« What's Beneath Roald Dahl's "Skin"? | Main | Race and Clarke's "Reunion" »

January 22, 2013

Opening Your Eyes to Raymond Carver's "Cathedral"


Image Source:http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2483/3732438797_4588feef2c_o.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

------------------------------------

Posted by lhobbs at January 22, 2013 11:08 AM

Readers' Comments:

Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
17 February 2013


Question: For Carver, salvation lies in human contact and connection. Comment critically.

Answer: Salvation lies in human contact and connection in Carver's "Cathedral" by him connecting to the blind man saved his relationship with his wife and with the blind man better. Together the blind man and the narrator make connections about relationships and the cathedral. With out contact there would be no connection, this is what Carver was trying to portray.

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at February 17, 2013 06:28 PM

Rannell Smith
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA05
17 February 2013

Question: What are the primary emotions displayed by the narrator throughout, and how can we
understand them in terms of the life he leads? What are some adjectives you would use
to characterize him? What role does alcohol play in his life?

Answer: The primary emotions are insecurity, discomfort, displease and discomfort.He is very ignorant, judgmental simpleminded, irrational and close minded. Moreover, there is no joy in his life. Furthermore, alcohol plays a major role in his life and he uses it to ease the tension between him and the blind man.In other words, alcohol is used as a relaxer for him.

Posted by: Rannell Smith at February 17, 2013 09:31 PM

Sarah Hatcher
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
18 February, 2013

Question: What does Robert "see" in the course of the evening?

Answer: Because Robert is blind, he cannot actually see anything but he has senses of the stuff going on around him. One is that he can see the colored tv that they have, and he can see where his food is without actually seeing. The last and most important thing is that he imagines a cathedral when the speaker draws it for him.

Posted by: Sarah Hatcher at February 18, 2013 01:28 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA05
18 February 2013

Question: Contrast the author's tone and the narrator's mood at the opening of the story with the tone and mood at the end. How does the change in style reflect the change that has occurred in the narrator?

Answer: Carver's tone in the opening of the story was serious and strict along with the narrator's mood being angry and sarcastic. In the end, the author's tone is much brighter as the narrator is enlightened and understanding. This change in style reflects the change in the narrator dramatically. At first the narrator isn't thrilled for Robert to stay at his house. Eventually, the narrator converses with Robert and begins to understand him more, this eventually leads them to drawing the cathedral together which is when the change has been completely made in the narrator.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 18, 2013 08:28 AM

Colby Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05 Academic Writing 2
18 February 2013

Question:What does the narrator learn from his encounter with Robert? Is the ending
convincing? Do you believe that there will be a significant change in his outlook from
this point on?

Answer: The Narrator learns that people are not always what they seem. He had a opinion about blind people before he ever met one. This is shown in the first paragraph of the story with the quote "My idea of blindness came from the movies. In the movies, the blind moved slowly and never laughed. Sometimes they were led by seeing-eye dogs. A blind man in my house was not something I looked forward to. I believe the ending to be very convincing. I argue that this will deffinatley change his outlook because he saw how stereotypes can affect people in a negative way. For example, him thinking that blind people all have canes, when in reality not all use canes.

Posted by: Colby Johnson at February 18, 2013 09:21 AM

Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
18 February 2013

Question: 13.What is it about Robert that unsettles the narrator? What does Robert do to put the narrator at ease?

Answer: The thing that unsettled the narrator the most was that Robert was blind. Robert eases his restlessness by helping the narrator understand how it feels to be blind. Roberts asked the narrator to explain a cathedral. He noticed that it was hard to explain what a building looked like to a blind person. Robert's then leads the narrator trough a possess; that thing that unsettled the narrator the most was that Robert was blind. Robert eases his restlessness by helping the narrator understand how it feels to be blind. Roberts asked the narrator to explain a cathedral. Th narrator finds it difficult. Robert's then leads the narrator trough a possess; that helps the him understand Roberts better. That helps the him understand Roberts better. This action puts the narrator at ease. Leaving Robert and the narrator laughing at the end.

Posted by: Octavia Robinson at February 18, 2013 09:46 AM

Terrance Browne
ENG122
18/Feb/2013

Question: Discuss the nickname “Bub.”
Answer:In my opinion the name "Bub" makes me think of the name "bum" mostly because every time you would hear that name its used to compare someone who is a nobody and doesn't contribute to the working life.In the text Carver says "Bub, I'm a Scotch man myself," he said fast enough in this big voice."Right," I said. Bub! "Sure you are. I knew it."(Carver,3)

Posted by: Terrance Browne at February 18, 2013 11:14 PM

Yes our opinion of him changes because at the beginning he is kind of mean to the blind man but throughout the story he becomes more friendly with him. Yes he does grow. he realizes that you shouldn't judge a book by its cover.

Posted by: Ryan Nowotny at February 20, 2013 08:52 AM

Ti’rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
9 October 2013
Question: What is it about Robert that unsettles the narrator? What does Robert do to put the narrator at ease?
Answer: The narrator is unsettled by the fact that Robert is blind and that he doesn’t wear dark glasses because his eyes have an odd color and his eyes keep turning in odd directions. He decided to have a drink with everyone, the man drinks a lot so this would have put him at ease. Later they smoked pot too.

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at October 9, 2013 09:51 AM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
7 October 2013

Question: What in your opinion, is a theme present in Carter's short story, "Cathedral"? Can you think of any others? Explain your theory.

Answer: the main theme is all people are created equal. Other themes can be actions speak louder than words, symbols often tell stories or help understand something, and the difference between looking and seeing. Even though the man is blind he is still equal to those who can see and he should be treated fairly even though he has a flaw

Proof: "This blind man"

"The TV showed this one cathedral. Then there was a long, slow look at another one. Finally, the picture
switched to the famous one in Paris, with its flying buttresses and its spires reaching up to the clouds. The
camera pulled away to show the whole of the cathedral rising above the skyline."

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at October 9, 2013 01:54 PM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
10 October 2013

Question: Is “Cathedral” funny? Offensive? Explain your answer.

Answer: The story Cathedral is more offensive than funny. This is because the unnamed narrator gives harsh judgments towards blind people without even getting to know them, and who they truly are as a person. He makes a lot of rude remarks and a lot of stereotypical comments, and this is offensive to the reader as well when they are reading the story. Even though the reader may not be blind, they could never imagine someone being this awful to a person who has a handicap. The story is not funny at all. The story, however, is very ridiculous in what the narrator says about blind people, which does give the reader room for an eye roll or smirk because of how stupid the narrator sounds whenever he is talking about blindness. He does not even know what he is talking about, and the narrator overall is just a stereotypical jerk, and the story is very offensive towards people who cannot see. Even though it can be humorous to see the narrator make himself look so ridiculous, the story is just downright offensive and hurtful.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at October 10, 2013 12:11 AM

Taina Valcarcel
Dr. Hobbs
September 11, 2013
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08

Question:. What does the narrator learn from his encounter with Robert? Is the ending convincing? Do you believe that there will be a significant change in his outlook from this point on?

Answer: What the narrator learns from his encounter with the blind man was that you do not need eyes to see the world around you and the beauty and meaning behind it. The ending is convincing in the way that it shows that the narrator learned to see beyond sight and was more understanding towards Robert. That narrator's outlook will be different than it was before only because he knows now that not seeing anything does not mean being disconnected from the world. A good example of the change the narrator went through is,"But I had my eyes closed. I thought I’d keep them that way for a little longer. I thought it was something I ought
to do.
“Well?” he said. “Are you looking?”
My eyes were still closed. I was in my house. I knew that. But I didn’t feel like I was inside anything.
“It’s really something,” I said" (Carver, 10).

Posted by: Taina Valcarcel at October 11, 2013 12:39 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
11 October 2013

Question #4: Discuss the idea of compassion in this story. Are nay of the characters compassionate? Why or why not? Some people feel that compassion can be “taught”(for example, by asking you to read stories such as these, some readers feel/hope that people will learn to be more sensitive to the needs of others). From your personal experience, how do you think people learn compassion? Can it be taught?

Answer: Compassion is a theme in Raymond Carver’s “Cathedral.” The wife in this story shows compassion for her friend Robert, the blind man, who has just had his wife pass away, by inviting him to come stay with her and her husband for a night(Carver 1).
Even though the wife’s husband is not fond of seeing a blind man, it seems as if he ends up enjoying spending time with the man(Carver 5-6). The speaker shares a smoke with the man(Carver 5). He even helps Robert create a cathedral, which the blind man desires to do(Carver 9). Even though the speaker mentions, “My legs felt like they didn’t have any strength in them,” he still is willing to participate in activity the blind man is interested in doing(Carver 8). He obviously has compassion for this man who is experiencing sadness because of his wife’s death.
Both characters, the wife and husband, show through their actions in the story, that they care about Robert in his time of mourning. They have allowed him to stay with them, and the wife makes sure he is comfortable(Carver 5).
I believe that people can actually learn compassion by seeing others use it. People, I think, see compassion for the first time when it is demonstrated by their mothers caring for them when they are small children. I think compassion is able to be taught, but becoming and staying a compassionate person would take a lot of practice, sensitivity, and faith.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at October 11, 2013 01:07 PM

Maryerie Rojas, Juliann Sauter, Ryan Moss
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
11 October 2013

Question 8: Would the story be different if a kind of building other than a cathedral was featured? Why or why not?

Answer: The story would be different if a building other than a cathedral was featured. The name of the story would change as well. It would be different because on the television there would have been a different type of programming and the blind man would have asked the main character to describe the different building. It might have been easier to describe a home or library, but a cathedral is more complex. Also, had it been a different building, it would have been easier to draw with his eyes closed.

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas, Juliann Sauter, Ryan Moss at October 11, 2013 01:57 PM

Taina Valcarcel
Jeffrey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
September 11, 2013
Question:What is the narrator’s attitude toward his wife? Describe the narrator’s marriage. What kind of marriage do they have, and what evidence do you find to support your conclusion? Is the narrator’s jealousy of Robert irrational?

Answer:The narrator's wife was active and had a social relationship with the blind man and she was very open minded. The narrator kept to himself and did not understand his wife's relationship with the blind man. They are complete opposites of each other, but they attract one another. The wife is friendly, kind, understanding, and innocent. The narrator is closed off, private, prejudiced, and stubborn. their marriage is platonic in the way that she is more open to the blind man and more lively than with her husband only because she has known Robert longer. An example that is shown in the story is, " She told him everything, or so it seemed to me" (Carver, 1). I believe that the jealousy that the narrator has towards Robert is not completely irrational because she seems to confide more on Robert than to the narrator because she seems to trust him more than him.

Posted by: Taina & Jeffrey at October 11, 2013 02:12 PM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
9 October 2013

Question #20: "Why such a "feeding frenzy" at dinner?"

Answer: Carver writes, "We didn’t talk. We ate" (Carver 4). Robert had just arrived before this dinner, and I feel as if the husband wasn't quite comfortable with him yet, so instead of small talk, they just ate everything in sight. They didn't have conversation to keep them from over eating, so they just kept going until everything was gone.

Posted by: Madison Owens at October 13, 2013 03:43 PM

Tyiasha Bailey and Tirani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA08
14 October 2013

Question: What does the narrator learn from his encounter with Robert? Is the ending
convincing? Do you believe that there will be a significant change in his outlook from
this point on?

Answer: The narrator learns that you do not need eyes to make sense of the world around you, and to see its beauty and meaning behind it. The ending is convincing because the narrator is more understanding of Robert and sees beyond sight or vision. His outlook will forever be different because he knows now that he doesn't have to see to enjoy the world around him.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey and Tirani Rye at October 14, 2013 10:17 AM

Luis Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
14 October 2013

Question- What does Robert "see" over the course of the evening?

Answer- While visiting Robert sees that the relationship between the man and his wife is nothing like an ordinary relationship. Conversations are not as constant or fluid as they are between the wife and Robert. Robert sees that without him the wife may not have anyone else that she can really talk too and perhaps this is why Beaulah has kept in contact for so long. The man and his wife seem to have little conversation between the two of them until Robert shows up and facilitates the conversations.

Posted by: Luis Martinez at October 14, 2013 11:22 AM

Emma De Rhodo and Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
14 October 2013

Question #13: What is it about Robert that unsettles the narrator? What does Robert do to put the narrator at ease?

Answer:
Mainly, Robert’s blindness is what bothers the narrator(Carver 1). The narrator feels uneasy that this blind man is going to come because he has stereotypes about blind people. The narrator says his “idea of blindness came from the movies”(Carver 1). He mentions that from what he has viewed in movies, he has learned that blind people do not travel quickly, have seeing-eye dogs, and do not laugh( Carver 1). Furthermore, the narrator also mentions the fact that he does not know Robert, so this fact bothers him as well(Carver 1). Also, the narrator is probably uncomfortable with the fact that the blind man knows so much about the narrator’s wife and has been keeping in touch with her for years through the tapes they have sent to each other(Carver 1). The narrator may be at least a little jealous of Robert since he seems to have a more insightful relationship with his wife than he himself does.
Robert, however, disproves the stereotypes the narrator has set forth; the narrator is put at ease through the revealing of Robert’s capabilities throughout the story. Robert smokes, which is an activity the narrator says he learned blind people could not take part in(Carver 4). Following, Robert recognizes that the television he, the narrator and the narrator’s wife are watching is in color; he says, “Don’t ask me how, but I can tell”(Carver 5). Towards the end of the story, Robert draws a cathedral with the narrator, showing that he is able to do more complex activities without being able to see(Carver 9). The narrator says the blind man “moved the tips of the fingers over the paper, all over what I had drawn, and he nodded;” he was able to tell that the narrator had done a fine job of creating a cathedral(Carver 9). The narrator’s stereotypes about certain disabilities of blind people had been proven wrong, and the narrator, throughout the story, has probably gotten to know the blind man more than he would have thought.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at October 14, 2013 01:17 PM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA08
16 October 2013

Question: Discuss the nickname "Bub."

Answer: The nickname Bub is brought up a few times in the story, one time was, "Bub, its all right,(Carter 7)." The name seems to be a word almost as bud meaning buddy or friend.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at October 16, 2013 06:17 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 February 2014

QUESTION #4:
Discuss the idea of compassion in this story. Are any of the characters compassionate? Why or why not? Some people feel that compassion can be "taught" (for example, by asking you to read stories such as these, some teachers feel/hope that people will learn to be more sensitive to the needs of others). From your personal experience, how do you think people learn compassion? Can it be taught?

ANSWER:
Within the short story, "Cathedral," I feel as though all of the characters may be considered compassionate in one way or another. The narrator, because in the end, he winds up becoming so consumed in the drawing of the cathedral for Robert, which shows that he wants to do his best in aiding Roberts disability (Carver, 9). The narrator's wife, because of how kind and caring she is towards Roberts, especially after the lose of his wife, Beulah. Not only that, but also because she tried numerous times to write a poem about the experience she had with Roberts when he touched her face for the first time (Carver 1). Now, finally, Robert, because for the last ten years, he made sure to always send an audio tape to the narrator's wife as support in her life, in a sense, and to always see how she's doing Carver 1).
As for my personal experiences with compassion, I think that people learn it through being truly at one with someone or something. In other words, compassion exists between two things when, within the two, there is a natural tendency to devote/dedicate time to care for and nurture one another. This is something I feel we all have the capability of experiencing, however, I don't feel it can be taught, simply because you cannot force someone to be compassionate towards something- as I said, it is a natural tendency.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at February 26, 2014 03:57 PM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

Question:
Is the narrator a sympathetic protagonist? Does our opinion of him change as the story
progresses? Does the narrator develop or change or "grow" over the course of the
evening?

Answer:
The narrator of "Cathedral" is obviously a shy, socially awkward, anti-social introvert who likes to drink, smoke tobacco and pot, and watch television. He doesn't like his job. People who find this narrator sympathetic are the people that like him in spite of his faults. Two of the traits they like best about him are his total honesty and his wry sense of humor. Although many stories and poems are terribly sad, there is almost always that characteristic quirky sense of humor to be seen in them. Typical examples of the narrators humor to be found in "Cathedral" are the following, Maybe I could take him bowling, I said to my wife (Carver 2) . The narrator knows this is going to antagonize her, but he can't help saying it. Maybe Carver's essential problem was that he couldn't control his impulses.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at February 27, 2014 04:12 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

Question: How or why is the cathedral an important image or symbol in the story? What is the significance of Carver's choice of a cathedral as catalyst for the narrator's learning experience? What added dimension does this symbol bring to our understanding of the story? Can you tie it to any previous detail?

Answer: The cathedral in this story is an important image because it serves as the symbol that teachers the narrator what life is like as a blind man. At the beginning of the story the narrator only knows of the blind from what he saw in movies. As the story goes on he starts to become more interested in the blind. You can tell this in lines such as, "Then something occurred to me, and I said 'Do you have any idea what a cathedral is? what they look like, that is? Do you follow me? If somebody says cathedral to you, do you have any notion what they're talking about? Do you the difference between that and a Baptist church, Say? '"(Carver 7). This quote shows the narrator becoming interested in the man's blindness and becoming curious about it. I think Carver chose a cathedral for this particular story because a cathedral is something that a person would have a tough time describing. To fully understand a cathedral you would have to see one. This brings an added dimension to the story because the narrator has to draw it to explain it to the blind man. To draw it he has to feel it. This ties to the beginning of the story when the narrator's wife talks about the blind man feeling her face and how it connected her with him. The blind man feels people's faces because that is his way of seeing things. At the end of the story the narrator keeps his eyes close when the blind man asks him to look at the drawing. The narrator keeps his eyes closed because he doesn't need to see it with his sight to see it because he felt it. You can tell this with the last quote of the story, "'It's really something,' I said" (Carver 10). This shows that the narrator now understands the blind man and why he touched his wives face the way he did.

Posted by: sawyer hand at February 27, 2014 04:49 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

Question: What, in your opinion, is a theme present in Carter’s short story, “Cathedral” Explain your theory.

Answer:
A theme in the story is the difference between looking and seeing. The narrator believes that seeing is something essential to someone’s life and that without that you are unable to make a woman happy or fulfill a full life. This is shown in this quote, “Hearing this, I felt sorry for the blind man for a little bit. And then I found myself thinking what a pitiful life this woman must have led. Imagine a woman who could never see herself as she was seen in the eyes of her loved one” (Carver 3). Robert who is blind is able to see more deeply into what things are and their significance. Robert is able to look at the narrator’s wife and even though he can’t identify her physically, he understands her because he is able to listen and understand who she really is by seeing inside her.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at February 27, 2014 06:29 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

Question #5: One of the things that will help if you are stuck finding a topic to discuss or write about literature is to try and identify the "conflicts." What seems to be one of the main conflicts in Carter's short story, "Cathedral"? What are some of the minor conflicts? How do these conflicts drive the plot or make it interesting? Are these conflicts realistic? Are any of them ever resolved? If so, how? If not, how might they be resolved?

Answer: The main conflict in Carter's short story "Cathedral" would be Man Vs. Man. A minor conflict would be Bub vs. Robert. Robert being blind makes him struggle throughout his whole life. Whereas for Bub, Bub does despises that Robert is blind. Robert starts to visit Bub's wife, which makes Bub unhappy. Bub says "I wasn't enthusiastic about his visit. He was no one I knew. And his being blind bothered me. My idea of blindness came from movies. In the movies, the blind moved slowly and never laughed" (Carver 1). Bub and Robert having this tension together really makes the plot interesting because you never know what is going to happen. In todays world, this would be bad news. Robert personality towards the wife seems a little sexual. The narrator says, "On her last day in the office, the blind man asked if he could touch her face. She agreed to this. She told me he touched his fingers to every part of her face, her nose-even her neck" (Carver 1)! By this quote, it seems like maybe the flirtatious attitude might be coming from the wife as well.
In a way, the conflict does resolve. Robert wants Bub to feel comfortable. Roberts tells Bub "I'm always learning something. Learning never ends. It wont hurt me to learn something tonight" (Carver 222).

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at February 27, 2014 10:19 PM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2014

QUESTION #13:
What is it about Robert that unsettles the narrator? What does Robert do to put the narrator at ease?

ANSWER:
The narrator is unsettled about Robert because the narrator didn't not know Robert as well as Robert being blind bothered him (Carver 1). Robert eases the narrator when he joins the narrator in smoking some dope. Which eventually leads to both the narrator and Robert drawing a cathedral together. "My eyes were still closed. I was in my house. I knew that. But I didn’t feel
like I was inside anything" (Carver 10). Within this moment the narrator felt at ease as he was guided to close his eyes and continue to draw with Robert enjoying the moment.

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at February 27, 2014 10:37 PM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
27 Feb. 2014

Question 14:
How does Robert shatter the narrator’s preconceived notions of blind people? How do
his appearance and bearing resist every stereotypical image the narrator has about
blind people, and why is this so upsetting?

Answer:
He shatters the narrator's mind because the blind man in the story acts as if he isn't blind, or at least it doesn't bother him as much, because in the story he was able to tell that he is watching colored T.V. (Carver 5)

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at February 27, 2014 11:57 PM

James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
27th February 2014

Question #1 - What is the significance of the title of Carter’s short story, “Cathedral”? What does it mean, what does it refer to, and why do you think he might have chosen this title, aside from the obvious reasons?

Answer – “God was important in everyone’s life” and “in the olden days, when they built cathedrals, men wanted to be close to God” (Carver 7) are two quotes from the story. This is, in my eyes a build up for Carver to show how most people thought that they couldn’t live without God, but they now obviously could do. It is similar to how people believe that they cannot live without their eyesight, but, although it may be tougher, it is easily possible to live through it and make the best of all situations. I believe that he may have chosen this title to send a message to the readers, to make them feel something when the cathedrals are mentioned in the story, as that is where I believe that the writer wanted people to connect with the story the most. But, it could also be seen another way. The blind man seems to see more beauty in things than that of the narrator, who is oblivious to the beauty around him. Another message could be that we take things for granted, just like many at the time took their faith for granted.

This was pretty tough to answer.

Posted by: James Jessop at February 28, 2014 12:17 AM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 February 2014

Question #11:
What are the primary emotions displayed by the narrator throughout, and how can we understand them in terms of the life he leads? What are some adjectives you would use to characterize him? What role does alcohol play in his life?

Answer:
Throughout the story the narrator displays a lot of criticism as well as lack of interest . He likes to drink and smoke and is not a religious man. The narrator seems to be very judgmental, skeptical, and irritated by the blind man. When his wife shows him one of the tapes Robert had sent her he thinks to himself "I heard my own name in the mouth of this stranger, this blind man I didn't even know!" (Carver 2). When Robert arrives he does not have much to say to him at first, for when they were chatting on the sofa he later tells us "I had absolutely nothing to say to that. No opinion" (Carver 5). We can conclude that the narrator likes his alcohol and drinks a lot when his wife goes to bed and it makes him somewhat of a bitter man.

Posted by: Berlin Waters at February 28, 2014 12:30 AM

NEW ONE WITH CORRECT QUEST. !!!
Bianca T. Smith
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
28 Feb. 2014

Question # 16-Contrast the author's tone and the narrator's mood at the opening of the story with the tone and mood at the end. How does the change in style reflect the change that has occurred in the narrator?

Answer- At the opening of the story, the author's tone and the narrator's mood is quite calm and unsure about the blind man's visit. He is also unsure about the blind man's blindness."I wasn’t enthusiastic about his visit. He was no one I knew. And his being blind bothered me. My idea of blindness came from the movies. In the movies, the blind moved slowly and never laughed. Sometimes they were led by seeing-eye dogs. A blind man in my house was not something I looked forward to"(Carver 1). The tone and the mood at the end, the narrator now understands and has experienced the change in his life when Robert was guiding him with the drawing of the cathedral." “Well?” he said. “Are you looking?”
My eyes were still closed. I was in my house. I knew that. But I didn’t feel like I was inside anything.“It’s really something,” I said(Carver 10).

Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at February 28, 2014 12:51 AM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 6, 2014 08:46 PM

Google
My Blog

Creative Commons License
This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Some rights reserved. 2006.