, if the story would have been written in another point of view details like these might have been left out.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at January 31, 2014 09:34 AM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
31 January 2013

QUESTION #14:
When do readers of this story get the first clue that the man in the chimney corner (who turns out to be the condemned man) was not being entirely truthful about himself?

ANSWER:
The readers of the story get the first clue that the man in the chimney corner was not being entirely truthful about himself is when announces a little baccy would really make him happy, yet he was all out of it. The shepherd then offered to fill his pipe but the man in the chimney corner responds by asking for a pipe because he had dropped his somewhere along the road. The shepherd didn't think anything of it and asked to fill the man in the chimney corner's baccy box as well which he had seemed to "lose" as well on the road.

" 'Hand me your baccy-box—I'll fill that too, now I am about it.' The man went through the movement of searching his pockets. 'Lost that too? ' said his entertainer, with some surprise. 'I am afraid so, said the man with some confusion (Hardy 9)."

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at January 31, 2014 10:17 AM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
31 Jan. 2014

Question #8:
Discuss Hardy’s use of plot. What aspects of “The Three Strangers” short story suggest that Hardy’s concern is with plot?

Answer:
The aspects that suggest Hardy's concerns is with plot is that "The bulk of his work, set mainly in the semi-imaginary county of Wessex, delineates characters struggling against their passions and circumstances (Hardy 2)."

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at January 31, 2014 10:20 AM

Shelby Marrero & Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
31 Jan. 2014

Question #14:
When do readers of this story get the first clue that the man in the
chimney corner (who turns out to be the condemned man) was not being
entirely truthful about himself?

Answer:
The first clue that the man in the chimney corner was not being entirely truthful was when he hid his hands in the shade and kept on smoking his pipe in a nonchalant type of manner. (Hardy 12)

Posted by: Shelby Marrero & Sawyer Hand at February 2, 2014 08:52 AM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2014

Question #7: All regions have their own colloquialisms. How do local dialect and landscape contribute to the story's atmosphere?

Answer: The dialect and landscape set the tone for the whole atmosphere of this story. The dialect helped the people living in the village determine where the outsiders were from. The landscape "seemed to be the crossing of two footpaths out right angles" (Hardy 3). One of the strangers was very well mannered "his manner, which, before entering, had been so dubious, was now altogether that of a careless and candid man" (Hardy 8).

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at February 2, 2014 02:21 PM

Hubert Reuter and Belin Waters

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 122 CAO12

February 3 2014

Question:
What is the function of the first four paragraphs? How do they prepare the
reader for the story that follows? Where does the introduction actually
end?

Answer:
The first four paragraphs describe the setting and plot of the story. It tells you the month, day and year. It sets the tone for something ominous to happen. It describes why the strangers are coming to the house, and it’s because of the storm (Hardy 4). The introduction ends at the begging of the fourth paragraph.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter and Berlin Waters at February 3, 2014 10:31 AM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at September 15, 2014 04:12 PM

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA07
17 September 2014

QUESTION #14:
In Thomas Hardy’s short story “The Three Strangers,” which character is the most dynamic and which is the most static?

ANSWER:
The most dynamic character ended up being the first stranger to enter the Shepard’s party. Mrs. Fennel, the farmer’s wife, questioned him very much at the beginning of his arrival. The way the narrator describes him is a man in worn down clothing, who just so happened to be going through a rough time. He was a very mysterious character, yet seemed of no harm. The lack of true and detailed facts about his life shaped him as a character, and then he is the biggest shock of all. The Shepard and everyone at his party chases down the third stranger, who they believe is a runaway criminal. The third stranger admits after “the mention of the man in the chimney-corner…that the condemned man [was] [his] brother” (Hardy 20). This first stranger character completely changes from the first impression to the final revealing of who he truly is. The most static character is the Shepard because this chaotic night had no effect on him, and he did not change or grow after this experience. The Shepard and his wife continued on with their lives as normal and the story remained with them, until “the grass has long been green on the graves...a story as well known as ever in the country about Higher Crowstairs” (Hardy 21). The character did not change, and the event was simply a strange occurrence, nothing more.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at September 17, 2014 05:59 PM

Roslyn Thomas
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
19 September 2014

Question 10:
In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what are the underlying attitudes of the guests towards the sheepstealer (both before and after)? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
Before they were stand off and not wanting to interact but after it was better. And because they said “Shepherd Fennel had married well, his wife being a dairyman's daughter from a vale at a distance, who brought fifty guineas in her pocket—and kept them there, till they should be required for ministering to the needs of a coming family.”

Posted by: Rosyn Thomas at September 19, 2014 11:48 AM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing CA07
21 September 2014


Question
In Thomas Hardy's short story, "The Three Strangers," what was it that brought all three strangers together to the same place, Under what circumstances should they have met the next day? answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer
According to the story, the rain brought two of the three strangers together to the shepherds cottage, but the third stopped to rest and ask the rest of the way. They should have met the next day specifically for the hanging of the first stranger. See, the first and third strangers are actually brothers, the third stranger who had came to visit his brother before his execution the next morning was the one who fled at the sight of his brother in the chimney corner. The second stranger was actually the executioner who had no clue that the man singing with him at the christening party was the one he was suppose t be his next job.

As seen on page 20 lines 4-9, "I have done nothing, my crime is that the condemned man is my brother. Early this afternoon I've left home at Shottsfrd to tramp it all the way to Casterbridge jail to bit him a farewell. As i was benighted and called here to rest and ask the rest of the way. When i opened the door i saw the very man, my brother that i thought to see in the condemned cell at Casterbridge"

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at September 21, 2014 05:33 PM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
22 September 2014

Question #4:
In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” how does Hardy make us suspicious of the first stranger? Be specific. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer:
Hardy has 3 strangers in this fiction. The first stranger is described to us by a dark complexion and no unprepossessing feature. (Hardy 7) He had a hat that hung over his eyes to where you could barely see them. He was very beat up and had a deep voice. (Hardy 7-8) The shepherd asked him some question and appeared he had nothing on his and he lost it. This stranger seems like he was living on the road because he said “I have had some rough times lately.” (Hardy 8)
“I have had some rough times lately, and have been forced to pick up what I can get in the way of wearing, but I must find a suit better fit for working-days when I reach home.”
“Their light disclosed that the stranger was dark in complexion and not unprepossessing as to feature.”
“His hat, which for a moment he did not remove, hung low over his eyes, without concealing that they were large, open, and determined, moving with a flash rather than a glance round the room”
“He seemed pleased with his survey, and, baring his shaggy head, said, in a rich deep voice, 'The rain is so heavy, friends, that I ask leave to come in and rest awhile.”

Posted by: Zachary Gary at September 22, 2014 09:11 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 21, 2014
The Three Strangers
By: Hardy, Thomas
Question 13:
In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” when do readers of this story get the first clue that the man in the chimney corner (who turns out to be the condemned man) was not being entirely truthful about himself? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer:
The first clue readers notice about the man in the chimney corner not being truthful about him is when the second stranger comes in the home. Once the second stranger makes himself at home the readers gets hints that the two may possibly know each other as they soon come into close companionship. The first stranger hands the second the family mug and quickly drank out of it (Hardy, 10).

Posted by: Stephanie Vera at September 22, 2014 10:24 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 21, 2014
The Three Strangers
By: Hardy, Thomas
Question 13:
In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” when do readers of this story get the first clue that the man in the chimney corner (who turns out to be the condemned man) was not being entirely truthful about himself? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer:
The first clue readers notice about the man in the chimney corner not being truthful about him is when the second stranger comes in the home. Once the second stranger makes himself at home the readers gets hints that the two may possibly know each other as they soon come into close companionship. The first stranger hands the second the family mug and quickly drank out of it (Hardy, 10).

Posted by: Stephanie at September 23, 2014 11:06 PM

Elizabeth Brown
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II
22 September 2014

Question #2:
In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what hints and clues suggest the real relationship among the three strangers. In other words, how was Hardy using foreshadowing?

Answer:
Hardy used foreshadowing with the weather, it was raining and that normally represents something bad or sad is about to happen. He also left many hints suggesting that all of the strangers knew each other because they all knew little details about the others, and Hardy explains how they are all intertwined.

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at September 24, 2014 07:53 AM

Trejon Baynham
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 07
24 September 2014

QUESTION:
When does the dénouement take place, and what IS the resolution of the conflict for this story, anyway?

ANSWER:
The dénouement occurs after the Shepard’s release from the magistrate when the narration enters an exploration of the Shepard’s mind regarding his ordeal (Hardy 20). The resolution of the story is that no punishment will be issued given that obtaining the individual responsible for the Shepard’s accused crimes was “beyond the power of the magistrate” (Hardy 20).

Posted by: Trejon Baynham at September 24, 2014 01:38 PM

Mickael Dodard
Dr.Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
24 September 2014

Question 7:
In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The three strangers,” discuss Hardy’s use of plot. What aspects of the three Strangers short story suggest that Hardy’s concern is with plot? You may need to go back to Robert’s chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the theory.

Answer:
The aspects of the three Strangers short story that suggest that Hardy’s concern is with plot is that the author fails to place to story in order. The suspense of the story is set way too early and the events are unpredictable. The author does not apply a plot in his story.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at September 24, 2014 01:46 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 30, 2014 02:00 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
5 February 15

The Three Strangers Discussion Question

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what is the chief of conflict? You may need to go back Roberts chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the theory.

Answer: In “The Three Strangers,” the chief of conflict is when the party searches for the third stranger after he flees. When they find him and bring him back, it turns out to be the incorrect man. “All I know is that it is not the condemned man,” states one of the characters (Hardy 19). The people in the cottage realize that the person they are looking for was the first stranger that they came across. “Conflicts may also exist between groups” (Roberts 3). The major conflict is between the panel of people that were in the cottage and whether or not they have the correct fugitive.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 5, 2015 05:09 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 February 2015

Question: Be sure you understand what irony is, especially in the dramatic sense (dramatic irony) In
Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what are some of the major examples of irony
in the story? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the
theory. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your
answer

Answer: The first stranger is the escaped convict. The second stranger is an arrogant hangman, who has been hired to hang the prisoner when he is found. “ 'He's come to do it! 'Tis to be at
Casterbridge jail to-morrow—the man for sheep-stealing…” (Hardy 13) The third stranger is the convict’s brother. There is a lot of irony in this story mostly because readers and the characters do not find out who the first stranger is until the end of the story. When the truth is revealed, they are left to look back and see how close the characters came to catching the convict. The arrogant hangman had his chance to catch the thief. When the gunshot sounds to alert the town of an escaped prisoner, the constable sends the party off in pursuit of the third stranger. The hangman, instead of aiding the search, he stayed behind and drank with the first stranger. The two talk for a bit and then go their separate ways. “The other had by this time finished the mead in the mug, after which, shaking hands heartily at the door, and wishing each other well, they went their several ways.” (Hardy 18) The party people return with the suspicious third stranger and discover that he is not the convict, and the first stranger was the convict and they were with him the whole time, he and the hangman were side by side. "He was in this chimney-corner; and jammed close to him, so that he could not have got out if he had tried, was the executioner who'd come to take his life, singing a song about it and not knowing that it was his victim who was close by, joining in to save appearances.” (Hardy 20)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 6, 2015 11:52 AM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
9 February 2015

Question 5: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what point of view has Hardy chosen to narrate this story? Was this effective? Why? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Point-of-View” to revisit the theory. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer

Answer: This story is written in the third person objective, this point of view is a fly on the wall view. This view is effective because it does not delve into the mind of one particular character but instead observes each character in particular and gives an unbiased timeline.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 8, 2015 07:56 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
8 February 2015

Question 2: In Thomas Hardy's short story, "The Three Strangers," what hints and clues suggest the real relationship among the three strangers? In other words, how has Hardy used foreshadowing?

Answer: Hardy has used foreshadowing in his story by giving the description of the strangers. Hardy makes the readers believe that it is the third stranger that is the prisoner based on his actions. He gives us clues that it is in fact the first stranger based on his appearance, mentioning "despite the fact that it was not a black coat nor a dark garment of any sort that he wore" (Hardy 6) his appearance suggested that there is something sketchy about him. There are also mentions of foreshadowing in the actions of the first stranger. He says that he is poor, noting giving many details about himself to Mrs. Fennel when asked and keeps to himself during the party. (Hardy 8)

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 8, 2015 09:20 PM

Diego Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
8 February 2015

Discussion Question

Quote: “His hat, which for a moment he did not remove, hung low over his eyes, without concealing that they were large, open, and determined, moving with a flash rather than a glance round the room.” (Hardy 7 and 8).

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” how does Hardy make us suspicious of the first stranger? Be specific.

Answer: Hardy makes us suspicious of the first stranger by the manner in which he enters the house. In addition, when the stranger came in he said that he smokes, but he did not have anything that smokers usually carry. This was explained in the story when the author says, “'I'll fill your pipe,' said the shepherd. 'I must ask you to lend me a pipe likewise.' 'A smoker, and no pipe about 'ee?'” The author makes it seem peculiar that he does not have those objects.

Posted by: Diego Garcia at February 8, 2015 09:37 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
8 February 2015

“The Three Strangers”

Question #2: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” What hints and clues suggest the real relationship among the three strangers? In other words, how had Hardy used foreshowing?

In this story, towards the middle is when I started to realize the relationship between the three strangers. It starts off by mentioning the first stranger then the second, I knew there was some sort of relation when the second stranger enters the story when “the first stranger handed his neighbour the family mug...” (Hardy page 10 paragraph 2) After, I read that sentence I inferred they had to be brothers. Their relation to the third stranger became known soon after when he walks into the door when he is “grazing round the room to observe the nature of the company amongst who he had fallen, his eyes lighted on the stranger in cinder-gray.” (Hardy page 14 paragraph 3) I inferred that he knew the second stranger because the sentence tells me that he recognizes him.

Posted by: Selena Hammie at February 8, 2015 09:52 PM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
8 February 2015

The Three Strangers

Question #1: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what was it that brought all three strangers together to the same place, i.e., the shepherd's cottage? Under what circumstances should they have met the next day? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: On the night of the christening, three strangers knocked on the door of the Fennel house. The shepherd welcomed them all in. The first stranger stopped by the house because “the rain is so heavy I ask to come in and rest awhile” (Hardy 8). The second stranger, “I must ask for a few minutes’ shelter, or I shall be wetted to my skin” (Hardy 9). The third stranger had stopped by to ask for directions. The three men should have met the next day at the Casterbridge jail. The first stranger was an escaped prisoner, the second was on his way to the jail to execute the prisoner, and the third stranger was the brother of the first (Hardy 20).

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at February 8, 2015 10:24 PM

Aderias Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
8 February 2015
Question 12: , “The Three Strangers,” the hangman's riddle contributes to the suspense, but also reveals something about his character. Explain.

The fact that the second stranger is a hangman, the hangman is a sadistic character because before the execution was about to occur the surprised gossip of towns people reconsidered. Saying, “our own country [man]" "whose family were a-starving . . . and took a sheep in open daylight" than the "stranger of the terrible trade" who "is come from up the country to do it because there's not enough to do in his own county town." Timothy Sommers, the thief, is painted as a loving father, one of their own, who nobly stole food to save his family from hunger, while the sadistic hangman is just looking for more people to execute, not really giving a thought to what other people are saying.

Posted by: aderias ewing at February 8, 2015 11:50 PM

Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing CA 12
6 February 2015

Question 8:
What are some of the major examples of irony in the story?
Answer:
A major example of irony in the cosmic irony. Some examples would include “The sad wan light revealed the lonely pedestrian to be a man of supple frame.” (Hardy 6). Another example would be “I shall be wetted to my skin.” (Hardy 9).These are the two examples I found to be of irony in this short story.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 9, 2015 12:19 AM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
8 February 2015

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” how does Hardy make us suspicious of the first stranger? Be specific. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” I felt as if Hardy made us feel suspicious of the first stranger by describing the scene of the story in an eerie manner. He describes it as a mysterious man ascending out of the darkness during the rain, and no one knows who this man is, it seems. “…the ascent of a human figure…strode on through the rain…” (Hardy 6). From Hardy including this description about the first stranger, it allows us as the reader to get an idea that this man that is coming to Mrs. Fennel’s party, she has no clue who he is. The reason as to why it gives us the feeling that the first stranger is suspicious.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at February 9, 2015 01:17 AM

Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
9 February 2015
Question: 6. All regions have their own colloquialisms (look this up if you do not know/remember what it means from ENG 121). In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” how does local dialect and landscape contribute to the story’s atmosphere? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer

Answer: Each stranger is using some type of dialect. It causes some problems in communication. “'And on his soul may God ha' merc-y!'” (14 Hardy). It also showed how awkward situation could happen when people do not understand each other. “'Be jiggered!' cried the stranger who had sung the song, jumping up. "What does that mean?' asked several. "A prisoner has escaped from the jail—that's what it means.’” (15 Hardy)

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak at February 9, 2015 09:42 AM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
12 September 2015

Question: In Thomas Hardy's short story, "The Three Strangers," when do readers of this story get the first clue that the man in the chimney corner (who turns out to be the condemned man) was not being entirely truthful about himself? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: The first clue I noticed about the man in the chimney-corner not being entirely truthful about himself was when Mts. Shepherd Fennel was observing him. The story stated, "'Yes, I am rather cracked in the vamp,' he said freely, seeing that the eyes of shepherd's wife fell upon his boots, ‘and I am not well-fitted either" (Hardy 8).

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 12, 2015 01:39 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 academic writing II CA03
13 September 2015

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “the three strangers,” discuss Hardy’s use of plot and what aspects of the short story suggest his concern with the plot.

Answer: Roberts theory on plot says to “find the conflict to determine the plot.” Hardy uses as little information on the strangers to allow the reader to make up their own assumptions about them. The plot takes a turn when the third stranger starts singing along with the other two making it seem that the strangers were coinciding with one another during the hanging.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 13, 2015 01:19 PM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 - Academic Writing II CAO3
September 13, 2015

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what hints and clues suggest the real relationship among the three strangers? In other words, how has Hardy used foreshadowing? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: The one example of foreshadowing I found in this story was when Hardy described the first stranger “having a gaunt appearance.” This makes sense because it’s foreshadowing that the first character is a poor individual and a sheep stealer.

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 13, 2015 05:36 PM

Tannor Berry
ENG 122 CA03
Hardy
“The Three Strangers”


Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story. “The Three Strangers,” how does Hardy make us suspicious of the first stranger? Be specific. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer: In Thomas Hardy’s short story “The Three Strangers,” Hardy brings us the first stranger which he perceives as suspicious. The stranger came in the direction of the town asking for shelter which he had received. While drying off by the fire he was asking some questions which he was evasive toward which made him become suspicious toward the audience. 'I'll fill your pipe,' said the shepherd. 'I must ask you to lend me a pipe likewise.' 'A smoker, and no pipe about 'ee?' 'I have dropped it somewhere on the road.' This gave rise to some questions on why he didn’t have much on him or why he was there roaming the streets.

Posted by: Tannor Berrry at September 13, 2015 08:36 PM

Cannelle Samson and Lois
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
13 September 2015

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” the atmosphere is suspenseful and somber, but it is relieved by certain touches of humor. You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Setting” to revisit the theory. Explain what this means and why it is true. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer

Answer: In “Writing about Literature” Roberts’s states, “Just as setting may reinforce character and theme, so it may establish expectations that are opposite of what occurs…” (Roberts, 112). In the short story “The Three Strangers” there is an extremely dangerous and suspenseful situation taking place. A runaway prisoner has entered a shepherd’s home. The prisoner’s executioner was also right beside the prisoner, not knowing who the prisoner was. Although “The Three Strangers” is suspenseful it is relieved by certain touches of humor. For example, the prisoner sings a song about his own crime. The prisoner sings his first verse, “O my trade it is the rarest one, Simple shepherds all— My trade is a sight to see; For my customers I tie, and take them up on high, And waft 'em to a far countree” (Hardy, 13). At this the room goes silent, as everyone is suspicious and frightful. The prisoner’s executioner, however, sings a lot with him, “And waft 'em to a far countree!” (Roberts, 13). The prisoner continues to sing, as he sings his last first another stranger comes in the room thoroughly shaken by the sight and runs out. At the end of “The three Strangers” we find out that the third stranger was the prisoner’s brother whom the party had gone after thinking that he was the prisoner. The humor demonstrated here has made a stressful and suspenseful story into a light-hearted, ironic, and funny story. Therefore, keeping the audience interested Hardy creates an amazingly suspenseful, ironic, and funny story.

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at September 13, 2015 10:04 PM

Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09
13 September 2015

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what is the chief conflict? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the theory. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: The chief conflict is that the people in the party are tying to figure these strangers out. They seem different from what they portray themselves. The family and friends are belittled by who these men are, especially when Fennel's wife says, "And a stranger unbeknown to any of us! For my part, I don't like the look o' the man at all." (Hardy 12)

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 13, 2015 10:29 PM

Zach Pottle
Professor Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
14 September 2015

Question:

In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what was it that brought all three strangers together to the same place, i.e., the shepherd's cottage? Under what circumstances should they have met the next day?

Answer:

In Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” the three strangers are all brought in under different circumstances. The first stranger comes seeking shelter from the in climate weather. The second stranger comes in also seeking shelter from the rain. Lastly, the third stranger was brought to the cottage looking for directions, but after seeing the second stranger, the county hangman, bolts out of the door. The three strangers turn out to be much more acquainted than they previously thought. The first stranger was actually Timothy summers, the man who was to be hung the next day by the second stranger. The third stranger was Timothy Summers brother, who was on his was to say goodbye to his brother as we learn from his explanation of why he was at the house “I was benighted, and called here to rest and ask the way. When I opened the door I saw before me the very man, my brother, that I thought to see in the condemned cell at Casterbridge” (Hardy 20). The three men were all supposed to have met the next day in Casterbridge, when Timothy Summers would have been hung.

Posted by: Zachary Pottle at September 14, 2015 12:57 AM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
11 September 2015


Question: Be sure you understand what irony is, especially in the dramatic sense (dramatic irony) In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what are some of the major examples of irony in the story? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the theory.

Answer: In the short story, "The Three Strangers," the author emphasized two major ironies during the revelation of the sheep thief. The first irony that the reader will encounter will be when the third character is invited to come in and minutes later runs off. After some gunshots, before the third stranger made his entrance, the second stranger explained that the gunshots meant that a prisoner had escaped, and then, he says, "I wonder if it is my man." Shortly after the hangman asked, the Shepard said, "Surely it its! And surely we've zeed him! That little man who looked in at the door by now, and quivered like a leaf when he zeed ye and heard your song. (Hardy 15)" Therefore, as a consequence of the third stranger's unreasonable escape, everyone thought he was the thief; however, the Shepard was previously making light of the situation, for he was not actually expecting the thief to appear at his doorstep. Later on in the story, once the criminal is captured and presented in front of the magistrate, the Shepard and his friends realize that they were chasing the wrong person; the third stranger was only the brother of the culprit. Ironically, the real thief feasted, laughed, and cheered the songs of his death by the hangman, and no one noticed because he did was not behaving like a typical fugitive criminal.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 14, 2015 03:08 AM

Jaclyn M Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA03
13 September 2015

Question: 12. In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” the hangman's riddle contributes to the suspense, but also reveals something about his character. Explain.

Answer: In Thomas Hardy’s short story the hangman’s riddle does contribute to the suspense as it reveals more to who and what the stranger is. For he is only a minor character it reveals that foreshadowing of that of another character and what he does. As his riddle continues it slowly starts to reveal what he does for a living and what he’s in town for and the riddle continues building up the suspense for what is coming up next.

Posted by: Jaclyn Taylor at September 14, 2015 08:36 AM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
12 September 2015

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers”, which character is the most dynamic and which character is the most static?

Answer: Mrs. Fennell is the most static character in the story because she does not undergo a change. She stays uptight about the plans for the night and keeping on the schedule she came up with. Throughout the story the constable undergoes a change. He is the most dynamic out of all the characters. He is arrogant and worried about power in the beginning of the story. By the end, when the hangman told the constable to catch the prisoner, the constable was repeating sentences and trying to show he was equal in authority, not greater than the hangman. When the hangman demanded the constable go pursue the prisoner the constable replied, “I will sir, I will – when I’ve got my staff. I’ll go home and get it, and come sharp here”(Hardy, 16).

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 14, 2015 09:08 AM

Yaribilisa Colon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122

QUESTION: In Thomas Hardy's short story, "The Three Strangers", what is the function of the first four paragraphs? How do they prepare the reader for the story that follows? Where does the introduction actually end?

ANSWER: The functions of the first four paragraphs is to not only give the reader a description of the setting. But to also expand their curiosity of wanting to know what is going to happen in the rest of the story.

Posted by: Yaribilisa Colon at September 14, 2015 09:46 AM

Group #1
Jacie Dieffenwierth
Sidnee Yaeger
Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 September 2015

Question #5

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what point of view has Hardy chosen to narrate this story? Was this effective? Why? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Point-of-View” to revisit the theory. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.


Answer: Thomas Hardy chose to narrate his story in third person omniscient, limited to the main characters. This type of point-of-view becomes evident when the reader can see the “scheme” hatched by Mrs. Fennel, to balance dancing with talking, “was entirely confined to her own gentle mind” (Hardy 5). You could also see the internal thoughts of the stranger when he “hoped his host might not be made unhappy either by too many or too few of such episodes” (Hardy 8). This point-of-view is effective because it gives more insight into the characters. It better relays their feelings and thoughts on various events that wouldn’t otherwise have been made known to the reader.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 14, 2015 04:09 PM

Jorge, Brittany, Shyiem
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing CA09
14 September 2015

Question:
In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what hints and clues suggest the real relationship among the three strangers? In other words, how has Hardy used foreshadowing? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer:
Hardy used clues in the first half of the story. The first person talks about he likes to smoke but has nothing to smoke with. He just seems like he doesn’t belong."I am not well fitted either. I have had some rough times lately, and have been forced to pick up what I can get in the way of wearing..." (Hardy 8). As for the Second person "The oddity of my trade is that, instead of setting a mark upon me , it sets a mark upon my customers." (Hardy 12) he suggest to the people he is talking to that he is looking for someone and that it is his job to bring him back. The third stranger seemed to be the one who escaped from jail. He was nervous and jittery, like as if someone is after him chasing him. "He stood before them the picture of abject terror-his knees trembling, his hand shaking..." (Hardy 14)

Posted by: Jorge Braham at September 14, 2015 04:16 PM

Group 5: Hana Lee, Mike, Daniel, Conner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
14 September 2015

“The other man, nothing loth, raised the mug to his lips, and drank on, and on, and on—till a curious blueness overspread the countenance of the shepherd’s wife, who had regarded with no little surprise the first stranger’s free offer to the second of what did not belong to him to dispense.” (Hardy 10)

Question #9: Be sure you understand what irony is, especially in the dramatic sense (dramatic irony). In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what are some of the major examples of irony in the story?

Answer: An example of irony in the story would be, “The executioner joined the party, and the poor thief was offering the executioner drinks.” So as the quote above has said, “the first stranger’s free offer to the second of what did not belong to him to dispense.” That is referring to the thief who is offering the executioner drinks.

Posted by: Hana Lee at September 14, 2015 04:20 PM

Luis Bautista
Dr. Hobbs
ENG – 122 Academic Writing
15 September 2015

“They noticed to their surprise that he stood before them the picture of abject terror—his knees trembling, his hand shaking so violently that the door-latch by which he supported himself rattled audibly: his white lips were parted, and his eyes fixed on the merry officer of justice in the middle of the room. A moment more and he had turned, closed the door, and fled”. (Thomas 14)
Question: Be sure you understand what irony is, especially in the dramatic sense (dramatic irony) In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what are some of the major examples of irony in the story? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the theory. Answer in your words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer: A major example of irony in the story “The Three Strangers” is when all the guests including the two strangers are reunited in the cottage and a third stranger knocks the door. While the second stranger, which was an officer looking for a man who stole a sheep, was putting together lyrics to create an impromptu song for the guests in which he talks about the purpose of him wander at night, the third stranger was in the door entrance looking at the officer. The third stranger was the man the officer was looking for. It’s ironic how the first and second, third strangers were brothers and the second stranger was looking for the escaped prisoner. The main irony in the story is that the three men meet all at the same house looking for a place to cover from the heavy rain. The dramatic irony, however, hides on the fact that the officer and the guest will chase the third stranger and probably he probably will be killed. Staves and pitchforks—in the name o' the law! And take 'em in yer hands and go in quest, and do as we in authority tell ye!' Thus aroused, the men prepared to give chase. (Thomas 16)

Posted by: Luis Bautista at September 15, 2015 07:34 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk, Necdet Gurkan, Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09
September 15, 2015


Question: In Thomas Hardy's short story, "The Three Strangers," the hangman's riddle contributes to the suspense, but also reveals something about his character. Explain.

Answer: The hangman's riddle relates to his character; he is aware of his identity and is not afraid to show it. Unlike Timothy Summers, who was hiding his identity because he was a fugitive. "Comparably, in Hardy's "The Three Strangers" the first stranger, Timothy Summers, speaks easily and comfortably in order to keep the natives and the second stranger, the Hangman from knowing his true identity." (Roberts pg. 67). The hangman is an obnoxious and careless character. In the riddle, he bluntly reveals that his work consists of hanging criminals as if it is a daily chore. "O my trade it is the rarest one, Simple shepherds all— My trade is a sight to see; For my customers I tie, and take them up on high, And waft 'em to a far countree!" (Hardy pg. 13). He is the executioner and knows his level of authority over the other folks, so the hangman could also be characterized as a narcissist. A moment of his authoritarian power is when he commands the folk to capture the third stranger, Timothy's brother. "Then, pursue the criminal at once, with assistance, and bring him back here." (Hardy pg. 16).

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk at September 15, 2015 11:41 PM

Anayah Mckenzie, Bred, Shania
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CA03
September 15, 2015

Question: All regions have their own colloquialisms (look this up if you do not know/remember what it means from ENG 121). In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” how does local dialect and landscape contribute to the story’s atmosphere? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

The local dialect and landscape contributes to the story’s atmosphere by allowing us to know it is not from our time or from the region we are from. The towns are spaced out; however, the town in which this story took place in was also secluded like. Back in those times, people seemed to walk to where they go often which indicates there was not car; hence, the three strangers having to join the party because of the storm taking place outside. The local dialect makes you feel foreign to the story. For instance, the shepherd’s wife was able to tell the first stranger was from where she grew up because of his word choices or accent but I would not be able to tell where he is from because they all sound the same to us because we are not from those parts.

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at September 16, 2015 01:14 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
28 January 2016

Three Strangers

Question #10: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” discuss Hardy’s use of plot. What aspects of “The Three Strangers” short story suggest that Hardy’s concern is with plot? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the theory.

Answer: “The Three Strangers” is a very tedious story just because the plot is not so easily figured out. You have to keep reading to figure out who all the players are and how they fit within the story. Hardy uses this method of slow introduction to keep the reader’s intrigue. If the reader already knows what is going to happen, why finish reading the story? Hardy is concerned with mystery and keeping the plot almost a secret from the readers. The reader has to try and guess, along with the other side characters which stranger is the “prisoner [that] has escaped from the jail” (Hardy 15). He presents it almost like a game leaving it to the reader to put the clues together to find out what is what.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at January 28, 2016 08:18 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
January 28 2016

Question 1) In Thomas Hardy's short story, "the three strangers" what was it that brought all three strangers together in the same place, i.e, the shepherds cottage? What circumstances should they have met the next day?

Answer 1) In the short story, the three strangers met at the celebration of the Sheppard's second girl's christening. They all met under random circumstances as they all knocked on the door whilst the party was going on, not invited and not knowing who the Sheppard was. However what we later find out is that one of the strangers is an executioner and another stranger is a prisoner, who will be executed by him the next day.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at January 28, 2016 10:00 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

In Thomas Hardy's short story, "The Three Strangers," what themes are present in the story? What aspects of the story suggest that Hardy is also concerned with theme? Remember that a theme is a recurring pattern. You may need to look ahead to Roberts's chapter on "Writing about Theme" to understand the concept of theme, if you don't already. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

In the short story, "The Three Strangers", Thomas Hardy presents several themes. There are parts of the story that Hardy emphasizes like appearances of the three strangers, and this suggests that at least one of the themes Hardy cares about, the theme of deception. In this story, the thief is revealed to be the third person; in fact, the person who is the least suspect. His appearance was rather deceptive, and this highlights the theme of deception. The second stranger says very little making the reader suspicious of him. Also, Fennel's wives uneasiness makes the reader uneasy about him, too. This is shown when Fennel's wife says that, "For my part, I don't like the look o' the man at all (12)." By voicing her doubts in the second stranger, Hardy creates this suspicion in the reader. The second stranger appears suspicious; however, actions and looks can be deceptive.
Community is another theme. This is shown at the beginning when we are introduced to 19 people gathered and Hardy describes the setting as "absolute confidence in each other's good opinion begat perfect ease, while the finishing stroke of manner, amounting to a truly princely serenity," This suggest that the members of the party have a bond, and this introduces the theme of community. This is seen through the short story when the they invite strangers into their homes. An example of then being welcoming is shown when Mr. Fennel says to the second stranger, "'Make yourself at home, master (10)." It is odd that people can willing invite strangers in their house, but Hardy shows this community in the story. Also, Hardy presents this theme of community by illustrating the two strangers being "brought into close companionship (10)." This suggests that even though they are strangers, they can still have a bond, and this shows the theme of community.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at January 28, 2016 10:56 PM

Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
28 January 2016

Question #3: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what is the function of the first four paragraphs? How do they prepare the reader for the story that follows? Where does the introduction actually end? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the theory. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: The exposition begins with an isolated cottage in an English countryside depicting the harsh, seasonal elements the shepherd and his family endures. The story describes struggle and pity for Shepherd Fennel and his family, which helps prepare the reader for understanding the struggles they face in times of harsh weather noting, “the house was exposed to the elements on all sides” (Hardy 3). This comment is foreshadowing the future events and is not exclusively referring to the weather. Another clue in the exposition highlights the crossing paths that both egress in right turns. As the plot begins, it spurs the reader’s curiosity when Hardy states, “cheerful events were in course of enactment with Fennel’s pastoral dwelling” (Hardy 5) and “the ascent of a human figure to the solitary hill of Higher Crowstairs” (Hardy 6). The plot initiates the tension as the first stranger approaches the house and sequentially unveils the two additional visitors and keeps the audience guessing as to who each person is and their agenda.

Posted by: Heather Hauck at January 28, 2016 11:17 PM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what is the chief conflict? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the theory.

Answer: The conflict in the story was that they captured the wrong stranger, but the actual prisoner was the first stranger who entered the cottage to take shelter. They never found the first stranger.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at January 29, 2016 02:22 AM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
25 January 2016

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” which character is the most dynamic and which character is the most static? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Character” to revisit the theory. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: A dynamic character is three-dimensional and they recognizes, change with, or adjust to circumstances. A static character, in contrast, is one- dimensional and simple. In the short story, “The Three Strangers”, the most dynamic character is the first stranger. Even though the first stranger did not reveal much about himself, he adjusted to the environment perfectly. The first stranger somehow knew that he should present himself in a humble manner among the party guests in order not to disclose his identity. He situated himself in the chimney corner and closely observes the party guest (Hardy 8). Shepherd Fennel, on the other hand is the most static character in the story. His role is quite simple where as he only invited the quest and the strangers into is home and spoke a few times.

Posted by: vincia mitchell at January 29, 2016 10:31 AM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
27 January 2016

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story “The Three Strangers,” what hints and clues suggest the real relationship among the three strangers? In other words, how has Hardy used foreshadowing?

Answer: Throughout the story, Hardy provides facts such as how all the strangers knew Mrs. Fennel, which suggests their relationships are something more. Later in the story when the strangers are talking, they don’t speak as if they do not know each other, rather like they’ve known each other for a while.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at January 29, 2016 12:56 PM

Phillip Moss
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing CA06
29 January 2016
Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” how does Hardy make us suspicious of the first stranger?
Answer: In the story, the three strangers Hardy makes the first stranger appear suspicious to the reader. The first stranger was wearing an all-black coat and did some unusual actions before he entered the party. What makes this character the most suspicious is how he avoids certain questions and doesn’t release much information about himself “You would hardly have heard of me,' he said quickly. 'My time would be long before yours, ma'am, you see.”(Hardy 8)

Posted by: Phillip Moss at January 29, 2016 01:00 PM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what are the underlying attitudes of the guests towards the sheepstealer (both before and after)?

Answer: The reactions from the guests are disgust from before. One guest says, “Timothy Summers, whose family were a-starving [ . . . ] took a sheep in open daylight” (Hardy 13). The guests are saying this man stole from the local farmer to feed his family. After they found out who the sheep-stealer was the guest were dumbfounded it was one of them. The narrator says, “the quest for the clever sheep-stealer became general and keen” (21). The people of the town made the sheep-stealer became a legend that nobody could catch in the act.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 29, 2016 01:46 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: 5.) In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what point of view has Hardy chosen to narrate this story? Was this effective? Why? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Point-of-View” to revisit the theory. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: 5.) The point of view Hardy chose to narrate the story is third person because he doesn't use self descriptive words like me and I. Yes, it is effective because he is able to explain the story from a view other than the characters.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at January 29, 2016 02:00 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 06 Academic Writing II
29 January 2016

Question 9.) What are some examples of dramatic irony in Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers”.
Answer: Dramatic irony happens when someone expects one thing to happen but the complete opposite takes place instead. One major example of dramatic irony we see in the short story is how well the families get along in the beginning. One would assume that families that are complete strangers would not be able to get along or be able to tolerate one another. The fact that a serpent was threatening their lives but they stuck together despite being complete strangers is very ironic, because most of the time strangers will just want to save themselves.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at January 29, 2016 02:01 PM

Travis Farmer


Dr. Hobbs


ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06


29 January 2016


Question: 3.) In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” what is the function of the first four paragraphs? How do they prepare the reader for the story that follows? Where does the introduction actually end? You may need to go back to Roberts’s chapter on “Writing about Plot” to revisit the theory. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.


Answer: The first four paragraphs function to introduce the setting of the story. They allow the reader to be introduced and familiar to the environment. In my opinion, the introduction ends in the fourth paragraph, as it introduces the guests. [Hardy 3]

Posted by: Travis Farmer at January 29, 2016 02:35 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
31 January 2016

“Three Strangers”

Q: All regions have their own colloquialisms. In Thomas Hardy’s short story, “The Three Strangers,” how does local dialect and landscape contribute to the story’s atmosphere?

A: Because of the bygone descriptions of the people’s livelihoods, such as “Charley Jake the hedge-carpenter, Elijah New the parish- clerk, and John Pitcher, a neighbouring dairyman”(Hardy 4 ) this is hinting of a rural area set in about the nineteenth century. The people’s word choice and customs also adhere to this time setting. These customs would be the regions different “colloquialisms” and this contributes to the story’s atmosphere in that the reader learns the story’s setting, therefore, learning what the culture and or atmosphere is during that time.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at January 31, 2016 05:26 PM

Hussam Babge - Hannah Rowe - Omar Martines ( Late)
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing CA06
2 February 2016

Q1: Who is the roundest character in the story? Why?

Answer: I think that the roundest characters are The three strangers because most of the events in the story based on them and the commotion that they cause within the close-knit society.

Q2: Who is the flattest character in the story? Why?

Answer: The flattest character are the twenty people who came to the party because they only had one role in the story.

Posted by: hussam at February 3, 2016 09:09 AM

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