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January 06, 2013

"There'll Be Scary Ghost Stories" with Dickens at Christmas


Image Source: http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Books/Pix/pictures/2008/12/05/xmasthis460.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 6, 2013 10:34 PM

Readers' Comments:

Joshua Natonio
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
3 September 2014


QUESTION #6:
What do the “portly gentleman” want? Use quoted passages form the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
The two portly gentleman who visit Scrooge on Christmas Eve were Christians attempting to collect donations from Scrooge for the “poor and destitute” (Dickens 5) to buy them “some meat and drink, and means of warmth (Dickens 6).

According to STAVE 1 of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” “At this festive season of the year, Mr. Scrooge,” said the gentleman, taking up a pen, “it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the poor and destitute, who suffer greatly at the present. Many thousands are in want of common comforts, sir” (Dickens 5).

According to STAVE 1 of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” “Under the impression that they scarcely furnish Christian cheer of mind or body to the multitude,” returned the gentleman, “a few of us are endeavouring to raise a fund to buy the Poor some meat and drink, and means of warmth” (Dickens 5).

Posted by: Joshua Natonio at September 3, 2014 11:21 AM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
3 September 2014

Question #18:
Stave One: Why was it so cold in the clerk’s office? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The individuals in the clerk’s office were the Scrooge and the clerk. During this setting, Dickens explained that the Scrooge is a cold featured person. The details revealed that outside of the office it was a cold dreary day like any other winter. Even with these details, the Scrooge stayed impartial to the wintery conditions. The Scrooges conditions seemed to match the weather; if bitter wind blew, the Scrooge was bitter as well. The narrator explained, “External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No warmth could warm, no wintry weather chill him.” (Dickens 6)
Within the office, Scrooge and the clerk both had two small fires burning which the clerk did not see as sufficient. The narrator explained replenishing the coal in the fire was a process, “so surely as the clerk came in with the shovel, the master predicted that it would be necessary for them to part.” (Dickens 8) Through quoted passages, it is clear that the clerk’s office is cold not because of his own will but many other collective factors.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 3, 2014 03:48 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative Ca01
4 September 2014

Question #7:
How does Scrooge treat his clerk? How does he respond to his clerk's request for Christmas day off?

Answer:
Scrooge treats his clerk very poorly and keeps him in extremely dismal conditions. He is constantly peering at the clerk through an open door to make sure he is still doing his job copying letters and refuses to add anymore coal to the clerk's dying fire, which has been reduced to only one piece of coal (Dickens 294). "The clerk put on his white comforter, and tried to warm himself at the candle; in which not being a man of a strong imagination, he failed" (Dickens 294).

When the clerk asks for Christmas day off, Scrooge tells him that "it's not convenient" and that it is unfair for him to have to pay "a day's wages for no work" (Dickens 298). However, Scrooge grants the clerk the day off, if he agrees to "be here all the earlier next morning" (Dickens 298).

*These quotes were found using the Barnes and Noble Leather Bound Classics edition of The Complete Works of Charles Dickens.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 4, 2014 12:18 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
4 September 2014

Question #2:
Describe the relationship between Scrooge and Marley.

Answer:
The depth of the relationship between Scrooge and Marley remained very professional, even as Marley returned to Scrooge as a ghost, Marley states “In life I was your partner” (Dickens 11). In remembrance of Marley, Scrooge attempts to show that Marley did not only hold a place as his business partner, but as a friend as well by calling him “Old Jacob Marley,” as if remembering a more congenial relationship (Dickens 13). In the present state for the book, the spirit of Marley is neither friend nor enemy to Scrooge, maintaining the very business-like relationship they withheld in life serving as a herald to Scrooge, warning him of what is to come (Wood).

Work Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.

Wood, Michael. "Hero's Journey Archetypes Explained." 15 November 2011. Web 10 October 2013

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 4, 2014 01:50 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #39:
Stave One: Why doesn’t Scrooge want to take advantage of the chance Marley’s Ghost offers? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Scrooge does not want to take advantage of the chance Marley’s Ghost offers him because he was afraid of the three ghosts that would visit him. Furthermore, the Ghost proceeded to say “you will be haunted, by Three Spirits” and Scrooge did not accept the offer by replying “I—I think I’d rather not.”

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 4, 2014 03:56 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
4 September 2014


Question #6
Describe Scrooge’s attitude toward the poor and the unfortunate? Provide a quoted passage of Scrooge’s that sums up his attitude.
Text source: Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library

Answer:
Scrooge believes that the poor should keep to themselves and to their business as to him worry about his own business (Dickens 16). Scrooge has a very selfish attitude when it comes to giving to the poor. Scrooge says, “I wish to be left alone. Since you ask me what I wish, gentleman, that is my answer. I don’t make merry myself at Christmas and I can’t afford to make idle people merry. I help to support the establishments I have mentioned-they cost enough; and those who are badly off must go there” (Dickens 16).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 4, 2014 04:48 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
4 September 2014


Question #6
Describe Scrooge’s attitude toward the poor and the unfortunate? Provide a quoted passage of Scrooge’s that sums up his attitude.
Text source: Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library

Answer:
Scrooge believes that the poor should keep to themselves and to their business as to him worry about his own business (Dickens 16). Scrooge has a very selfish attitude when it comes to giving to the poor. Scrooge says, “I wish to be left alone. Since you ask me what I wish, gentleman, that is my answer. I don’t make merry myself at Christmas and I can’t afford to make idle people merry. I help to support the establishments I have mentioned-they cost enough; and those who are badly off must go there” (Dickens 16).

WorkCited: http://web.archive.org/web/20110116051613/http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/toccer-new2?id=DicChri.sgm&images=images/modeng&data=/texts/english/modeng/parsed&tag=public&part=1&division=div1

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 4, 2014 04:51 PM

Kendra Hinton
Professor Hobbs
ENG 220CL
September 3, 2014

Question 1. Stave One: Fill in the gaps of your knowledge; look up the concept “simile.” What is the simile in the second paragraph? Explain it in your own words and explain its significance to this stave, i.e, this part of the story, so far.
To begin, a simile is a technique in the English language is a comparison of two things that are different in efforts to create a mental picture in the readers head. In the book, the simile is located in the second paragraph it states: “Marley was as dead as a door-nail (Dickens, 1).” I believe that the significance of this is also seen in the second paragraph when Scrooge stated that he viewed the coffin-nail as the deadest piece of iron in the ironmongery trade. Therefore, in the last sentence of the second paragraph Scrooge describes Marley as being dead as a doornail because Marley has been dead for several years.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 4, 2014 05:16 PM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 September 2014

Question #36:
Stave One: Briefly describe two important conflicts from Stave One using quoted passages as support (2-3 sentences). Support your idea. Explain what kind(s) of conflict each is (man v. man, man v. nature, man v. self, etc). Explain why the conflicts you chose are the kind you labeled them.

Answer:
In Stave One of A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge has two important conflicts. The first conflict is Scrooge’s dislike of all the Christmas spirit he that surrounds him because of the townspeople’s celebration. This is apparent when Scrooge’s nephew visits and wishes Scrooge a “Merry Christmas.” Scrooge quickly refutes this by saying, “Bah! Humbug” repeatedly followed by “Merry Christmas!… What reason do you have to be merry? You’re poor enough” (Dickens 14). The nephew leaves after Scrooge refuses to come over for Christmas dinner (Dickens 16). Later, two men come to visit and ask Scrooge to donate to charity (Dickens 17). Scrooge shows his disinterest by saying he would rather invest in prisons, workhouses or just have the people die than give them any of his money (Dickens 18). This conflict is man versus society because the townspeople are excited about Christmas while Scrooge dislikes their excitement, which goes against the rest of the town’s tradition of Christmas hospitality and cheer.

The second conflict happens when Marley’s ghost visits Scrooge (Dickens 25). Marley warns Scrooge that if he does not change his ways he will face the same afterlife as Marley but explains“…you have yet a chance and hope of escaping my fate" (Dickens 30). Marley says that three spirits will visit Scrooge, and they could be the key of saving his soul (Dickens 31). This conflict is man versus supernatural since Marley is a ghost and appears to tell Scrooge that more spirits will be haunting him.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 4, 2014 05:21 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE
3 September 2014

Question 31:
What did Scrooge see when he looked out the Window? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Scrooge saw other ghosts in the same predicament as his friend Jacob. The book describes the view as “The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in restless haste, and moaning as they went.” (Dickens) Scrooge knew many of the ghosts, and all of the phantoms wore chains about them.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 4, 2014 07:30 PM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 September 2014

QUESTION #27 Why did Marley wear chains?
ANSWER:
Jacob Marley wore chains because he cared very little about the world, and cared mostly about himself. We can distinguish this fact from three statements Marley made to Ebenezer Scrooge he visited him. The first statement Marley made was "I wear the chain I forged in life," replied the Ghost. "I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.” (Dickens, A Christmas Carol: A Ghost Story 31). This statement suggests that Marley knew he had a choice. It also suggests that the choices he made of self-interest over human empathy is what is causing his afterlife woes. When Marley says “Not to know that any Christian spirit working kindly in its little sphere, whatever it may be, will find its mortal life too short for its vast means of usefulness.” (Dickens 34), he is telling Ebenezer of the hard lessons he was forced to learn. Marley was telling Ebenezer that being kinder to everyone would have saved him from his misery. Finally, Marley tells Ebenezer that the business of making money isn’t what the human purpose is. "Business!" cried the Ghost, wringing its hands again. "Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business.” (Dickens 34). From these three statements, we can conclude that the reason Jacob Marley is wearing chains because he put his wants, desires, and goals above everyone else.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 4, 2014 08:26 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
4 September 2014

QUESTION #30:
Why had Marley come to visit Scrooge? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
In the novelette A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, Marley’s apparition visited Scrooge in order to stage an intervention for him, so he would not have to suffer the same fate as Marley did, “ I am here to- night warn you, that you have yet a chance and hope of escaping my fate” (Dickens 15). Scrooge was living a life analogous to that of Marley’s as they were partners in business. However, instead of turning a new leaf after Marley’s death, he continued his egocentric existence, oblivious to the needy thus extending his ‘chain,' “Is its pattern strange to you?... the weight and length of the strong coil you bear… is a ponderous chain” (Dickens 13). If Scrooge were successful in taking note of Marley’s counsel and intervention form, the three apparitions to come foretold by Marley the length of his chain would not exist.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 4, 2014 08:28 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in narrative
4 September 2014

Question #11- What does Marley tell Scrooge he’s been doing in the seven years since his death?

Answer
Marley tells Scrooge that he has been wandering the earth dragging along heavy chains as a punishment. This punishment is for all the wrong doings and how he treated people while he was alive. When Scrooge asked why Marley was fettered, “I wear the chain I forged in life” Marley replied, “I made it link by link, yard by yard; I grinded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.”(pg 18)

The edition of the book I used is copyright 2009 Cricket House Book
http://books.google.com/books?id=fVvQ0ssnNfIC&printsec=frontcover&dq=a+christmas+carol+by+charles+dickens&hl=en&sa=X&ei=SP8IVOH8GYjhsASohIKICA&ved=0CDIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=a%20christmas%20carol%20by%20charles%20dickens&f=false

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 4, 2014 08:31 PM

Question # 4:
What, besides Christmas, does Scrooge ridicule in his conversation with his nephew?

Answer:
In Chapter one, Scrooge mocks several concepts of life. He ridicules his nephew for being poor and for falling in love. In one very discourteous line, Scrooge says to his nephew, “What reasons have you to be merry? You’re poor enough” (Dickens 3). Scrooge is saying that his nephew has nothing to be joyful about because he has no money. His idea of happiness seems to revolve around material possessions.

Later on in the conversation, Scrooge asks his nephew why he got married. His nephew replied, “Because I fell in love” (Dickens 4). To Scrooge, this answer doesn’t seem to be good enough. He feels that falling in love is the only thing more absurd than saying merry Christmas (Dickens 4).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 4, 2014 08:38 PM

Question #40: What does Scrooge see when he looks at the doorknocker on his front door? Is Scrooge frightened by what he sees on his doorknocker? Why, or why not? How does he react?

Answer: When Scrooge looks at his doorknocker, he sees his deceased partner, Marley’s face, as it looked at Scrooge “as Marley used to look”.(Paragraph 79) Scrooge then does a double take and looks back only to find that the face has transformed back into a knocker. Scrooge is described as being startled and he has a very strange feeling in his blood when he sees the ghost of Marley. He is frightened by this because he has not see Marley in seven years, nor has he thought about Marley in seven years and to all of a sudden see his face is a shock for Scrooge. He reacts by pausing for a second, and being very hesitant before shutting the door and dismissing that this ever happened.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 4, 2014 09:14 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
September 4, 2014
‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens

Question #16: How did the author compare Scrooge to the weather?

Answer: Dickens compares Scrooge’s unpleasant character to the weather significantly in Stave 1. For example, he states, “the cold within him froze his old features” (Dickens 2). By using the word “froze,” the author portrays Scrooge as a miserable man who has a hardened heart.

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications, 1991. 2. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 4, 2014 09:25 PM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
4 September 14

Question #8: What strange incident happens to Scrooge as he reaches his house? What does it indicate? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Instead of Scrooge seeing his average door, he saw Marley’s face in the doorknocker as he goes to enter his house, in the house he had lived in for so long, that he knew every stone in the yard. (Page 14). It indicates that Scrooge misses Marley and is lonesome, because he had only been mentioned once in seven years, and at first mention, it brings him to the forefront of Scrooge’s mind. “Let it be boure in mind that Scrooge had not bestowed one thought on Marley, since his last mention of his seven-years’ dead partner that afternoon. And then let any man explain to me, if he can, how it happened that Scrooge, having his key in the lock of the door, saw in the knocker, without its undergoing any intermediate process of change: not a knocker, but Marley’s face.” (Page 15)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 4, 2014 09:29 PM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 journeys in narrative CA01
4 September 2014

Question #9: Describe Marley's ghost- provide a both physical and emotional description.

ANSWER:
In stave on the first glimpse, the author give of Marley is where scrooge feels for some reason that he sees Marley's face in the knocker. This is where scrooge first gets drawn into the ghost presence in the house. This time of year he saw if all the tiles had Marley's face on it. (Dickinson 8) As he finally finds his way to his bed, he lays down and start to hear a bell ringing yet it's only for a moment. Then seconds later, he hears chains dragging over the casks in the cellar heading upward.

Moments after he sees Marley's he can see right through him to see the other buttons on his waistcoat also he has pigtails with tights and boots on. (Dickinson) You could also tell from the ghost’s presence he was a little startled the terror in his voice rattled his bones. He cries out in a large roar to make Scrooge understand.

Yet, his physical presence was very scary and shook thorough the bones of scrooge his emotional presence had a different feel. He had a feeling in his voice of regret and disappointment for how his life had gone. He made it clear to Scrooge that he was not living the right life. Although, Scrooge asks for him for some comfort the ghost says he has none to give. He later tells Scrooge that he will end up like him if he doesn't change his ways. This becomes real as he notices when he walks towards the door Jacob tells him to stand back because this is no place he wants to se. (Dickinson)

In all Marley's ghost as a whole had a sense of urgency to tell Scrooge how serious the matter was and to warn him before he was too late. And I feel through this encountering I can see a change in Scrooges behavior by not saying, "humbug" before bed. (Dickinson)

Posted by: aaron virelli at September 4, 2014 10:01 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 September 2014

QUESTION #37:
There are several different reasons why Marley is being punished. What are they? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

ANSWER:
Jacob Marley has spent seven years in heavy chains wandering the Earth as a punishment for the sins that he committed. Marley explains that the chains he “unknowingly forged himself in life “were because of the greed and selfishness that he had in himself. Marley spent his life on earth mistreating poor people and continually had the greed of money. “The chain he drew was clasped about his middle. It was long, and wound about him like a tail, and it was made (for Scrooge observed it closely) of cash-boxes, keys, padlocks, ledgers, deeds, and heavy purses wrought in steel.” (Dickens 25). Scrooge looked closely at the chains and realized Marley was locked in links of cash boxes, ledgers, padlocks, and steel purses. Overall, Marley has made many mistakes in life, and ever since he has been dead, he has been walking around trying to do well, and now he tries trying to convince Scrooge to change his ways before it is too late.


Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 4, 2014 10:08 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
4 September 2014

Question #3:
Stave One: Contrast Scrooge with his nephew. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
In the story “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens, I have found evidence in the text showing a few differences between the character Ebenezer Scrooge and his nephew. The biggest difference they have are the different feelings they have for Christmas. Scrooge does not like Christmas which is clearly shown when he says, “when I live in such a world of fools as this? Merry Christmas? Out upon merry Christmas! What’s Christmas time to you but a time for paying bills without money;” (Dickens 3); however, his nephew has a complete opposite view in terms of Christmas which is shown when he says, “A merry Christmas, uncle! God save you!” (Dickens 3).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 4, 2014 10:11 PM

Bryce Veller
Dr.B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative
4 September 2014

Question 25.) Stave 1
When Scrooge lit the candle, what did he think he saw going before him?

As Scrooge lit the candle after he entered his house “he paused,” for his eyes to get adjusted or was he intending to see something frightening (Dickens pg. 9). As stated in the paragraphs beforehand as he was walking up to his door and appeared to see Marley’s face on the knocker of the door. Lighting a candle, he checked carefully behind the door to see if Marley was behind as if he thought he was going to find a ghost. Double locking himself in, he proceeded away.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 4, 2014 10:11 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 September 2014

Question #33:
What is the first fact the reader discovers about Jacob
Marley? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of
your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
The first fact the reader discovers about Jacob Marley is that Scrooge and Marley were in fact partners. Scrooge was not upset about Marley’s passing even though Scrooge was his sole “executor,” “administrator,” “assign,” “residuary legatee,” “friend,” and “mourner” (Charles Dickens 1). Not only were they partners but Scrooge was in charge of signing the register for Marley's burial as the clergyman.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 4, 2014 10:48 PM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL CA02
4 September 2014

Question #29:
Why was Christmas the most trying time of the year for Marley? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Christmas was trying for Marley because it was the time of year when he was most sharply reminded of his lack of compassion towards others in his life. Marley lived his life ignoring those in need, going "through crowds of fellow-beings with [his] eyes turned down" (Dickens 14). It is because of this lifestyle that Marly says of Christmas: "At this time of the rolling year...I suffer most" (Dickens 14).

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 4, 2014 11:50 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
Sep. 4 2014

Question #23:
How were the ways the clerk and Scrooge behaved when they left the office different?

Answer:
The way that Scrooge and the Clerk behaved were very different from one another. When they left the office the clerk was happy that Scrooge gave him Christmas day off, but did not want to make it obvious. “The clerk smiled faintly.” (Dickens 15). Scrooge was mad because he does not understand the importance of Christmas and thinks he is just losing money by not having the clerk in the office. “A poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December.” (Dickens 15).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 5, 2014 12:08 AM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
3 September 2014

Question 24:
What happened to the knocker on the door when Scrooge went to unlock the door? Use quoted passages to support part of your answer.

Answer:
When Scrooge went to unlock his door, he saw his knocker turn into the ghost of Marely instantaneously, “without its undergoing any intermediate process of change” (Dickens 16).

Marely’s face stared at Scrooge until “Scrooge looked fixedly at this phenomenon” (Dickens 16).

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at September 5, 2014 12:17 AM

Matthew Basin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
4th Sept. 2014

Question # 32
Why does Dickens spend the first several pages of the novel telling us “Marley was dead, to begin with”? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The reason why Dickens spends the first several pages of the novel telling us “Marley was dead to begin with is because Scrooge already knew that his friend was dead but gets an unexpected visit when he gets home. It also describes the mood, setting and introduces many important characters in the first stave. “ The mention of Marley’s funeral brings me back to the point I started from. There is no doubt that Marley was dead,” (Dickens 1). This quote from Dickens shows that Scrooge already knew his friend was dead and Scrooge never painted over Marleys name on the sign outside their office. Marley’s death had a huge impact on Scrooge and lived in Marley’s house. While locking up his home, he notices a shadow in the window but it is not just a shadow, it’s Marley. Scrooge was shocked when he realized he was talking with Marley because he thought he was dead all this time. The more and more Scrooge and the Ghost(Marley) talked, the more Scrooge became more and more frighten. The Ghost(Marley) and Scrooge have a conversation back and forth. They talk about the business and Scrooge ask Marley all sorts of questions. “ The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in restless haste, and moaning as they went” (Dickens 16). “Many had been personally known to Scrooge in their lives”(Dickens 16). Dickens puts much emphasis on “Marley was dead, to begin with” because Scrooge thought he was dead but when he gets a visit from his ghost, it shocks him and he is frighten at to who he is talking to since he thought Marley was dead in the beginning.

Work Cited:
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991.Print



Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 5, 2014 12:22 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG-220CL Journeys in Narrative

4 September 2014

QUESTION #22:

What did Scrooge think should be done with people who were poor and destitute? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:

Scrooge thought the poor and the destitute should be working in prisons and union workhouses. He thinks that these locations because he thinks that the poor and destitute's natural habitat to work. In the reading, on page 12, when the two gentlemen enter Scrooge's office to ask for donations.

‘“At this festive season of the year, Mr. Scrooge,” said the gentleman, taking up a pen, “it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the Poor and destitute, who suffer greatly at the present time. Many thousands are in want of common necessaries; hundreds of thousands are in want of common comforts, sir (Dickens 12).”’

Scrooge was asking questions about if there were prisons and union workhouses still operational and the two gentlemen confirmed that they were still working and operational.

‘“Are there no prisons?” asked Scrooge.

“Plenty of prisons,” said the gentleman, laying down the pen again.

“And the Union workhouses?” demanded Scrooge. “Are they still in operation?”

“They are. Still,” returned the gentleman, I wish I could say they were not.”

“The Treadmill and the Poor Law are full vigour, then? said Scrooge.

“Both very busy, sir.”

“Oh! I was afraid, from what you said at first, that something had occurred to stop them in their useful course,” said Scrooge. “I’m very glad to hear it.”’

“Under the impression that they scarcely furnish Christian cheer of mind or body to the multitude,” returned the gentleman, “a few of us endeavouring to raise a fund to buy the Poor some meat and drink, and means of warmth. We choose this time, because it is a time, of the others, when Want is keenly felt, and Abundance rejoices. What shall I put you down for (13)?"'

Scrooge did not want to be put down for anything because the companies and businesses that he supports cost enough and the people who aren’t should go to those businesses. Although the gentleman defended the poor and destitute by saying they can’t go there, and many would rather die (13). Then Scrooge told the gentleman that they should get it over with and quick and decrease the amount of people in the surplus population.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 5, 2014 12:41 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
5 September 2014
Question: #34
Stave One: How does Scrooge feel about the fact that people avoid him on the streets, beggars won’t ask him for money, children won’t ask of him the time, no one will ask him for directions, and even seeing‐eye dogs take blind men out of his path? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
Reading into A Christmas Carol we are presented with the main character, Scrooge who can be characterized as an isolated, miserly being who only looks out for himself. Scrooge is a mostly reserved person who interacts with a select amount of people. Two familiar contacts Scrooge meets are his clerk whom he sees on a daily basis and pays horribly as well as an annual visit from his nephew whose sole wish is to have his uncle come to his Christmas party. His Nephews requests are met with a stale "Good afternoon," (Dickens 10) Scrooge is a man who simply wants to be left alone in complete isolation, and we can clearly see this in his reaction from the people he passes in the streets. “Nobody ever stopped him in the street to say, with gladsome looks, "My dear Scrooge, how are you? When will you come to see me?" No beggars implored him to bestow a trifle, no children asked him what it was o'clock” (Dickens 4). While most people would experience this and find it to be a bleak existence, this is the very life Scrooge reveres. “But what did Scrooge care! It was the very thing he liked.” (Dickens 5). The years of hardness has brought a chain about his heart so that he no longer wishes to be associated with the common man but rather in his words "I wish to be left alone, said Scrooge” (Dickens 14)
Work Cited
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.
Wood, Michael. "Hero's Journey Archetypes Explained." 15 November 2011. Web 10 October 2013

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 5, 2014 01:18 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
3 September 2013


Question #35:
Stave One: A Christmas Carol is full of symbolism. Briefly describe, in your own words, something from the first stave that is symbolic, using quoted passages as support (2-3 sentences). Fully support your idea. Explain why/how the example you chose is symbolic.

Answer: “No warmth bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty.” (Page 2, line 16)

“To edge his way through the crowded paths of life, warning all human sympathy to keep its distance, was what the knowing ones call nuts to Scrooge.” (Page 2, line 33)

“A poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December.” (Page 8, line 5)

In my opinion, all three of these quotes have symbolic meaning. The first two show how bitter and grouchy Scrooge is. Clearly, he lacks all of the Christmas spirit elements. Scrooge represents unconcern and egotism.

In regards to the last quote, Scrooge was very inconsiderate in giving his clerk the day off for Christmas. I believe he symbolizes greed.

Work Cited
Dickens, C. (1991). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 5, 2014 01:35 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation In Narrative CA01
5 September 2014

QUESTION #34
(Stave One) How does Scrooge feel about the fact that people avoid him on the streets, beggars won't ask him for money, children won't ask of him the time, no one will ask him for directions, and even seeing-eye dogs take blind men out of his path? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Scrooge actually liked that people normally would not come near him and would get out of his way when he was walking. Scrooge hated people in general and hated being bothered by random questions by these people so he would much rather them stay away. Also another perk (in Scrooge's mind) of having people stay out of his way was that he did not have to fight through the crowds. This would cause him to be late for either work or his very specific after work schedule. According to all accounts in the first Stave, (not wanting to give his employees Christmas off) there was nothing more Scrooge hated than missing work. "But what did Scrooge care! It was the very thing he liked. To edge his way along the crowded paths of life, warning all human sympathy to keep its distance, was what the knowing ones call "nuts" to Scrooge" (Dickens 10).

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 5, 2014 08:34 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL CA02
4 September 2014

Question #29:
Why was Christmas the most trying time of the year for Marley? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Christmas was trying for Marley because it was the time of year when he was most sharply reminded of his lack of compassion towards others in his life. Marley lived his life ignoring those in need, going "through crowds of fellow-beings with [his] eyes turned down" (Dickens 14). It is because of this lifestyle that Marly says of Christmas: "At this time of the rolling year...I suffer most" (Dickens 14).

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 5, 2014 09:14 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL
5 September 2014

Question #7:
what does Scrooge think has caused this ghost to appear? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer.

Answer:
According to Stave I of Charles Dickens "A Christmas Carol",Scrooge claims he has seen Marley's Ghost because specks of things could affect his six senses. Scrooge says "a slight disorder of the stomach makes them cheat" (Dickens 12). Scrooge also says "you may be a undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese or a fragment of a underdone potato"(Dickens 12).

Posted by: Tashanna Harris at September 5, 2014 09:48 AM

Thomas Meseroll
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220cl: Journeys in the Narrative
4 Sep 2014

Question # 28: Stave One: What did Marley tell Scrooge about the seven years since his death? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
When Marley appears to Scrooge in his bed chamber, he does so in an attempt to warn Scrooge of what his future holds and tells him of his own experiences since his death seven years ago. He tells Scrooge that as a spirit, he is resigned to walk the earth alone, never able to rest, shackled and bound in chains that were made, by his own hand, in his mortal life.

This is explained when Scrooge asks why he is in chains, Marley replies “I wear the chain I forged in life, I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it”(Dickens). Scrooge continues to question Marley, asking him for words of comfort and to be told “I have none to give”(Dickens). Marley continues by describing his existence for the past seven years, saying “I cannot rest, I cannot stay, I cannot linger anywhere. My spirit never walked beyond our counting-house—mark me!—in life my spirit never roved beyond the narrow limits of our money-changing hole; and weary journeys lie before me” (Dickens). Marley further describes his solitary years as “No rest, no peace. Incessant torture of remorse”(Dickens).

Posted by: Thomas Meseroll at September 5, 2014 10:25 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Instructor: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL
5 September 2014
Question
There are several different elements to Marley’s punishment. What are they? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer
The first of these punishments was that A big chain bound Marley made up of “cash-boxes, keys, padlocks, ledgers, deeds, and heavy purses” (Dickens 18) that wound around him like a tail clasped in the middle. Marley’s wrongdoings in life were what formed the chain he wore, “I wear the chain I forged in life” (Dickens 22).
The second punishment was the abnormal lower jaw of Marley, who “dropped down upon his breast” (Marley 21) once he unwrapped the bandage around his head.
Another punishment of Marley was him being forced to watch what he could have done to change his fate and find happiness “witness what it cannot share, but might have shared on earth, and turned to happiness” (Dickens 22). Furthermore, his soul is doomed never to find rest, or peace, “I cannot rest, I cannot stay, I cannot linger anywhere” (Dickens 22), because in life Marley’s “spirit never walked beyond our counting-house” (Dickens 22).

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 5, 2014 10:33 AM

Olivia N Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
6 September 2014

Question #53:
Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: How has Scrooge changed after the visit by the Ghost of Christmas Past? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Scrooge changed after a visit by the Ghost of Christmas Past from hatred and “Bah Humbug” to expressing emotions of happiness to see everyone again celebrating Christmas with smiles and regret of things that if he went back he would have done events differently. The Ghost of Christmas past brought Scrooge to his hometown, he was clapping his hands and shouting with excitement and tears of joy at first, then it shifted to sadly crying because he forgot how he used to be. “Why did his cold eyes glisten, and his heart leap up as they went to the past (Dickens 31).” “Scrooge sat down upon a form, and wept to see his poor forgotten self as he used to be (32).” The moments of regret happened when Scrooge had a girlfriend, Abigail, and choose money over choosing a life with Abigail. After that scene Scrooge had kept on saying, he should have done things for Abigail like pay attention to her and change for the bad. “And dearly should have dearly liked, I own, to have touched her lips; to have questioned her, that she might have opened them; to have looked upon the lashes of her downcast eyes, and never raised a blush; to have let loose waves of hair, an inch of which would be a keepsake beyond price: in short I should have liked, I do confess, to have had the lightest license of a child, and yet to have been man enough to know its value (42).

Work Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 6, 2014 01:05 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
4 September 2014

Question #75:
Who were the two children the Ghost has under its robe? What did the Spirit tell Scrooge about them?

Answer:
From the words of the Spirit, Scrooge learns that the town mysterious children under the Spirit’s cloak are the manifestation of Man’s Ignorance (who is a boy) and Want (who is a girl) (Dickens 49). “Beware them both, and all their degree, but most of all beware this boy, for on his brow I see that written is Doom,” these words from the Spirit serve as a warning to Scrooge telling him that if he becomes ignorant to what he has been told by the ghosts his soul will still be doomed (Dickens 49).

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 6, 2014 01:43 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
7 September 2014

QUESTION #41:
(Stave Two) What did Scrooge notice about the church chimes when he woke up? What did he think had happened?

ANSWER:
“He was endeavoring to pierce the darkness with his ferret eyes, when the chimes of a neighboring church struck the four quarters. So he listened for an hour.” (Dickens 16). The chimes at the church went from six to seven, to seven to eight and up to twelve and stopped. He thought an icicle had gotten into works. “To his great astonishment the heavy bell went on from six to seven to eight, and regularly up to twelve; then stopped. Twelve! It was past two when he went to bed. The clock was wrong. An icicle must have got into works. Twelve!” (Dickens 17)

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 7, 2014 01:02 AM

(Resubmitted)Blake Bromen
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
4 September 14

Question #8: What strange incident happens to Scrooge as he reaches his house? What does it indicate? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

From the Penguin Group 2008 issue of A Christmas Carol. Instead of Scrooge seeing his average door, he saw Marley’s face in the doorknocker as he goes to enter his house. The house in which he had lived in for so long, that he knew every stone in the yard. (Dickens 14). It indicates that Scrooge misses Marley and is lonesome, because he had only been mentioned once in seven years, and at first mention, it brings him to the forefront of Scrooge’s mind. “Let it be boure in mind that Scrooge had not bestowed one thought on Marley, since his last mention of his seven-years’ dead partner that afternoon. And then let any man explain to me, if he can, how it happened that Scrooge, having his key in the lock of the door, saw in the knocker, without its undergoing any intermediate process of change: not a knocker, but Marley’s face.” (Dickens 15)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 7, 2014 10:50 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE
3 September 2014


Question 63:
The second of the Three Spirits: Who was the second Spirit? Describe him.

Answer:
The second spirit is the spirit of Christmas Present. When scrooge sees the spirit, he appears to be what is described as a “jolly Giant, glorious to see” (Dickens, 45). The spirit is dressed in a deep green robe with white fur. A holly wreath is on his head, and he seems to be cheerful.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 7, 2014 11:04 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 – On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
7 September 2014.

QUESTION # 45:
Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: How does Scrooge initially react to the Spirit? What is his attitude? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
After Marley had told Scrooge that three spirits would visit, he was utterly perplexed. Therefore, Scrooge did not know what to believe. Thus, he kept vigil until one o’ clock when the first apparition was to visit, out of concern for what Marley said to him and to prove that it was a figment of imagination. After the clock had stricken, he concluded that he would have no visitation but was surprised, “The curtains of his bed were drawn aside: and Scrooge, starting up into a half-recumbent attitude…” (Dickens 18), he was face to face with the spirit.

Scrooge being a man of hard and fast nature believed in what he could see and explain in the here and now. Therefore, encountering this apparition when he was not asleep threw him for a loop, “… at another time the figure itself fluctuated in its distinctness…dissolving parts…, it would be itself again; distinct and clear as ever.” (Dickens 18), as it was nothing he had seen before, heightening his curiosity. Although curious, Scrooge had to be respectful towards the spirit, “Scrooge reverently disclaimed all intention to offend or any knowledge of… his life.” (Dickens 19), as he did not know what to expect from the ghost.

Therefore, Scrooge’s reaction from the arrival of the ghost moved from one of recumbence, which transcended to attentiveness, respect, and reverence.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 7, 2014 11:07 AM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
7 September 2014

QUESTION #74 What happened to the way the Ghost and Scrooge looked as the night went on?
ANSWER:
As the night wore on, Ebenezer Scrooge’s appearance changed in two ways. His outward appearance changed from a boy to a man as stated in Stave II “For again Scrooge saw himself. He was older now; a man in the prime of life. His face had not the harsh and rigid lines of later years; but it had begun to wear the signs of care and avarice.” There was also a change in his inward appearance as well. “There was an eager, greedy, restless motion in the eye, which showed the passion that had taken root, and where the shadow of the growing tree would fall.” (Dickens 27) The Ghost of Christmas Present had grown old very quickly. We know this because Dickens wrote “It was strange, too, that while Scrooge remained unaltered in his outward form, the Ghost grew older, clearly older. Scrooge had observed this change, but never spoke of it, until they left a children’s Twelfth Night party, when looking at the Spirit as they stood together in an open place, he noticed that its hair was gray.” (Dickens 48) There was a very different change in the appearance of the Ghost of Christmas Past because Scrooge could all the faces that the Spirit had shown him, which was difficult for Scrooge to accept. “He turned upon the Ghost, and seeing that it looked upon him with a face, in which in some strange way there were fragments of all the faces it had shown him, wrestled with it.” (Dickens 30)

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 7, 2014 12:26 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journey’s in Narrative
7 September 2014

Question #58:
Describe the scene at Fezziwig’s warehouse. What did Scrooge say to the Ghost about the scene?

Answer:
The Ghost of Christmas Past takes Scrooge back to a previous Christmas where he was working as an intern in Fezziwig’s warehouse. Fezziwig let Scrooge and his coworker off early for Christmas. They quickly shut up the shop and threw a party (Dickens 24-25).

After watching the party, Scrooge tells the spirit that Fezziwig had the power to make him and his partner happy or unhappy. After realizing this, Scrooge began to feel bad for his clerk. The spirit asks Scrooge what is wrong, and Scrooge replies, “I should like to be able to say a word or two to my clerk just now” (Dickens 26-27).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 7, 2014 01:46 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG: 220CL
September 7, 2014

Question 60:
How did Scrooge try to get rid of the Ghost? What happened? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The ghost that Scrooge tries to attempt to get rid of is The Ghost of Christmas Past. Scrooge tries to get rid of the ghost by using an “extinguisher” over the top of the ghost and by pressing down on the floor. Scrooge kept pressing down with all his strength, but he could not get rid of the light that was coming from The Ghost of Christmas Past. The Ghost of Christmas Past “light” image symbolizes truth. Therefore, this is where Scrooge does not want revealed his actions in the past, but try to extinguish them (meaning get rid of them). However, Scrooge cannot get rid of the truth. (Dickens, 18)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 7, 2014 02:36 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
7 September 2014

Question #64:
Describe the first place they went.

Answer:
The Ghost of Christmas Present takes Scrooge to the bustling city on Christmas morning. The weather was gloomy and the house-fronts looked black, which contrasted the white snow that was piled on the rooftops. Despite the dismal weather, everyone in the city seemed to be joyous and the shops were all filled with various types of food for people to feast on. The people were all wearing their best clothes and running down the streets to the grocers and church. "The Grocers'! Oh the Grocers'! nearly closed with perhaps two shutters down, or one; but through those gaps such glimpses! It was not alone that the scales descending on the counter made a merry sound, or that the twine and roller parted company so briskly, or that the canisters were rattled up and down like juggling tricks, or even that the blended scents of tea and coffee were so grateful to the nose" (Dickens 318). "But soon the steeples called good people all, to the church and chapel, and away they came, flocking through the streets in their best clothes, with their gayest faces" (Dickens 319).

*These quotes were found using the Barnes and Noble Leather Bound Classics edition of The Complete Works of Charles Dickens.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 7, 2014 02:43 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
8 September 2014


Question #42
Stave II: Describe the appearance of the first spirit. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Text source: Dover, Thrift Editions

Answer:
The book was very descriptive in describing the first of the three spirits. The ghost was a mix between a child and an old man but didn’t resemble one more than the other. The ghost had long white hair, which resembled an old person but had a young glistening face with no wrinkles. The ghosts arms and hands were very muscular which meant that the ghost was very strong. The ghost was dressed in a white gown with a shiny belt wrapped around its waist. The spirit held a piece of holly in its hand that signified winter and had summer flowers trimmed on the gown. Atop the spirit’s head was streaming light that could be put out with a cap it held under its arm (Dickens 18). Through scrooges eyes, “It was a strange figure — like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man, viewed through some supernatural medium, which gave him the appearance of having receded from the view, and being diminished to a child’s proportions. Its hair, which hung about its neck and down its back, was white as if with age; and yet the face had not a wrinkle in it, and the tenderest bloom was on the skin. The arms were very long and muscular; the hands the same, as if its hold were of uncommon strength. Its legs and feet, most delicately formed, were, like those upper members, bare. It wore a tunic of the purest white, and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful. It held a branch of fresh green holly in its hand; and, in singular contradiction of that wintry emblem, had its dress trimmed with summer flowers. But the strangest thing about it was, that from the crown of its head there sprung a bright clear jet of light, by which all this was visible; and which was doubt- less the occasion of its using, in its duller moments, a great extinguisher for a cap, which it now held under its arm”(Dickens 18).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 7, 2014 04:02 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
7 September 2014

Question #46:
Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: What part of his past does the spirit show to Scrooge first? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The part of Scrooges past that is shown first by the first ghost was a school that Scrooge used to attend as a young boy during Christmas time. It showed how he was often neglected and left alone. There is proof of this with the following quote, “ “The school is not quite deserted,” said the Ghost. “A solitary child, neglected by his friends, is left there still”” (Dickens 20).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 7, 2014 06:38 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
September 7th, 2014
‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens
Stave Three

Question #73: How did Scrooge feel by the time he and the Spirit left his nephew’s house?

Answer: The visit to his nephew’s house softened Scrooge (Dickens 46) and made him feel “gay and light of heart” (Dickens 48). These emotions are strikingly different to those in Stave I. This makes it clear that the visit from the Ghost of Christmas Past and Ghost of Christmas Present has successfully instilled hope in Scrooge’s future.

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications, 1991. 46+. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 7, 2014 08:03 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journey in Narrative CA02
7 September 2014

Question#67:
Describe the Cratchit family's toast to Scrooge.

Answer:

The Cratchit family toast to Scrooge was rather interesting and intense. The father of the family began the toast when his wife interrupted wishing Scrooge was their so she could give him a piece of her mind. Mrs. Cratchit told her husband she would drink to "his health for your sake" (Charles Dickens 41). Dickens also mentions how the thought of Scrooges name "cast a dark shadow on the party" (41).

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 7, 2014 08:45 PM

Bryce Veller
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
September 7, 2014

Question # 61
How did Scrooge find the second Spirit ?

Answer
As Scrooge was lying in bed when the bell struck one, he showed fear for the thought that a second spirit would appear anytime soon (Dicken 31). As Scrooge is lying in his bed with all the window curtains pulled open, was illuminated by the light off the clock tower. As time went by, no ghost appeared before Scrooge, and he began to think where this mystic light was shining from (Dickens 32). He came up with an idea that took full control of him. Scrooge getting up out of bed walks to his adjoining room. As he touched the doorknob, a voice called his name and commanded him to enter the room.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 7, 2014 09:10 PM

Question #48: What kind of people are the Fezziwigs? Describe them in all aspects.

Answer: Mr. Fezziwig was the man whom Scrooge was an apprentice for. The Fezziwig family are known for their Christmas parties, and that is what the ghost has taken Scrooge to witness. Charles Dickens describes the women of the family as “beaming and loveable” (Dickins 64) and having “one vast substantial smile. (Dickins 64). They are truly caring people who love the spirit of Christmas and the ghost brings Scrooge to this scene to hopefully recognize all the good that Christmas does.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 7, 2014 09:31 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
September 7, 2014

Question: Describe the “Yes and No” game. What was the subject of the game? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The spirit of a Christmas present, the second spirit, brought Scrooge to see his nephew’s Christmas party, where he and his party guests played a game called “Yes and No." The way Scrooge’s nephew and the party guests play “Yes and No” is that one person thinks of a noun and everyone else asks yes or no question. The point of the game is to guess what the person is thinking of, “I have found it out! I know what it is Fred! I know what it is! ‘What is it?’ cried Fred. ‘It’s your Uncle Scro-o-o-o-oge!” (Dickens 48).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 7, 2014 09:38 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
7 September 2014

Question #69:
Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: What did Scrooge’s nephew and niece say about him? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Scrooge’s nephew and niece did not share the most pleasant comments about Scrooge. Both shared they did not see anything to say against him but then carried on comments about him. Scrooge’s nephew shared his thoughts about his wealth, “His wealth is of no use to him. He don’t do any good with it. He don’t make himself comfortable with it. He hasn’t the satisfaction of thinking-ha, ha, ha!-that he is ever going to benefit US with it.” (Dickens 71) Scrooge’s niece shared, “I have no patience with him.” (71) All the women within the area agreed with the comments shared above. They collectively agreed that he misses events with his ill feelings towards everything. In summary, the guests all felt that Scrooge is the one facing the consequences of not sharing memories with everyone.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 7, 2014 10:51 PM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL CA02
4 September 2014

Question #66:
Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: Who was Tiny Tim? What did Scrooge as the Ghost about Tiny Tim? What was the Ghost's reply?

Answer:
Tiny Tim was Bob Cratchit's youngest son, whom Bob has to take special care of because Tiny Tim "was a cripple" (Dickens 38). Scrooge asked the Ghost "if Tiny Tim will live" (Dickens 40), to which the Ghost replied "If these shadows remain unaltered by the future, the child will die." (Dickens 40)

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 7, 2014 11:48 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #59:
Stave Two: The first of the Three Spirits: Describe the scenes with Belle. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
The first of the Three Spirits takes Scrooge to past events and one of the events was when he and Belle were together and she was breaking off their engagement. In this scene, Belle argues that his love of money has caused him to “fear the world too much” (Dickens 40), and that this fear has led him to change. He no longer values her as he did before; instead, he has another Idol: a golden one. However, he doesn’t accept this change she sees in him. He does not accept that she let him go because he is a different man, that he would no longer “choose a dowerless girl” (41), and that to avoid any remorse that would come with marrying a girl of her status she is willing to release him. “The ghost then proceeds to take Scrooge to the scene of a recent Christmas of Belle and her husband and she was talking to him about Scrooge.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 8, 2014 12:05 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 September 2014

Question #36:
Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: What did Scrooge think about when he heard the harp music? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer:
When Scrooge’s niece was playing the harp, he instantly remembered the experience he had with the Ghost of Christmas Past because he was familiar with the song from his childhood (Dickens, 80). The longer the music played, the more he reveled in it, and he thought, “…if he could have listened to it often, years ago, he might have cultivated the kindnesses of life for his own happiness with his own hands…” Dickens 80). Scrooge engulfed himself in his memories and maybe even his regrets.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 8, 2014 12:37 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
3 September 2013

Question #51:
Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: What does Scrooge regret as he watches each scene from the past unfold? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: How does scrooge try to “extinguish the light”? Does he succeed?
Answer:
“Leave me! Take me back! Haunt me no longer.” (Page 30, Line 31)
As Scrooge watches each scene from the past unfold, it is evident that he feels remorse for his past actions. For example, when the Ghost took Scrooge to the moment in which his fiancé was breaking off the engagement, he became emotional. He tensely exclaimed to remove and take him back and that he could not withstand the haunting any longer.
Scrooge tries to “extinguish the light” by pressing the cap over his head; however, he failed miserably because the light was simply symbolic, he could not hide the truth.
Work Cited
Dickens, C. (1991). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 8, 2014 12:49 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation
8 September 2014

QUESTION #57:
Who was Fan? Describe the scene with her. Use quoted passage from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
In the short story “A Christmas Carol,” the character of Fan was Scrooges younger sister. A joyous young girl that was very affectionate of her older brother, “a little girl, much younger than the boy, came darting in, and putting her arms about his neck, and often kissing him, addressed him as her “Dear, dear brother” (Dickens, 34).

The scene with Fan revolved around her coming to pick up Scrooge from what appeared to be a boarding school, “I have come to bring you home, dear brother” (Dickens, 34). Their father had sent Scrooge there, and it was not until one fateful night of kindness that, upon Fans request, Scrooge was allowed to return home, “I was not afraid to ask him once more if you might come home; and he said yes” (Dickens, 34).

Fans happy nature and love for Scrooge is passed to her only child, Scrooges nephew. Fan had a “large heart” (Dickens, 35), as referenced by the Ghost, showing that she was a very kind person, albeit delicate.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 8, 2014 01:15 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
5 September 2014

Question #76: What was the spirits reply to Scrooge’s question: ‘’ Have they no refuge or resource?
The spirt reply was “Are there no Prisons?" said the Spirit, turning on him for the last time with his own words. "Are there no workhouses?"( Dickens 48)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 8, 2014 01:59 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA02 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
7 September 2014
Question #68:
Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: What were some of the other places the Ghost took Scrooge? What did Scrooge find at each place? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The Ghost of Christmas Present is an interesting character in the book that has both 1800 brothers and lives for a single day. The Ghost of Christmas Present takes scrooge on a journey to many different places that all share one there: joy. The ghost first takes Scrooge to see a joyful city working away at their daily toils yet still finding happiness. “For the people who were shoveling away on the house-tops were jovial and full of glee; calling out to one another from the parapets, and now and then exchanging a facetious snowball” (Dickens 81). After the city, we are brought to Bob Cratchit’s house where Bob brings home the measly salary from Scrooge to pay his family yet they still find comfort and contentedness in it. “There was nothing of high mark in this. They were not a handsome family; they were not well dressed; their shoes were far from being water-proof; … But they were happy, grateful, pleased with one another” (Dickens 99) After we are presented with some familiar characters in the story we are also presented with some foreign characters who are in bleak situations yet still find joy in the simplicity that is community on Christmas. The Ghost brings Scrooge first to a family of miners who find light in the bowels of the earth. “Passing through the wall of mud and stone, they found a cheerful company assembled round a glowing fire. An old, old man and woman, with their children and their children's children” (Dickens 102). After the earth, we are brought out to sea and find two weather worn lighthouse men sharing a moment in the desolate circumstance. “Through the loophole in the thick stone wall shed out a ray of brightness on the awful sea. Joining their horny hands over the rough table at which they sat, they wished each other Merry Christmas in their can of grog” (Dickens 104). We can see in these many examples the one prevailing factor which is overflowing joy and the joy that is brought to any situation with the priceless gifts of community and love.
Work Cited:
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.
Wood, Michael. "Hero's Journey Archetypes Explained." 15 November 2011. Web 10 October 2013

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 8, 2014 02:27 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative ENG 220 CA01
8 September 2014

Question: The first of the three spirits: Contrast Scrooge’s old Christmas celebrations with those of the Fezziwigs. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Analysis: In the past, Scrooge used to celebrate Christmas happily with those in his life, Fezziwig represented a positive influence in Scrooge’s life. He openly celebrated with friends and family, refusing to overwork or allow greed to affect his personal life.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at September 8, 2014 05:23 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
8 September 14

Question #54: Describe what the first spirit looked like, who was the first spirit? What was its purpose?

From the Penguin Group 2008 issue of A Christmas Carol. The first spirit was “like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man… Its hair, which hung about its neck and down its back, was white as if with age; and yet the face had not a wrinkle in it… the arms were very long and muscular; the hands the same, as if its hold were of uncommon strength. Its legs and feet, most delicately formed, were, like those upper members, bare. It wore a tunic of the purest white; and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful. It held a branch of fresh green holly in its hand; and, in singular contradiction of that wintry emblem, had its dress trimmed with summer flowers. But the strangest thing about it was, that from the crown of its head there sprung a bright clear jet of light by which all of this was visible” Dickens 33-34)

The first spirit was the ghost of Christmas past. It was there to improve Scrooge’s welfare (Dickens 35) and show him what he has become by taking him back to his childhood and depicting how he has changed.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 8, 2014 09:03 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation in Narrative CA01

QUESTION #71:
What did Scrooge do while his nephew and the others were playing games? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
While everyone else was playing games, Scrooge started playing along with then in the game How, When, and Where. Also, during all of this the ghost told Scrooge that they had to leave, but Scrooge tried to bed him to stay until everybody left. The ghost went on to say that they could not stay any longer. "There might have been twenty people there, young and old, but they all played, and so did Scrooge; for, wholly forgetting in the interest he had in what was going on that his voice made no sound in their ears, he sometimes came out with his guess quite loud, and very often guessed right, too; for the sharpest needle, best Whitechapel, warranted not to cut his eye, was not sharper than Scrooge; blunt as he took it in his head to be."

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 8, 2014 09:27 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
Eng220CL
8 September 2014

Question #44:
what is the first spirit called? what does this spirit symbolize?

In Stave two of "A Christmas Carol" the first spirit to appear was known as the Ghost of Christmas Past. "It was a strange figure like a child: yet not so like a child as like a old man viewed through a supernatural medium"(Dickens 18).

The spirit symbolizes memory in which he takes Scrooge back to the past taking him back to the Christmas memories he once had. "At one of these a lonely boy was reading near a feeble fire; and Scrooge sat down upon a form, and wept to see his poor forgotten self as he had used to be" (Dickens 21).

Posted by: Tashann Harris at September 8, 2014 09:46 AM

Joshua Natonio
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
8 September 2014

QUESTION #6:
52. Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: What does the light symbolize? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
STAVE 2 of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” is a montage of different points in Ebenezer Scrooge’s life before he became a Christmas curmudgeon. It is the apparition who guides Ebinezer through his hazy past and shows him different episodes in his life in hopes of rekindling his love of the holidays.

Light can signify hope, heavenly power, and purity, however, in the case of the light emanating from the top of the first of the three ghosts that visited Ebinezer Scrooge; the light seems to symbolize truth and knowledge. The first spirit shows an unabridged series of events that have occurred in Scrooge’s life. For many the truth is hard to bear, and this is evident in the case of when the ghost guides Ebinezer through his past. “’What.’ exclaimed the Ghost,’ would you so soon put out, with worldly hands, the light I give. Is it not enough that you are one of those whose passions made this cap, and force me through whole trains of years to wear it low upon my brow’”(Dickens 24). This passage introduces the theme of truth and knowledge and makes reference to the fact that the truth can be a hard pill to swallow and that we tend to bury our memories of the past.

Two exchanges between Scrooge and ethereal time traveling tour guide are indicative to the overall symbolic theme of truth and knowledge in STAVE 2. The first being when Belle broke off the engagement with Ebenezer because of his lust for wealth. “She left him, and they parted. ‘Spirit.’ said Scrooge,’ show me no more. Conduct me home. Why do you delight to torture me.’‘One shadow more.’ exclaimed the Ghost. ‘No more.’ cried Scrooge. ‘No more, I don’t wish to see it. Show me no more’” (Dickens 31).

The second occurrence is when the ghost brings Scrooge to his former lover’s home accompanied by her husband. “‘Spirit.’ said Scrooge in a broken voice,’ remove me from this place.’ ‘I told you these were shadows of the things that have been,’ said the Ghost. ‘That they are what they are, do not blame me.’‘Remove me.’ Scrooge exclaimed,’ I cannot bear it.’ He turned upon the Ghost, and seeing that it looked upon him with a face, in which in some strange way there were fragments of all the faces it had shown him, wrestled with it. ‘Leave me. Take me back. Haunt me no longer’” (Dickens 36).

The overall symbolic themes of light, truth, and knowledge of the past (memories) run rampant in STAVE 2 of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.” It is important to note even the ghost having a flame upon its head is reminiscent of a lighthouse which guides ships in wayward waters.

WORKS CITED:
Dickens, Charles. Christmas Stories Including A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Hazleton, PA: Electronic Classic Series Publication, 2013. 24-36. Online.

Posted by: Joshua Natonio at September 8, 2014 10:25 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220 cl journeys in narrative CA01
8, September 2014

Question 62#; the second of the three spirits: Describe the scene when scrooge found second spirit

Answer: the scene where scrooge feels that he will be encountering another ghost he is in a mood in which he feels he’s ready for the ghost not letting him be taken by surprise or made nervous. (Par75 Dickinson) You could tell that the ghost were starting to get to scrooge cause of his actions to be prepared for him rather then be caught off guard. he had been laying in his bed when he became unbelievably cold so he got up and opened all of the blinds himself so he could establish a sharp look out all around the bed. (Par75 Dickinson) The bell struck one but the ghost had not appeared yet he began to wonder. this had was on the knocker when a voice told him to enter and he obeyed. In moments his whole room turned to a beautiful garden filled with all of the most delicious fruits and leaves. There sat before him a very large man this man was the ghost of Christmas present.

Posted by: aaron virelli at September 8, 2014 10:33 AM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
8 September 2014

Question 47 - Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: What do you learn about Scrooge when his sister, Fan, visits him at school? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In stave two, when Scrooge is visited by his sister, Fan, we learn that for some reason, his father disallowed him to come home. “Father is so much kinder than he used to be,” (Dickens 33) shows that Scrooge’s father was abusive in some way and had kicked Scrooge out.

We also learn that she died relatively young, seeing as Scrooge outlived her, and is the mother of Scrooge’s nephew.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at September 8, 2014 10:47 AM

Matthew Basin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
6th Sep. 2014


Question Stave Three #65:
What was the second place they visited? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The second place they visited is Bob Cratchit’s house after the suburbs of the town.
“ On the threshold of the door the Spirit smiled, and stopped to bless Bob Cratchits dwelling with the sprinklings of his torch” ( Dickens 36).
“Bob had but fifteen “Bob” a week himself; he pocketed on Saturdays but fifteen copies of his Christian name; and yet the Ghost of Christmas Present blessed his four-roomed house”( Dickens 37)!
Works Cited
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York:Dover Publications, 1991.2.Print.

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 8, 2014 11:08 AM

Do Over
Matthew Basin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
6 Sep. 2014

Question Stave Three #65:
What was the second place they visited? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The second place they visited is Bob Cratchit’s dwelling after the suburbs of the town.
“ On the threshold of the door the Spirit smiled, and stopped to bless Bob Cratchits dwelling with the sprinklings of his torch” ( Dickens 36).
“Bob had but fifteen “Bob” a week himself; he pocketed on Saturdays but fifteen copies of his Christian name; and yet the Ghost of Christmas Present blessed his four-roomed house”( Dickens 37)!
Works Cited
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York:Dover Publications, 1991.2.Print.

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 8, 2014 11:34 AM

Joanna Ozog, Bryce Veller, James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
8 September 2014

Question:
Group 4: Besides just being a creepy old dude with chains, what role does Jacob Marley really play in the story? For example, is it possible that, like a messenger or harbinger of old, is Marley challenging Ebenezer Scrooge to something? Is he, in some way, laying out an invitation for Scrooge? Explain your response.

Answer:
Marley, being one of Scrooge’s best friends, has a lot of impact on Scrooge. Marley chained himself to his fate with the deeds he has done. He said “I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it,” (Dickens 13). And Marley is now here to save Scrooge’s fate and to help convert Scrooge into a better person by showing what he was and what he will become. To quote Marley exactly, he says, “I am here to-night to warn you, that you have yet a chance and hope of escaping my fate,” (Dickens, 21).


Posted by: Joanna Ozog, Bryce Veller, James Sierra at September 8, 2014 12:21 PM

Bronwen Burke, Nathanael Jones, Aaron Virelli
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
8 September 2014

Group 5

Question 5:
In this stave, besides just being a creepy old dude with chains, what role does Jacob Marley really play in the story? For example, with his “warning,” is he trying to prevent Scrooge from going on the journey he is about to embark upon? Or, with his “warning,” is he trying to “encourage” (you may define “encourage” in a way that seems appropriate) Scrooge to embark upon the journey? In other words, is he an enabler (helper) or a hinderer for Scrooge, at this point in the story? Explain your response.

Answer:
Marley plays the role of the Herald, who serves as enabler encouraging Scrooge to take the journey being laid in front of him. “‘I wear the chain I forged in life,’ replied the Ghost. ‘I made it link by link, yard by yard; I girded it on my own free will, and of my own free will I wrote. Is its pattern strange to you?’” (Dickens 13) The Ghost, Marley, warns Scrooge of his life actions resulting in his chains in death and with the relationship between Scrooge and Marley, Marley implies that Scrooge’s fate will be the same. However, with the presentation of the Spirits as the way of cleansing his past actions, Scrooge may be able to free himself of the chains he has already forged. Marley serves to convince Scrooge of dropping his naturally closed-minded nature and listen and believe in what the Spirits have to say, leaving Scrooge with one final warning to convince him to listen, “‘Without their visits,’ said the Ghost, ‘you cannot hope to shun the path I tread. Except the first to-morrow, when the bell tolls one.’” (Dickens 15)

Work Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 8, 2014 01:04 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
8 September 2014

Question #87:
Who had been kind to Bob Cratchit, and what was the kindness?

Answer:
“Bob told them the extraordinary kindness of Mr. Scrooge’s nephew,” in the troubling times for Bob Cratchit and his family, Bob distinctively notes Fred, Mr. Scrooge’s nephew, as offering up a service to him (Dickens 60). However, though the genuine kindness is over the loss of poor Tiny Tim, Bob takes away that Fred called Mrs. Cratchit is a “good wife” (Dickens 60). The ultimate consideration in all of Fred’s ways came with “If I can be of service to you in any,” the fact that Fred, nephew of his boss, reaches out to help the family of a stranger makes Bob feel that Fred knew Tiny Tim and is actually touched by that (Dickens 60).

Work Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 8, 2014 08:14 PM

GROUP 2
Maria Aguilera
Jonah Robertson
Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #2:
Stave One-Marley’s Ghost: In your group, come up with a working definition for the concept of a “hero.” Nevermind what Christopher Vogler has to say about it (for now); how do you define a hero, or, someone who is heroic? Based on what you know so far in Stave One, between the two, who is the most “heroic,” in the traditional sense of the world: Ebenezer Scrooge or Bob Cratchit? Why? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
A hero is someone that people look up to. In “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens, Bob Cretchit exhibits heroic characteristics. Cratchit’s heroic qualities are exemplified by the sacrifices he makes to take care of Tiny Tim and the rest of his family; such as telling them that Tiny Tim will grow up to be “strong and hardy” (Dickens 38), even though he knows that that is not true, sacrificing his own feelings for their emotional stability is more important to him.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 9, 2014 08:33 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #82:
Stave Four: The last of the Spirits: Where did they go second? What did they see? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
The last of the Spirits took Scrooge to a churchyard where the Spirit directed Scrooge to a grave where Scrooge found himself reading his own name “Ebenezer Scrooge.” On his knees surprised and scared, Scrooge asked the Ghost “Am I that man who lay upon the bed?” (Dickens 84). He begged the Spirit that he was now a changed man, “hear me! I am not the man I was. I will not be the man I must have been but for this intercourse. Why show me this, if I am past all hope!” (84). He claimed that we would honor Christmas in his heart and all throughout the year because “The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me” (84) because he did not want to die.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 9, 2014 08:35 AM

Do over
Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 September 2014

QUESTION #27 Why did Marley wear chains?

ANSWER:
Jacob Marley wore chains because he cared very little about the world, and cared mostly about himself. We can distinguish this fact from three statements Marley made to Ebenezer Scrooge he visited him. The first statement Marley made was "I wear the chain I forged in life," replied the Ghost. "I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.” (Dickens, A Christmas Carol: A Ghost Story 31). This statement suggests that Marley knew he had a choice. It also suggests that the choices he made of self-interest over human empathy is what is causing his afterlife woes. When Marley says “Not to know that any Christian spirit working kindly in its little sphere, whatever it may be, will find its mortal life too short for its vast means of usefulness.” (Dickens 34), he is telling Ebenezer of the hard lessons he was forced to learn. Marley was telling Ebenezer that being kinder to everyone would have saved him from his misery. Finally, Marley tells Ebenezer that the business of making money isn’t what the human purpose is. "Business!" cried the Ghost, wringing its hands again. "Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business.” (Dickens 34). From these three statements, we can conclude that the reason Jacob Marley is wearing chains because he put his wants, desires, and goals above everyone else.

Works Cited
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol: A Ghost Story. [Waiheke Island] : The Floating Press. 2009, 2009. Novella.
—. A Christmas Carol: A Ghost Story. [Waiheke Island] : The Floating Press. 2009, 2009.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 9, 2014 10:53 AM

Do over
Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
7 September 2014

QUESTION #74 What happened to the way the Ghost and Scrooge looked as the night went on?

ANSWER:
As the night wore on, Ebenezer Scrooge’s appearance changed in two ways. His outward appearance changed from a boy to a man as stated in Stave II “For again Scrooge saw himself. He was older now; a man in the prime of life. His face had not the harsh and rigid lines of later years; but it had begun to wear the signs of care and avarice.” There was also a change in his inward appearance as well. “There was an eager, greedy, restless motion in the eye, which showed the passion that had taken root, and where the shadow of the growing tree would fall.” (Dickens 27) The Ghost of Christmas Present had grown old very quickly. We know this because Dickens wrote “It was strange, too, that while Scrooge remained unaltered in his outward form, the Ghost grew older, clearly older. Scrooge had observed this change, but never spoke of it, until they left a children’s Twelfth Night party, when looking at the Spirit as they stood together in an open place, he noticed that its hair was gray.” (Dickens 48) There was a very different change in the appearance of the Ghost of Christmas Past because Scrooge could all the faces that the Spirit had shown him, which was difficult for Scrooge to accept. “He turned upon the Ghost, and seeing that it looked upon him with a face, in which in some strange way there were fragments of all the faces it had shown him, wrestled with it.” (Dickens 30)

Works Cited
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. Ed. Stanley Appelbaum. Dover Thrift Editions, 2013. Novella.
—. A Christmas Carol. Ed. Stanley Appelbaum. Dover Thrift Editions, 2013. Novella.
—. A Christmas Carol. Ed. Stanley Appelbaum. Dover Thrift Editions, 2013. Novella.
—. A Christmas Carol. Ed. Stanley Appelbaum. Dover Thrift Editions, 2013. Novella.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 9, 2014 10:55 AM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 September 2014

QUESTION #106: How does Scrooge reconcile with Fred, his nephew?

ANSWER:
Scrooge reconciles with Fred, his nephew, by attending dinner at Fred’s house on Christmas day. “In the afternoon, he turned his steps towards his nephew’s house.” (Dickens, A Christmas Carol 66) “It’s I. Your uncle Scrooge. I have come to dinner. Will you let me in, Fred?” (Dickens 67)

Works Cited
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. Ed. Stanley Appelbaum. Dover Thrift Editions, 2013. Novella.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 9, 2014 11:14 AM

Matt Basin and Jake Gates
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
8 Sep 2014

Question Group 7:
One-way to think of each concept that Ebenezer Scrooge had to face with the three visitors who followed Jacob Marley might be as bizarre testing his character. If the hypothesis is true, what was being tested or questioned about Scrooge by each of the spirits? You can be general in your answer , but it must be valid. After you have identified what the challenges were, given an account to how fared (remember, you cannot consider Stave Five at this point). Did Scrooge pass/fail any of them? Did Scrooge pass any/all of the test? How was Scrooge improved or worsened after the conclusion of each test? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Each of the Ghost tests his capacity for something. Ghost of Christmas Past tests his capacity for joy and happiness. Ghost of Christmas present test his capacity for empathy and Ghost of Christmas Future is the only dark ghost, so it’s different from the others. It represents how far he could fall, it still gives him hope that he could change. He passed his entire test because they all had a desired effect on him and it taught him that he could change for the best. He was improved as the test went on, the Ghost of Christmas Past shows how he was, the Ghost of Christmas Present shows how he is right now, how he acts around people and the Ghost of Christmas future shows that things could still be much worse and that he does have time to change.

“He was conscious of being exhausted, and overcome by an irristible drowsiness; and, further, of being in his own bedroom. He gave the cap a parting squeeze, in which his hand relaxed; and had barley time to reel to bed, before he sank into a heavy sleep” (Dickens 31).

“ Holding up his hands in one last prayer to have his fate reversed, he saw an alteration in the Phantom’s hood and dress. It shrunk, collapsed, and dwindled down into a bedpost” (Dickens 62).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 9, 2014 03:44 PM

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Jouney in Narrative CA01
9 September 2014

Question:
Before anything happens at all, that is, before Ebenezer Scrooge goes home for the night, how would you describe the “ordinary day” that seems to be taking place. From what we know, so far, in stave one, what does a typical, commonplace day look like for Ebenezer Scrooge and Bob Cratchit?

Answer:
The daily like of Ebenezer Scrooge is greatly revolved around money. Bob Cratchit’s life revolves around his family and how he can provide for them.
Scrooge wakes up, goes to work, goes to work, thinks about money all day, and himself then goes home and sits by the fire until he goes to sleep, then starts his day all over again. Bob Cratchit goes to work thinking about his family and dealing with Scrooge all day because he knows that is the best thing for his family.
Scrooge keeps to himself and does not want personal relationships with anyone. Dickens shows this as he wrote “Nobody ever stopped him in the street to say, ‘how are you? When will you come to see me?’ No beggars implored him to bestow a trifle, no man or women ever once in all his life inquired the way to such and such a place, of scrooge.”

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 9, 2014 04:50 PM

Erin Gaylord and Abrar Nooh
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
9 September 2014

Group 1 Question #1: Before anything happens at all, that is before Ebenezer Scrooge goes home for the night, how would you describe the “ordinary day” that seems to be taking place. From what we know, so far, in Stave One, what does a typical, commonplace day look like for Ebenezer Scrooge and Bob Cratchit?

Answer:
Scrooge was in the office where he works. It is wintertime and the office is very cold. The temperature in his office seems to be a reflection of Scrooge’s cold-hearted personality. His nephew came in and invited him to dinner the following day. His nephew’s giddiness about Christmas annoyed Scrooge. He did not want anything to do with Christmas, and he hated being told merry Christmas (Dickens 3-4). When his nephew finally left, two men walked in. They wanted Scrooge to donate money to the poor for Christmas. Scrooge wanted nothing to do with it and did not show any courtesy to the lives of the poor and needy. When he was asked how much he wanted to donate, he replied, “Nothing!” One of the men replied, “You wish to be anonymous?” Scrooge replied in a very rude manner, that he wanted them to leave (Dickens 6).

Bob Cratchit is the father of a very poor family. His youngest son has a lot of medical problems, but his family happy despite their lack problems. Scrooge underpays him, but even though his family does not have enough food to feed them all, none of them complain. Scrooge is a stingy man with a lot of money, but he is not happy in life.

Bob Cratchit’s typical day, is working as a clerk for Scrooge. He is not treated very humanely, but he does his job without complaining nonetheless.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 9, 2014 04:52 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
9 September, 2014

Question #99:
Stave Five: How did Scrooge act when he went outside?

Answer:
Scrooge was very enthusiastic about Christmas, and loved seeing the smiles on everyone’s faces. He was very giddy and wanted to help as many people as he could. He met one of the men who asked him to donate money to the poor on the road. His change in mood surprised the man greatly. After Scrooge whispered in the man’s ear he said, “Lord bless me! My dear Mr. Scrooge, are you serious” (Dickens 66).

Scrooge also sent the Cratchit family a very large turkey. He then caught up with Bob Cratchit before he went home from work, and told him he was giving him a courteous raise.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 9, 2014 05:10 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
9 September 2014

Question #84:
What did Scrooge think about when he saw the dead man? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
When Scrooge saw the dead man, he pictured himself as the man, which scared him greatly. ““Spirit!” said Scrooge, shuddering from head to foot. ”I see, I see. The case of this unhappy man might be my own. My life tends that way, now. Merciful Heaven, what is this!”” (Dickens 56).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 9, 2014 05:52 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 September 2014

Question #89: Stave Four- The Last of the Spirits:
What question did Scrooge ask the Ghost as they stood among the graves?

Answer:
As they stood among the graves, Scrooge asked the Ghost if he is seeing the image of things that will happen or may happen and when he realizes that it is his name on the grave he asks why the Ghost would show him this if there was no hope for him. "Are these the shadows of the things that will be, or are they shadows of things that may be, only?" (Dickens 338). "Hear me! I am not the man I was. I will not be the man I must have been but for this intercourse. Why show me this, if I am past all hope?"(Dickens 338).

*These quotes were found using the Barnes and Noble Leather Bound Classics edition of The Complete Works of Charles Dickens.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 9, 2014 06:55 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
9 September 2014

Question #93: What are the words the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come says to Scrooge which make Scrooge so afraid?

Answer: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come doesn’t speak to Scrooge at all, rather, he communicates with him by pointing to what he wants Scrooge to see. ‘The finger pointed from the grave to him, and back again.’ (Dickens, 62) Scrooge’s realization that the gravestone is his own leads him to beg the Ghost in “agony”: “…he caught the spectral hand.” Scrooge was also “holding up his hands in one last prayer to have his fate reversed” (Dickens, 62). Dickens makes the audience aware that Scrooge is desperate for a second chance at life; Scrooge is terrified that he will have the same fate as Marley.

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. "Save IV - The Last of the Spirits." A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications, 1991. 62. Print

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 9, 2014 07:03 PM

Ashley Gross, Gabriela Caminero, Joshua Natonio
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
9 September 2014

Question:
Stave One-Marley's Ghost: In your group, come up with a working definition for the concept of a "hero". Nevermind what Christopher Vogler has to say about it(for now); how do you define a hero or, someone who is heroic? Based on what you know so far in Stave one, between the two, who is the most "heroic", in the traditional sense of the word: Ebenezer Scrooge or Bob Cratchit? Why?

Answer:
As a group, we thought that the defining characteristics of a hero were selflessness, someone who is good natured, a person who has something to lose, and someone who possess a character flaw.

We determined that of the two, Bob Cratchit was the most heroic. He was brave enough to ask for Christmas off when he knew that his boss hated the holiday. The risk of asking for the day off could have easily resulted in Bob's termination from work and ultimately the loss of his wages, which would have burdened his already struggling family. Even when the request was protested by Scrooge, Bob asserted that it was only once every year that he requested to spend the whole day with his family. "The clerk observed that it was only once a year" (Dickens 298). " A poor excuse for picking a man's pocket every twenty-fifth of December! But I suppose if you must have the whole day. Be here all the earlier next morning" (Dickens 298).

*These quotes were found using the Barnes and Noble Leather Bound Classics edition of The Complete Works of Charles Dickens.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 9, 2014 07:33 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220Cl- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation In Narrative CA01
10 September 2014

Question #101: Whom did Scrooge visit? What was the reaction? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: When Scrooge wakes up on Christmas Day, there is a new found joy and appreciation in him. Among other things, he goes to visit his nephew Fred, who has been inviting him to his Christmas dinner for years but he has never gone. Scrooge tells Fred when he arrives, ”I have come to dinner, will you let me in, Fred?” (Dickens 164) The family embraces Scrooge and accepts him into their normal celebration, rather than overreacting and making him feel uncomfortable. “He was at home in five minutes……Wonderful party, wonderful games, wonderful unanimity, wonderful happiness!” (Dickens 163-164)

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 9, 2014 08:00 PM

Zachary Sabo, Kendra Hinton, Kyle VanBuren
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220Cl- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation In Narrative CA01
10 September 2014

Group Work Question #4: Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: In this stave, besides just being a creepy old dude with chains, what role does Jacob Marley really play in the story? For example, is it possible that, like a messenger or harbinger of old, is Marley challenging Ebenezer Scrooge to something? Is he, in some way, laying out an invitation for Scrooge?

Answer: When Jacob Marley visits Scrooge, he is playing the role of a messenger, in the sense that he is warning Scrooge about the choices he is making. He informs Scrooge of the three ghosts that will visit him in the following hours, but also that if Scrooge continues of his path, that he will end up like Marley. He tells him that, “If a spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death.” (Dickens 30) He is challenging Scrooge to reevaluate his life choices so that his spirit does not end up like Marley’s, because in life, Marley was just as cold hearted as Scrooge is.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo, Kendra Hinton, Kyle VanBuren at September 9, 2014 08:18 PM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL CA02
9 September 2014

Question #86:
Stave Four: The Last of the Spirits: What did Scrooge ask the Ghost to show him next? What did the Ghost show him? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
After he realizes the horrors that the future Christmas holds for him, Scrooge asks the spirit to show him "If there is any person in the town, who feels emotion caused by [Scrooge's] death," (Dickens 57) and in response to this query the spirit takes them to a house where a woman is "expecting someone with...anxious eagerness" (Dickens 57). The woman's husband arrives and Scrooge is shown that the only emotion that is felt by the people of the town in relation to his passing is joy (Dickens 58).

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 9, 2014 08:22 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
10 September 2014
Question #91
What is the emotion Caroline and her family (Not the Crachits) feel when they learn Scrooge is dead? Whey do Caroline and her family feel this way?
Text Source: Dover, Thrift Editions
Answer:
In Stave Four of, “A Christmas Carol,” when Caroline and her family learn that Scrooge is dead, they all have a sense of relief. The book describes Caroline’s reaction pretty straight forward as follows, “She was a mild and patient creature if her face spoke truth; but she was thankful in her soul to hear it, and she said so, with clasped hands” (Dickens 58). The reason why they were relieved that Scrooge was dead was because Caroline and her family owed Scrooge money. They still planned on paying back their debt, but the fact that Scrooge was their debt collector sickened them (Dickens 58).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 9, 2014 08:56 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
9 September 2014

QUESTION #100:
What did Scrooge do when he met the man who had asked for a donation the day before?

ANSWER:
Scrooge met a portly gentleman the day before asking for a donation; they had the opportunity to meet again. When the gentleman asked for the generous donation, Scrooge whispered an amount in the man’s ear and asked the man to come and see him. “That is my name, and I fear it may not be pleasant to you. Allow me to ask your pardon. And will you have the goodness”- here Scrooge whispered in his ear.” (Dickens 66). “Don’t say anything, please,” retorted Scrooge. “Come and see me. Will you come and see me?” (Dickens 66)

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 9, 2014 08:58 PM

Olivia N Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 September 2014

Question #83:
What was Scrooge’s reaction to the scene? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Scrooge’s reaction to the scene was surprised, horrified, and terrified. After observing the first scene of the two men that were discussing a man that died the night prior, Scrooge was surprised that the Ghost of Christmas Future showed him this conversation these two men. Scrooge was getting the assumption that they were talking about him, but he was keeping that thought in the back of his mind just in case. He was a little surprised overall about this scene because he was already having the idea of a better look on life (Dickens 117-118). Although, there was this next scene where a group of people was talking about how some man should be buried. There was a woman that was being a little bit more modest than the two other friends were. She had the other man, Joe; that was with them help unload the items she brought. Mrs. Dilber was laughing numerous times about what she brought to, in a sense, say good riddance (122). She brought sheets, towels, and the corpse’s bed curtains. When Joe recognized that, they were bed curtains they all laughed obnoxiously and added them to the bundle for the corpse. After the group had added their items, Scrooge felt extremely offended because “they had been obscene demons, marketing the corpse itself (125). The group was leaving, and Joe was carrying a bag of money with him. He was announcing the irony of how when this man that died was alive that he would make everyone’s lives horrible by taking their money but now that he’s dead that his profits them (125). Scrooge was comparing how this guy that died is him and was telling the Ghost of Christmas Future, and it’s a realization treatment for him; but, then the scene changes to and Scrooge in a really dark room terrified. There was a bed with no curtains but bare with something covered on it. Scrooge snuck closer to it with fear, and there was a stone with a name the Ghost of Christmas Future was pointing at it. It had “EBENEZER SCROOGE (138-139)” and the Ghost of Christmas Future was pointing back and forth from the stone to grave to Scrooge. Scrooge did not want this to happen to him and was repeatedly screaming that he will change and that he means it.

Work Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol: A Ghost Story Of Christmas. [Waiheke Island]: The Floating Press, 2009. eBook Academic Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 9 Sept. 2014.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 9, 2014 09:07 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
9 September 2014

Question #85:

Stave Four: The Last of the Spirits: Scrooge asked the spirit to show him someone who felt emotion at the man’s death. Describe the person the Spirit showed him. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

“If there is any person in the town, who feels emotion caused by this man’s death,” said Scrooge quite agonized, “show that person to me, Spirit, I beseech you!” (Dickens 91)
The Spirit showed Scrooge a mother and her children who shared regretful relief in hearing about the man’s death. Scrooge did not expect the emotion portrayed, because it was only one of pleasure because of the man’s death. The family that the Spirit showed Scrooge seemed to owe some sort of debt to the man. They felt relief that their debt was set aside at least for another night now that the man was gone.
“Let me see some tenderness connected with a death,” said Scrooge. (92) The Spirit could not show Scrooge the emotion that he was looking for to associate with the man’s death.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 9, 2014 09:15 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
9 September 2014

Question #105:
Stave Five: The End of It: What actions does Scrooge take to make amends for the past? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
There is a few things that Scrooge does to make amends right for his past. He mostly makes up to Bob for treating him as badly as he did. He called out to a boy and asked him to buy the prized turkey at the Pulters’s, to give to Bob Cratchit. There is evidence of this when he says, “ “I am in earnest, Go and buy it, and tell ‘em to bring it here, that I may give them the direction where to take it. Come back with the man, and I’ll give you a shilling. Come back with him in less than five minutes, and I’ll give you a half a crown. “The boy was off like a shot. He must have had a steady hand at a trigger who could have got a shot off half so fast. “ I’ll send it to Bob Cratchit’s!”” (Dickens 64).
He also adds to his generosity by telling Bob that he will raise his salary and assist him with the struggles he is going through with his family. In the book he says, “A merrier Christmas, Bob, My good fellow, than I have given you , for many a year! I’ll raise your salary , and endeavor to assist your struggling family, and we will discuss your affairs this very afternoon,” (Dickens 68).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 9, 2014 09:21 PM

Caitlin Christian, Ashlee English, Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
8 September 2014

Question Group 5:
Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: In the stave, besides just being a creepy old dude with chains, what role does Jacob Marley really play in the story? For example, with his “warning,” is he trying to prevent Scrooge from going on the journey he is about to embark upon? Or, with his “warning,” is he trying to “encourage” (you may define “encourage” in a way that seems appropriate) Scrooge to embark upon the journey? In other words, is he an enabler (helper) or a hinderer for Scrooge, at this point in the story? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
“I am here to-night to warn you, that you have a chance and hope of escaping my fate.” (Dickens 15)
Jacob Marley plays the role of the enabler who warns Scrooge. Marley comes forward to show that Scrooge needs an intervention in order to change his fate. Marley shares that he wants Scrooge to go on this journey so that he does not end up the same as him. Marley is a point of information and guidance to Scrooge. Marley knows more than Scrooge, sharing that he knows his suffering will be greater because of the length of his chain. Marley is also a point of encouragement to take the journey seriously and listen to every Spirit and story shown to him. Marley knows from experience and wants to make sure Scrooge does not make the same mistakes he did on his journey.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian, Ashlee English, Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 9, 2014 09:24 PM

Bryce A Veller
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
September 9, 2014

QUESTION #92
What event transpired in the Catchit house?

ANSWER
The scene starts with the Catchit family extremely quiet going about them, as a literary tool of foreshadowing about what is to come. Robert (Bob) came home to the whole family and sat down in front of them all and said “ I promised I would walk there on a Sunday. My little child, little child, cried Bob. “My little child.” He broke down in tear immediately in front of the family (Dickens 60). He composed himself and kissed Tiny Tim’s cheek as he laid a pond the bed, lifeless. For Tiny Tim had passed away.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 9, 2014 10:07 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journey in Narrative CA02
9 September 2014

Question #108 Stave Five: The End of It:
What lesson has Scrooge learned?

Answer:
Scrooge has ultimately learned how to be a better and happier person. He learned his lesson that he should respect Bob Cratchit as a man and as a father especially since now Scrooge knows all about Tiny Tim. Scrooge tells Mr. Cratchit that he will raise his salary. While at the Cratchit's family house Scrooge told Bob to have "a merrier Christmas, Bob, my good fellow, than I have given you, for many a year! I'll raise your salary, and endeavour to assist your struggling family, and we will discuss your affairs this very afternoon.." (Charles Dickens 67-68).

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 9, 2014 10:20 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
9 September 2014

Question 94:
The Last of the Spirits: What might be some possible reasons that Dickens chose to have the Spirit of the Future share some feature with the Grim Reaper? What about this bleak future gives Scrooge hope?

Answer:
I believe one reason Dickens may have chosen to have the Spirit of the future resemble the Grim Reaper to for shadow the fact that the dead man everyone was talking about was Scrooge. I also think another reason could be because the future for Scrooge was extremely Grimm. Scrooge finds hope in his thoughts that “if the courses be departed from, the ends will change” (Dickens 83). He feels that by changing his ways he can have a brighter future.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 9, 2014 10:37 PM

Britney Polycarpe
DR. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
9 September 2014

Question #79
Where did Scoorge and the spirit go first?
Scoorge and the spirit first went to the first went to the city. According to the story “ They scarcely seemed to enter the city; for the city rather seemed to spring up about them, and encompass them of its own act. But there they were, in the heart of it.” (Dickens 70)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 9, 2014 10:44 PM

Britney Polycarpe
DR. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
9 September 2014

Question #79
Where did Scoorge and the spirit go first?
Scoorge and the spirit first went to the first went to the city. According to the story “ They scarcely seemed to enter the city; for the city rather seemed to spring up about them, and encompass them of its own act. But there they were, in the heart of it.” (Dickens 70)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 9, 2014 10:44 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
9 September 2014.

QUESTION # 102:

Stave Five: The End of It: What happened at the office the next morning? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

ANSWER:

The day following the holiday, Scrooge, went to the office early to get there before Bob Cratchit, “If he could only be there first… Bob Cratchit coming late!” (Dickens 67), as his intentions were to ‘chastise’ Crachit for being late. However, to Cratchit’s surprise, unaware of Scrooge’s intervention he was flabbergasted by Scrooge’s statement, “and therefore I am about to raise your salary!”(Dickens 67). Moreover, Scrooge also promised more than Cratchit could ever desire, “and endeavour to assist your struggling family, … Bob! Make up the fires and buy another coal-scuttle before you dot another i, Bob Cratchit!” (Dickens 67), which was unlike the Ebenezer Scrooge he knew.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 9, 2014 10:54 PM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 September 2014

Question #96:
Stave Five: The End of It: Describe Scrooge’s behavior when he woke up. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
When Scrooge awakes from his encounter with the Ghost of Christmas Future, he acts in an entirely different manner. He is excited and spastic in a way. He is relieved that he has woken up without missing a day and can prove to the spirits that he is willing to make a change in his daily life and ultimately change his fate. He is very friendly and charitable; he calls out to people on the street, gives money to a little boy and buys a turkey for the Bob Cratchit’s family. Scrooge continues his hospitality by giving Bob a raise and visiting his nephew for Christmas. He was a new outlook on life and said “I will live in the past, the present and the future! ... The spirits of all three shall strive within me..." (Dickens 105). Scrooge wakes up a changed man; he is no longer stingy and has a bigger concern for the people around him and his future morality.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 9, 2014 10:55 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA02 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
9 September 2014


Question #110:

Stave Five: The End of It: Why was Scrooge so surprised to find his bed curtains still on his bed? Why did Scrooge think his bed curtains had been torn down? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:

When we open to Stave Five Scrooge awakes and is overjoyed to find the bed curtains still up. "They are not torn down," cried Scrooge, folding one of his bed-curtains in his arms, "they are not torn down, rings and all. They are here: I am here: the shadows of the things that would have been, may be dispelled. They will be. I know they will!" (Dickens 153) This message can be a whole lot of nonsense when taken out of context but when we look back at Stave Four when the Ghost of Christmases to come visits Scrooge we see the symbolism of the curtains. One of the more powerful scenes in Stave Four is when Scrooge is brought to an ominous room of an upper-class individual who had his deathbed plundered by the ones he managed poorly. “He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed: a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up, which, though it was dumb, announced itself in awful language. ” (Dickens 136) The bed curtains missing is a symbol of Scrooges death with nobody to care for him; this is referenced by his former employees pawning off the curtains in greed. “"You don't mean to say you took 'em down, rings and all, with him lying there?" said Joe. "Yes I do," replied the woman. "Why not?" (Dickens 134) We eventually come to a close in Stave Four with Scrooge’s realization that it is indeed himself that has had a disrespected, disturbed and ignored death. "Am I that man who lay upon the bed?" he cried, upon his knees. The finger pointed from the grave to him, and back again. "No, Spirit! Oh no, no!” (Dickens 150)


Work Cited:

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.
Wood, Michael. "Hero's Journey Archetypes Explained." 15 November 2011. Web 10 October 2013

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 9, 2014 11:22 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
9 September 2014

Question #103:
How did Scrooge spend the rest of his life? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
“The bed was his own, the room was his own. Best and happiest of all, the Time before him was his own, to make amends in!” Scrooge changes his life around for good intentions. However, Scrooge escapes from hell by going to social events and experiencing the moral change that was oblige him to look fondly on holiday gathering. Scrooge a change man and his story of his redemption end with happiness, expectation, and encouragement. He became “a good friend, a good master, and a “good man” in this world. Scrooge lives upon his Total Abstinence Principle. “God bless us, Every one,” which mean that Scrooge understand how his story unfolds, but understand the meaning of Christmas and being passionate. (Dickens, 63-68)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 9, 2014 11:50 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
8 Sep 2014

Question 78. Stave Four: The Last of the Spirits: What did the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come look like? Use quoted passages from the next to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come looks like a menacing figure wearing a black robe, which concealed his head, its form and left nothing visible save one outstretched hand.
“ The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently, approached. When it came near him, Scrooge bent down up his knee; for in the very air through which this spirit moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery”(Dickens 50).
“ It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its fork and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand” (Dickens 50)

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 10, 2014 05:16 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative ENG 220 CA01
10 September 2014

Question: The End of It:What did Scrooge ask the boy under his window to do, and why? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge asked the boy to go and buy the prize turkey hanging in the nearby butcher shop. Scrooge was planning to give it to Bob Cratchit’s family, and to not reveal that he was the one that did.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at September 10, 2014 07:17 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220 cl journeys in narrative CA01
8, September 2014

Question 62#; the second of the three spirits: Describe the scene when scrooge found second spirit

Answer: the scene where scrooge feels that he will be encountering another ghost he is in a mood in which he feels he’s ready for the ghost not letting him be taken by surprise or made nervous. (Par75 Dickinson) You could tell that the ghost were starting to get to scrooge cause of his actions to be prepared for him rather then be caught off guard. he had been laying in his bed when he became unbelievably cold so he got up and opened all of the blinds himself so he could establish a sharp look out all around the bed. (Par75 Dickinson) The bell struck one but the ghost had not appeared yet he began to wonder. this had was on the knocker when a voice told him to enter and he obeyed. In moments his whole room turned to a beautiful garden filled with all of the most delicious fruits and leaves. There sat before him a very large man this man was the ghost of Christmas present.

Posted by: aaron virelli at September 10, 2014 07:34 AM

Summer Taylor, Blake Broman, Tyler Sommers
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
10 September 2014

QUESTION #3:
In this stave where would you draw the line between what seemed like an "ordinary day" and ordinary world for Ebenezer Scrooge, and the weird, very unordinary world in which stranger, unusual things begin to happen? Where at what point does the old, everyday world of existence "end," so to speak, for Scrooge?

ANSWER:
Group three believes that the ordinary world for Scrooge started to end at when he was going home from work in the first stave and his door knockers turned into his old business partner's face. This particular point is where Scrooge's plain ordinary work day turns into something much, much more. "And then let any man explain it to me, if he can, how it happened that Scrooge, having his key in the lock of the door, saw in the knocker, without its undergoing any intermediate process of change-not a knocker, but Marley's face" (Dickens 17). At this first sign of the supernatural, the reader may think that Scrooge may just be seeing a hallucination, but the passage goes on to explain otherwise. "Marley's face. It was not in impenetrable shadow, as the other objects in the yard were, but had a dismal light about I, like a bad lobster in a dark cellar" (Dickens 17). After Scrooge crosses through his door to his house everything begins to get stranger and stranger. This door is important because it represents the crossing of the threshold in the heroes journey. The crossing of the threshold is where a character crosses over from his or her ordinary world into the world of adventure. In this case the crossing of the threshold is an actual physical door.

Posted by: Summer Taylor, Blake Broman, Tyler Sommers at September 10, 2014 08:47 AM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01

Question # 50
Why does Belle end her relationship with Scrooge?

Answer

Belle ends her relationship with Scrooge because she feels that he is not the same person he used to be and that he loves his money more than he loves her. “Our contract is an old one. It was made when we were both poor and content to be so, until, in good season, we could improve our worldly fortune by our patient industry. You are changed. When it was made, you were another man.”(pg 27)
I am using the Dover Thrift Edition of “A Christmas Carol”, edited by Stanley Appelbaum.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 10, 2014 08:51 AM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01

Question # 50
Why does Belle end her relationship with Scrooge?

Answer

Belle ends her relationship with Scrooge because she feels that he is not the same person he used to be and that he loves his money more than he loves her. “Our contract is an old one. It was made when we were both poor and content to be so, until, in good season, we could improve our worldly fortune by our patient industry. You are changed. When it was made, you were another man.”(pg 27)
I am using the Dover Thrift Edition of “A Christmas Carol”, edited by Stanley Appelbaum.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 10, 2014 08:51 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative
10 September 2014

Question: How did Scrooge feel about the Ghost of Christmas yet to come??

Answer: when the ghost appears you can tell that scrooge his more open and is okay with the ghost showing up for the better good yet, there was something about this ghost that had him particularly rattled. In paragraph 122 he states, “ He feared the silent shape so much his legs trembled beneath him…and couldn’t stand once going to follow him.” This is where I feel scrooge show how this ghost unlike the others is getting to him. Later in the stave scrooge releases a feeling of if the ghost is watching him although you cant see the ghost eyes behind that big heap of black. This feeling of the unknown builds up a shudder and a feel very cold. (Dickinson 128par). Furthermore, at the end of that stave Scrooge has a sense of true repentance he even swore to change. this shows the fear set in his mind by the ghost of christmas yet to come.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at September 10, 2014 08:56 AM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
10 September 2014

Question # 109
What type of person is Scrooge at the end of the story?

Answer

At the end of the story, Scrooge was a joyful character who no longer put his money first. He also became a nice and cheerful man. The holidays were no longer filled with “Bah humbug”, but rather filled with “A merry Christmas to everybody! A happy New Year to all the world! Hallo here! Whoop! Hallo!” (pg 63) Scrooge came to realize that all of his money is meaningless without people to share it with and to love. “I’ll raise your salary, and endeavor to assist your struggling family, and we will discuss your affairs this very afternoon, over a Christmas bow of smoking bishop.” (pg 68)

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 10, 2014 08:58 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
EN-220Cl-CA02 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
10 September 14

Question #81:
What was Scrooge’s attitude about being with the third spirit? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of the answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
From the Penguin Group 2008 issue of A Christmas Carol. Scrooge’s attitude was terrified and frightened of the third spirit. “Although well used to ghostly company by this time, Scrooge feared the silent shape so much that his trembled beneath him, and he found that he could hardly stand when he prepared to follow it.” (Dickens 93) And again later Dickens wrote, “”Ghost of the future!” he exclaimed, “I fear you more than any Spectre I have seen.”” (Dickens 93)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 10, 2014 09:08 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
10 September 2014

QUESTION #95:
What suggests to Scrooge that the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come feels sorry for Scrooge? Use quoted passages from the text to support part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
On the last page of stave four there begins to be several slight clues about the true nature of the Ghost of Christmas to Come. Throughout this last ghost's visit Scrooge through this ghost to be cold and uncaring, but as it turns out the ghost actually feels sorry for Scrooge. "For the first time the hand appeared to shake. 'Good Spirit," he pursued, as down upon the ground he fell before it: 'Your nature intercedes for me, and pities me. Assure me that I yet may change these shadows you have shown me by an altered life?' The kind hand trembled" (Dickens 81).

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 10, 2014 09:22 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys of Transformation In Narrative
9 September 2014

Question #111:
Why is Scrooge so interested in/in love with the doorknocker? Use quoted passages from text to support the part of your answer that appear in your own words.

Answer:
Scrooge came back from with the spirits his attitude towards Christmas time changed,he was jolly, he looked at the brighter side of Christmas and he felt happy he says "I'm as light as a feather, I am happy as an angel" (Dickens 63).

When the doorknocker knocks on the door he instantly ask what day is was and when the door knocker replied Christmas Scrooge was ecstatic. Scrooge then ask about the turkey and was it still hanging. Scrooge then tells the boy to go buy it and that if he came back with the turkey and the man who delivers it in 5 minutes Scrooges says "I'll give you a shilling. Come back with him in less than five minutes and I'll give you half-a-crown" (Dickens 64).


Posted by: Tashanna Harris at September 10, 2014 10:11 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL – On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative (CA02)
10 Sept 2014

QUESTION #107:
Describe Scrooge’s interaction with Bob Cratchit at his office. What is Bob’s response? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
In Stave Five of a Christmas Carol, Scrooge is eager to catch Bob Cratchit walking into the office late as Bob later does. With the eagerness of a child on Christmas day Scrooge waits, “The clock struck nine. No Bob” (Dickens 90). He continues to wait until a “full eighteen minutes and half behind his time” (Dickens 90), does Bob show up for work.

Scrooge calls Bob into his office proclaiming he will “not stand this sort of thing any longer” (Dickens 90). Bob is quite frightened that Scrooge is going to fire him because Scrooge’s voice is that of his regular grouchy tone. However, Scrooge is playing a joke on old poor Bob and instead is “about to raise his salary. At this point, Bob is taken aback and contemplates the “idea of knocking Scrooge down…and calling to the people in the court for help and a straight-waistcoat” (Dickens 90).

Then Scrooge wishes Bob a “Merry Christmas” (Dickens 90) and promises to “assist his struggling family) (Dickens 90), along with a raise. They then share a bowl of “smoking bishop” (Dickens 90). Bob is delighted by his new raise and friendly boss. Furthermore, Scrooge followed through on his word and became a “second father” (Dickens 90), to Tiny Tim, Bob’s ill son.

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. Web. .

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 10, 2014 10:38 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
8 September 2013

Question #80:
Stave Four: The Last of the Spirits: What were the business men talking about? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in appears in your own words.

Answer:

“I thought he’d never die.” (Page 51, Line 35)

The business men were discussing the death of a rich man. However, what makes this conversation particularly uncomfortable is that the business men showed no sympathy or care for the dead man. They were actually relieved that he was gone. They all agreed that he was a greedy, grumpy, and cold-hearted man.

Work Cited
Dickens, C. (1991). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 10, 2014 11:02 AM

Group 6:

Anet Milian
Leroy
Sharrad

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
3 September 2013

Question:
Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: In this Stave, besides just being a creepy old dude with chains, what role does Jacob Marley really play in the story? For example, with his “warning” is he trying to actually teach something to Ebenezer Scrooge? If so, what “lesson” could Marley possibly have for Scrooge? In other words, what Scrooge learn from Marley? Does Scrooge heed this lesson or is he, like some college students, what contemporary pedagogy labels “a resistance learner”? Is Scrooge resistant to the lesson, whatever it is? Explain your response. Use quotes passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Jacob Marley plays a huge role in the story. He appears to scrooge as a ghost to warn him of his fate and of the three spirits that were going to come visit him. As his friend and old partner, he doesn’t want Scrooge to suffer like him. Scrooge doesn’t truly realize of the seriousness of the situation until he is actually visited by the three ghost. At first, he is resistant and ignorant. For example when Marley first appeared to him, he said that little things affect your senses, a slight disorder of the stomach makes them cheat. (Page 12, Line 13) Another example of his resistance to learning is found on page 28, line 34. When the ghost is showing him the scene in which his finance is breaking off the engagement; He continually asks the ghost to leave him alone and to show him no more. Although his reaction is a bit understandable, it is evident that he is regretful of his past, he showed a little bit of ignorance and selfishness. He would rather avoid watching the scene, then to fully grasp the reasoning as to why he’s being shown his past. However, as the story progresses, he changes. He becomes more open to understanding why it is important for him to go through these stages. For example, Scrooge says, “But as, I know your promise is to do me good, and as I hope to live to another man from what I was, I am prepared to bear your company, and do it with a thankful heart. (Page 51, Line 10) At this point in the story, it is obvious that he understands and wants to bear what the ghost has to show him in order to better his life.

Work Cited
Dickens, C. (1991). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 10, 2014 11:28 AM

Abrar Nooh
Dr. B Lee Hobbes
ENG 220CL
9/10/2014

Q#56
Describe the first scene Scrooge and the spirit visited. How did Scrooge feel about what he saw ?

Answer:
Scrooge went to his old school, and "Wept to see his poor forgotten self as used to be".
Scrooge and the spirit went to his old school, and they crossed a hall and found an open door before they went inside and saw an empty room where young Scrooge is reading. Then he remember his old self and. starts crying, because he is not happy about his childhood. Because he was always lonely and did not have friends.

Posted by: Abrar Nooh at September 10, 2014 03:30 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
10 September 2014

Question #134:
What physical change took place in the spirit of Christmas Present from his when he first appears in the story to when he leaves? Explain fully.

Answer:
The spirit of Christmas Present lives as long as that year’s Christmas day; this becomes apparent as he ages during the progression of his visit with Scrooge. Described in vivid detail of his grandeur, the spirit of Christmas Present appears full of life at the beginning of his journey with Scrooge with “dark brown curls (that) were long and free: free as its genial face, its sparkling eye, its open hand, its cheery voice, its unconstrained demeanor, and its joyful air” (Dickens 33). However, by the end of the journey, when Christmas ends, he begins to fade away and die. “‘My life upon this globe, is very brief,’ replied the Ghost. ‘It ends to-night’” the ghost explains this to Scrooge after Scrooge notices, “its hair was gray” (Dickens 48-49). Though the description of ghost does not focus upon details of the appearance, the implication of his life ending at the end of the night signifies that the ghost aged throughout the night until his death.

Work Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 10, 2014 04:41 PM

Peter Bellini & Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA02 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
10 September 2014

“Hero Archetype” Question #6:


In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic” function of demonstrating “growth” in the Hero archetype. (b.) what does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:


When we take a look at Ebenezer Scrooge throughout the story, we see a completely changed and dynamic character. From the beginning, we see a gradual change from responding to “Merry Christmas” with a “Good Afternoon” to giddily crying out on Christmas morning. "I am as light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am as merry as a school-boy. I am as giddy as a drunken man. A merry Christmas to everybody! A happy New Year to all the world. Hallo here! Whoop! Hallo!" (Dickens 153). Scrooge changes from paying fifteen pence to his worker, Bob to being his crippled child’s second father. The ghosts facilitate this change in our hero by displaying very personal and shocking images. “He recoiled in terror, for the scene had changed, and now he almost touched a bed: a bare, uncurtained bed: on which, beneath a ragged sheet, there lay a something covered up, which, though it was dumb, announced itself in awful language.” (Dickens 136) We see Dramatic Function alive and well in this example as we see a window into Scrooge’s life to come. This stark image and the reality of what is to be drives the changes necessary which eventually resulted in Scrooge gaining love, friendship and Happy Holidays to come.

Work Cited:


Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.
Wood, Michael. "Hero's Journey Archetypes Explained." 15 November 2011. Web 10 October 2013
http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Christmas_Carol_(Dickens,_1843)

Posted by: Peter Bellini Nuri Salahuddin at September 10, 2014 10:32 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION#129
What specific events lead to Scrooge’s eventual reformation? In particular, at what point in the story do we first begin to see him change (that is, when does he first begin to show emotions other than anger)?

ANSWER:
In stave two when the Ghost of Christmas Past took Scrooge to his hometown showing him how he used to be is when Scrooge started to change. Scrooge was so happy that the Spirit took him to his hometown; he was smiling, clapping his hands, and filled with excitement until he realized how he used to be and started crying. “Scrooge sat down upon a form, and wept to see his poor forgotten self as he used to be (Dickens 32).”

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 11, 2014 09:19 AM

Zack Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
12 September 2014

Question #136: At the beginning of stave five, Scrooge is happy that the “time” before him is his own. Why would time be so important to Scrooge? Explain.

Answer: When stave five begins, the author uses the phrase “his own” multiple times, and it describes his bed, his room, and his bedpost as back to being his own. To maintain the same repetitive theme, the author tells the reader that, “Best and happiest of all, the time before him was his own, to make amends in!” (Dickens 152) The author uses this phrase over and over again to show that Scrooge has returned from journey with the ghosts back into his normal habitat. He is very excited to return home to see all of his own items again, and best of all, now that he has his time back again, he is able to move forward with his life and make better decisions that are going to make him happier in the future.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 11, 2014 03:49 PM

Bronwen Burke and Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 September 2014

Question #1:
In your own words, explain Vogler’s claim that archetypes, such as the hero archetype, are best understood as “functions,” rather than “roles.” You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, he meanings of both “role” and “function” to fully understand the difference. (b.) What does the have to do with the hero archetype used, particularly the hero archetype, in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:

Vogler describes a “role” as an archetype that remains the same throughout a narrative. (Vogler, 24) For example, Marley plays the role as Herald in the novel - “I am here tonight to warn you, that you have yet a chance and hope of escaping my fate.” (Dickens, 15) Marley’s archetype is considered a role instead of a function because his purpose remains the same.
Vogler claims that a “function” is a temporary role played by characters to achieve certain effects in a story. (Vogler, 24) Scrooge relates to this in the sense that he functions as a villain at the beginning of the story, and then transforms into the hero once the Spirits enlighten him. Scrooge’s dramatic transformation of functions allows Dicken’s to entertain the reader.

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications, 1991. 15. Print.
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. Studio City, CA: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. 24. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 11, 2014 04:17 PM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
9 September 2014

Question #119: What did the Ghost of Christmas Present tell Scrooge about whether Tiny Tim would live or die? Why is this significant to the story? Explain.

Answer:
“I see a vacant seat.. In the poor chimney corner, and a crutch without an owner, carefully preserved. If these shadows remain unaltered by the future, the child will die.” (Page 40, Line 19)

The Ghost of Christmas Present told Scrooge that Tiny Tim would die, if he did not adjust his ways. This scene is significant to the story because it demonstrates how Scrooge’s cold heart and selfishness affects others. The main purpose of the visitation of the three spirits, is to help Scrooge recognize that his negative attitude and carelessness towards others is undesirable, and how it affects them and how it will affect him in the future, if he continues to remain the same. This scene in particular is really noteworthy because Tiny Tim is young and innocent. It really shows Scrooge how his unkindness is detrimental.

Work Cited
Dickens, C. (1991). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 11, 2014 04:41 PM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 September 2014

QUESTION #144:
Some readers suggest that a major theme in this story is “the real meaning of Christmas.” Using both paraphrased and quoted passages from the test, show how this idea is, indeed, one that reoccurs repeatedly throughout the narrative.

ANSWER:
This story begins with a bitter old man, Scrooge, who does not believe that Christmas should be a joyous time of year. When talking with his nephew, Fred, Scrooge says “Merry Christmas! Out upon merry Christmas!” “every idiot who goes about with ‘Merry Christmas,’ on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart.” (Dickens, A Christmas Carol 3) Further, all the spirits that visited Scrooge were spirits of Christmas, the Ghost of Christmas past, Christmas present, and the Ghost of Christmas yet to come. At the end of the final Spirit’s visit, Scrooge says, “I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.” (Dickens 62)

Works Cited
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. Ed. Stanley Appelbaum. Dover Thrift Editions, 2013. Novella.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 11, 2014 06:20 PM

Bryce Veller
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220CL-Journey in Narratives
September/11/2014

QUESTION # 142
Some suggest that a major theme in the story is “Moral Responsibility”. Show how this idea reoccurs throughout the story.
ANSWER
Moral responsibility is a major theme throughout the story also with generosity and kindness. In Stave 1, the ghost of Marley sheds a little lesson on Scrooge that he should be caring for the people around him not pushing them away. Marley goes on to state that people should be of more importance then for his business and making money. Marley states “Mankind was my business, the welfare of others, that the dealings of trades were merely a drop of water in the ocean “(Dickens 14). In stave 2 the Ghost of Xmas Past showed Scrooge how he used to be before Marley died, that he used to be happy when he had positive energy and relationships around like his Sister and Fezziwig. Scrooges remember the domestic ballroom dances they used to throw (Dickens 26). From Stave 3, the Ghost of Xmas present shows Scrooge that people are happy despite being poor i.e. the Catchits. You see change in Scrooge when he asks the Ghost about if Tiny Tim will live or not (Dickens 41). Stave 4 the Ghost of Xmas Future shows Scrooge of the road he is traveling down. Scrooge asks the phantom “Is this going to happen or May it happen”. In the end Scrooge is a changed man for the better, with kindness and generosity flowing out of him, he begins to rebuild relationships with people and learns to give his resources to others.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 11, 2014 07:41 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
11 September, 2014

Question #132:
Why is it significant at the end of the story that Scrooge has learned that it’s important to be able to laugh at himself?

Answer:
In the beginning of the story, Scrooge is to himself and does not care about other people. In the end when he keeps laughing, it is important because he’s realizing how he used to act and how he’s changed. He realizes what he was missing. Its important that he is able to laugh at himself because it shows that he really has changed. His view on Christmas at the end of the story is the exact opposite of the way he feels at the beginning.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 11, 2014 08:12 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
10 September 2014

Question #122:
Now that you have read the entire story, what does it mean when someone is described as a “Scrooge”? Is Scrooge now an archetype, of some sort? If so, what archetype? Explain.

Answer:
Yes, Scrooge is an archetype of the “villain” that turn into a “hero.” Scrooge was a stingy, bitter old man who changes his life around as a generous humanitarian. However, I feel that Scrooge was villain that turn into “Hero.” We all know in the story of A Christmas Carol Scrooge was the villain who had reached a turning point in his life where he want to changes his ways in by treating people wrong. Scrooge became a “hero” by gaining self-growth. The three spirits taught Scrooge how to be a better person, and he learns and grows throughout the story. Scrooge being a “Hero” at the end of the story he overcomes obstacles and achieve improvements, but gain knowledge being a caring person.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 11, 2014 08:19 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
10 September 2014

Question #122:
Now that you have read the entire story, what does it mean when someone is described as a “Scrooge”? Is Scrooge now an archetype, of some sort? If so, what archetype? Explain.

Answer:
Yes, Scrooge is an archetype of the “villain” that turn into a “hero.” Scrooge was a stingy, bitter old man who changes his life around as a generous humanitarian. However, I feel that Scrooge was villain that turn into “Hero.” We all know in the story of A Christmas Carol Scrooge was the villain who had reached a turning point in his life where he want to changes his ways in by treating people wrong. Scrooge became a “hero” by gaining self-growth. The three spirits taught Scrooge how to be a better person, and he learns and grows throughout the story. Scrooge being a “Hero” at the end of the story he overcomes obstacles and achieve improvements, but gain knowledge being a caring person.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 11, 2014 08:19 PM

Kendra Hinton, Tashanna Harris
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
10 September 2014

Question #7:
In addition to “psychological functions,” any given archetype also performs a “dramatic function” of some variety. (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “action” in the Hero archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
A.) A dramatic function is to identify with the hero to see the same point of view as he or she the world through their story line. Example villain turns into a hero.
B.) Scrooge was a villain that reaches a turning point in his life and became a hero. Self-expression the beginning of the story Scrooge was a miserable old man and an ego build off wealth. Towards the ending of the story Scrooge, demonstrate growth and wisdom.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton, Tashanna Harris at September 11, 2014 08:21 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
11 September 2014

Question # 118
Why didn’t Scrooge marry the lady he knew from the past? What might have happened, if he did? What really happened because he didn’t?

Answer
Scrooge and Belle did not get married because she ended the relationship with him. She ended it with him because she felt as if he cared more for his money than he did for her. She also could feel that he was a changed man since coming into wealth. “Our contract is an old one. It was made when we were both poor and content to be so, until, in good season, we could improve our worldly fortune by our patient industry. You are changed. When it was made, you were another man.”(pg 27) If they were too possibly get married Scrooge might not have been so bitter and mean all his life. The happiness Belle could have brought him might have altered his feelings and could have changed how he acted towards the rest of the world. However, since Scrooge and Belle did not end up getting married. Belle married another man and had a family with him. Belle was happy with the life she had with her loving family.


The Dover Thrift Edition of “A Christmas Carol” editor Stanley Applebaum

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 11, 2014 08:44 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
11 September 2014

Question #123: What physical things began to happen to Scrooge when he became very frightened? How realistic/plausible is this? Why?

Answer: Scrooge is filled with “solemn dread,” his “legs trembled beneath him” and “he could hardly stand” as the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come approached him (Dickens, 51). Considering that the phantom was cloaked in black, did not speak, and barely moved, it is understandable that Scrooge was terrified! Scrooge’s emotions are very realistic, regardless that the novelette is a fictional one.

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications, 1991. 51. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 11, 2014 08:51 PM

Tyler Sommers and Aaron Virelli
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
11 September 2014

Question # 3
(a.) In your own words, explain Volger’s rational/dismissal of other well-known archetypes in literature, that are not included in his list of eight “most common and useful” ones. Also, what driving questions can be used to help identify the nature of any archetype in a narrative, including the hero archetype? Why might this be important for the reader?

Answer
Volger’s rational is based off of his main eight archetypes by saying that all other archetypes derive from the main eight. With that being said some of the other archetypes would not be important if they did not fall under one of the eight main categories. When it comes to the hero, hearing words of wisdom from another character, such as a mentor, it will help him learn how to carry himself as a leader. This is important for the reader because it gives clear direction for the reader to understand where the story’s direction is heading and who the protagonist and antagonist.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers and Aaron Virelli at September 11, 2014 09:06 PM

Tyler Sommers and Aaron Virelli
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
11 September 2014

Question # 3
(a.) In your own words, explain Volger’s rational/dismissal of other well-known archetypes in literature, that are not included in his list of eight “most common and useful” ones. Also, what driving questions can be used to help identify the nature of any archetype in a narrative, including the hero archetype? Why might this be important for the reader?

Answer
Volger’s rational is based off of his main eight archetypes by saying that all other archetypes derive from the main eight. With that being said some of the other archetypes would not be important if they did not fall under one of the eight main categories. When it comes to the hero, hearing words of wisdom from another character, such as a mentor, it will help him learn how to carry himself as a leader. This is important for the reader because it gives clear direction for the reader to understand where the story’s direction is heading and who the protagonist and antagonist.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers and Aaron Virelli at September 11, 2014 09:06 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
11 September 2014

Question # 128:
In what way does Tiny Tim serve as the thematic center of A Christmas Carol? In other words, how does Tiny Tim effectively connect all the major characters/symbols/themes in this novella?

Answer:
Tiny Tim's purpose is to ultimately pull at Scrooge's heart strings and make him realize that the life he is living is hurting everyone associated with him. Scrooge is not initially aware of Bob Cratchit's crippled son, however, when he finds out Tiny Tim will die if Scrooge continues to live the way that he does, he becomes very worried about a boy who represents the poverty stricken people/children that Scrooge constantly refused to donate to. The spirit even throws Scrooges own words in his face. "If he be like to die, he had better do it, and decrease the surplus population"(Dickens 322). Scrooge ends up becoming very close with Bob's family and even becomes like a second father to Tiny Tim.

*These quotes were found using the Barnes and Noble Leather Bound Classics edition of The Complete Works of Charles Dickens.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 11, 2014 09:14 PM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL
11 September 2014

Question #147:
Some readers suggest that a major theme in this story is "the right and wrong ways to use money." This seems to echo, at least, one of the SLU core values. Using both paraphrased and quoted passages from the text, show how this idea is, indeed, one that reoccurs repeatedly throughout the narrative.

Answer: Scrooge exemplifies the idea that there are both right and wrong ways to use money, as throughout the story he progressively changes from a tightfisted old miser to a philanthropist. A prime example of Scrooge's cheap nature early in the tale is when he asks the two men "Are there no prisons?" and "Are [the Union workhouses] still in operation?" (Dickens 5-6), because he would rather people be forced into those unpleasant environments than be given his money. This attitude is changed by the end of the tale when Scrooge gives a young boy money to buy a huge turkey for the Cratchits (Dickens 64). So, in the tale it is very clearly shown that the wrong way to use money is to be greedy and selfish, and the right way to be giving and helpful to those in need.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 11, 2014 09:32 PM


Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
11 September 2014

Question #121:
After he was returned to his home and to his own time, Scrooge did three good deeds. What were they and why are they important?

Answer:
After Scrooge returned to his home he did three good deeds. The first deed he did was buy Bob Cratchets family the prized turkey to eat for Christmas, there is evidence of this in the following quote, “I’ll send it to Bob Cratchet’s!” whispered Scrooge, rubbing his hands, and splitting with a laugh. “He sha’n’t know who sends it. It’s twice the size of Tiny Tim” (Dickens 65). The last two deeds Scrooge did was to raise Bob Cratchet’s salary and help him with his struggling family. Scrooge specifically says this in this instance, “A merrier Christmas /bob, my good fellow, than I have given you, for many a year! I’ll raise your salary, and endeavor to assist your struggling family,” (Dickens 68).

These deeds are important because while the ghosts were showing Scrooge’s fate, they showed him that if things were to continue going the way they are with Bob, then many unfortunate things will happen to them. The most tragic event that will happen is his son, Tiny Tim dying, that’s potentially because he cant afford all the treatment that he needs. With Scrooge giving Bob a bit of extra money and him helping his family, it gives Tiny Tim a better chance at surviving.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 11, 2014 09:56 PM

Olivia N Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

QUESTION #117
Based on the trip taken with the Ghost of Christmas Past, how did Scrooge compare to his old boss to Fezziwig? Were they alike in any ways? Different? Who was worse, and why? Explain.

ANSWER:
Scrooge and his old boss Fezziwig are two completely different men. They have very limited similarities because Fezziwig is a man that was very positive and laughed; while Scrooge was always grumpy and had a continuous smirk of hatred on his face. The limited similarities between these two men were that they were heads of the same industry and had an employee or employees. How they treated the people they were completely different as well because Fezziwig would greet them and would give holidays like Christmas Eve and Christmas days of no work; while, Scrooge would let his only employee with a family of his own work on those holidays.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 11, 2014 09:57 PM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE (CA02)
12 September 2014

QUESTION #148:
Some readers suggest that a major theme in this story is that “the crimes of humanity carry their own form/s of punishment.” Using both paraphrased and quoted passages from the text, show how this idea is, indeed, one that reoccurs repeatedly throughout the narrative.

ANSWER:
This idea, seen in the text, as the various ghosts that come to haunt Scrooge. Though Scrooge’s awful actions as a human being, he is being punished in a similar manner. The fact that Scrooge described as “a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous, old sinner!” (Dickens 8), applied to this notion. Scrooge was such a horrible person that his form of punishment would be to see the error of his ways face first.

Scrooge feels horror when the Ghost of the Future appears, and he states that he “hopes to live to be another man” (Dickens 70). Through all that he has seen in the other ghosts, Scrooge finally begins to understand, albeit through fear, that due to the crimes he committed, that is, his selfishness and neglect of the poor and needy, that he would be punished by otherworldly spirits.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 11, 2014 10:03 PM

Rebeccah Braun and Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 September 2014

Question #4:
In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Hero archetype. You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, that meanings of both “hero,” as understand by the ancient Greeks, and “ego,” as understood by Sigmund Freud, to fully understand this concept. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
When a character “…is able to transcend the bounds and illusions of the ego…” (Vogler 30) is a way Vogler defines the psychological function of the Hero archetype. To understand this, he explains that the term “hero” originates from the Greek and means to “protect and serve” (Vogler 29), and is usually self-sacrificing. The hero will give up his own wants and needs to protect and help his society in any means. An ego is an ideology created by Sigmund Freud and is part of the personality that diverges from the normality of society and stands out. Vogler explains that the hero is entirely ego at the beginning of the story, and the hero archetype represents how the character overcomes his ego and becomes the selfless hero identity.

In A Christmas Carol, it is hard to decipher who the hero is at the beginning since little is explained about other characters besides Scrooge. At the beginning of the book, Scrooge can only be seen as the protagonist not as a hero, however, after the three Spirits of Christmas visit him he undergoes a change and becomes a hero. As Vogler stated the hero has to overcome his ego, in Scrooge's case this would be his stinginess. His bleak personality and his despise of Christmas sets him apart from the rest of his society. After the spirits visit him, he overcomes his ego by becoming happier and more charitable. He starts donating money, buy things for others and gives back to his community in hopes to change not only his future but the people’s around him as well. This allows Scrooge to follow Vogler’s hero archetype.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 11, 2014 10:15 PM

Rebeccah Braun and Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 September 2014

Question #4:
In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the Hero archetype. You’ll first have to define, and be clear on, that meanings of both “hero,” as understand by the ancient Greeks, and “ego,” as understood by Sigmund Freud, to fully understand this concept. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the hero archetype used in A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens?

Answer:
When a character “…is able to transcend the bounds and illusions of the ego…” (Vogler 30) is a way Vogler defines the psychological function of the Hero archetype. To understand this, he explains that the term “hero” originates from the Greek and means to “protect and serve” (Vogler 29), and is usually self-sacrificing. The hero will give up his own wants and needs to protect and help his society in any means. An ego is an ideology created by Sigmund Freud and is part of the personality that diverges from the normality of society and stands out. Vogler explains that the hero is entirely ego at the beginning of the story, and the hero archetype represents how the character overcomes his ego and becomes the selfless hero identity.

In A Christmas Carol, it is hard to decipher who the hero is at the beginning since little is explained about other characters besides Scrooge. At the beginning of the book, Scrooge can only be seen as the protagonist not as a hero, however, after the three Spirits of Christmas visit him he undergoes a change and becomes a hero. As Vogler stated the hero has to overcome his ego, in Scrooge's case this would be his stinginess. His bleak personality and his despise of Christmas sets him apart from the rest of his society. After the spirits visit him, he overcomes his ego by becoming happier and more charitable. He starts donating money, buy things for others and gives back to his community in hopes to change not only his future but the people’s around him as well. This allows Scrooge to follow Vogler’s hero archetype.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 11, 2014 10:15 PM

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
9 September 2014

Question:
Some readers suggest that a major theme in this story is “redemption.” If you aren’t sure of the meaning of this work, take the time to fill in the gaps of your knowledge, and look it up. Using both paraphrased and quoted passages for the text, show how this idea is, indeed, one that reoccurs repeatedly throughout the narrative.

Answer:
Redemption- “to make up for; make amends for; offset (some fault, shortcoming, etc.) (Dictionary.com). In the beginning of the novel, Scrooge was a very cheap and selfish man, “A poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December!” (Dickens 8). As the three Christmas ghosts came to visit Scrooge and learned to love and to appreciate his life again. Scrooge redeems himself by the end of the book by helping Bob Cratchit and his family with their money issues and also becoming a very good family friend. He especially helps Bob’s son Tiny Tim by helping to fund treatment for his illness. “Scrooge was better than his word. He did it all, and infinitely more; and to Tiny Tim, who did NOT die, he was a second father. He became as good a friend, as good a master, and as good a man, as the good old city knew, or any other good old city, town, or borough, in the good old world.” (68).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 11, 2014 11:02 PM

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
9 September 2014

Question:
Some readers suggest that a major theme in this story is “redemption.” If you aren’t sure of the meaning of this work, take the time to fill in the gaps of your knowledge, and look it up. Using both paraphrased and quoted passages for the text, show how this idea is, indeed, one that reoccurs repeatedly throughout the narrative.

Answer:
Redemption- “to make up for; make amends for; offset (some fault, shortcoming, etc.) (Dictionary.com). In the beginning of the novel, Scrooge was a very cheap and selfish man, “A poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December!” (Dickens 8). As the three Christmas ghosts came to visit Scrooge and learned to love and to appreciate his life again. Scrooge redeems himself by the end of the book by helping Bob Cratchit and his family with their money issues and also becoming a very good family friend. He especially helps Bob’s son Tiny Tim by helping to fund treatment for his illness. “Scrooge was better than his word. He did it all, and infinitely more; and to Tiny Tim, who did NOT die, he was a second father. He became as good a friend, as good a master, and as good a man, as the good old city knew, or any other good old city, town, or borough, in the good old world.” (68).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 11, 2014 11:02 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
5 September 2014

Scoorge became a better man after his experience with the spirits. According to the book Scoorge says, “I will live in the past, the present and the future, the spirits of all three shall be within me.” Years after Scoorge experience Scoorge became such a stronger individual . Scoorge became as a good friend, as a good master and as a good man to Tiny Tim he was a second father.”

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 11, 2014 11:14 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
5 September 2014

Scoorge became a better man after his experience with the spirits. According to the book Scoorge says, “I will live in the past, the present and the future, the spirits of all three shall be within me.” Years after Scoorge experience Scoorge became such a stronger individual . Scoorge became as a good friend, as a good master and as a good man to Tiny Tim he was a second father.”

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 11, 2014 11:14 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
5 September 2014

Scoorge became a better man after his experience with the spirits. According to the book Scoorge says, “I will live in the past, the present and the future, the spirits of all three shall be within me.” Years after Scoorge experience Scoorge became such a stronger individual . Scoorge became as a good friend, as a good master and as a good man to Tiny Tim he was a second father.”

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 11, 2014 11:14 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
5 September 2014

Scoorge became a better man after his experience with the spirits. According to the book Scoorge says, “I will live in the past, the present and the future, the spirits of all three shall be within me.” Years after Scoorge experience Scoorge became such a stronger individual . Scoorge became as a good friend, as a good master and as a good man to Tiny Tim he was a second father.”

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 11, 2014 11:14 PM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 September 2014

Question #140:
Who seems to be the intended audience of this novella? Are readers supposed to identify with Scrooge, and reach into our own pockets to fix their ungenerous lifestyles before it’s too late? Or, are readers supposed to sigh with relief, as they realize that at least they’re not that guy? Does that narrative seems to encourage/promote activism or passivity? Explain.

Answer:
The target audience of A Christmas Carol seems to be young adults. Readers are supposed to look onto Scrooge’s misfortunes and reevaluate how they are living their life. Readers should not judge Scrooge on his lifestyle but follow it as an example. If they already lead their life in the manner of Scrooge at the end of the novella, they should be read the novella as a warning. Readers should remember that Scrooge too had Christmas cheer and people in his life that were special to him. When the Ghost of Christmas Past took him back to his childhood, he wept out of happiness from all the memories and was genuinely happy to see his former campaigns (Dickens 42). Scrooge lost this spark as he was growing up and became obsessed with material objects rather than the people around him.

Dickens promotes activism. Scrooge’s nephew, Fred, constantly invited Scrooge over for Christmas dinner to get Scrooge into his and his family’s life, but Scrooge always denied the request (Dickens 16). However, when the Ghost of Christmas Present shows Scrooge his families’ Christmas dinner they continuously ragged on Scrooge for his stingy ways (Dickens 78) but when Scrooge shows up for Christmas dinner after he wakes, they are delighted to have him over (Dickens ). Dickens shows that Fred and his family saw Scrooge in one light and criticized him for it and thought he could never change, however, from his one visit their entire opinion of about him changed. Activism is shown throughout the entire novella. If Scrooge continued down his path of stinginess, he would have died alone, but since he heeded the warnings of the Spirits and then lived in a generous lifestyle he changed his fate. Dickens showed that one cannot sit idly by expecting changes; one has to achieve it.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 11, 2014 11:15 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA02 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
11 September 2014


Question #145:

Some readers suggest that a major theme in this story is “one’s duty to his/her fellow human being.” This sounds a lot like one of the SLU core values. Using both paraphrased and quoted passages from the text, show how this idea is, indeed one that reoccurs repeatedly thought the narrative.


Answer:

The story begins with an example of a hermit by the name of Scrooge, who has no value of community. Gradually throughout the story we see the change taking place with the eventual polarization of Scrooge into a merry man. Very early on we see how scrooge surrounded by people who are parts of the community such as Bob Cratchit and Scrooges Nephew. Scrooge’s nephew in particular invites Scrooge every year to his Christmas party to which he gives a very curt “Good Afternoon." The second ghost finally brings scrooge to the party, and he finds just how joyful a community can be. "I was only going to say," said Scrooge's nephew, "that the consequence of his taking a dislike to us, and not making merry with us, is, as I think, that he loses some pleasant moments, which could do him no harm. I am sure he loses pleasanter companions than he can find in his own thoughts, either in his mouldy old office, or his dusty chambers. I mean to give him the same chance every year, whether he likes it or not, for I pity him. He may rail at Christmas till he dies” (Dickens 109). We also see how Scrooges must act upon the value of community in order to save Tiny Tim’s life as his intervention is the ultimatum for life and death. “"If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, none other of my race," returned the Ghost, "will find him here. What then? If he be like to die, he had better do it, and decrease the surplus population. Scrooge hung his head to hear his own words quoted by the Spirit.” (Dickens 96) Ultimately we see the necessity of a community to survive which has proven throughout history to be the cornerstone of success in the human population.


Work Cited:

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.
Wood, Michael. "Hero's Journey Archetypes Explained." 15 November 2011. Web 10 October 2013

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 12, 2014 12:23 AM

Peter Bellini - **Do Over**
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA02 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
7 September 2014


Question #68:


Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: What were some of the other places the Ghost took Scrooge? What did Scrooge find at each place? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


The Ghost of Christmas Present is an interesting character in the book that has both 1800 brothers and lives for a single day. The Ghost of Christmas Present takes scrooge on a journey to many different places that all share one there: joy. The ghost first takes Scrooge to see a joyful city working away at their daily toils yet still finding happiness. “For the people who were shoveling away on the house-tops were jovial and full of glee; calling out to one another from the parapets, and now and then exchanging a facetious snowball” (Dickens 81). After the city, we are brought to Bob Cratchit’s house where Bob brings home the measly salary from Scrooge to pay his family yet they still find comfort and contentedness in it. “There was nothing of high mark in this. They were not a handsome family; they were not well dressed; their shoes were far from being water-proof; … But they were happy, grateful, pleased with one another” (Dickens 99) After we are presented with some familiar characters in the story we are also presented with some foreign characters who are in bleak situations yet still find joy in the simplicity that is community on Christmas. The Ghost brings Scrooge first to a family of miners who find light in the bowels of the earth. “Passing through the wall of mud and stone, they found a cheerful company assembled round a glowing fire. An old, old man and woman, with their children and their children's children” (Dickens 102). After the earth, we are brought out to sea and find two weather worn lighthouse men sharing a moment in the desolate circumstance. “Through the loophole in the thick stone wall shed out a ray of brightness on the awful sea. Joining their horny hands over the rough table at which they sat, they wished each other Merry Christmas in their can of grog” (Dickens 104). We can see in these many examples the one prevailing factor which is overflowing joy and the joy that is brought to any situation with the priceless gifts of community and love.


Work Cited:


Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.
Wood, Michael. "Hero's Journey Archetypes Explained." 15 November 2011. Web 10 October 2013

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 12, 2014 12:34 AM

Peter Bellini - **Do Over**
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
5 September 2014


Question: #34


Stave One: How does Scrooge feel about the fact that people avoid him on the streets, beggars won’t ask him for money, children won’t ask of him the time, no one will ask him for directions, and even seeing‐eye dogs take blind men out of his path? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


Reading into A Christmas Carol we are presented with the main character, Scrooge who can be characterized as an isolated, miserly being who only looks out for himself. Scrooge is a mostly reserved person who interacts with a select amount of people. Two familiar contacts Scrooge meets are his clerk whom he sees on a daily basis and pays horribly as well as an annual visit from his nephew whose sole wish is to have his uncle come to his Christmas party. His Nephews requests are met with a stale "Good afternoon," (Dickens 10) Scrooge is a man who simply wants to be left alone in complete isolation, and we can clearly see this in his reaction from the people he passes in the streets. “Nobody ever stopped him in the street to say, with gladsome looks, "My dear Scrooge, how are you? When will you come to see me?" No beggars implored him to bestow a trifle, no children asked him what it was o'clock” (Dickens 4). While most people would experience this and find it to be a bleak existence, this is the very life Scrooge reveres. “But what did Scrooge care! It was the very thing he liked.” (Dickens 5). The years of hardness has brought a chain about his heart so that he no longer wishes to be associated with the common man but rather in his words "I wish to be left alone, said Scrooge” (Dickens 14)


Work Cited:


Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover, 1991. Print.
Wood, Michael. "Hero's Journey Archetypes Explained." 15 November 2011. Web 10 October 2013

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 12, 2014 12:36 AM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
12 September 2014

Question #125:
What makes the holiday of Christmas such an effective setting for the humanitarian issues (i.e. sympathy for the poor, needy children) that the author of A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens, was trying to address?
Answer:
When one imagines Christmas the typical setting is presents under the tree, family all around, and love surrounding the area. Something about Christmas makes, the whole world want to be joyful, happy, and spread that happiness on to others they encounter. In the story, A Christmas Carol, Scrooge is portrayed as the only person without such feelings towards Christmas. Even with poor and needy children surrounding Scrooge he refuses to share his wealth. Dickens portrays through much needed growth and change progress can happen. Scrooge was shown many ghosts of his past, which changed his emotions towards Christmas. Through this story, many can truly understand that Christmas does not have to be just about the presents but also about helping others who are in need.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 12, 2014 12:57 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
12 September 2014.

QUESTION # 138: For such a short piece of fiction, there are two surprisingly long sections given over to people dancing with each other: the party at Fezziwig’s house, and then the party at Fred’s (okay, good call, at Fred’s there is a little dancing and some blind- man’s bluff, but they are similar enough to fall under this category). Why is this? Why aren’t these simply scenes of people enjoying dinner or conversation together, instead of partying? Why might the author, Charles Dickens, focus so much on the physicality of movement and dance?

ANSWER:
From the beginning of time, gestures and movements were mediums individuals used to convey messages and emotions. Similarly in the novelette A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens dance is highlighted at the party held at both Fezziwig’s and Fred’s house. At the party, at Fezziwig’s the dancing along with the music set the mood of the party and at Fred’s when Scrooge danced with his niece- in- law conveyed Scrooge’s emotion. Moreover, the scene also reflected the mood of the season: cheerfulness and merriment, where everyone at heart is a child, “During the whole of this time Scrooge had acted like a man out of his wits.” (Dickens 26) thus demonstrating that Scrooge is capable of enjoying and feeling the Christmas spirit and has just lost his way to enjoy the season.

By framing Scrooge in this setting as a part of the Christmas activities and participating in the dancing, he assumes the visage of a victim versus a monster.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 12, 2014 02:15 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative ENG 220 CA01
12 September 2014

Question: Why wouldn’t Scrooge permit a fire in the counting house? What is the significance of this act to the story, as a whole? Explain.

Analysis: Scrooge would not allow a fire in the counting house because he did not want to spend money on firewood or coal to keep himself or Cratchit warm. This is significant because it shows that Scrooge’s greed was not only harmful to Cratchit and those around him, but that Scrooge was ultimately harming himself as well. Scrooge was willing to sacrifice his own comfort and wellbeing for the sake of the bottom line.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at September 12, 2014 05:20 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative
10 September 2014

Question: How did Scrooge feel about the Ghost of Christmas yet to come??

Answer: when the ghost appears you can tell that scrooge his more open and is okay with the ghost showing up for the better good yet, there was something about this ghost that had him particularly rattled. In paragraph 122 he states, “ He feared the silent shape so much his legs trembled beneath him…and couldn’t stand once going to follow him.” This is where I feel scrooge show how this ghost unlike the others is getting to him. Later in the stave scrooge releases a feeling of if the ghost is watching him although you cant see the ghost eyes behind that big heap of black. This feeling of the unknown builds up a shudder and a feel very cold. (Dickinson 128par). Furthermore, at the end of that stave Scrooge has a sense of true repentance he even swore to change. this shows the fear set in his mind by the ghost of christmas yet to come.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at September 12, 2014 08:52 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative
12 September 2014

Question: what two thing did the “Ghost of Christmas to come “ show scrooge that both upset and frightened him? Was it an effective strategy for the ghost to use?

Answer: unlike most the Ghost of Christmas yet to come had scrooge on the verge of being terrified by him and the visions he was showing. The Ghost takes scrooge to two places one being a room with a man with a white sheet over him and a graveyard. These horrifying images made scrooge both frazzled and upset. Later in that scene scrooge comes to find out that the man under the white sheet is him. He did not want to lift the curtain but the ghost made him scrooge try’s to get himself out of it by saying in paragraph 138, "this is a fearful place. In leaving it, I shall not leave its lesson, trust me. Let us go!” later he goes to a grave yard there he
Scrooge crept towards it, trembling as he went; and following the finger, read upon the stone of the neglected grave his own name, Ebenezer Scrooge. This is where he puts together that the man under the curtain was him this sent chills through scrooge. All in all, scrooge was the most willing to change after the last ghost you know this when he says "I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!” (Dickinson par151). The change that I saw in scrooge was so large with every ghost that past but I feel the last ghost made them all worth while making him truly confess to doing the right and just.

Posted by: aaron virelli at September 12, 2014 08:56 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation In Narrative CA01
12 September 2014

QUESTION #135:
Bob Cratchit offers a Christmas toast in Scrooge's honor. Mrs. Cratchit's feelings about Scrooge are different from her husband's. What would cause this difference in their feelings?

ANSWER:
Bob Cratchit is a very thankful and gracious man that appreciates everything he has. He is happy about his daughter Martha being home for Christmas, he is happy they have a wonderful goose and food for dinner, and he is happy that it is Christmas. Mrs. Cratchit, however, is unsatisfied with how Scrooge treats her husband. She sees the hand-me-down clothes, the cheap ribbons they are wearing, and her son Tiny Tim's illness. "It should be Christmas Day, I am sure," sais she, "on which one drinks the health of such an odious, stingy, hard, unfeeling man as Mr. Scrooge. You know he is, Robert! Nobody knows it better than you do, poor fellow?'" Even though Mr. Cratchit knows this, he has nothing to say about Scrooge and just wants to enjoy the time that him and his family have together at Christmas time.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 12, 2014 09:28 AM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
10 Sep 2014

Question 116:
Jacob Marley’s ghost left Scrooge with a lesson and a prediction. What was the lesson and what was the prediction and how were the significant to the story? Did scrooge learn the lesson and did the prophecy come true? Explain.

Answer:
The lesson is that three spirits will visit Scrooge over the next three nights. He also says that the first two ghosts appear at one o clock and the last ghost coming at midnight. The ghost tells Scrooge that he has come from beyond the grave to save him from this very fate. He means that in order for scrooge to save himself, Jacob had to come from beyond the grave in order to save Scrooge from becoming worse than he already is. It was significant to the story because the three ghosts that visited Scrooge showed him the person he could have been before he became a lot worse and showed that he can change as a human being. Yes, Scrooge did learn his lesson because when each ghost visited him, it put into perspective how is life can be a lot better and that he could change sooner than later. If it weren’t for Jacob’s ghost coming back to help Scrooge, the prophecy would have never come true and Scrooge’s life would be a lot worse than it is now.

“You will be haunted,” resumed the Ghost,” by Three Spirits” (Dickens 15).
“ Expect the second on the next night at the same hour. Third upon the next night when the last stroke of twelve has ceased to vibrate. Look to see me no more; and look that, for your own sake, you remember what has passed between us”(Dickens 15)!

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 12, 2014 09:34 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL- Journeys of Transformation In Narrative
12 September 2014

Question #130:
Why is Scrooge so moved by-and terrified of-the children, "Ignorance and Want"? Why does the spirit tell him to "most of beware [Ignorance]"?

Answer:
Scrooge had noticed something clinging onto the second spirits robe, "I see something strange, and not belonging to yourself, protruding from your skirts. Is it as foot or a claw!"(Dickens 49). when Scrooge noticed the folding of the robe he saw two children "wretched, abject, frightful, hideous, miserable" (Dickens 49). there lied a boy and a girl by the name of Ignorance and Want, what terrified Scrooge the most is the appearance of the children they looked aged older than they should be looking. "No change, no degradation, no perversion of humanity, in any grade, through all the mysteries of wonderful creation, has monsters half so horrible and dread" (Dickens 49).

When Scrooge asked the spirit were they his kids he told them they were a mans and they cling onto him. the spirit then tells Scrooge to beware of both Ignorance and Want. he then says "most of all beware of the by, for his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing erased" (Dickens 49). The children could have been creations of what the devil had possessed, which would bring along bad luck.

Posted by: Tashanna.Harris at September 12, 2014 09:50 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
12 September 14

Question #127: What important real-life issues does Dickens, the author of A Christmas Carol, use children and childhood to symbolize?

Answer: From the Penguin Group 2008 issue of A Christmas Carol. In A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens uses children to help display a middle class society; he uses this technique to appeal to the widest possible audience. An example character in A Christmas Carol would be Bob Cratchit. In stave one Scrooge appears at Bob Cratchit’s desk in the front of the office on his way out, and talks to him briefly about his pay for the full day off (Christmas day)so he can help provide for his family, while remaining jolly and present in the holiday spirit with his poor family. (Mrs. Cratchit, Peter, Martha, Tiny Tim and the rest of his children). (Dickens 15) Bob Cratchit uses his pay and family to convince Scrooge for a day’s pay without work. Being poor was a very common occurrence in the mid-nineteenth century and still is today, that is why this work is still an everyday read.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 12, 2014 10:04 AM

Joshua Natonio
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
11 September 2014


QUESTION #124:
Scrooge promised he would keep Christmas in his heart throughout the year. What does this mean, exactly? Is this believable? Why, or why not?

ANSWER:
According to Stave 4 of Charles Dicken’s “A Christmas Carol,” “I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone” Dickens 62).


If Scrooge were to honour/honor his promise to keep Christmas in his heart throughout the year, he would do this by keeping a more positive life style exhibiting kindness and charity to others. “Keeping Christmas is [his] heart” simple means that Scrooge will try to keep a positive outlook in life, and remember the lessons from his three paranormal visitors.


His promise to keep Christmas in his heart seems believable because of the magnitude of his journey. In fact, [Scrooge] had no further intercourse with Spirits, but lived upon the Total Abstinence Principle, ever afterwards; and it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge” (Dickens 68).

Posted by: Joshua Natonio at September 12, 2014 10:26 AM

Abrar Nooh
D. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL


Q# 97
What day was it when Scrooge woke up ?

Answer:
Scrooge regarded everyone with a delight smile. He locked so irresistibly pleasant, in a word that three or four good, humored follows said " good morning, sir! A merry christmas to you !".

Posted by: abrar nooh at September 12, 2014 10:37 AM

Abrar Nooh
Dr.. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL

Abrar Nooh
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL

Q# 114
What was Ebenezer Scrooge's business and what was the most important thing in the world to him?

Answer:
His business is Counting House. The most impotent thing to him are: HIs nephew. Scrooge kept the coal-box in his own room.
Merry Christmas! Out upon merry Christmas! What's Christmas time to you but a time for paying bills without money; a time for finding yourself a year older, and not an hour richer.

Posted by: abrar Nooh at September 12, 2014 10:48 AM

Group 8:

Anet Milian
Olivia Ago-Stallworth

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
12 September 2014

Question: In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “the hero’s conscience” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]

Answer:
In Volger’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “the hero’s conscience” in the mentor archetype, he describes the mentor as someone who serves to remind the hero of the two opposing sides of decision making. This particular function is relevant to A Christmas Carol because Jacob Marley and the three spirits are Scrooge’s Mentor. They help guide and show Scrooge the opposing results of his actions.

Work Cited
Dickens, C. (1991). A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications.


Posted by: Anet Milian at September 12, 2014 12:05 PM

Blake Bromen & Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
12 September 14

Question #3:
In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “teaching” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer:
The teacher/ mentor is the gateway into the journey of the main character/hero. The mentor teaches the hero a lesson that will benefit him or her throughout their journey. (Vogler 40) From the Penguin Group 2008 issue of A Christmas Carol. This archetype is shown through the three spirits guiding Scrooge throughout his journey. The ghost of Christmas past for example is a mentor to Scrooge, by showing him his journey to where he is today, and showing him what he has become. (Dickens 37-56) He needs to know what caused the change in his life, so he can better himself in the future.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 13, 2014 02:49 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
13 September 2014

QUESTION #141:
What is the significance of Scrooge running a money-lending operation rather than, for example, being a boss of a big-time factory, etc.? Does it matter what Scrooge has done to become rich? Would the story be different if he still had the same personality, but was instead a really rich painter, politician, or entertainer (just as Dickens, himself, actually was)? How so? Explain.

ANSWER:
Ebenezer Scrooge had a money lending company, he was a money lender. Scrooge made loans for a high rate of interest. He helped those that are desperate for the money and desperate for secrecy. He had a love for money, and loaning money was less risky with higher returns. Nonetheless he was very selfish. It did matter what he did for his money, because he exploited his customers by taking more money from them than expected.

I would expect the "Christmas Carol" to definitely be different because there will never be three ghost visiting him, and convincing him to change his life. If he was a high paying employer then his ways would have slightly change, but there are some characteristics that would be the same. For example, he still might have not have any concern for the poor just like he did before.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 13, 2014 07:12 PM

Kendra Hinton and Zachary Sabo
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
14 September 2014

Question #5:
In addition to “psychological functions,” archetypes also perform one or more “dramatic functions.” (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of “gifts in mythology” & “Perseus” in the Mentor archetype. (b.) What does this particular function have to do, if anything, with the mentor archetype/s used in A Christmas Carol [you’ll have to identify the mentor/s to know]?

Answer:
A. Gifts in Mythology is defined as a gift giving. The hero receives a gift or has a trait on wisdom of knowledge. Persus is someone who is shower with gifts. He is a typical hero, he is providing for by gods, by his mentor’s adventure.
B. The spirits were Scrooge mentors, which help him gain knowledge and growth

Posted by: Kendra Hinton and Zachary Sabo at September 14, 2014 09:45 PM

Ashley Gross and Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
14 September 2014

Question #6:
In addition to "psychological functions," archetypes also perform one or more "dramatic functions." In your own words, explain Vogler's discussion of the "dramatic function" of "gifts should be earned" in the mentor archetype. What does this particular function have to do with the mentor archetype used in A Christmas Carol?

Answer:
Vogler's "gifts should be earned" dramatic function basically says that the character must work for what he/she is getting in return. In A Christmas Carol the mentors for Scrooge are Marley and the Spirits. The mentors want Scrooge to see what he is doing wrong and what the consequences of his life would bring. By showing him horrifying visions, they want him to learn and grow from the wrong that he has been doing in order for him to receive a better fate.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 14, 2014 11:03 PM

Douglas Ross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative.
14 September 2014

Question #20:
Stave One: How did Scrooge feel about Christmas? Use quoted passages from the text to support.

Answer: Scrooge was immensely against Christmas, not only had his old partner Marley died on Christmas years ago, he treated it as a poor use of time and money. He felt that it was an inconvenience to give his worker the entire day of Christmas off, he felt that just because people want to celebrate doesn’t mean his business should have to suffer for it. (Dickens 8)
Works Cited
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. London: Chapman and Hall, 1843.

Posted by: Douglas Ross at September 15, 2014 10:41 AM

Ashley Gross, Bronwen Burke, Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 September 2014

Question #1:
In his chapter on the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler outlines a possible “symbiotic relationship between” that archetype and “a villain." In your own words, explain this possible relationship” as it exists in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the meaning of “symbiotic” AND you will need to identify the villain behind the threshold guardian/s in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, and then discuss their possible symbiotic relationship.

Answer:
To answer the question, we first had to define the meaning of symbiotic. The technical definition of the word is a relationship between two people or groups that work with and depend on each other. In literature, the villain and the guardian have such a relationship. According to Vogler, the guardian is often used as a "bodyguard" by the villain and if anything, say the hero, approaches, then the guardian will warn the villain. "In nature, a powerful animal such as a bear will sometimes tolerate a smaller animal such as a fox nesting at the entrance of its lair. The fox, with its strong sense of smell and sharp teeth, tends to keep others animals from wandering into the cave while the bear is sleeping. The fox also serves as an early warning system for the bear by making a racket if something tries to enter the cave" (Vogler 49).

In A Christmas Carol, Scrooge is an identifiable villain. As a group, we decided that Jacob Marley and the Spirits would be the guardians to Scrooge. Their purpose in the story is to warn Scrooge of what his fate will be if he continues on the path that he is on.

* Quote found using The Writer's Journey Third Edition by Christopher Vogler

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 16, 2014 08:52 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
12 September 2014

Question: what two thing did the "Ghost of Christmas to come " show scrooge that both upset and frightened him? Was it an effective strategy for the ghost to use?

Answer: unlike most the Ghost of Christmas yet to come had scrooge on the verge of being terrified by him and the visions he was showing. The Ghost takes scrooge to two places one being a room with a man with a white sheet over him and a graveyard. These horrifying images made scrooge both frazzled and upset. Later in that scene scrooge comes to find out that the man under the white sheet is him. He did not want to lift the curtain, but the ghost made him scrooge try to get himself out of it by saying in paragraph 138, "this is a fearful place. In leaving it, I shall not leave its lesson, trust me. Let us go!" later he goes to the graveyard there he
Scrooge crept towards it, trembling as he went; and following the finger, read upon the stone of the neglected grave his own name, Ebenezer Scrooge. He puts together that the man under the curtain was him this sent chills through scrooge. All in all, scrooge was the most willing to change after the last ghost you know this when he says "I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!" (Dickinson par151). The change that I saw in scrooge was so large with every ghost that past, but I feel the last ghost made them all worth while making him confess to doing the right and just.

Posted by: aaron virelli REDO at September 17, 2014 07:50 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL CA01 journey into narritve
4 September 2014

Question #6: Describe Marley’s ghost- provide a both physical and emotional description.

Answer: In stave on the first glimpse, the author give of Marley is where scrooge feels for some reason that he sees Marley’s face in the knocker. Scrooge first gets drawn into the ghost presence in the house. This time of year he saw if all the tiles had Marley’s face on it. (Dickinson 8) As he finally finds his way to his bed, he lays down and start to hear a bell ringing yet it’s only for a moment. Then seconds later, he hears chains dragging over the casks in the cellar heading upward.
Moments after he sees Marley’s he can see right through him to see the other buttons on his waistcoat also he has pigtails with tights and boots on. (Dickinson) You could also tell from the ghosts presence he was a little startled the terror in his voice rattled his bones. He cries out in a large roar to make Scrooge understand.
Yet his physical presence was very scary and shook thorough the bones of scrooge his emotional presence had a different feel. He had a feeling in his voice of regret and disappointment for how his life had gone. He made it clear to Scrooge that he was not living the right life. Although, Scrooge asks for him for some comfort the ghost says he has none to give. He later tells Scrooge that he will end up like him if he doesn’t change his ways. This becomes real as he notices when he walks towards the door Jacob tells him to stand back because this is no place he wants to se. (Dickinson)
In all Marley’s ghost as a whole had a sense of urgency to tell Scrooge how serious the matter was and to warn him before he was too late. And I feel through this encountering I can see the change in Scrooges behavior by not saying, “humbug” before bed. (Dickinson)

Posted by: aaron virelli REDO at September 17, 2014 07:56 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 September 2014

Question: How did Scrooge feel about the Ghost of Christmas yet to come??

Answer: when the ghost appears you can tell that scrooge his more open and is okay with the ghost showing up for the better good yet, there was something about this ghost that had him particularly rattled. In paragraph 122 he states, " He feared the silent shape so much his legs trembled beneath him…and couldn't stand once going to follow him." I feel scrooge shows how this ghost, unlike the others, is getting to him. Later in the stave scrooge releases a feeling of if the ghost is watching him although you can't see the ghost eyes behind that big heap of black. This feeling of the unknown builds up a shudder and a feel very cold. (Dickinson 128par). Furthermore, at the end of that stave Scrooge has a sense of true repentance he even swore to change

Posted by: aaron virelli REDO at September 17, 2014 07:57 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220 cl journeys in narrative CA01
8, September 2014

Question 62#; the second of the three spirits: Describe the scene when scrooge found second spirit

Answer: the scene where scrooge feels that he will be encountering another ghost he is in the mood in which he feels he's ready for the ghost not letting him be taken by surprise or made nervously. (Par75 Dickinson) he had been laying in his bed when he became unbelievably cold so he got up and opened all of the blinds himself so he could establish a sharp look out all around the bed. (Par75 Dickinson) The bell struck one, but the ghost had not appeared yet he began to wonder. This had was on the knocker when a voice told him to enter, and he obeyed. In moments, his whole room turned to a beautiful garden filled with all of the most delicious fruits and leaves. There sat before him a enormous man this man was the ghost of Christmas present.

Posted by: aaron virelli REDO at September 17, 2014 07:58 AM

Bronwen Burke and Tyler Sommers
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
17 September 2014

Question #5:
Identify accurately the HERALD in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the Herald Archetype, and how this plays out in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

Answer:
Vogler describes a Herald as offering the hero “motivation” and “both a challenge and an opportunity, and get the story rolling” (Vogler 56). In A Christmas Carol, Jacob Marley plays the role of Herald: “I am here to-night to warn you, that you have yet a chance and hope of escaping my fate” (Dickens 15). This lingering warning sparks Scrooge’s motivation to embark on his journey.

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications, 1991. 15. Print.
Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. Studio City, CA: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. 56. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 21, 2014 01:01 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 23, 2014 09:24 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
25 January 2015


Question: Stave one- Marley’s Ghost: Why was scrooge surprised at the sight of Marley’s ghost? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Marley’s ghost appears with almost what some would describe an aggressive entrance into the scene, with a door swinging wide open very swiftly and without much warning. That being set already would instill some fear into Mr. Scrooge. The appearance of the ghost in itself, while not necessarily posing a threat, is quite a shocking and disturbing visual. The fact that the ghost was transparent but could still is seen, for example, the clothing the ghost was wearing on its back could be seen from the front offered a very strange and abnormal visual to the scrooge. Finally the fact that the ghost announces to the scrooge that he is indeed Jacob Marley, and the scrooges response was denial leads to the reader easily being able to understand that the scrooge is surprised and quite afraid. (Dover 13)

Posted by: Matthew at January 25, 2015 12:57 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE
January 25, 2015


Questions: What did Scrooge notice about the church chimes when he woke up? What did he think had happened?

Answers:“To his great astonishment, the heavy bell went on from six to seven, and from seven to eight, and regularly up to noon. It was past two when he went to bed” In this passage, Scrooge notices that the chimes when on for an extra two hours. “Why, it isn’t possible that I could’ve slept through the whole day and far into another night” In this passage, Scrooge thinks that he may have slept through the day into another night. Also earlier in the stave, Scrooge feels that something must be wrong with the clock.

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at January 25, 2015 08:41 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
24 January 2015

“The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in the restless haste, and moaning as they went. Every one of them wore chains like Marley’s ghost; some few (they might be guilty governments) were linked together; none were free.” (Dickens 16)

Question 31. Stave One- Marley’s Ghost: What did Scrooge see when he looked out the window? Use quoted passages from the text to support your part of the answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge see’s chained spirits outside the window. They are the spirits who didn’t have respectable and virtuous lives. Some of them were called governments most likely the British parliament because that’s what Dickens knew.

Posted by: William at January 25, 2015 09:28 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 January 2015
A Christmas Carol
Question #30: Why had Marley come to visit Scrooge?
Answer: Jacob Marley’s ghost had come to visit Ebenezer Scrooge to warn and to try to help him so that he would not end up the same way as he did after he died. When Marley was alive, he was a selfish, mean, miserable man. When he died, his soul was forced to drag chains around with him as his soul went around. Marley went to warn Scrooge that he has “a chance and hope of escaping [Marley’s] fate.” (Dickens 15). If Scrooge changes his behavior and is kinder to others the will not end up with the same fate as Marley had after he passed away. If he does not, then he will end up with chains that would be longer than Marley’s is.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at January 25, 2015 10:05 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
25 January 2015

35. Stave One-Marley’s Ghost: A Christmas Carol is full of symbolism. Briefly describe, in your own words, something from the first stave that is symbolic, using quoted passages as support (2-3 sentences). Fully support your idea. Explain why/how the example you chose is symbolic.

In Stave 1, Marley's ghost is burdened in death by chains that represent his sins in life. Dickens even writes that they are literally made of objects used in his greediness. He writes, "It was long, and wound about him like a tail; and it was made (for Scrooge observed it closely) of cash- boxes, keys, padlocks, ledgers, deeds, and heavy purses wrought in steel" (Dickens 18). Marley's most common sin during his life is greed. So, it is fitting that the chain is a representation of his greed.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at January 25, 2015 11:20 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
26 January 2015

Question: Stave 2 - What part of his past does the spirit show to Scrooge first? Use quotes passes from the text to support the part of our answer that appears in your own words

Answer: In Stave 2 of A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge is visited by the first Christmas Spirit, “the Ghost of Christmas Past” (Dickens 29). Scrooge and Spirit ventured to Scrooge’s boarding house where “the Spirit touched him [Scrooge] on the arm, and pointed to his younger self,” (Dickens 32) which brought about many memories. When Spirit asked if Scrooge remembered the way, Scrooge exclaimed that he “could walk it blindfold” (Dickens 31). Scrooge experienced an intense emotional reaction because he was “rejoiced beyond all bounds” (Dickens 31) as he walked with Spirit through the familiar sites. From this information, the reader can guess this place was where Ebenezer Scrooge grew up.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at January 25, 2015 11:20 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
25 January 2015

Question: What does scrooge regret as he watches each scene from the past unfold? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Kindness is a man going out of his way to make a stranger’s day. Kindness is a man finding the time to relax with his family. Kindness is a man who puts his loved ones before his wealth. Kindness is a man who treats his employees in such a way that work becomes a privilege instead of a burden. In Stave Two of Charles Dicken’s novella, A Christmas Story, kindness is not a characteristic that one can attribute to Scrooge’s former self. In fact, this very quality causes Scrooge great emotional distress as he views quondam Christmases. While viewing his childhood, two men give a much younger Scrooge a gift. Scrooge is then reminded of the Christmas caroler that he chased off earlier that day and regrets the incident. He even goes as far as stating that, “I should like to have given him something” (Dickens, 22). Here one sees that the Scrooge regrets not showing the caroler the same kindness that the two men bestowed upon him. Later in Stave Two, Scrooge feels, “uneasy in his mind” (Dickens 23) when he is reminded of his nephew. This uneasiness arises from the feeling of regret that he had not shown his nephew any kindness when the nephew asked Scrooge to join his family for a Christmas meal. As the night progresses with the Ghost of Christmases Past, Scrooge watches as his younger self is eager to work for a man despite being paid low wages. To put it in Scrooge’s own words, “The happiness he gives, is quite as great as if it cost a fortune” (Dickens, 26). In that instance, Scrooge compares his employer’s kindness as effective as a means of motivation as a fortune of money. He later goes on to regret how he treated his clerk because he motivated his clerk with money and never kindness. Lastly, the scrooge is shown the moment when he lost the love of his life Belle. In their argument, Belle eloquently states the reason for their division. In a fierce anger, she spits forth, “I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off one by one, until the master-passion, Gain, engrosses you” (Dickens, 27) Because Scrooge neglected to act with kindness by putting his wealth before his love, he ends up losing her. And it is because of that very incident that Scrooge cries out in regret and begs the spirit not to show him any more events.

Source:
Dickens, Charles. A Christmas Carol. New York: Dover Publications Inc, 1991. Print.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at January 26, 2015 12:01 AM

Marie Destin
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys of Transformations in Narrative CA02
26 January 2015

“He spoke before the hour bell sounded, which it now did with a deep, dull, hollow, melancholy ONE. Light flashed up in the room upon the instant, and the curtains of his bed were drawn. The curtains of his bed were drawn aside, I tell you, by a hand. Not the curtains at his feet, nor the curtains at his back, but those to which his face was addressed. The curtains of his bed were drawn aside; and Scrooge, starting up into a half-recumbent attitude, found himself face to face with the unearthly visitor who drew them: as close to it as I am now to you, and I am standing in the spirit at your elbow.” .”(Stave 2: The First Three Spirits, page 18, para 13)


“It was a strange figure—like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man, viewed through some supernatural medium, which gave him the appearance of having receded from the view, and being diminished to a child’s proportions. Its hair, which hung about its neck and down its back, was white as if with age; and yet the face had not a wrinkle in it, and the tenderest bloom was on the skin. The arms were very long and muscular; the hands the same, as if its hold were of uncommon strength. Its legs and feet, most delicately formed, were, like those upper members, bare. It wore a tunic of the purest white; and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful. It held a branch of fresh green holly in its hand; and, in singular contradiction of that wintry emblem, had its dress trimmed with summer flowers. But the strangest thing about it was, that from the crown of its head there sprung a bright clear jet of light, by which all this was visible; and which was doubtless the occasion of its using, in its duller moments, a great extinguisher for a cap, which it now held under its arm.”(Stave 2: The First Three Spirits, page 18, para 14)

Question: Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: Describe the appearance of the first spirit. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
The Ghost of Christmas Past came to Scrooge middle of the night with a huge ruckus. When Scrooge saw the Ghost, the appearance resembled such features of a young child and an elderly man illumed in a ghostly glow. The shape of the Ghost was so abnormal that it resembles a kid's frame. The Ghost of Christmas Past hair laid down to his neck and back and it was white as snow. But there was not any sight of a wrinkle on the ghost face it was soft as the day. The Ghost arms were lean and strong as if the ghost arms were for a track runner. The ghost wore a white long shirt that was white as snow and around his waist was a belt that was shiny as silk. As Scrooge staring at the Ghost he notices “It held a branch of fresh green holly in its hand; and, in singular contradiction of that wintry emblem, had its dress trimmed with summer flowers” (Dickens ,18)The Ghost of Christmas Past carried a fresh winter flower which did not match the flowers on his long sleeve shirt.

Posted by: Marie Destin at January 26, 2015 06:47 AM

Rachel Andrews

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road

26 January 2015

Question: There are several different reasons why Marley is being punished. What are they? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

After his death, Jacob Marley’s spirit is forced to “wander through the world and witness what it cannot share” (Dickens 17) as punishment for his earthly sins. He was an unkind man, greedy and selfish, never giving to charity. Dickens uses the phrase “Marley had no bowels” (Dickens 14), as a way to encompass all that Jacob Marely was as a man. ‘Bowels’ in this period means feelings of compassion or pity, so this archaic phrase is referring to the fact that Marley was not a sympathetic or caring person. He laments to Scrooge “that no space of regret can make amends for one life’s opportunity misused” (Dickens 19), meaning he wishes now that could go back and be a better person. Someone who was not only “a good man of business” (Dickens 19), but also someone who gave to the poor and assisted in making the welfare of the common people better.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews at January 26, 2015 08:59 AM

Bobbi Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL
1, January 2015


Question: From Stave Two, what was the strangest thing about how the spirit look?

Answer: The ghost of Christmas past, look to have many years under its belt, but only had the appearance of a young child. This is odd, because things, which are in the past are often considered old or tattered in nature or in their appearance. “It was a strange figure-like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man, viewed through some supernatural medium…” (Dickens, 18) A child, that appears to be “an old man”, and “viewed through some supernatural medium.” What exactly is the point of looking like both? The spirit is from the past, and looks older, but is a child so as to show it lacks the knowledge of the future. So it only has a limited view of the world. This is perhaps why, Dickens, writes of this character as such.


Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at January 26, 2015 10:46 AM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL: On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative
26 January 2015

Question: Stave One-Marley’s Ghost: What does Scrooge see when he looks at the doorknocker on his front door? Is Scrooge frightened by what he sees on his doorknocker? Why, or why not? How does he react?

Answer: In A Christmas Carol’s first stave, upon opening the door to his house, the doorknocker transformed into his dead associate Marley’s face. It was motionless and not prominent, but it was still the familiar face Scrooge had always known. Just as quick as it came, the face disappeared. Scrooge did not seem frightened but “to say that he was not startled […] would be untrue” (Dickens 16). After entering his home, Scrooge looked at the door and “half expected to be terrified with the sight of Marley’s pigtail sticking out” (Dickens 16); he saw nothing and slammed the door. He wasn’t too frightened because, as Scrooge told Marley’s ghost, “a slight disorder of the stomach makes [his senses] cheats” (Dickens 20).

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at January 26, 2015 11:08 AM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Literature CA02
26 January 2015

Question: Stave One-Marley’s Ghost- What is the first fact the reader discovers about Jacob Marley? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your words.

Answer: The first fact the reader discovers about Jacob Marley is that he is dead. That is how the book opens up in the first sentence of the first chapter. "Marley was dead: to begin with." There was no doubt about it. Scrooge signed the register of his burial. I was a done deal. "Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail." (Dickens pg. 1)

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at January 26, 2015 11:41 AM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
English 220Cl On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
26 January 2015

"He was conscious of being exhausted, and overcome by an irresistible drowsiness; and, further, of being in his own bedroom. He gave the cap a parting squeeze, in which his hand relaxed; and had barely time to reel to bed, before he sank into a heavy sleep. (page 31)"

How has Scrooge changed after the visit by the Ghost of Christmas Past?

Throughout the adventure Scrooge and the ghost of Christmas past, Scrooge went through a variety of emotions. Starting in childhood, he enjoyed watching all of those memories. It is when he starts to get older, he becomes saddened by his past. This is especially true when he visits the scene where his fiance breaks up with him, due to his obsession with money. It gets even worse for him when he looks further in the future and sees that same girl, but with her own happy family. At this time, Scrooge is more than ready to go home. He was obviously deeply saddened by the flashback and wanted to have time to process the past and what he desires in the future.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at January 26, 2015 01:12 PM

REDO: William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 January 2015


Question 31. Stave One- Marley’s Ghost: What did Scrooge see when he looked out the window? Use quoted passages from the text to support your part of the answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge see’s chained spirits outside the window. They are the spirits who didn't have respectable and virtuous lives. Some of them were called governments most likely the British parliament because that’s what Dickens knew.“The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in the restless haste, and moaning as they went. Every one of them wore chains like Marley’s ghost; some few (they might be guilty governments) were linked together; none were free.” (Dickens 16)

Posted by: William Pereira at January 26, 2015 02:08 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
25 January 2015

Question: What is the first spirit called? What does this spirit symbolize?

Answer: In Stave Two of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol", the very first spirit is introduced to Scrooge. This
spirit is the first of the three spirits which Scrooge
encounters. This first spirit is called the Ghost of Christmas Past. The Ghost of Christmas Past takes Scrooge on a journey back down memory lane (Dickens 34). This spirit symbolizes memory. As Scrooge anxiously agrees to go on the journey of the past with the Ghost of Christmas Past, he begins to experience the same emotional feelings that he felt at each of the Christmas's which they revisited from the past. At one specific visit to the past, the Ghost of Christmas Past takes Scrooge back to a Christmas he had as a kid. This specific Christmas was the loneliest, and that moment, Scrooge felt the same loneliness and emotions. In Stave Two, Charles Dickens' states, "At one of these a lonely boy was reading near a feeble fire; and Scrooge sat down upon a form, and wept to see his poor forgotten self as he used to be" (Dickens 38). Scrooge felt the same loneliness emotionally, and he began to feel sorrowful as he reminisced on his lonely younger self. The Ghost of Christmas Past continued to take Scrooge throughout other Christmas's from the past, which were both happy and sad memories (Dickens 39-56). The Ghost of Christmas Past symbolized memory and reminiscence of the past.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at January 26, 2015 02:12 PM

REDO Jasmine Weaver
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
26 January 2015

Question: Stave one- How does Scrooge feel when no beggars implored him to bestow a trifle, no children asked him what it was o'clock, even the blindmen's dogs appeared to know him though they said, "no eye at all is better than an evil eye, dark master!"?

Answer: In the story A Christmas Carol, Scrooge was very unhappy and did not have the Christmas spirit. "But what did Scrooge care! It was the very thing he liked. To edge his way along the crowded paths of life, warning all human sympathy to keep its distance, was what the knowing ones call "nuts" to Scrooge."
"A Christmas Carol (Dickens, 1843)/Stave 1." - Wikisource, the Free Online Library., 24 Dec. 2013. Web. 26 Jan. 2015.

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at January 26, 2015 03:06 PM

Adam Alexander (Redo)
Dr. Hobbs
English 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01
26 January 2015

Question: Why doesn't Scrooge want to take advantage of the chance Marley’s Ghost offers? Use quoted passages from the text to support the park of your answer that appears in your words.

Answer: After explaining to Scrooge that he must redeem himself to avoid a similar after-life, Marley’s Ghost leads him to the window. Looking out, Scrooge sees many apparitions that look similar to Marley’s Ghost, “The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in restless haste, and moaning as they went. Every one of them wore chains like Marley's Ghost.”

Scrooge realizes that “many had been personally known to [him] in their lives,’ and this is unsettling. He is frightened at the idea of meeting many of these souls again, shown through “Scrooge closed the window, and examined the door by which the Ghost had entered. It was double-locked, as he had locked it with his own hands, and the bolts were undisturbed. He tried to say ‘Humbug!’ but stopped at the first syllable.” Here, Scrooge looks around for a way to escape, uncomfortable with what is about to happen. He realizes there will be no way out, and he sleeps.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at January 26, 2015 03:10 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
25 January 2015

Stave one

Question: There are several different elements to Marley’s punishment. What are they?

Answer: It is obvious that Jacob Marley was not physically punished because he was dead, but he was spiritually punished. It seems that Jacob lived a greedy and self-serving life, and it is now time to pay up by having that spirit he owned weighted down with a heavy chain (Dickens 19). His mind and spirit has been wandering since he died as a punishment for his consuming to business rather than with people while alive. Marley told Scrooge that there are three ghosts coming to visit the next three days. Those ghosts are indication of Marley’s bad behavior in physical life. Those three ghosts are mostly there to have Scrooge avoid the mistakes his partner made throughout his life. The chain he is wearing in his spirit is typically the same chain he used to wear in real life. He said, "I wear the chain I forged in life," replied the Ghost. "I made it link by link and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it. Is its pattern strange to you?” (Dickens 23) The ghost did not have any rest or peace the seven years he travelled after his death.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at January 26, 2015 04:08 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 January 2015

Question: Why did Marley wear chains? Use quotes passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The main reason the Ghost of Jacob Marley was “fettered”, is because he primarily concentrated on achieving personal affluence and disregarding the requests of those whom he might have facilitated with his affluence (Dickens 13). He now is chained for eternity. These chains also represent the burden of his own guilt that he must carry with him forever. In Stave I of A Christmas Carol, Dickens inscribes “I wear the chain I forged in life, replied the Ghost. “I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and not of my own free will I wore it” (Dickens 13). In other words he did not build the “chain” the correct way throughout his lifetime by increasing his own prosperity and ignoring the poor. Marley sounds like he was a very selfish man like Scrooge.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at January 26, 2015 05:45 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
26 January 2015

68: Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: Describe the Cratchit family's toast to Scrooge. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


The Cratchets makes a toast to Scrooge simply because it is Christmas Day. They believe so strongly in the spirit of the day that they are willing to toast "...the Ogre of the family"(Dickens 57). Dickens writes, "“I’ll drink his health for your sake and the Day’s,” said Mrs. Cratchit, “not for his. Long life to him!" (Dickens 57). They are very clear that they dislike him and are compelled only by the spirit of Christmas.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at January 26, 2015 08:09 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
28 January 2015

Question: Stave 3: The Second of the Three Spirits: What did Scrooge do while his nephew and the others were playing games?

Answer: In Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol Scrooge, accompanied by the “Ghost of Christmas Present” (Dickens 48), witnesses various celebrations such as his nephew, Fred’s (Dickens 52-65). While visiting Fred, Scrooge becomes a participant in the game of How, When and Where (Dickens 64). Despite his voice not being heard “he sometimes came out with his guess quite loud, and very often guessed quite right,” (Dickens 64). Taking much pleasure in the group games, “he begged like a boy to be allowed to stay” (Dickens 64) until the conclusion of the final game of Yes and No (Dickens 64-65).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at January 26, 2015 09:57 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative CA02
26 January 2015


Question: Why was Christmas the most trying time of the year for Marley?

Answer: During the time when Jacob Marley and Scrooge worked together, they practiced shrewd and greedy behavior especially towards the poor. Marley’s afterlife is one filled with guilt and remorse. Chained to shackles in his afterlife Marley endlessly contemplate and agonizes over his past misdeeds. The story describes the traditional Christmas spirit as a time of goodwill and charity. Christmas becomes an especially trying time for Marley because of the spirit of generosity. The spirit of Christmas overwhelms and pains Marley more than any other time. The remorse of Marley is illustrated when he responds negatively to Scrooge’s praise by crying “Buisiness! Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence were all, my business. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!” (Dickens, 61) Marley goes onto explain the three spirits who will come to visit him. It is clear that Marley regrets his past actions and that the Christmas season is especially difficult.

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at January 26, 2015 11:06 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
27 January 2015


Questions: How did Scrooge feel by the time he and the Spirit left his nephew's house? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answers: After seeing his nephew, Scrooge began to have a change of heart and start pleading for more time to spend with his family. In Stave 3, the difference is illustrated by the passage “Uncle Scrooge had imperceptibly become so gay and light of heart, which would have pledged the unconscious company in return, and thanked them in an inaudible speech if the Ghost had given him time. But the whole scene passed off in the breath of the last word spoken by his nephew, and he and the Spirit were again upon their travels (Dickens 97).”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at January 27, 2015 06:23 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
27 January 2015

Question: Stave three- How did Scrooge find the second spirit?

Answer: As scrooge is sleeping he hears the noise of the church bell which wakes him up, after awakening scrooge looks around for the second spirit that he is promised will visit him, scrooge does not see the ghost. Becoming impatient scrooge goes to another room where he sees a glowing light where he assumes is the second spirit and finds this to be true.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at January 27, 2015 08:42 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 January 2015

Question: 90. Stave 4: The Last of the Spirits: What question did Scrooge ask the ghost as they stood among the graves?

Answer: Scrooge ask the ghost if he was the man who laid in the grave? Scrooge says "Am I that man who lay upon the bed?" (Dickens 62)

Posted by: William Pereira at January 27, 2015 11:10 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
28 January 2015

Question 64: Who was the second Spirit? Describe him.

Answer: In Stave III, Scrooge is haunted by the second Spirit, which is the Ghost of Christmas Present. Dickens writes, “I am the Ghost of Christmas Present,” said the Spirit. “Look upon me!” Scrooge reverently did so. It was clothed in one simple deep green robe, or mantle, bordered with white fur. This garment hung so loosely on the figure, that its capacious breast was bare, as if disdaining to be warded or concealed by an aritifice. Its feet, observable beneath the ample folds of the garment, were also bare; and on its head it wore no other covering than a holly wreath set here and there with shining icicles. Its dark brown curls were long and free: free as its genial face, its sparkling eye, its open hand, its cheery voice, its unconstrained demeanour, and its joyful air (Dickens 33). This passage virtually describes a king like character because Dickens labels the second Spirit as a majestic giant or person of royalty.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at January 27, 2015 11:11 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 January 2015

A Christmas Carol

Question #80: The Last of the Spirits: Where did Scrooge and the spirit go first?

Answer: In the Christmas Carol, the last spirit first leads Scrooge into “the city” (Dickens 51). The spirit took Scrooge to the London Stock Exchange. They both ended up listening to a group of businessmen speaking about the death of a wealthy man. After that, they ended up going to two other places.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at January 27, 2015 11:18 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 January 2015

A Christmas Carol

Question #80: The Last of the Spirits: Where did Scrooge and the spirit go first?

Answer: In the Christmas Carol, the last spirit first leads Scrooge into “the city” (Dickens 51). The spirit took Scrooge to the London Stock Exchange. They both ended up listening to a group of businessmen speaking about the death of a wealthy man. After that, they ended up going to two other places.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at January 27, 2015 11:18 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
28 January 2015

Question: What was Scrooge’s attitude about being with the third spirit?

Answer: Scrooge was fearful of the third spirit. Scrooge responds in terror of the phantoms large and grim appearance. Dickens captures the attitude toward the third spirit when he expresses “Scrooge feared the silent shape so much that his legs trembled beneath him, and he found that he could hardly stand when he prepared to follow it.” (Dickens, 179). The spirit drags Scrooge to many strange places. Scrooge later pleads for forgiveness and yet another opportunity to redeem himself.

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at January 28, 2015 01:17 AM

Adam Alexander
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01
28 January 2015

Question: What did Scrooge think about when he heard the harp music?

Answer: The Ghost of Christmas Present takes Scrooge to his nephew’s house to watch their family celebrate Christmas. While all the merrymaking is going on, Scrooge’s niece begins to play the harp. The music affects Scrooge a certain way, written that “when this strain of music sounded, all the things that Ghost had shown him, came upon his mind; he softened more and more.” It appeases Scrooge’s mind. Dickens writes, “if he could have listened to it often, years ago, he might have cultivated the kindnesses of life for his own happiness with his own hands, without resorting to the sexton's spade that buried Jacob Marley.”
Summary: The music makes Scrooge think of everything the ghost has shown him.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at January 28, 2015 01:40 AM

Marie Destin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
26 January 2015

Question: Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: What happened to the way the Ghost and Scrooge looked as the night went on? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The Ghost of Christmas was looking less and less youthful throughout the journey with Scrooge. There wasn’t any change in Scrooge appearance during the journey of Christmas past. Scrooge noticed the change on the last night of the journey of Christmas past when looking at the Sprit he saw the strand of gray hair. In the text Dickens wrote , “Scrooge had observed this change, but never spoke of it, until they left a children’s Twelfth Night party, when, looking at the Spirit as they stood together in an open place, he noticed that its hair was grey.” (Dickens 48).

Posted by: Marie Destin at January 28, 2015 03:09 AM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
28 January 2015

Question: (#83) Where did they go second? What did they see?
Answer: In Stave Four of Charles Dicken’s Novella, A Christmas Carol, the second place at which The Ghost of Christmases Yet To Come and Scrooge arrive at is a poor section of town that Scrooge had never been to before. The specific place that the duo head towards is described to the reader as, “…[A] low-browed, beetling shop, below a pent-house roof, where iron, old rags, bottles, bones, and greasy offal, were brought” (Dickens, 53). Later on in Stave Four, Dickens describes the location – via a character’s dialogue – as a, “parlour” (Dickens, 54). It is in this location where three individuals – a laundress, a charwoman, and an undertaker’s man – all meet with an elderly man who looked, “nearly seventy years of age” (Dickens, 53). Each of the three individuals is carrying a sack, the contents of which they reveal to the elderly man one after another. Their sacks turn out to be the stolen possessions of a recently passed away man and, as it turns out, they happen to be selling said possessions to the elderly man. The victim of this thievery is described to the reader as “dead” (Dickens, 54), “a wicked old screw” (Dickens, 54), and as being, “…alone by himself” (Dickens, 54). Near the end of Stave Four, the identity of the deceased is revealed to the reader as being none other than Scrooge himself.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at January 28, 2015 03:38 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 January 2015

Question: What did the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come look like?

Answer: In Stave 4, Scrooge encounters the last Spirit, Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is explained as a dark mysterious figure. The spirit is explained to have a melancholy feeling which settles in the room when it approaches Scrooge. The narrator explains the spirit by stating, "The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently approached. When it came, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in the very air through which this Spirit it moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery". In more description of the Spirit, the narrator also states, "He felt that it was tall and stately when it came beside him, and that its mysterious presence filled him with a solemn dread" (Dickens 73). In Stave 4, the Spirit is presented as a dark and gloomy figure which foreshadowed and symbolized that Scrooge was going to see the Christmas's filled with more gloom and sorrow regardless of how optimistic Scrooge seemed about the future. (Dickens 74).

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at January 28, 2015 09:28 AM

Rachel Andrews

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road CA02

28 January 2015

Question: What was the Spirit's reply to Scrooge's question: "Have they no refuge or resource?" Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In Stave III of “A Christmas Carol”, the Ghost of Christmas Present responds to Scrooge’s question of “Have they no refuge or resource?" (Dickens 24) with the man’s own words. In Stave I, two gentlemen come to Scrooge’s business asking him if he might assist in providing “some slight provisions for the Poor and Destitute” (Dickens 7) since it is Christmas and a time of giving. Scrooge demands, “Are there no prisons?” (Dickens 7) and “Are there no Union workhouses?” (Dickens 7). When the Spirit uses Scrooges own, harsh words back at him, he is mocking him and showing him how cruel and callous he was.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews at January 28, 2015 09:32 AM

Bobbi Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Love and Desire CA01
28, January 2015

Q: From Stave 4: How did Scrooge feel about the ghost of Christmas Yet to Come? (#78)

A: Scrooge’s feelings, toward this new ghost are anything but pleasant. The mere description of the new ghost, is dreadful because the ghost is of the unknown. It is unknown, because it is yet to come, but what is yet to come is able to change. “It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand.” (Dickens 50).
The description, of this ghost is similar to what many think of as the Grim Reaper. Even in the olden days of Scrooge, there were tails of the Grim Reaper. Two other prime examples of how Scrooge feels toward this ghost are: “He felt that it was tall and stately when it came beside him, and that its mysterious presence filled him with a solemn dread.” (Dickens, 50) The” mysterious presence” (Dickens, 50), with it being so unknown to Scrooge, could be to blame for the unease.
During these times, people had extreme fears, of things they did not understand. Scrooge, being a business man, and a fairly successful one to all appearances would be no different in this regard. Another passage, from the stave, that also reinforces this point is “Although well used to ghostly company by this time, Scrooge feared the silent shape so much that his legs trembled beneath him, and he found that he could hardly stand when he prepared to follow it.” (Dickens, 50). As was mentioned, Scrooge was no spring chicken to the presents of ghosts, but this ghost still unnerved him. The ghost was even aware of this fact too, because “The Spirit paused a moment, as observing his condition, and giving him time to recover.”(Dickens, 51). This simple action, shows that the spirit is not bad intentions despite its given appearance.
But, this doesn’t seem to do any good for poor Scrooge for he at one point says to the spirit, “I fear you more than any Spectre I have seen…” (Dickens, 51). Despite this, Scrooge eventually comes around, and even admits he knows of the spirits good intentions and follows it. Scrooge pushes, past rational thought and fear of the unknown, because he doesn’t wish to become like that of his partner Marley in death.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at January 28, 2015 10:40 AM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journey’s in Narrative CA02
28 January 2015

Question: Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: Who were the two children the Ghost had under its robe? What did the spirit tell Scrooge about them?

Answer: In A Christmas Carl’s stave four, the Spirit’s reply to Scrooge’s question is, “Ignorance and Want” (Dickens 71). He goes on to tell Scrooge that these children belong to man and are not to be toyed with. He warns Scrooge to beware both of the children “but most of all beware the boy” (Dickens 71). The spirit explains his warning by stating, “on his brow I see that written which is doom, unless the writing be erased” (Dickens 17). With that, Scrooge seemed to feel a little sympathy towards the children.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at January 28, 2015 10:54 AM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
English 220Cl On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in NarrativeCA02
28 January 2015

Question: Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: What was the second place they visited?

After seeing the city on Christmas day, the second spirit took Scrooge to the home of Bob Cratchit. This is pointed out in the text, "that led him straight to Scrooge's clerks's; for there he went, and took Scrooge with him, holding to his robe; and on the threshold of the door the Spirit smiled, and stopped to bless Bob Cratchit's dwelling with the sprinklings of his torch." (Dickens, 36). The family doesn't have a lot of money, but they make it a point to show that they are having a merry Christmas.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at January 28, 2015 01:09 PM

Duane Daye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
28 January 2015

Question: What was the second place they visited? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The second place the visited was “where Miners live, who labour in the bowels of the earth”. Scrooge here witnessed a cheerful company group of people around a fire. An old man and woman, with their children and their grandchildren a dressed in holiday attire singing Christmas carols

Posted by: Duane Daye at January 28, 2015 01:24 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
26 January 2015

Stave three

Question: what were some of the other places the ghost took scrooge? What did Scrooge find at each place?

Answer: He went to his room that looked very different. The walls, the ceiling looked different and more of living Green (Dickens 59). The ghost of Christmas present lures him into his room filled with delicious food (Dickens 59). From this room all foods disappear, and the ghost takes him to Christmas morning. The weather is almost as snowstorm ice everywhere, the windows are black along with the houses, but it is almost as everyone in the neighborhood is enjoying the outside world (Dickens 61). For instance, Dickens’ writes about how people are throwing snowballs, Spanish men winking at beautiful girls. The ghost took him to the richest of the rich people and the poorest of the poor and showed him that no matter what they all as a family will celebrate the day of Christmas (Dickens 61, 62). Even two men who only watch over light “they wished each other Merry Christmas in their can of grog” (Dickens 79). Scrooge found out that no matter what place he went to everybody celebrated Christmas day with bliss.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at January 28, 2015 02:14 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
1/28/2015

Question: Stave 3 the second of 3 spirits: How did scrooge feel by the time he and the spirit left his nephews house?

Scrooge felt like he was a member of the family before leaving his nephew's house because on, (Dickens page 47) in the second paragraph, “Scrooge was playing the game with his family and forgot that he was just a mere ghost.” Also on in the fourth paragraph of )Dickens page 48) Scrooge is happy to see that all of his family is thinking, of him because he, “Scrooge became gay!” Regardless of his is will toward Christmas and his cynicism towards his family, he demonstrates wanted to be a part of their games and acknowledges that his family cares for him.

Posted by: sergio Velazquez at January 28, 2015 02:21 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 January 2015

Question: How does Scrooge feel when he realizes the visits are over?

Answer: As Scrooge awoke in Stave V from the last Spirit’s haunting, he felt as if he was the happiest man alive. He understood now why Marley and the Three Spirits came to rendezvous with him. He realized that he made many mistakes as a child, young adult, and now one of the town’s elders. He appreciated Christmas in every way possible and started living it by giving provisions towards the poor. Dickens says, “YES! And the bedpost was his own. The bed was his own, the room was his own. Best and happiest of all, the Time before him was his own, to make amends to it!” Scrooge said he would live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits would strive within him. He was shimmered and so glorious with his good intentions. “I don’t know what to do!” cried Scrooge, laughing and crying in the same breath; and making a perfect Laocoön of himself with his stockings. “I am as light as a feather, I am happy as an angel. I am as merry as a school-boy… A merry Christmas to everybody!” (Dickens 63)

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at January 28, 2015 08:21 PM

Jasmine Weaver
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
28 January 2015

Question: Stave 3: The 2nd of 3 Spirits: Who was Tiny Tim? What did Scrooge ask the Ghost about Tiny Tim? What was the Ghost’s reply?

Answer: Tiny Tim was a young boy that was crippled. Scrooge asked the ghost to tell him if Tiny Tim would live. The ghost told him "I see a vacant swat, in the poor chimney corner, and a crutch without an owner, carefully preserved. If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, the child will die."
"A Christmas Carol (Dickens, 1843)/Stave 3." - Wikisource, the Free Online Library, 24 Dec. 2013. Web. 28 Jan. 2015.

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at January 28, 2015 09:21 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
30 January 2015

Question #111. Stave Five: The End of It: Why is Scrooge so interested in/in love with the doorknocker? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In Stave 5 of A Christmas Carol, while Scrooge is waiting for the turkey delivery he acknowledges that he “scarcely ever looked at it [the doorknocker] before” (Dickens 87). It is presumable that the knocker is a reminder of Scrooge’s experience with the Christmas spirits. More precisely, his visit from the deceased Jacob Marley, since the knocker was “not a knocker, but Marley’s face” (Dickens 16) before the four spirits came to Scrooge.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at January 29, 2015 05:15 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
29 January 2015

95. Stave Four: The Last of the Spirits: What suggests to Scrooge that the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come feels sorry for Scrooge? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge believes that the Ghost of Christmas yet to Come feels sorry for Scrooge because when Scrooge is pleading to the Spirit, the Spirit's hand shows some humanity as it shakes and trembles. As Scrooge pleads "For the first time the hand appeared to shake" (Dickens 62) After Scrooge continues to plead Dickens describes the ghost hand by saying "the kind hand trembled" (Dickens 62)

Posted by: William Pereira at January 29, 2015 05:59 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
29 January 2015

Question: What did scrooge do when he met the man who had asked for a donation the day before? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Upon waking that morning, scrooge was generally over excited and full of life. He meets one of the men who earlier asked him for charity donations for the poor and apologizes for his previous rudeness, he then promises to donate large sums of money to the poor. He essentially does everything that a good moral person would have done, once given a second chance with new understanding and respect with life.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at January 29, 2015 07:17 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
29 January 2015

Question: (#97) What day was it when Scrooge woke up? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: In the Fifth Stave of Charles Dicken’s novella, A Christmas Carol, Scrooge woke up on December the 25th, better known as, “Christmas Day” (Dickens, 64).

Posted by: Bryan Hess at January 29, 2015 09:08 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
29 January 2015

A Christmas Carol

Question #96: The End of It: Describe Scrooge’s behavior when he woke up.

Answer: When Scrooge woke up, his ordinary nature, that he was known for having, had changed completely, for the better. He had woken up overjoyed, so happy that as he struggled to get out of bed he bellowed, “I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future!” (Dickens 63). After the whole experience with all three of the spirits, he had an entirely different look on life. He changed the way he was so that he would not end up a sad and miserable old man that everyone hated. He became very grateful and charitable after everything.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at January 29, 2015 10:46 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys into Narrative
26 January 2015
A Christmas Carol

Question: Stave Five: The End of It: How did Scrooge spend the rest of his life? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge spent the rest of his life as kinder, gentler, and more compassionate person. Dickens confirms this in the final paragraph when he writes, “He had no further intercourse with Spirits, but lived upon the Total-Abstinence principle ever afterwards; and it was always said of him that he knew how to keep Christmas well if any man alive possessed the knowledge.” (Dickens, 237)

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at January 29, 2015 11:00 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
26 January 2015

Question: Stave V:What happened at the office the next morning?

Answer: Scrooge waited for Bob Cratchit to walk in late to tell him that he is giving him a raise in his salary. He was so excited to tell him and offer a raise to Bob. "I'll raise your salary, and endeavour to assist your struggling family, and we will discuss your affairs this very afternoon, over a Christmas bowl of smoking bishop, Bob!" Scrooge wished Bob a merry Christmas and wanted to give him a better year than he has given him beofre. (Dickens 67,68).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at January 30, 2015 01:03 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
29 January 2015

Question #99: How did Scrooge act when he went outside?

Answer: In the very last stave, Scrooge finally steps outside. Scrooge is blissful and has never been so content in the season of this specific holiday. Scrooge is jubilant and genuinely feels this happiness in his heart. The last stave states, "His own heart laughed: and that was quite enough for him" (Dickens 147). The book explained Scrooge's feelings by stating, "He had never dreamed that any walk--that anything--could give him so much happiness" (Dickens 144). Scrooge finally reached a moment in his life where he felt genuinely happy with his day as he went outside.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at January 30, 2015 01:51 AM

Adam Alexander
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01
30 January 2015

Question: What is Scrooge’s business and what is the most important thing in the world to him?

Answer: The place that Scrooge works at is made very unclear throughout the book. However, it is shown that he owns a “firm” and is the head of it, “The firm was known as Scrooge and Marley. Sometimes people new to the business called Scrooge Scrooge, and sometimes Marley, but he answered to both names: it was all the same to him.” Scrooge and Marley opened it together, and it is most likely a type of money lending business, money, of which, would be Scrooge’s most important thing in the world. As a cold business, he has no time for anything but making profit. It is shown in the many cases were he puts money first, and people’s lives second. For example, “what's Christmas time to you but a time for paying bills without money; a time for finding yourself a year older, but not an hour richer; a time for balancing your books and having every item in 'em through a round dozen of months presented dead against you?” Dickens doesn’t specifically say what job Scrooge has because it doesn’t matter, it’s just about working hard, money, selfishness, and money.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at January 30, 2015 03:59 AM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
29 January 2015

Based on the trip taken with the Ghost of Christmas Past, how did Scrooge compare to his old boss to Fezziwig? Were they alike in any ways? Different? Who was worse, and why? Explain.


Fezziwig, while a serious businessman, is willing to sacrifice productivity for other people and for Christmas. Dickens writes, "“Yo ho, my boys!” said Fezziwig. “No more work to-night. Christmas Eve, Dick. Christmas, Ebenezer! Let’s have the shutters up,” cried old Fezziwig, with a sharp clap of his hands." (Dickens 36). Scrooge, however, values productivity over all things.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at January 30, 2015 10:59 AM

Christina Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in a Narrative CA02
30 January 2015

Question: Stave Five: The End of it: Why was Scrooge so surprised to find his bed curtains still on his bed? Why did Scrooge think his bed curtains had been torn down?

Answer: In Stave Five of A Christmas Carol, Scrooge had just awoken from his trip into the future. In the future (Stave Four), Scrooge had died, and Joe took down Scrooge’s curtains “rings and all” (Dickens 88) to sell them. So when he awoke from the trip, he was surprised to see the curtains. He goes on by saying, “They are here—I am here—the shadows of the things that would have been, may be dispelled” (Dickens 102). His bed curtains being there and not torn down means Scrooge had not died. This realization made him “as happy as an angel” (Dickens 101), and he went on being merry.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at January 30, 2015 11:07 AM

Rachel Andrews

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road CA02

29 January 2015

Question:

What is a straightjacket? Why did Bob Cratchit consider putting Scrooge in straightjacket? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

In Stave V of “A Christmas Carol”, Bob Cratchit contemplated hitting his boss over the head and putting him into a “straight-waistcoat” (Dickens 7). This is similar to the straightjackets they put on the mentally insane to incapacitate them when they are a danger to themselves or others. Bob Cratchit believes this is a reasonable course of action when his cruel, penny-pinching, selfish, bitter boss “[leaps] from his stool” (Dickens 7) and offers to raise his salary for being late to work.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews at January 30, 2015 12:12 PM

Marie Destin
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys of Narratives CA02
30 January 2015


Question: 109. Stave Five: The End of It: What type of a person is Scrooge at the end of the story? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer: At the beginning of the story, Scrooge was furious and cold man. That Scrooge was so angry that he did not let his clerk have and fire and did not want to participate in Christmas festive. When Scrooge when through his journey with three spirits seeing every part of his life. Scrooge became a changed man. Scrooge became loving Christmas, he said “I shall love it, as long as I live!” cried Scrooge, patting it with his hand. “I scarcely ever looked at it before. What an honest expression it has in its face! It’s an incredible knocker!—Here’s the Turkey! Hallo! Whoop! How are you! Merry Christmas (Dickens 85 ).

Posted by: Marie Destin at January 30, 2015 12:56 PM

Duane Daye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 January 2015

Question: What did Scrooge ask the boy under his window to do, and why? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Upon waking up from the three visits from the ghost, Scrooge was in shock to finally be in his bed. Scrooge woke up as a new man saying “I will live in the past, the present, and the future” (Dickens 64). Still in confusion on what the date was, he yelled out the window to a boy outside “What’s to-day?” and the boy replied “Why, Christmas Day” (Dickens 64). Then Scrooge went on to ask the boy a favor, if he could go buy a huge Turkey “I am earnest, Go and buy it, and tell ‘em to bring it here, that I may give you shilling. Come back with him in less than five minutes, and I’ll give you half-a-crown!” (Dickens 64). Scrooge said “I’ll send it to Bob Cratchit’s!” because he wanted to make sure that Bob’s family had enough to eat on the holiday, especially after he saw how Tiny Tim was sick.

Posted by: Duane Daye at January 30, 2015 01:10 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL on the Proverbial Road: Journeys in a Narrative CA02
30 January 2015
Q: Jacob Marley’s ghost left Scrooge with a lesson and prediction.what was the lesson and what was the prediction and how were they significant to the story? Did scrooge learn the lesson and did the prophecy come true.
Marly Predicted that Scrooge would become just like him and wonder the earth endlessly, ”Without their visits,'' said the Ghost, ``you cannot hope to shun the path I tread. Expect the first to-morrow, when the bell tolls one.''(first Stave)Scrooge learned a lesson so the prophecy was avoided.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at January 30, 2015 01:59 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
2 February 2015

Question 121: After he was returned to his home and to his own time, Scrooge did three good deeds. What were they and why are they important?

Answer: Upon returning home, first Ebenezer Scrooge anonymously sends a turkey “twice the size of Tiny Tim” (Dickens 87) to the Cratchit family. Then, upon seeing the “portly gentleman, who had walked into his counting-house the day before” (Dickens 88) on the street, Scrooge makes a donation. After which Scrooge requests the man “come and see me” (Dickens 89) to repay “a great many back-payments” (Dickens 88). Ebenezer’s final good deed occurs the following day. Upon Bob Cratchit’s arrival, Scrooge declares he will “raise your salary” (Dickens 90), along with assist the Cratchit’s during their economic hardship.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at January 30, 2015 10:30 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 January 2015

Question 135: Bob Cratchit’s offers a Christmas toast in Scrooge’s honor. Mrs. Cratchit’s feelings about Scrooge are different from her husband’s. What would cause this difference in their feelings?

Answer: Mr. Cratchit gives a toast in Scrooge’s honor because he wishes he too could celebrate Christmas the way everyone else does. However, Mrs. Cratchit’s feelings about Scrooge are different from her husband’s because when she says “it should be Christmas Day, I am sure, on which one drinks the health of such an odious, stingy, hard, unfeeling man as Mr. Scrooge… I’ll drink his health for your sake and the Day’s said Mrs. Cratchit, not for his. Long life to him! A Merry Christmas and a happy new year! - he’ll be very merry and very happy, I have no doubt!” (Dickens 41) This passage explains why Mrs. Cratchit dislikes Mr. Scrooge. Another reason why Mr. and Mrs. Cratchit’s feelings are different is because of the way Scrooge reveals himself to the public. While at work, Mr. Cratchit believes Scrooge needs somebody to talk to, where as Mrs. Cratchit thinks he should not be honored because of his nasty ways of treating people.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 1, 2015 04:23 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
31 January 2015

A Christmas Carol

Question #143: Some readers suggest that a major theme in this story is “the possibility of change.” This sounds a lot like one of the SLU core values (perhaps, personal development). Using both paraphrased and quoted passages from the text, show how this idea is, indeed, one that repeatedly reoccurs throughout the narrative.

Answer: One of the major themes in the Christmas Carol is “the possibility of change” that is similar to one of Saint Leo University’s core value of personal development. The theme and the core value go hand in hand because it is about the development or change of one’s self. Saint Leo describes it as the development and strengthening of one’s character to have a more balanced life. In the Christmas Carol, Scrooge is the one that goes through a significant change and becomes a changed man. Before the Spirits arrived, Scrooge was a mean, cheap, and rude man that did not care for anyone around him. After the Spirits had mentored Scrooge, he changed completely; he was nicer, happy, joyful, and giving. Scrooge even states that he will stay the way he is during Christmas and “try to keep it all the year” (Dickens 62). That is something that changed Scrooge and made him a changed man for the better.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at February 1, 2015 04:36 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
28 January 2015
Stave five

Question: describe scrooge’s interaction with Bob Cratchit at his office, what is Bob’s response?

Answer: Scrooge set himself to see Bob come in late to the office, and that is what happened. Scrooge waited and waited for Bob until “He was full eighteen minutes and a half behind his time.” Scrooge asked Bob "What do you mean by coming here at this time of day?” (Dickens 145). Bob replied by saying that this has only happened once a year and he will never repeat this again. Scrooge interaction was that he is going to raise Bob’s salary, clapped his back, and told him Merry Christmas as if he did it the first time of his life. Scrooge also offered to help Bob’s struggling family as well as discussing his affairs in the afternoon (Dickens 146).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 1, 2015 05:38 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
1 February 2015

Question: In stave three, why is scrooge so moved by- and terrified of- the children, “ignorance and want”? Why does the spirit tell him to “most of all beware [ignorance]”?

Answer: Scrooge cannot fathom how inconsiderate the children are in regards to their own personal wants. Scrooge is very moved and terrified by the children’s “ignorance” primarily because he was unable to relate to how they were acting at all. He was not sure how to confront these children nor speak with them.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at February 1, 2015 09:28 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
1 February 2015

Question: What specific events lead to Scrooge's eventual reformation? In particular, at what point in the story do we first begin to see him change (that is, when does he first begin to show emotions other than anger)?

Answer: One specific event Scrooge encounters which causes him to change his mindset is the moment he sees his future self dead in a grave. Scrooge shows emotions of fear and regret when he sees the gravestone with his name printed on it. At this moment, Scrooge realizes his life must undergo some major changes (Dickens 84). Towards the end of the book, Scrooge approaches the upcoming Christmas holiday with a brighter and uplifted attitude rather than bitterness and anger; this is one of the specific events of reformation Scrooge experiences (Dickens 89).

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 1, 2015 10:45 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
1 February 2015


“Christmas Carol”

Question: What specific events lead to Scrooge's eventual reformation? In particular, at what point in the story do we first begin to see him change (that is, when does he first begin to show emotions other than anger)?

Answer: Scrooge changes his life when the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come shows him his future grave. in this specific event, Scrooge encounters a realization that he must alter his lifestyle. Scrooge’s reformation is when he shows emotions of utter happiness on Christmas day after his visit with Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come (Dickens 84).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 1, 2015 11:17 PM

Marie Destin

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys of Narratives CA02

2 February 2015

Question: Scrooge promised he would keep Christmas in his heart throughout the year. What does this mean, exactly? Is this believable? Why, or why not?

Answer: When Scrooge said,, “I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!” (Dickens, 84).When Scrooge said this, he means he will be a better man.The Spirt of Christmas will flourish throughout his whole body. When comprehending the proclamation that Scrooge said, “I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future!” Scrooge repeated as he scrambled out of bed. “The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. Oh, Jacob Marley! Heaven and the Christmas Time be praised for this! I say it on my knees, old Jacob, on my knees!”(Dickens 85). The action and words were entirely believable before finishing the novel. He sounds so sincere when claiming he will pursue friendly lifestyle.Many can see the quote that he gotten drop to his knees to emphasise his claim of living in the Christmas Spirit. That he even said his Jacob Marley for showing him the way to live a generous life. There is sufficient evidence to show his sincerity after claiming to do well to people and family he did many good deeds to keep Christmas alive.

Posted by: Marie Destin at February 1, 2015 11:21 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Literature CA02
1 February 2015


Question: How did Scrooge compare to his old partner Jacob Marley? Were they alike in any ways? Different? Who was worse, and why? Explain.


Answer: Jacob Marley and Scrooge were both greedy and selfish. The chains were made because of his greed and selfish acts throughout his life. He mentions that Scrooge also made those same chains seven years ago and wears them still. Both Marley and Scrooge worked together in the counting house. They had become cold-hearted and hard towards the poor and wanted to fill their pockets with money as much as they could. An example of this is shown in Stave I when Scrooge refuses to give money to the poor or help in any way. He also is cold towards his nephew who only wants to spend time with him. (Dickens 3-6).

The obvious difference between the two is that Marley is dead and wanders as a ghost as punishment, and Scrooge is still alive and given the chance to change his destiny.

Scrooge is worse because he made those chains seven years ago. Marley tells Scrooge his chains were “...full and heavy and as long as this, seven Christmas Eves ago. You have laboured on it, since. It is a ponderous chain!” Marley is saying that his chain has gotten longer and heavier since those seven years ago. Since these chains were meant as punishment, the longer chains can be presumed to be the worst. The death of Marley may have made Scrooge’s attitude towards the world more cold or harsh (Dickens 13-14).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at February 2, 2015 12:06 AM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA02
02 February 2015

Question: Why didn’t Scrooge marry the lady he knew from the past? What might have happened if he did? What really happened because he didn’t?

Answer: In Stave Two of A Christmas Carol, Scrooge didn’t marry the lady he knew from the past, Belle because she left him. She believed “another idol [had] displaced [her]” (Dickens 45), that idol being gold. If they actually got married, there could have been two possible outcomes. The first one is they would live a miserable life due to his obsession with gold. The other outcome is they would live happy with children. However, because he didn’t marry Belle, she married someone else, had children and seemed happy (Dickens 48). Scrooge ended up sitting in his office alone during the death of Marley.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at February 2, 2015 11:01 AM

Rachel Andrews

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02

1 February 2015


Question: Now that you have read the entire story, what does it mean when someone is described as a “Scrooge”? Is Scrooge now an archetype, of some sort? If so, what archetype? Explain.

Answer:The word “Scrooge” has a negative connotation. It has become somewhat of an archetype. If someone is a “Scrooge”, he/she tends to be callous, cold-hearted, greedy, and selfish. These describe Ebenezer Scrooge at the beginning of the novella “A Christmas Carole” perfectly. The word “Scrooge” has become somewhat of an archetype, describing a character who is miserly and misanthropic. This character would go without the basic goods and luxuries to hoard money; they have a disgust for all things merry and related to humans.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews at February 2, 2015 11:11 AM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 February 2015

Question: 138. For such a short piece of fiction, there are two surprisingly long sections given over to people dancing with each other: the party at Fezziwig’s house, and then the party at Fred’s (okay, good call, at Fred’s there is a little dancing and some blind-man's bluff, but they are still similar enough to fall under this category). Why is this? Why aren’t these simply scenes of people enjoying dinner or conversation together, instead of partying? Why might the author, Charles Dickens, focus so much on the physicality and movement of dance?

Answer: Dickens uses the physicality and movement of dance to convey the joy that is felt among them. If he had just used the act of conversation the message to Scrooge would not have been as powerful. Conversation can mean anything but dancing is true joy and exuberance. Dickens explains “To couple too; with a good stiff piece of work cut out for them; three or four and twenty pair of partners; people who were not to be trifled with; people who would dance, and had no notion of walking” (Dickens 25) Scrooge earlier in the book says he would not attend Fred’s party and tells him to go to hell. The irony is that he attends Fred’s party at the end of the novel to in fact save him from going to hell.

Posted by: William Pereira at February 2, 2015 11:17 AM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
02 February 2015

Question: What was Ebenezer Scrooge’s business and what was the most important thing in the world to him? Why? Explain.

Answer: Scrooge dedicated his whole life towards his business, forgetting other people and acts of charity. His business was a money lending business and he was an accountant. Scrooge cared about money more than anything, and this is shown here, "I don't make merry myself at Christmas, and I can't afford to make idle people merry. I help to support te establishments I have mentioned: they cost enough: and those who are badly off must go there." (Dickens 6) This statement accurately depicts what Scrooge was all about. This changed after he was visited by the Ghosts, and he ends up becoming a more charitable man and redefining his priorities.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at February 2, 2015 12:31 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
2 February 2015

Question: (#145) Some readers suggest that a major theme in this story is “one’s duty to his/her fellow human being.” This sounds a lot like one of the SLU core values. Using both paraphrased and quoted passages from the text, show how this idea is, indeed, one that reoccurs repeatedly throughout the narrative.

Answer: In Charles Dickens’ novella, A Christmas Carol, the theme of one’s duty to his or her fellow human being is, in fact, a central concept to the plot as a whole. This theme – reminiscent of the Saint Leo University core value of Community – is the lesson that the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Future are trying to teach Scrooge throughout the narrative. For example, the Ghost of Christmas Past brings Scrooge to a scene in which two men visit Scrooge as a child. Scrooge recalls how the two men quelled his loneliness and made him feel joy by giving him gifts. This, in turn, resulted in Scrooge wishing that he, “… [Had] given [a child] something,” earlier that day (Dickens, 22). Later on, the reader sees both the Ghost of Christmas Present and Future using similar techniques to help Scrooge understand that he is not treating his fellow human beings with the kindness and passion that they deserve.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 2, 2015 01:07 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 January 2015

Q) What makes the holiday of Christmas such an effective setting for the humanitarian issues (i.e. sympathy for the poor, needy children) that the author of A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens, was trying to address?
Christmas is the time of selfness and giving, also a time associated with deep introspection when we hope to develop a more kindred spirit of humanity, Scrooge’s character is the old crone who is cold and bitter, he contrast’s the setting perfectly and it really shoes the reader just how deeply hardened of an individual he is. But in the end even the coldest of hearts was warmed by the spirits of Christmas.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at February 2, 2015 02:01 PM

Adam Alexander and Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road CA01
5 February 2015

Question: Who do you believe fits the Herald archetype in “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens?

Answer: The function of a Herald is to provide reason to go on a journey or accept a challenge. Both Marley’s Ghost and Scrooge have aspects of the Herald, each represents a type of realization for going on the journey, the ghost providing the physical and Scrooge, the metaphysical.
The first character to fit the archetype would be Marley’s Ghost. He shows Scrooge both ends of his path and this causes Scrooge to want to change. Marley’s Ghost thrusts Scrooge into this journey, but Scrooges motivation drives him to continue. Marley’s Ghost shows Scrooge physical evidence of what he will become if he continues his life the way he has, through himself.
Scrooge on the other hand, represents the herald through metaphysical realization, which causes change. Through his journey, he uses his experiences to develop an understanding of himself, realizing what he has been missing in his life. Dickens writes, ““No space of regret can make amends for one life's opportunity misused.” Scrooge cannot change his past mistakes but he can change himself for a better future. He digests the question “to maintain this life or to ascend.”

Posted by: Adam Aleander at February 6, 2015 02:23 PM

Adam Alexander and Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road CA01
9 February 2015
Question: What is the significance of the shapeshifter and which character from A Christmas Carol represent the archetype.

Answer: The purpose of a shapeshifter, said by Vogler, was to change the view or mood of the protagonist. They could lead then to a new way of thinking or mislead them down the wrong path. The shapeshifter can also be represented as someone who changes form.
In Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, the shape-shifter archetype is aligned well with Marley’s Ghost, in a literal and metaphorical way. Marley was once human and exemplified the same characteristics shown with Scrooge at the beginning of the novel. After death, he realizes his past mistakes and helps Scrooge on his journey to avoid the afterlife he experienced himself. He goes from the physical human form to the ghost form.
Marley also represents the shapeshifter in a metaphorical sense, because he helps change the view that Scrooge has on life. With Marley’s assistance, Scrooge is able to realize himself that he wants to change and live a happier life. This is shown in the Scrooge’s words, "’I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future!’ Scrooge repeated as he scrambled out of bed. ‘The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. Oh Jacob Marley! Heaven, and the Christmas Time be praised for this. I say it on my knees, old Jacob, on my knees!’ Scrooge lives with what he learned from the past, present, and future ghosts. He thanks Marley because it was him who changed Scrooge’s view of his life.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at February 9, 2015 02:56 AM

Chrissy Castro and Rachael Andrews
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220cl On the Proverbial Road: A Journey in Narrative CA01
23 March 2015
Departure Stages
In A Christmas Carol written by Charles Dickens, the hero of the story is Scrooge. For Scrooge, the Ordinary world is everything outside of his house on that particular day. The Extraordinary world is everything after he goes in his house that day. The door to his house is actually the first threshold for his journey. During his journey into the extraordinary world, Scrooge meets Marley and the three spirits. These characters play as the tests as well as the allies. As for enemies, he doesn’t encounter other beings on his journey so maybe he’s just an enemy to himself.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro and Rachael Andrews at March 23, 2015 02:26 PM

Thomas Egyed

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative

21 January 2016



Question 5: Stave One-Marley’s Ghost: What do the “portly gentlemen” want? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.




Answer: Ultimately the portly gentlemen would like Scrooge to make a donation to help the poor. At the beginning of the conversation they say it in a way that is not asking but more as a suggestion. “it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the poor and destitute,” (Dickens 5) Scrooge replies with sarcasm. The portly gentlemen were persistent and continued to suggest in different ways until the end of the conversation when they finally ask “What shall I put you down for?” (Dickens 6)

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 21, 2016 04:22 PM

Thomas Egyed

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative

21 January 2016



Question 46: Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: What part of his past does the spirit show to Scrooge first? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.




Answer: The first part of Scrooge’s past the spirit shows him is the countryside where he grew up as a little boy. “I was bred in this place. I was a boy here!” (Dickens 20) The ghost then questioned him about the surroundings as they moved onward. “They walked along the road; Scrooge recognizing every gate, and post, and tree; until a little market-town appeared in the distance, with its bridge, its church, and winding river.” (Dickens 20)

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 21, 2016 04:26 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
21 January 2016
Question 27: Marley’s Ghost: Why did Marley wear chains? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: Marley wears the chains that he forged in life. Due of Marley’s greed, he now is fated to walk the world wearing these chains.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at January 21, 2016 07:25 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
21 January 2016
Question 43: The First of the Three Spirits: What was the strangest thing about the way the spirit looked? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: The ghost of Christmas past looked “like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man”. The figures face was that of a child’s while its hair lay stained with age; its body was muscular but bared no trace of hair (Dickens 19).

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at January 21, 2016 07:38 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
20 January 2016

Stave One

Question 12. Marley’s Ghost: What warning does Marley give to Scrooge?

Answer Marley’s ghost warns Scrooge that he will be condemned to wandering the earth after death if he does not change. “I am here to-night to warn you that you have yet a chance and hope of escaping my fate…” (Dickens 16) Marley continues to say that Scrooge will be visited by three spirits, and he will need them in order to avoid his potential cursed fate. “You will be haunted by three spirits… Without their visits, you cannot hope to shun the path I tread.” (Dickens 16)

Stave Two

Question 42.
The First of the Three Spirits: Describe the appearance of the first spirit.

Answer The first spirit appeared through the flashing of light. “Light flashed up in the room upon the instant.” (Dickens 18) Scrooge compares him first to a child, then to an old man. “It was a strange figure -- like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man…” (Dickens 18) He decides that the spirit looks like an old man with a child’s proportions. “…gave him the appearance of having receded from the view, and being diminished to a child's proportions” (Dickens 18) Its’ white hair ran down the spirit’s back and his face had no wrinkles. “Its hair, which hung about its neck and down its back, was white as if with age; and yet the face had not a wrinkle in it, and the tenderest bloom was on the skin.” (Dickens 18) He wore a pure white tunic which was fastened with a belt. “Its legs and feet, most delicately formed, were, like those upper members, bare. It wore a tunic of the purest white, and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful.” (Dickens 18) He was holding a holly branch, and some summer flowers. Out of the top of his head came a beam of light, and under his arm he held a cap. “…from the crown of its head there sprung a bright clear jet of light, by which all this was visible; and which was doubtless the occasion of its using, in its duller moments, a great extinguisher for a cap, which it now held under its arm.” (Dickens 18)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 21, 2016 10:55 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey into Narratives
21 January 2016

Question#30: Why had Marley come to visit Scrooge?
Answer: its stated in the book that Marley decided to come visit Scrooge, from the fact that it was a part of his duty as a ghost to do so, because if he hadn’t he would be forced to once he decided to join the others. So he decided to visit Scrooge to give him advanced warnings about what was about to happen to him. As said on page 15 in stave one the Ghost says “You will be haunted, by three spirits” (pg 15 paragrph 5)

Question #52: What does the light symbolize?
Answer: The light represented the ghosts spirit that he was taking Scrooge to all these different place, as Scrooge would some of the time tell the ghost that he wanted to return home. As stated on page 30 Scrooge has gone on this journey with the first spirit and has seen what has happened and now would really appreciate returning home. Scrooge has said “Spirit remove me from this place, these are shadows of things that have been.” (pg 30 paragraph 6)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 21, 2016 11:41 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
21 September 2016

Stave 1
Question: Describe Scrooge’s attitude toward the poor and the unfortunate? Provide a quoted passage of Scrooge’s that sums up his attitude.

Answer: In Stave one, “Marley’s Ghost, Scrooge possessed an attitude that utterly disregarded the poor and unfortunate. Scrooge states, “I don't make myself merry at Christmas, and I can’t afford to make idle people merry. I help to support the establishments I have mentioned: they cost enough…” (Dickens 6) By uttering such a comment displays his hatred toward the homeless, and unfortunate. To him they were simply a waste to society and nothing more, due his questions, “Are there no prisons? Are they still in operation?” (Dickens, 5,6) and his later remark, “…and those who are badly off must go there” ( Dickens 6) referencing that they deserved to go to prison.

Stave 2
Question: What is the first spirit called? What does this spirit symbolize? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In Stave two, the first spirit was called The Ghost of Christmas Past, for this was the name the spirit addressed to Scrooge when he was asked who he was. In the text, the spirit symbolized Scrooge’s past life, and his many experiences during the Christmas holiday in his former years. In the text it states:
They went, the Ghost and Scrooge, across the hall, to a door
at the melancholy room, made beer still by lines of plain deal
forms and desks. At on of there a
lonely boy was reading near a feeble fire, and Scrooge sat
down upon a form, and wept to see his poor forgotten self as
he had use to be (Dickens 21).
Through this supernatural experience, the Ghost’s purpose is made clear by making evident to Scrooge of how his past shaped his present mentality of hatred toward Christmas.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 22, 2016 12:01 AM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
21 January 2016
Question: #7 Stave One-Marley’s Ghost: How does Scrooge treat his clerk? How does he respond to his clerk’s request for Christmas day off? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge treats his clerk carelessly, and doesn’t consider his well-being or thoughts. On page 5 states “The door of Scrooge’s counting-house was open, that he might keep his eye upon his clerk, who; in a dismal little cell beyond, a sort of tank, was copying letters.” ... Scrooge had a very small fire, but the clerk’s fire was so very much smaller that it looked like one coal.” (Dickens 5). Also, Scrooge responds to his clerk’s request for Christmas day off hastily, sarcastic, and rude. On page 10 it refers to this “It’s not convenient, and it’s not fair. If I was to stop half a crown for it, you’d think yourself mightily ill-used, I’ll be bound?” … “A poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December! But I suppose you must have the whole day. Be here all the earlier next morning.” (Dickens 10)

Question: #50 Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: Why does Belle end her relationship with Scrooge? What does she say to him? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words
Answer: Belle doesn’t have a relationship Scrooge in Stave Two; Stave Two the Ghost of the Christmas Past re-lives Scrooges past with no consciousness of them being there present with the past. Notwithstanding, Scrooge couldn’t have been in a relationship or no one could be in contact with him expect the Ghost of the Christmas Past. Page 19 states “I am the Ghost of Christmas Past.” … “No. Your past. The things that you will see with me are shadows of the things that have been; they will have no consciousness of us.” (Dickens 19).

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 22, 2016 02:22 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative
20 January 2016


Question: Describe the appearance of the first spirit. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in you own words.


Answer:
The first spirit that appeared to Scrooge unusual because it seemed to be a child and an old man. A person within a person, both young and old. The spirit’s hair was white as the hair of an aged man. The hair hung down the spirits back, but its face was smooth and wrinkle free. The spirit’s arms and hands were very long and muscular, appearing to be capable of great strength. The legs and feet of the spirit were naked and fragile. It wore a white tunic and a gorgeous, shiny belt around its waist. The spirit held in one hand a branch of green holly, yet its dress contradicted the idea of winter by its trim with summer flowers. The strangest attribute of the spirit was the jet of pure light that emanated from the top of its head. The spirit held a cap under its arm that it could use as an extinguisher so that its light could be dulled. It was “a strange figure, like a child: yet not like a child as an old man.”

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at January 22, 2016 10:41 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative
20 January 2016


Question: Describe the relationship between Scrooge and Marley.


Answer: Marley was the business partner of Scrooge. They were quite similar, and because of their shared business and traits and character, Scrooge became fond of Marley. He missed him when he died, although Scrooge wouldn't want to admit it. He desired his old companion, “having his key in the lock of the door, saw in the knocker, without its undergoing an intermediate process of change, not a knocker, but Marley’s face.”

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at January 22, 2016 10:41 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
20 January 2016

Stave Two

Question 42.
The First of the Three Spirits: Describe the appearance of the first spirit.

Answer The first spirit appeared through the flashing of light. The book states, “Light flashed up in the room upon the instant.” (Dickens 18) Scrooge continues, and compares him first to a child, then to an old man. “It was a strange figure -- like a child: yet not so like a child as like an old man…” (Dickens 18) He decides that the spirit looks like an old man with a child’s proportions. Scrooge describes the apparation with “child's proportions” (Dickens 18) Next Scrooge observed the spirits hair. “Its hair, which hung about its neck and down its back, was white as if with age; and yet the face had not a wrinkle in it, and the tenderest bloom was on the skin.” (Dickens 18) Then Scrooge observed his clothes. “Its legs and feet, most delicately formed, were, like those upper members, bare. It wore a tunic of the purest white, and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful.” (Dickens 18) He finishes the description with descriping what he was holding and his head. He was holding a holly branch, and some summer flowers. Out of the top of his head came a beam of light, and under his arm he held a cap. The text describes, “…from the crown of its head there sprung a bright clear jet of light, by which all this was visible; and which was doubtless the occasion of its using, in its duller moments, a great extinguisher for a cap, which it now held under its arm.” (Dickens 18) Scrooge was perplexed by what he observed.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 22, 2016 11:12 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
20 January 2016

Stave One

Question 12. Marley’s Ghost: What warning does Marley give to Scrooge?

Answer Marley’s ghost warns Scrooge that he will be condemned to wandering the earth after death if he does not change. The ghost said, “I am here to-night to warn you that you have yet a chance and hope of escaping my fate…” (Dickens 16) Marley continues to say that Scrooge will be visited by three spirits, and he will need them in order to avoid his potential cursed fate. Marley said, “You will be haunted by three spirits… Without their visits, you cannot hope to shun the path I tread.” (Dickens 16) Scrooge listened to what the ghost had to say.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 22, 2016 11:15 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
20 January 2016

Question: Describe the relationship between Scrooge and Marley.

Answer: Marley was the business partner of Scrooge. They were quite similar, and because of their shared business, traits and character, Scrooge became fond of Marley. He missed him when he passed away, although Scrooge wouldn't want to admit it. He desired his old companion, and Scrooge “having his key in the lock of the door, saw in the knocker, without its undergoing an intermediate process of change, not a knocker, but Marley’s face” (Dickens 11). Scrooge would see Marley’s face in most objects, as a testament to the guilt and emptiness he felt inside as a result of Marley’s death.

Posted by: revised1_Andre Gilbert at January 22, 2016 11:32 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
20 January 2016

Question: Describe the appearance of the first spirit. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in you own words.

Answer: According to Scrooge, the first spirit that appeared was unusual, child like and yet like an old man, he notes, “it was a strange figure, like a child: yet not so like a child as an old man” (Dickens 18). Scrooge describes the spirit’s long hair that hung down its back as, “white with age; and yet the face had no wrinkle in it,” and it made Scrooge both uncomfortable and intrigued (Dickens 18). The spirit’s arms were very long and muscular, and Scrooge confirmed, “the hands the same, as if its hold were of uncommon strength” (Dickens 18). The legs and feet of the spirit were bare and fragile, “delicately formed,” Scrooge observed (Dickens 18). It wore a white tunic and a gorgeous, shiny belt around its waist, and Scrooge described the tunic as “purest white; and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful” (Dickens 18). The spirit held a branch of green holly, and its dress trimmed with summer flowers, that perplexed Scrooge, describing the “branch of fresh green holly in its hand; and, in a singular contradiction of that wintry emblem, had its dress trimmed with summer flowers” (Dickens 18). The strangest attribute of the spirit was the jet of light coming from its head, and Scrooge acknowledged that the “bright clear jet of light, by which all was visible; and which was doubtless the occasion of its using, in its duller moments, a great extinguisher for a cap,” did explain the spirit’s duller moments. (Dickens 18).

Posted by: revised2_Andre Gilbert at January 22, 2016 11:33 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
20 January 2016

Question: Describe the appearance of the first spirit. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in you own words.

Answer: According to Scrooge, the first spirit that appeared was unusual, child like and yet like an old man, he notes, “it was a strange figure, like a child: yet not so like a child as an old man” (Dickens 18). Scrooge describes the spirit’s long hair that hung down its back as, “white with age; and yet the face had no wrinkle in it,” and it made Scrooge both uncomfortable and intrigued (Dickens 18). The spirit’s arms were very long and muscular, and Scrooge confirmed, “the hands the same, as if its hold were of uncommon strength” (Dickens 18). The legs and feet of the spirit were bare and fragile, “delicately formed,” Scrooge observed (Dickens 18). It wore a white tunic and a gorgeous, shiny belt around its waist, and Scrooge described the tunic as “purest white; and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful” (Dickens 18). The spirit held a branch of green holly, and its dress trimmed with summer flowers, that perplexed Scrooge, describing the “branch of fresh green holly in its hand; and, in a singular contradiction of that wintry emblem, had its dress trimmed with summer flowers” (Dickens 18). The strangest attribute of the spirit was the jet of light coming from its head, and Scrooge acknowledged that the “bright clear jet of light, by which all was visible; and which was doubtless the occasion of its using, in its duller moments, a great extinguisher for a cap,” did explain the spirit’s duller moments (Dickens 18).

Posted by: revised3_Andre Gilbert at January 22, 2016 11:39 PM

REVISED-Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 January 2016

Question 5: Stave One-Marley’s Ghost: What do the “portly gentlemen” want? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Ultimately the portly gentlemen would like Scrooge to make a donation to help the poor. At the beginning of the conversation they say it in a way that is not asking but more as a suggestion. “it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the poor and destitute,” (Dickens 5) Scrooge replies with sarcasm. The portly gentlemen were persistent and continued to suggest in different ways until the end of the conversation when they finally ask, “What shall I put you down for?” (Dickens 6) The portly gentlemen were declined yet again and were unable to get the donation that they came for.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 23, 2016 03:09 PM

REVISED-Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 January 2016

Question 46: Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: What part of his past does the spirit show to Scrooge first? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The first part of Scrooge’s past the spirit shows him is the countryside where he grew up as a little boy. “I was bred in this place. I was a boy here!” (Dickens 20) The ghost then questioned him about the surroundings as they moved onward. Scrooge did remember the surroundings, “recognizing every gate, and post, and tree; until a little market-town appeared in the distance, with its bridge, its church, and winding river.” (Dickens 20) This shows what Scrooge saw with his first encounter in the past with the ghost.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 23, 2016 03:11 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl Revision
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey into Narratives CA01
21 January 2016

Question#30: Why had Marley come to visit Scrooge?
Answer: its stated in the book that Marley decided to come visit Scrooge, from the fact that it was a part of his duty as a ghost to do so, because if he hadn’t he would be forced to once he decided to join the others. So he decided to visit Scrooge to give him advanced warnings about what was about to happen to him. As said on page 15 in stave one the Ghost says, “You will be haunted, by three spirits” (15)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 23, 2016 04:36 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl (revision)
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220cl Journey into Narrative CA01
21 January 2016

Question #52: What does the light symbolize?
Answer: The light represented the ghosts spirit that he was taking Scrooge to all these different place, as Scrooge would some of the time tell the ghost that he wanted to return home. As stated on page 30 Scrooge has gone on this journey with the first spirit and has seen what has happened and now would really appreciate returning home. Scrooge has said “Spirit remove me from this place, these are shadows of things that have been.” (30)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 23, 2016 04:38 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 January 2016

Question 64: The Second of the Three Spirits: Describe the first place they went.
Answer The second of the three spirits took Scrooge to his clerk’s four bedroom house. The text describes the scene, “Scrooge and the Ghost passed on, invisible, straight to Scrooge’s clerk’s… his four-roomed house!” (Dickens 27) The text continues to describe what Scrooge and the spirit found inside, “… it was a sufficient dinner for the whole family…” the Clerk’s family, including his disabled son, “… Tiny Tim, he bore a little crutch…” were having Christmas dinner. (Dickens 29)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 23, 2016 06:08 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 January 2016

Question 82:
The Last of the Spirits: Where did they go second? What did they see?

Answer
Second, the last spirit took him to an “obscure part of the town, to a low shop where iron, old rags, bottles, bones, and greasy offal were bought.” (Dickens 43) There they witnessed “a woman with a heavy bundle of slunk into the shop.” (Dickens 43) They listened to the people in the shop talk about the unnamed, miserable, deceased man whose belongings were about to be offered for sale.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 23, 2016 06:10 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 January 2016

Question 82:
The Last of the Spirits: Where did they go second? What did they see?

Answer
Second, the last spirit took him to an “obscure part of the town, to a low shop where iron, old rags, bottles, bones, and greasy offal were bought.” (Dickens 43) There they witnessed “a woman with a heavy bundle of slunk into the shop.” (Dickens 43) They listened to the people in the shop talk about the unnamed, miserable, deceased man whose belongings were about to be offered for sale.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 23, 2016 06:10 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 January 2016

Question 82:
The Last of the Spirits: Where did they go second? What did they see?

Answer
Second, the last spirit took him to an “obscure part of the town, to a low shop where iron, old rags, bottles, bones, and greasy offal were bought.” (Dickens 43) There they witnessed “a woman with a heavy bundle of slunk into the shop.” (Dickens 43) They listened to the people in the shop talk about the unnamed, miserable, deceased man whose belongings were about to be offered for sale.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 23, 2016 06:12 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 January 2016

Question 64:
The Second of the Three Spirits: Describe the first place they went.

Answer
The second of the three spirits took Scrooge to his clerk’s four bedroom house. The text describes the scene, “Scrooge and the Ghost passed on, invisible, straight to Scrooge’s clerk’s… his four-roomed house!” (Dickens 27) The text continues to describe what Scrooge and the spirit found inside, “… it was a sufficient dinner for the whole family…” the Clerk’s family, including his disabled son, “… Tiny Tim, he bore a little crutch…” were having Christmas dinner. (Dickens 29)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 23, 2016 06:13 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
24 January 2016

Question #84: What did Scrooge think about when he saw the dead man? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own work.
Answer: When Scrooge first saw the dead man, his first thought that it was himself. But he kept trying to get the answer out of the Spirit, but wouldn’t say anything he would just continuously point to the scene that was going on stating that he wanted Scrooge to watch what was going on. Here’s what it said in the book: “Spirit! Said Scrooge, I see, I see. The case of this unhappy man might be my own. My life tends that way, now. Merciful Heaven, what is this!” (56)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 24, 2016 02:11 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
24 January 2016

Question74: What happened to the way the Ghost and Scrooge looked as the night went on? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your words.
Answer: As the night went on, and Scrooge and the Ghost went from one place to the next Scrooge could see the ghost becoming older and older with every place they went and Scrooge wondered if the ghost’s life was shorter than he originally may have thought. Here’s the answer I found in the book though: “It was strange, too the while Scrooge remained unaltered in his outward form, the Ghost grew older, clearly older. Scrooge had observed this change, but never spoke of it, until they left a children’s Twelfth Night party, when, looking at the Spirit as they stood together in an open place, he noticed that its hair was gray.” (48)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 24, 2016 03:17 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
21 January

Question: #7 Stave One-Marley’s Ghost: How does Scrooge treat his clerk? How does he respond to his clerk’s request for Christmas day off? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge treats his clerk just like every other person who speaks to him, carelessly, and rude. Scrooge responds to his clerk in an unjust and aggravated tone by saying “It’s not convenient, and it’s not fair. If I was to stop half a crown for it, you’d think yourself mightily ill-used, I’ll be bound?” … “A poor excuse for picking a man’s pocket every twenty-fifth of December! But I suppose you must have the whole day. Be here all the earlier next morning.” (Dickens 10). Scrooge response shows that he is just a bitter and careless person; the way he spoke to his clerk shows how ignorant he can be.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 24, 2016 04:09 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
21 January 2016

Question: #50 Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: Why does Belle end her relationship with Scrooge? What does she say to him? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: Belle doesn’t have a relationship Scrooge in Stave Two; Stave Two the Ghost of the Christmas Past re-lives Scrooges past with no consciousness of them being there present with the past. Notwithstanding, Scrooge couldn’t have been in a relationship or no one could be in contact with him except the Ghost of the Christmas Past. In the beginning, in Stave Two the Christmas Past introduced himself and said “I am the Ghost of Christmas Past.” … “No. Your past. The things that you will see with me are shadows of the things that have been; they will have no consciousness of us.” (Dickens 19). This quote explains what happens in this Stave Two as if Scrooge was in a dream. Furthermore, Belle wasn’t mentioned not once in this Stave and doesn’t exist; therefore, Scrooge couldn’t have been in a relationship.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 24, 2016 04:11 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
21 January 2016

Question: #50 Stave Two: The First of the Three Spirits: Why does Belle end her relationship with Scrooge? What does she say to him? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: Belle doesn’t have a relationship Scrooge in Stave Two; Stave Two the Ghost of the Christmas Past re-lives Scrooges past with no consciousness of them being there present with the past. Notwithstanding, Scrooge couldn’t have been in a relationship or no one could be in contact with him except the Ghost of the Christmas Past. In the beginning, in Stave Two the Christmas Past introduced himself and said “I am the Ghost of Christmas Past.” … “No. Your past. The things that you will see with me are shadows of the things that have been; they will have no consciousness of us.” (Dickens 19). This quote explains what happens in this Stave Two as if Scrooge was in a dream. Furthermore, Belle wasn’t mentioned not once in this Stave and doesn’t exist; therefore, Scrooge couldn’t have been in a relationship.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 24, 2016 04:12 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 January 2016

Question #63 Stave Three: The Second of the Three Spirits: Who was the second Spirit? Describe him. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The second ghost introduces himself saying “I am the Ghost of Christmas Present.” (Dicken 28). The Ghost of the Christmas Present was generous, caring, kind, etc. He gave to others in need without hesitation; the narrator described his blessing as “The Spirit stood beside sick-beds, and they were close at home; by struggling men, and they were patient in their greater hope ; by poverty, and it was rich.” (Dicken 40). This quote explains the Spirits personality and good heart that he had before he vanished; he made sure those who were unfortunate had a fortune.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 24, 2016 05:03 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 January 2016

Question #79 Stave Four: The Last of the Spirits: Where did Scrooge and the Spirit go first? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The Spirit and Scrooge first went into the city. As Scrooge asked the Spirit to lead “They scarcely seemed to enter the city ; for the city rather seemed to spring up about them. But there they were in the heart of it ; on ‘Change, amongst the merchants. The Spirit stopped beside one little knot of business men.” (Dicken 41-42). As the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come lead Scrooge into the city, they stopped at a group of business men and listened in on their conversation.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 24, 2016 05:21 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 January 2016

Question 62: Stave Three - The Second of the Three Spirits: Describe the scene when Scrooge found the second Spirit. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The scene starts off during the night when Scrooge was waiting for the spirit. He thought that it was in the adjacent room, so he went to investigate. When he entered, “It was his own room. There was no doubt about that. But it has undergone a surprising transformation.” (Dickens 32) Everything had changed, “The walls and ceiling were so hung with living green, that it looked a perfect grove,” (Dickens 32) The entire room looked like a small forest with festive food, “Heaped up upon the floor, to form a kind of throne, were turkeys, geese, game, poultry, brawn, great joints meat,” and much more. Then he saw the ghost, “In easy state upon the couch, there sat a jolly Giant,” (Dickens 32) This is when he found the second spirit.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 24, 2016 07:34 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 January 2016

Question 81: Stave Four - The Last of the Spirits: What was Scrooge's attitude about being with the third Spirit? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge’s attitude being with the third spirit was a mixture of fear and confusion. The narrator describes Scrooge’s state of mind “Although well used to ghostly company by this time, Scrooge feared the silent shape so much his legs trembled beneath him, and he found that he could barely stand when he prepared to follow it.” (Dickens 50) This points out his reaction to being with the third Spirit. Next they traveled to different parts of town listening on to what he thought was trivial conversation. After listening to the people, “Scrooge was at first inclined to be surprised that the Spirit should attach importance to conversations apparently so trivial;” (Dickens 52) This also shows his attitude being with the third Spirit.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 24, 2016 07:36 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
21 January 2016

Question: What did Scrooge’s nephew and niece say about him?

Answer: In stave three of “A Christmas Carol,” Scrooge’s nephew and niece made mixed comments about their uncle. The nephew criticized Scrooge jokingly for believing that Christmas was a humbug, and he exclaimed,
“He said Christmas was a humbug, as I live!” Scrooge’s niece agreed,
“He believed it too!” “More shame for him, Fred!” said the niece in a condescending and indignant tone (Dickens 36). The conversation continued with the nephew wondering why his uncle disliked them so much that he would refuse to sit at their dinner, and inquired,
“Here, he takes it into his head to dislike us, and he won’t come and dine with us. What’s the consequence? He don’t lose much of a dinner.” Scrooges’s niece interrupts,
“I think he loses a very good dinner” (Dickens 37), and It was true that Scrooge would indeed lose out on a splendid dinner.

Posted by: stave3_Andre Gilbert at January 24, 2016 08:12 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
21 January 2016

Question: Who was the dead man? How did Scrooge discover who it was?

Answer: Near the end of Scrooge’s journey in stave four of “A Christmas Carol,” we find that Scrooge faces his future death. The spirit takes Scrooge to his grave where his name was engraved on it, “Scrooge crept towards it, trembling as he went; and following the finger, read upon the stone of the neglected grave his own name, Ebenezer Scrooge” (Dickens 48). Despite the hints that the dead man was, in fact, Scrooge, it was only because “the Spirit stood among the graves, and pointed down to One,” that Scrooge finally came to terms with the evidence that he was the dead man that everyone was talking about (Dickens 47).

Posted by: stave4_Andre Gilbert at January 24, 2016 08:13 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 January 2016
Question 70: The Second of the Three Spirits: What did Scrooge think about when he heard the harp music? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: When Scrooges niece began playing the harp, he thought of the Ghost of Christmas Past. Scrooge thought that if he had listened to it years ago “he might have cultivated the kindness of life for his own happiness with his own hands (Dickens 46).”

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at January 24, 2016 09:11 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 January 2016
Question 70: The Second of the Three Spirits: What did Scrooge think about when he heard the harp music? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: When Scrooges niece began playing the harp, he thought of the Ghost of Christmas Past. Scrooge thought that if he had listened to it years ago “he might have cultivated the kindness of life for his own happiness with his own hands (Dickens 46).”

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at January 24, 2016 09:18 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 January 2016
Question 89: The Last of the Spirits: What question did Scrooge ask the Ghost as they stood among the graves? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: As they stood among the graves Scrooge asked the Spirit, “Are these the shadows of the things that Will be, or are they shadows of the things that May be only (Dickens 62)?” Scrooge is wondering whether he will be able to avoid his impending death.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at January 24, 2016 09:18 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 September 2016

Stave 1
Question 6: Describe Scrooge’s attitude toward the poor and the unfortunate? Provide a quoted passage of Scrooge’s that sums up his attitude.

Answer: In Stave one, “Marley’s Ghost,” Scrooge possessed an attitude that utterly disregarded the poor and unfortunate. Scrooge states, “I don't make myself merry at Christmas, and I can’t afford to make idle people merry. I help to support the establishments I have mentioned: they cost enough…” (Dickens 6) By uttering such a comment displays his hatred toward the homeless, and unfortunate. To him they were simply a waste to society and nothing more, due his questions, “Are there no prisons? Are they still in operation?” (Dickens, 5,6) and his later remark, “…and those who are badly off must go there” referencing that they, the poor and unfortunate, deserved to go to prison (Dickens 6).

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 24, 2016 10:12 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 September 2016

Stave 2
Question 44: What is the first spirit called? What does this spirit symbolize? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In Stave two, the first spirit was called The Ghost of Christmas Past, for this was the name the spirit addressed to Scrooge when he was asked who he was. In the text, the spirit symbolized Scrooge’s past life, and his many experiences during the Christmas holiday in his former years. In the text “Scrooge sat down upon a form, and wept to see his poor forgotten self as he had use to be (Dickens 21).Through this supernatural experience, the Ghost’s purpose is made clear by making evident to Scrooge of how his past shaped his present mentality of hatred toward Christmas.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 24, 2016 10:14 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journey in Narrative
24 January 2016

Stave 3

Question 66: The Second of the Three Spirits: Who was Tiny Tim? What did Scrooge ask the Ghost about Tiny Tim? What was the Ghost's reply?

Answer: Tiny Tim was young Cratchit who “bore a little crutch, and his limbs supported by an iron frame,” which meant that he was a crippled boy that needed support to move (Dickens 37).
In the text Scrooge genuinely asked the Spirit, “Tell me if Tiny Tim will live,” possessing for the first time companion for another should beside his own (Dickens 40). In reply to Scrooge’s sincere question the Spirit responded saying, “ I see a vacant seat…in the poor chimney corner, and a crutch without an owner, carefully preserved,” alluding to the fact that he was going to die if he had not received any treatment.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 25, 2016 12:11 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journey in Narrative
24 January 2016

Stave 4

Question 80: The Last of the Spirits: What were the business men talking about? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The business men within the group were discussing Scrooge’s death and funeral. They conversed amongst themselves stating, “I only know he is dead. Suppose we make a party and volunteer,” discussing what the would do for his funeral (Dickens 51-52).

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 25, 2016 12:14 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 January 2016

Question 97:
What day was it when Scrooge woke up?

Answer
When Scrooge woke up he ran to the window and called out from his window asking a boy, “What’s to-day, my fine fellow?” (Dickens 49) The boy replied, “To-day! Why, Christmas Day.” (Dickens 49) Scrooge shouted out again, “It’s Christmas Day! I haven’t missed it.” (Dickens 49) He was happy that he had been given a second chance.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 26, 2016 03:07 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 January 2016

Question 98: Stave Five: The End of It: What did Scrooge ask the boy under his window to do, and why? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge wanted to surprise his clerk with a turkey. When he poked his head out the window, he saw a little boy and asked him to buy a turkey. The little boy was hesitant so Scrooge told the boy, “Go and buy it, and tell ‘em to bring it here, that I may give them the direction where to take it. Come back with the man, and I’ll give you a shilling. Come back with him in less than five minutes, and I’ll give you half-a-crown!” (Dickens 64) He did this because he wanted to make amends with Bob Cratchit.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 26, 2016 06:51 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
26 January 2016

Question #106 Stave Five: How does Scrooge reconcile with Fred, his nephew? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge reconciled with his nephew Fred by showing up to his Christmas dinner and greeting everyone with great spirits and happiness. Fred couldn’t believe his eyes as he said “Why bless my soul! Who’s that?” Scrooge was more than happy to accompany his family as he replied “It’s I. Your uncle Scrooge. I have come to dinner. Will you let me in, Fred?” From the reply Scrooge gave, Fred was relieved and grateful to see his uncle.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 26, 2016 10:32 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
26 January 2016

Question #106 Stave Five: How does Scrooge reconcile with Fred, his nephew? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge reconciled with his nephew Fred by showing up to his Christmas dinner and greeting everyone with great spirits and happiness. Fred couldn’t believe his eyes as he said “Why bless my soul! Who’s that?” Scrooge was more than happy to accompany his family as he replied “It’s I. Your uncle Scrooge. I have come to dinner. Will you let me in, Fred?” From the reply Scrooge gave, Fred was relieved and grateful to see his uncle.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 26, 2016 10:32 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL CA01 Journey in Narrative

26 January 2016

Stave 5

Question 105: The End of It: What actions does Scrooge take to make amends for the past?

Answer: Scrooge made amends for his past mistakes through opening his heart. He bought a feast for families and paid for Tiny Tim’s recovery. In the text, it stated, “the chuckle with which he paid for the Turkey…crab…with which he recompensed the boy.” This referenced to aiding Tiny Tim’s health and feeding many (Dickens 65). Also, he made amends by asking his nephew,Fred, “I have come to dinner. Will you let me in, Fred?” (Dickens 67). Through visiting his nephew and enjoyed a meal with family closing a gap he created due to his abrasive and repelling behavior.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 26, 2016 11:34 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 CL journeys into Narrative CA01
January 26, 2016

Question103: How did Scrooge spend the rest of his life? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in you own words
Answer: By the end of the book, Scrooge has seen more than enough to understand all the wrong that he has done throughout the years, and by the time he gets back home and realizes how many rights he must make, he does become a better person. He lives the rest of his life in a very different mindset than he ever had before because he wants everyone to be able to enjoy Christmas. As stated in the book “ He became a good friend, as a good master, and as a good man, as the good old world” (68)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 26, 2016 11:44 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 CL journeys into Narrative CA01
January 26, 2016

Question103: How did Scrooge spend the rest of his life? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in you own words
Answer: By the end of the book, Scrooge has seen more than enough to understand all the wrong that he has done throughout the years, and by the time he gets back home and realizes how many rights he must make, he does become a better person. He lives the rest of his life in a very different mindset than he ever had before because he wants everyone to be able to enjoy Christmas. As stated in the book “ He became a good friend, as a good master, and as a good man, as the good old world” (68)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 26, 2016 11:44 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
21 January 2016

Question: Who did Scrooge visit? What was the reaction?

Answer:

In stave five of “A Christmas Carol,” Scrooge visited his nephew, but at first, had been pacing outside the house, “he passed the door a dozen times, before he had the courage to go up and knock. But he made a dash, and did it” (Dickens 51). Fred, the niece and everyone who came reacted in a joyful when they saw Scrooge was there, in fact, “Nothing could be heartier. His niece looked just the same. So did Topper when he came. So did the plump sister when she came. So did every one when they came,” they partied and had a wonderful time (Dickens 51).

Posted by: Stave5_Andre Gilbert at January 27, 2016 07:47 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 January 2016

Question 113: . Stave Five: The End of It: What happened to Scrooge in the years
after his experience? Use quoted passages from the text to support
the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge became a good man, “he did it all and more; and to Tiny Tim, who did not die, he was a second father, as a good master, and as good a man as the good city, town or borough in the good old world… it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well.” (Dickens 138) Scrooge changed for the better and the whole town was better because of his change.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 28, 2016 01:35 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 January 2016

Question 113: . Stave Five: The End of It: What happened to Scrooge in the years
after his experience? Use quoted passages from the text to support
the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Scrooge became a good man, “he did it all and more; and to Tiny Tim, who did not die, he was a second father, as a good master, and as good a man as the good city, town or borough in the good old world… it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well.” (Dickens 138) Scrooge changed for the better and the whole town was better because of his change.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 28, 2016 01:36 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 January 2016

Question 125: What makes the holiday of Christmas such an effective setting for the humanitarian issues (i.e. sympathy for the poor, needy children) that the author of A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens, was trying to address?

Answer: The idea centered around Christmas is to give out of joy. This time setting shows an even bigger impact because the poor and needy children are the ones who need help the most. Charles Dickens addresses this with his character Scrooge. In the beginning, Scrooge wanted no part in helping the poor but throughout his journey, he changed his ways.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 28, 2016 05:51 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
January 2016

Question 120: What two things did the “Ghost of Christmas to Come” show Scrooge that both upset and frightened him? Was it an effective strategy for the Ghost to use? Why, or why not?

Answer: The Ghost of Christmas to Come showed Scrooge first a gathering of people conversing about a man ho had died. How they spoke of this man proved to upset Scrooge, causing him to “view them with detestation and disgust” as the talked absolute folly about the deceased (Dickens 56). Secondly, what aroused fear within Scrooge was the second site which the Spirit revealed him when he pointed to the grave site. The text states, “Scrooge crept towards it, trembling as he went; and following the finger, read upon the stone of the neglected grave his own name" (Dickens 62). Astonish by the discovery that it was he who was the deceased, shock Scrooge to his core and shifted his mentality that he became anew; proving that the Spirit’s strategy was effective and accomplished its mission.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 28, 2016 10:38 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
January 28, 2016

Question 127: What important real-life issues does Dickens, the author of A Christmas Carol, use children and childhood to symbolize?
Answer: What Dickens was trying to relay to the readers about what Christmas is all about especially in the Christmas Carol, is that you really need to appreciate those who are with you and don’t take things for granted when you’re a child and growing up. As from what Scrooge was able to see throughout his journey, it made him realize how many mistakes he made through all the different Christmas’s, as he started to understand more and more what he needed to fix in order to make things right once again As it’s stated, it says ‘Dickens carries this sentiment even further with the tragic figure of the pure-hearted, crippled Cratchit son, Tiny Tim. Scrooge’s emotive connection to Tiny Tim dramatically underscores his revelatory acceptance of the Christmas ideal.” (sparknotes)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 28, 2016 11:41 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 January 2016

Question #121: After he was returned to his home and to his own time, Scrooge did three good deeds. What were they and why are they important?

Answer: Scrooge was able to give money to the portly gentleman who stopped by his office who asked for a donation for the less fortunate. Also, he visited his nephew Fred who invited him to celebrate Christmas cheer; and lastly, he gave his clerk Bob a raise in his salary as well as offering to help out with his family. These three deeds were important because Scrooge was repugnant toward these three gentlemen at the beginning of the story. Doing these deeds, Scrooge manifested the change in his life by blessing these three gentlemen with great deeds that they have asked of him.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at January 28, 2016 11:45 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
28 January 2016

Question: What specific event led to Scrooge’s eventual reformation? In particular, at what point in the story do we first begin to see him change (That is, when does he first start to show emotions other than anger)?

Answer: In Stave Five of A Christmas Carol, Scrooge realizes that the grave was his own, and as “Scrooge crept towards it, trembling as he went; and following the finger, read upon the stone of the neglected grave his name, Ebenezer Scrooge” (Dickens 48). At this moment, Scrooge came to terms with his future and spoke to the spirit crying out, “hear me! I am not the man I was” (Dickens 48). Scrooge first exhibits new emotion when the first spirit showed him the boys who trotted by on their ponies, “and as they came, Scrooge knew and named them every one. Why was he rejoiced beyond all bounds to see them! Why did his cold eye glisten, and his heart leap up as they went past!” (Dickens 21). It was the first time we see that Scrooge expressed a feeling opposite to anger.

Posted by: Dickens129_Andre Gilbert at January 29, 2016 01:09 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
Feburary 2, 2016

Chapter 3 Question38: Why did Govinda break with his friend, Siddhartha?
Answer: Govidinda broke his friendship with Siddhartha because of the face he realized he failed being his friend, and lost him because of the fact of the choices he decided to make a long the way. Forcing him to make a decision to go with him to make the journey to prove he was worthy enough to be with Buddha. (22)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at February 3, 2016 01:03 AM

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