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January 22, 2013

What's Beneath Roald Dahl's "Skin"?


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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Posted by lhobbs at January 22, 2013 08:41 AM

Readers' Comments:

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Students of 2011,

Using the direction I provided in some handouts I gave you previously, please type your entry-ticket discussion questions for this reading in the comment box below. These questions will be fair game for the midterm and final exam. In addition to submitting the question to English-blog.com, the question must also be submitted to Turnitin.com. You should also have it written in your Course Journal (collected at midterm and at the final), and have a typed, printed hardcopy to bring with you to class on the day the work is discussed (see syllabus). I will not accept late submissions so mind the deadlines.
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Entry Ticket: Skin
Explain how greed plays a role in this story. Does beauty partake? Are there any connections to the two?

Posted by: Manda Butler at February 9, 2011 02:15 PM

Emmanuel Cruz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 340
February 11, 2011
Discussion Question
Drioli’s back becomes dehumanized when greedy art collectors want to own his piece of art. This dehumanization, however, is partly empowered by beauty because Drioli’s body has become more than simple flesh. His piece of art will immortalize his passion, which lives among his soul. Is Drioli’s piece of art a reflection of eternal life?

Posted by: Emmanuel Cruz at February 10, 2011 02:26 PM

Talk about giving the skin off your back. What is the significance of the tattoo that Soutine gives Drioli in Roald Dahl’s Skin?

Posted by: William Kopnek at February 10, 2011 03:23 PM

Patricia Pothier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 340
2/10/11
The art gallery patron’s zeal in excitement at the sight of Drioli’s back. How does their willingness to offer him anything to get the tattoo reflect a Westernized view of the need to collect art, is admiring it not enough?

Posted by: Patricia Pothier at February 10, 2011 07:13 PM

Discussion Question 4: Dahl’s “Skin”
When Drioli first presents the idea of tattoo to the artist the artist says that he will paint a picture on his back instead. The artist tells the man that it will stay on his body as long as he does not bathe himself. It was supposed to be a test of Drioli’s dedication to the artist’s work. However, Drioli still insists on having this tattoo. Do you think that the artist was hesitant because he knew that Drioli was not as dedicated to his work as he appeared to be? Or do you feel that the artist was truly not confident enough in his work to have it remain on human skin forever?

Posted by: Tara McLoughlin at February 10, 2011 08:54 PM

Discussion Question: In the short story Skin by Roald Dahl, the main character, Drioli, asks his young artist friend to paint and tattoo a picture on his back. Though the picture is of Drioli’s wife, the boy agrees. Until the piece is finished, Drioli has no idea what it will look like, but he trusts the artist enough to know that his work is what Drioli wants. Today, it seems that most tattoos given are more of the wearers’ ideas, rather than that of the artist. Why do you feel people do not trust those with the needles and ink enough to create something original for them?

Posted by: Chad W. at February 10, 2011 11:34 PM

Dana Jennings
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-340
2/11/11
Entry Ticket #4: Skin
In the story, Drioli has to convince both Soutine and his wife with copiuous amounts of wine to perform the act that leaves him with a tattoo, does the tattoo give him the beauty and happiness he deeply desires?

Posted by: Dana Jennings at February 10, 2011 11:45 PM

How far can artist can be bought in the name of art? I know that art is considered to be a form of expression and of one’s self, but to those who make their profession: able to make a living of it is tough act to follow up, but the old man known as Drioli is confronted of actually being art and can be given money for someone’ else work, either to literally selling his own skin, to just live in a hotel to be like a walking canvas, so he knows what people really treat art rather than an artist who sells it. Now, it is more or less a bad thing, as he practically succumbs to be more of an object than a person.

Posted by: John Walker at February 11, 2011 12:05 AM

The boy in the story desired Drioli’s wife a great deal and this is mentioned when the boy says, “Is it that you have decided to divorce your wife so she can marry me” (Dahl p. 165)? Why is Drioli not bothered by these comments and still very fond of the boy, and do you think that the boy only agreed to do the tattoo because of Josie? Is there any relation between the boy’s eagerness of tattooing her and saying that Drioli is naught but a canvas?

Posted by: Eric Dirth at February 11, 2011 01:50 AM

The tattoo by Chaim Soutine was valued at two hundred thousand francs; more than that even, as it is suggested that the tattoo is worth committing murder. Do you think that other tattoos could be considered this valuable or is it unique to this specific painter/tattooist?

Posted by: Nicole Natoli at February 11, 2011 11:53 AM

In Roald Dahl’s Skin, Soutine becomes a painter of such fame that the collectors at the art gallery were falling over themselves to get Drioli’s skin. While the gallery dealer was bluntly offering to buy Drioli’s skin for an enormous sum, the older gentleman was making sly promises of comfort and luxury until Drioli’s dying day. How is each offer inherently sinister, especially in light of Drioli’s disappearance?

Posted by: Douglas Phillips at February 11, 2011 12:46 PM

Drioli is possessed with having a picture of his wife to carry on his skin. When he is broke and destitute at the end of the story it is the only reminder he has of a happier time in his life, and if he has it removed from his back a skin graft would likely kill him. Given Drioli's skin being sold at the end, does this convey something about the permanence of tattoos and the memories associated with them? Do you think that the narrator's final thoughts are nothing more than comforting words for the audience, or did Drioli actually survive the literal and figurative separation from the portrait of his wife?

Posted by: Greg Robinson at February 11, 2011 01:06 PM

If tattoos are something that is suppose to be symbolic and meaningful both personally and culturally wouldn’t the selling and cutting of someone elses flesh distort that sacred meaning of getting a tattoo? Wouldn’t that just make tattoos another form material possession?

Posted by: Amanda Arce at February 11, 2011 01:16 PM

Do you believe that people thrive so badly for tattoos that they find people to let them cut them off of them? If so, what reasons do you think they have for becoming so obsessed?

Posted by: Meghan Donovan at February 11, 2011 01:26 PM

Katie Ganning
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 340
11 February 2011
Discussion 5
Roald Dahl’s Skin
1. Before agreeing to tattoo Drioli’s back, Chaїm Soutine stated Drioli about him taking a bath and remove the painting on his back would be a showing of him not valuing his picture and “It will be a test of your admiration for my art.” (Dalh 170) The tattoo by Soutine appeared in Buenos Aires weeks after Drioli’s encounter with the dealer. How does this show that Drioli did not in fact admire Soutine’s artwork as much as he stated years ago? Explain Drioli’s true intentions when it came to the artwork.

Posted by: Katie Ganning at February 11, 2011 01:41 PM

Drioli gets his wife’s face tattooed on his back by Soutine in 1913. Many years later, we see him as a disheveled old man who appears to be homeless which is completely opposite of the Drioli we see in the beginning of the story. Does the tattoo have any connection to his downfall? Does having her face on his body effect the grieving process after her death?

Posted by: Taylor Leonard at February 11, 2011 01:43 PM

Natasha Witter
February 11, 2011
ENG 340
Tattoo in Literature
Skin

The author goes into great detail of a scene we assume to be of a man or maybe a group of people who are carefully hanging the skin of a Sioux war chief up for display.The author mentions hoisting the “dreadlocked carcass, over the darkening fairgrounds” is it fair to assume that the body was seen by a group of people as a form of art work or was it because they were repulsed by the practice of tattooing because they did not understand it?

Posted by: Natasha Witter at February 11, 2011 01:44 PM

The protagonist of Roald Dahl’s short story Skin spends a sizeable portion of the story debating whether or not to have the tattoo removed from his back. In the end, he opts to go to a hotel to model his tattoo. By simply having Drioli disappear and through the narrator’s implication, what can the reader assume happened to him? What do you feel is the greater purpose behind skin collection?

Posted by: Lindsay Renner at February 11, 2011 01:55 PM

Today, Roald Dahl is probably known primarily for his Charlie Bucket stories(Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Willy Wonka and the Great Glass Elevator). Does his foray into the dark in this short story surprise you? What elements of the Dark Romantic can you find in “Skins” and how would you compare this story to the works of other writers such as Poe, Hawthorne, or Melville?

Posted by: JH Pless at February 11, 2011 01:56 PM

Discuss the idea of the ending being so vague. Do you agree with the implication that the hotel owner had Drioli murdered in order to get the tattoo on his back?

Posted by: Meahgan Jameyson at February 11, 2011 02:13 PM

“Skin” Entry Ticket
Being that Roald Dahl is a very well known children’s author, such as “Willy Wonka and The Chocolate Factory” and “The Twits,” what do you think made him take a dive into such dark material? What do you think is the attractiveness in collecting tattoos from skin that isn’t yours?

Posted by: Sarah Buckner at February 11, 2011 02:16 PM

Does the second bidder’s ability to pass Drioli’s back tattoo as a “heavily varnished” painting speak to the artistic integrity of tattooing? Does the appellation of “heavily varnished” designate a subordinate ranking to the fine art of painting?

Posted by: Jamison Whitney at February 11, 2011 02:19 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at February 16, 2011 06:54 AM

Jose Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA04 Academic Writing II
20th February 2013
1.“To Serve Man” & 2. “Skin”
Question:

Skin
14. Why does Drioli not like the way the gallery owner is looking at him?
Answer:

14. In Roald Dahl’s “Skin,” Drioli, a tattoo parlor owner was passing by an art gallery in Paris when he recognized a familiar piece of artwork. He entered the gallery and as he stood examining the picture, he was rudely asked to leave and then nearly forced to leave until a scuffle broke out. Drioli forcefully stood his ground, and replied to the gallery’s confusion by exclaiming he has a piece of artwork by the same artist, who was actually his friend and the artwork, or tattoo was on his wife. This caused Drioli to have a sentimental connection to the piece; however, once Drioli proved he had a gallery worthy piece of artwork the gallery owner wanted it. He made offers to buy it, but the value it bore caused Drioli to be hesistant until the gallery owner said its worth nothing until “your” dead, “how old are you, you’re can’t be in good health [neither].” Dahl explains the gallery owner staring at Drioli as a farmer looking at an old horse. This was an insult to Drioli at the highest degree, it represented the lack of respect that he had for Drioli, until the line was once again crossed saying that he would pay a surgeon to remove and replace his skin.

Posted by: Jose Garcia at February 21, 2013 05:20 PM

Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
21 February 2013


Question 2: At the beginning of the story, what was the old man’s name?

Answer: In the very beginning the old mans name was Drioli. This can be found on page 164 of Roald Dahls "Skin".

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at February 21, 2013 08:43 PM

Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA 05
22 February 2013

Question: What is Drioli's occupation?

Answer: Drioli's was a tattoo artist in the past. At this current point in the story, Drioli is unemployed and homeless. The author uses context clues to lead to the fact that Drioli was a tattoo artist. When Drioli talks to the young boy he talks about teaching him how to tattoo, and he also talks about the number of people that came into his shop that day.

Posted by: Octavia Robinson at February 21, 2013 09:52 PM

Terrance Browne
Dr.Hobbs
ENG122
21/February/2013

Question:14. Why does Drioli not like the way the gallery owner is looking at him?

Anwser:In the short story Drioli doesn't like the way how the owner is looking at him because he feels as if the owner is going to kick him out, he feels this way because he isn't dressed in the same type of attire that everyone is else is in, so he feels as if the owner will kick him out, which is what happens."If you please, the man was saying, 'take yourself out of my gallery"(Dahl,145)

Posted by: Terrance Browne at February 21, 2013 11:26 PM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA02 Academic Writing II
22nd of February 2013

Question: “In the story, Drioli has to convince both Soutine and his wife with copious amounts of wine to perform the act that leaves him with the tattoo; does the tattoo give him the beauty and the happiness he deeply desires?”

Answer: The Tattoo that Drioli received did bring him happiness momentarily, but over time, after his wife passed away, the tattoo began to seem like a burden to Drioli. The tattoo began to remind him of what he could never have ever again, his wife, specifically. And eventually, the tattoo does bring Drioli another moment of happiness when he reveals his back at the Soutine art exhibit, but again, the tattoo creates more trouble than it’s worth, culminating in Drioli’s (implied) murder.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at February 22, 2013 02:56 AM

Colby Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05 Academic Writing 2
22 February 2013

Question: 10. What does Soutine mean when he says his paintings are not “nourishing”?

Answer: Soutine explains why he did not find the paintings nourishing in the quote on page 168 "“that in themselves they are not nourishing. I cannot eat them.”

Posted by: Colby Johnson at February 22, 2013 09:09 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA05
22 February 2013

Question: Who is Soutine? Where is he from? What is his role in the story?

Answer: In the story, Soutine is an admired artist and an old friend of Drioli. According to Soutine in the story, he is from Smilovichi, Russia, which is about 12 miles away from Minsk (Dahl, 167). Soutine is a famous artist and he is responsible for tattooing a picture of Josie's- Drioli's wife-face on his back.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 22, 2013 09:33 AM

Alexandra Rivera-vega
Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05
21 feb 2013

Question: How does Edward dispose of the bramble bushes in his yard?

Answer: Edward dispose of the bushes by throwing them in the fireplace.

Posted by: Alexandra Rivera-vega at February 22, 2013 10:14 AM

Christopher M. Burke
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II

Question: What does Drolli want to celebrate?

Answer: Because he just litterally sold the skin off of his back.

Posted by: Christopher Burke at February 22, 2013 10:16 AM

Chris Lavie
Dr Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
2 February 2013

QUESTION15. Do you trust the hotel owners offer to live at the Hotel Bristol in Cannes? What are his motives?

No, the hotel owner lies. There is no Hotel Bristol in Cannes; page 179:” […] the fact that there is no hotel in Cannes called Bristol. He just wants to bait Drioli and make him think that if he accepts to sell his back, he will live a luxurious life. Of course, he lies. The owner just wants the tattoo and he doesn’t care about Drioli’s life.

Posted by: Chris Lavie at February 22, 2013 11:00 AM

Rannell Smith
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA05
22 February 2013

Question: Talk about giving the skin off your back. What is the significance of the tattoo that Soutine gives Drioli in Roald Dahl’s “Skin”?

Answer: The significance of the tattoo that Soutine gave Drioli reminds him of the night 30 years ago. He came home from his tattoo parlor flush with cash and bearing bottles of wine. Soutine had been painting a picture of Drioli's wife, with whom he was infatuated. Moreover, the three of them got very drunk and Drioli came up with the idea that he wants the boy to paint a picture on his back and then tattoo over it. Soutine only agreed when Drioli's wife Josie says she will pose for the picture. It took all night, but eventually the picture was finished and signed. As a result, in the present, Drioli is homeless and all he has left is the tattoo on his back that is worth a lot of money where people are ready to take the painting of his skin.

Posted by: Rannell Smith at February 22, 2013 11:33 AM

Octavio Herrera
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA04
21 February 2013

Question: Who is Soutine? Where is he from? What is his role in the story?

Answer: Soutine was a painter that Drioli had known many years ago “And this Soutine, this ugly little kalmuck, a sullen brooding boy whom he had liked” (Dahl 165). Soutine was from Smilovichi, Russia. Soutine was the painter that tattooed the art on Drioli’s back; which would later get him much attention.

Posted by: Octavio Herrera at February 22, 2013 12:16 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
22 February 2013

Question: 6. Talk about giving the skin off your back. What is the significance of the tattoo that Soutine gives
Drioli in Roald Dahl’s “Skin”?

Answer: Giving the skin off your back means that you would literally do anything for someone or something. Soutine gives Drioli a tattoo of his wife and later, Drioli becomes poor and is a begger on the street. He sees that Soutine has paintings in an art gallery and Drioli wants to get a skin grafting surgery so he can sell his tattoo. "I too have a picture by this painter! He was my friend and I have a picture which he gave me!" (Dahl 175) He would literally give the skin off his back in order to have his life back.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at February 22, 2013 07:49 PM

Analisa Johnson
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122- CA 08
24 Feb 2013

Question: Who is Soutine?Where is he from?What is his role in the story?

Answer: Soutine is a friend of Drioli and is from Smilovichi, Russia. Soutine is a painter and had made a tattoo on Drioli's back which later become valuable to many people.

Posted by: Analisa Johnson at February 24, 2013 01:54 PM

Marlie Gonzalez
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic writing II
24 Febuary 2013

Question: Why did drioli not like the way the gallery owner was looking at him?


Answer: If you read page 174 and 175, you would see that it was necessarily how the gallery owner looked at him, but how he treated him in general. He just wanted to see pictures and the owner sends him out immediately.

Posted by: Marlie Gonzalez at February 24, 2013 04:01 PM

Jade Lowe
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
24 February 2013

Question:What does Soutine mean when he says his paintings are not “nourishing”?

Answer: When Soutine says his paintings are not nourishing he means that he can not eat them.(page 166)

Posted by: Jade Lowe at February 24, 2013 08:07 PM

Jordan Miller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
18 Feb 2013

Question 9: What does Drioli want to celebrate?
Answer: In Ronald Dahl’s “Skin”; Drioli stated “We celebrate because I have made a great sum of money with my work (Dahl, 165).” He also wanted to celebrate that his friend Poutine had made nothing. Drioli was proud of what he did, and he wanted to share it with his wife and one of his friends.

Posted by: Jordan Miller at February 24, 2013 08:38 PM

Jasmine Lowe
Dr.Hobbs
ENG- 122-CA08
February 24, 2013
Question: How does the reader know that Soutine liked the painting of Josie on Drioli’s back?
Answer: He said he liked it himself and he thought it was good enough for him to sign. (Page 173)

Posted by: Jasmine Lowe at February 24, 2013 09:36 PM

Brynn Laverdure
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA08
February 23, 2013

Question: What is Drioli's occupation?

Answer: In the story of "Skin", Drioli is a Tattoo Artist. When referring to how many tatoos in one day, "He had never done as many as many as nine before"(Dahl 165).

Posted by: Brynn Laverdure at February 24, 2013 09:56 PM

2. At the beginning of the story, what was the old man’s name?
The Old Man’s Name Was Drioli.

Posted by: Vintoria Hopps at February 24, 2013 11:44 PM

Marquisa Turner
ENG 122-CA04 Academic Writing II
Dr. Hobbs
24 February 2013

Question: What does Soutine mean when he says his paintings are not “nourishing”?

Answer: When Soutine says that his paintings are not nourishing he means that they are not benefiting him and his well being. They are not nourishing to his body which he needs to survive. “The trouble is, the boy said, scowling, that in themselves they are nourishing. I cannot eat them” (Dahl), This quote shows how his paintings are not making him money so that he can nourish his body with food.

Posted by: Marquisa Turner at February 24, 2013 11:58 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Hobbs
Eng122 CA04
25 February 2013

Question: How does the reader know that the picture gallery is going to be significant?

Answer: The reader knows that the picture is going to be significant when Drioli takes off his shirt and everybody is being quite. Indeed this moment shows that all the educated people who meets at the picture gallery knows that the tattoo on his back is a real one: “There was a was a sudden absolute silence in the room, each person arrested in what he was doing, standing motionless in a kind of shocked…” (Dahl, 175).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 25, 2013 03:12 PM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
14 October 2013

Question: How does Drioli first describe Soutine?

Answer: Drioli describes Soutine as "My Little Kalmuck"

Proof: p.164, paragraph 3, lines 3-5 ("Very" to "is!")

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at October 14, 2013 04:52 PM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
14 October 2013

Question: How does Drioli first describe Soutine?

Answer: Drioli describes Soutine as "My Little Kalmuck"

Proof: p.164, paragraph 3, lines 3-5 ("Very" to "is!")

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at October 14, 2013 04:56 PM

Ti’rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
16 October 2013
Question: What kind of man do you think the dignified people at the art exhibition see when they look at Drioli?
Answer: Drioli was a beggar on the streets, so their first impression was that he was homeless and dirty. Then after he reveals his skin, his back, and their perspective changes.

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at October 16, 2013 10:52 AM

Ryan Voss
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
16 October 2013

Question #3: How did Drioli used to make a lot of money from sailors?
Answer: Drioli sold wine that he convinced the sailors was magical and made you just excitingly happy. “drioli sold the wine to the sailors.” 255 (Dahl)

Posted by: Ryan Voss at October 16, 2013 01:37 PM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
15 October 2013

Question: What does Drioli want to celebrate?

Answer: Drioli wants to celebrate how much money he has made at his tattoo parlor today. He is very excited about this, because his business is doing very well. He wants to celebrate with his friends, and have a party for his growing business, as well he is happy because he is doing what he loves to do. This is a reason for him celebrate, he believes.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at October 16, 2013 01:44 PM

Sade Loiseau
Dr. Hobbs
English 122
16 October 2013

Question 15- Do you trust the hotel owners offer to live at the Hotel Bristol in Cannes? What are his motives?
Answer- No, I do not trust the hotel owners. I think he is just using the guy, because he wants to get famous off his painting. He would get fame off the painter living at his hotel. On page 17 it states the hotel owner explaining to the painter what will happen in his future.

Posted by: Sade Loiseau at October 16, 2013 03:47 PM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA08
16 October 2013

Question: What does Soutine mean when he says his paintings are not “nourishing”?

Answer: In the story, what Soutine means when he says the paintings are not nourishing is that the paintings are not edible in terms of food. The boy says, "That in themselves they are not nourishing I cannot eat them (Dahl 166)", shows that he was talking about food when he mentioned the word nourishing.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at October 16, 2013 05:48 PM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
17 October 2013

Question: What is Drioli’s occupation?

Answer:
In the story “Skin,” Drioli’s occupation is being the owner of a tattoo shop.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at October 17, 2013 08:57 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
18 October 2013

Question #11: How does the reader know Soutine liked the painting of Josie on Drioli’s back?

Answer: Soutine actually says, “I rather like it myself” after hearing what Drioli says after viewing the painting Soutine has created on his back(Dahl 173). Furthermore, Soutine decides to sign the painting, declaring, “I think it’s good enough for me to sign,” which shows that he really is pleased with what he has done(Dahl 173).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at October 18, 2013 11:28 AM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
16 October 2013

Question #17: "In the story, Drioli has to convince both Soutine and his wife with copious amounts of wine to perform the act that leaves him with a tattoo; does the tattoo give him the beauty and happiness he deeply desires?"

Answer: In the long run, I do not think that the tattoo gives Drioli the happiness he was looking for. He nonchalantly says, "There was that nonsense with the tattoo" (Dahl 165). Referring back to memories he had of the young male painter, he doesn't even seem to have real feelings towards the tattoo on his back, it is just "that tattoo". Later on in the story, Drioli asks, "But how can you buy it" (Dahl 177). He then sells himself to a man who wanted the "masterpiece" on his back, and it would seem that if the tattoo really brought him happiness he wouldn't have done that. It would have been more sentimental to him if it brought him the beauty and happiness he wanted.

Posted by: Madison Owens at October 21, 2013 12:06 AM

Bianca T. Smith
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
3 March 2014

Question #12-Why wouldn't people want tattoos on their arms anymore?

Answer- If people want art on their body, it would have to be on their back. The person is like a canvas and the tattoo artist is the one making the art on human canvases. "Are you the canvas or not the canvas? "I am the canvas. Already I begin to feel like a canvas. "Then place yourself upon the easel. There should be no difficulty"(Dahl 11).

Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at March 9, 2014 07:03 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA12
9 March 2014

QUESTION #14:
Why does Drioli not like the way the gallery owner is looking at him?

ANSWER:
Drioli does not like the way the gallery owner is looking at him because at a mere first glance, he assumes that Drioli does not belong in the gallery and proceeds to start asking him to leave. In addition to this, it's worth noting that the gallery owner's cheeks "hung down on either side of the mouth in two fleshy collops" (Dahl 13-14) and that appeared to bother Drioli as he goes on to mentioning it.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at March 9, 2014 08:02 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
9 March 2014

Question: Who is Soutine? Where is he from? What is his role in the story?

Answer: In Dahl's "Skin" Soutine is someone the protagonist, Drioli, knew years ago. At the time Soutine was just a boy that Drioli liked because he was such a good painter. He lived on Cite Falguiere street. These things are shown in lines such as, "And this Soutine, this ugly little Kalmuck, a sullen brooding boy whom he had liked- almost loved for no reason at all that he could think of except that he could paint" (Dahl 165). The line that shows where he lives is, "Which street? Where was it the boy had lived? The Cite Falguiere, that was it!" (Dahl 165). Soutine has a major role in the story even though he is never actually in it. The only thing we know of him is the memories of him Drioli has and the paintings of his being displayed at the gallery.

Posted by: sawyer hand at March 9, 2014 09:21 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
9 March 2014

Question:
How does the reader know that the picture gallery is going to be significant?

Answer:
The reader knows that the picture gallery is going to be significant because thinking of the tattoo that he got on him he remembered his old friend Le Havre. They show this on this flashback, “The old man smiled as he remembered Le Havre. Those were the pleasant years” (Dahl, 13).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at March 9, 2014 11:00 PM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
7 March 2014

QUESTION #8:
How does Drioli first describe Soutine?

ANSWER:
Drioli first describes Soutine by describing the place where Soutine stayed and how he remembered how he looked. "Then there was the studio with the single chair in it, and the filthy red couch that the boy had used for sleeping; the drunken parties, the cheap white wine, the furious quarrels, and always, always the bitter sullen face of of the boy brooding over his work" (Dahl 165). Though his first description of Soutine may seem in a poor manner, Drioli loved the boy.

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at March 9, 2014 11:02 PM

James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
9th March 2014

Question #17 - In the story, Drioli has to convince both Soutine and his wife with copious amounts of wine to perform the act that leaves him with a tattoo; does the tattoo give him the beauty and happiness he deeply desires?

Answer – Drioli comes across to me as a man who likes to feel important, to be the center of attention and feel as though he is better than everybody else. “It is only the very wealthy who can afford to celebrate this way” (Dahl 6) and other similar quotes from this area of the story are what allow me to believe this. So in a way, Drioli will feel very happy to be noticed and have his tattoo commented on like “it is fantastic, fantastic!” (Dahl 15), in such a gallery of people. This feeling of involvement I believe in a way is what Drioli perceives as happiness. Drioli wanted “a picture I can have with me always” (Dahl 7), and I guess his wish came true. Although he had briefly forgotten about the tattoo with it being on his back, it had always been with him. And although “this is a drunken idea” (Dahl 8), it was, at one moment in time his wish, and his wish came true so some happiness could have been found from that. Although he gained happiness from this image, and others viewed the work as beautiful, I don’t believe that it gave him the beauty and happiness which he deeply desired, as it was not him that was beautiful, it was simply the artwork upon his skin. And even the art dealers were disappointed with this.

Posted by: James Jessop at March 10, 2014 12:29 AM


Sergio Velazquez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng122 - ACADEMIC WRITING II CA12
3/10/2014


16. The boy in the story desired Drioli’s wife a great deal and this is mentioned when the boy says,
“Is it that you have decided to divorce your wife so she can marry me” (Dahl p. 165)? Why is
Drioli not bothered by these comments and still very fond of the boy, and do you think that the
boy only agreed to do the tattoo because of Josie? Is there any relation between the boy’s
eagerness of tattooing her and saying that Drioli is naught but a canvas?

On page 165 the boy was being satirical when he said “ you have decide to divorce your wife so she can marry me.” The boy was eager too tattoo something, but when It come to being experienced and sober, the boy could not allow himself to do it, but only with the help of Droili's sketch would he feel comfortable drawing it.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at March 10, 2014 09:57 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 12, 2014 07:12 AM

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