« Bisecting Beowulf: Dividing What You've Seen and What You've Read | Main | "There'll Be Scary Ghost Stories" with Dickens at Christmas »

January 05, 2013

Bird-Watching in Jerzy Kosinski's Controversial Novel


Image Source: http://th03.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2013/055/7/5/the_painted_bird_by_dandandantheman-d5w24ir.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 5, 2013 11:52 PM

Readers' Comments:

Blog Entry 6
The Monomyth Part 2


In Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird the monomyth is highly exemplified both litereally and figuratively. The Crossing of the First Threshold is a literal crossing within the first page or so of the book. The boy is separated from his parents during the mess of World War II. His family has given him up without much choice and he is placed with an old lady named Marta who lives in a hut. This begins his literal adventure as he has been transferred from the city life to the country life. He is more educated and of a different rank socially than the people in the area he is traveling through. It is at this point that he is first separated from his parents and must lead a life of self-sufficiency.
However, the figurative threshold is when the hut burns down and Marta dies. Since he was placed with Marta after he was taken away from his parents, she is more or less still his protective and parental source. After he death, the boy is now truly left to live on his own and is forced to be self sufficient for the first time. It is totally the boy’s responsibility to find food and shelter. He has to figure out a way to survive and not get caught by the Nazis. Therefore, it is his jump into the “belly of the whale” in Campbell’s monomyth and he is ready to begin the “road of trials. This is also considered his crossing the “threshold of adventure” so that the initiation phase can begin for the novel.

Posted by: Candice S at April 6, 2008 03:40 PM

American Lit
4/6/08
Apotheosis in Painted Bird

I thought at first the apotheosis might be the part where the boy loses his voice, on page 139 to 141. In the hand out on the major steps of the monomyth, it says that the apotheosis is to “die a physical death” or that it’s “the period of rest, peace, and fulfillment before the hero begins the return.” That seemed to fit pretty well with the part of the story, because the boy almost dies when he loses his voice, and he also has a period of relative peace afterwards while he lives with Makar and then with Labina.
On looking at it a second time, I thought that the apotheosis might also be when he finds out about Ewaka’s infidelity and the conclusion he raises on page 154. On the link to www.wiu.edu there was a small summary of apotheosis that said it was when “Father and son are often pit against each other for mastery of the universe…The hero must reconcile with this ultimate authority figure.” I thought this fit pretty well there because the boy finally comes to the conclusion that he will never be reconciled with God, so he must turn instead to Satan. As apotheosis means “to deify” the sudden burst of strength and power the boy finds could be a type of deifying himself. Unfortunately, this opposes more than it fits to the handout’s idea that apotheosis gives a state of “divine knowledge, love, compassion and bliss.” Instead, the boy makes a resolution to do evil and create destruction. I think, though, this might just be him failing at the apotheosis, though it does occur.

Posted by: HGeary at April 6, 2008 11:08 PM

Amanda Farabaugh
Monomyth response


In the book The Painted Bird by Kosinski, the protagonist is faced with the call to adventure or the refusal of the call. The refusal of the call may be found on page 4 of the text. In the first sentence towards the bottom, “I lived in Marta’s hut, expecting my parents to come for me any day, any hour. Crying did not help . . .” When you think about this sentence, the protagonist is refusing to accept the call to stay and live with Marta in her hut. He wishes that he could be with his parents instead of her.
In almost every chapter, the protagonist is faced with the refusal of the call or accepting the call. For example in Chapter 2, the beginning sentence, the protagonist refuses to accept that his parents are not coming and that he has to live in a different hut. He refuses to be alone and he must find a new place to live. This shows that he is unwilling but forced to live without his parents. In Chapter 3, he refuses to accept that he would be alone. He believed that Olga set spells on him to find his way back to her, though as we find out in Chapter 4 it doesn’t happen. In the chapters, the protagonist has to either refuse the call or accept the call to either stay at his new home or seek another home to stay in.
My partner and I also found that at the end of the book, the protagonist refuses to go with his parents, but goes without a fight. In actuality he is waiting for Gavrila (The Red Army Soldier who took him under his wing and cared for him and watched over him, without being beat, molested and hated). This is whom the protagonist wanted as his family. He was afraid to go with his “real” parents, on page 226, the protagonist says ‘I could not readily accept the idea of suddenly becoming someone’s real son, of being caressed and cared for, of having to obey people, not because they were stronger and could hurt me, but because they were my parents and had rights which no one could take away from them.” By the protagonist accepting the call at the end of the book, means that the new life will be with his “real” parents and not with Gavrila. You could take this as it’s a new journey that the protagonist must go on.

Posted by: Amanda F at April 9, 2008 03:33 PM

My partner and I had The Ultimate Boon for our part of the journey in “The Painted Bird.” The Ultimate Boon is described as when the hero achieves the goal of the quest. It is what the person goes on the journey to get. The previous steps in the Monomyth serve to prepare and purify the person for this step. The boon in many myths is something that is transcendent like the elixir of life itself, or a plant that supplies immortality, or the Holy Grail.
When we first began thinking about the boon in “The Painted Bird” we had a hard time figuring out what it was. After thinking about it, I realized that the “comet” was the boon for the boy. He used the boon in order to stay alive in a couple different situations. I think that this would be one of the boons in the story. Also, I think that the survival skills that Olga taught him were a boon in a way as well. Without those skills that she taught him, the boy would not have been able to survive throughout the book. These are the literal boons in the book.
I think that the symbolic boon in the book was the fact that the boy was able to survive on his own. He left his family and was able to survive on his own at a very young age. He made things work and helped himself through the events that he encountered.

Posted by: Michelle E. at April 13, 2008 01:04 AM

While it seems that supernatural aids appear throughout the entirety of this book, one aid stands out to me as being the most consistent and most important. The aid of light, or a “comet,” proves invaluable to the boy as he moves from place to place. The Jewish child is made aware of the importance of this little bit of fire by one of his “foster” parents. While she teaches him seemingly everything he needs to know about wildlife, herbs, remedies, and other, more superstitious affects, the comet is stressed as being the ultimate necessity, by far. Her apparent pagan lifestyle was tied to the land and lent itself to living the type of life the boy will lead for the next few years.

“The comet was also indispensable protection against dogs and people” (pg. 25). Swinging this article through a darkened sky would surely send any evildoer away so the boy made sure he had the comet with him each time he traveled. The comet was not only a protective source, it was the only source of fire he had for heat, cooking, and as a means to light his way. Keeping this fire lighted was of extreme importance. Other means of creating a fire were scarce so it was imperative that he protect this aid.

The comet was symbolic of life; as long as the comet remained afire, the boy had no worries. This guide enabled him to walk freely and safely through his own mind as well as any dark forest. Light is an extremely important facet in Jewish culture, so the importance of Light as a life force, a symbol, and a guide in this story was pulled directly from the culture. More than any single person, although he had many aids throughout the story, the comet proved a necessary aid that guided him through dark areas both literal and symbolic.

Posted by: Vivian Lee at April 13, 2008 11:49 AM

The main character in the story finds his parents in the end of the story, and is forced to return back to his original life. This marks the return of threshold. Even though he does not want to return home, and he even pretends that his parents are dead, he goes home with his parents after being identified by his birth mark. He survives all that he has been through during the war time, and beats incredible odds. He masters both worlds in this novel. The worlds are actually the same world, they are just different perspectives. On one end of the spectrum, the young boy is dealing with educated city people, while on the other end, he is struggling to adapt and survive in a world with superstitious rednecks. He learned how to survive in both worlds, which made him a strong, educated person. He is very worldly and independent after this experience.
Amanda S.

Posted by: Amanda Swartz at April 15, 2008 09:36 PM

As we discussed in class, it seems that Kosinski’s, The Painted Bird, portrays the main character going through one full journey in the span of the novel; however, we also see the beginning of what appears to be another journey at the end of the novel. For each of these journeys, the boy can be seen in “The Belly of the Whale.”
For his first journey, it is quite clear that the journey has been initiated prior to where we meet the young boy. From the first words he speaks, in chapter one, he is in the belly of the whale. This is the point where he knows he has been separated from his known world. He mentions that he’s already passed the point of expecting his parents to come get him, and he mentions that he no longer cries, for it does no good. This is the transition point for him—he’s moving into a new world and a new self. After this, he continues on his road of trials skipping from place to place.
His second journey begins when his parents show up at the orphanage. It is when he goes back to live with his parents that he is in the belly of the whale for the second journey. He says that he could have run away, or not shown them his birthmark, but he does anyway. Yet as he lives with them longer and longer, he regrets his decision. He wants to go back to the orphanage and wait for his Russian friends to adopt him. He even wants to be on the run again. Anything seems better than the situation he is currently in; however, he knows it is too late. He’s already in the belly of the whale, there’s no returning to the old world now.

Posted by: Chera P at April 15, 2008 11:01 PM

Apothesis can be described as a period of rest or peace before the hero in the story begins his return. Apothesis is in the Initiation stage in The Hero’s Journey. In The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski, a Hero’s Journey can be described. The boy or main character in the story experiences Apothesis when he is thrown into the mud.
Throughout the entire story up until this point, the boy had suffered and wandered from town to town. He comes into unbelievable circumstances and is never really at rest. The only way that I can describe apothesis in this story is when the boy is thrown into the mud and he becomes deaf. This is a point where the boy is at peace. Also, this is a point before the Return in the Hero’s Journey.

Posted by: C. Bell at April 16, 2008 12:12 AM

The boy’s “father figure” was Mitka. Mitka guided him through the journey since the boy entered the regimental hospital. Mitka got the boy back to a healthy state by feeding him and helping him though the medical examinations. Mitka even went as far as helping the boy to get better while he was vomiting for two days, by holding his head.
The first threshold was when Mitka started looking after the boy at the regimental hospital. Mitka “literally” helped the boy along their path. He feed him, helped him get through examinations, introduced him to poetry, and taught him many other things. He basically got the boy from point A to point B (hospital to home).
The boy’s symbolic state really came about through the journey, but more so toward the end. Mitka, as I mentioned before, taught the boy many things, but they became more meaningful and helpful the farther along in the journey they got. By the time he reached his threshold again, the boy was changed. It was showed when the boy finally got home to see his father. It was expected for the boy to be ecstatic upon his return; however, the boy’s immediate thought is of Mitka. He thought about how much he missed him.

Posted by: Chris King at April 16, 2008 12:52 AM

T. Wineland
Prof. Hobbs
Intro. to Literature
April 2, 2008

“The Painted Bird” by Jerzy Kosinsky

Crossing of the First Threshold

The crossing of the first threshold is represented at moment that the hero, the young boy, is sent away by his mother and father, and his home, for his own protection. He is taken by a stranger to a village in the country to stay with a woman he has never met. From there he will enter many similar villages which are unlike his hometown.

The villagers he encounters are poor, uneducated, superstitious and fair skinned with blue eyes. The boy obviously stands out in these villages, with his olive skin, dark eyes and dark hair. Many of the villagers call him a Gypsy or Jew and treat him as if he is a curse or demon of some kind.

He was from a town of individuals who were well educated and wealthier than the villagers. He had a nurse and nanny to look after him when his parents could not so he was obviously from a privileged family. He probably didn’t want or need for much and it seems that his parents cared for him deeply, especially in their sacrifice of him to save his life. He had probably never been on his own before in a town with common folk, let alone a country village with strange looking individuals, who speak a different dialect and do not seem to like him very much.

This crossing of the threshold takes the boy from the ordinary world where he is looked after and cared for, lives life well and amongst educated, well to do individuals, into the special world of country villagers, with little to no education, strange superstitions, shabby living conditions and strange language. Once he crosses this threshold he has crossed into a new chapter of his life where he is forced to rise to the challenge of the unknown along his journey.

Posted by: T. Wineland at April 16, 2008 12:08 PM

Ryenn Micaletti

American Lit (1915-Present)

Road of Trials


In our last class discussion, we were assigned a certain stage in “The Hero’s Journey” or “The Monomyth” in which we were to determine what we thought took place during this stage, in the book, “The Painted Bird”. My group assigned stage was “Road of Tests/Trials or also known as “The Belly of the Whale”. The Road of Trials takes place during the “Initiation” phase of the hero’s journey. The Road of Trials is a series of tests, tasks, or obstacles, the hero must face before they begin their transformation.

In the novel “The Painted Bird,” the hero is the six year old boy. During the book he moves from place to place. My group felt the people he lived with were his tests/trials. In each home he lived in he witnessed things not someone of his age normally witnessed. He was widely exposed to sex and violence as a child. This caused him much pain. After, going through the tests and trials of going from place to place, began his transformation from innocence to adulterate.

The hero’s literal journey was when he began living in Marta’s hut. This started his literal road of trials. The roads he traveled to get to his different shelters were his Roads of Trials. Symbolically, when he first moves into Marta’s hut, was his road of trials mentally. With every place the boy went to, he became more and more exposed to the cruelty of the world. Every place he lived was a mental and emotional “Road of Trials”.

Posted by: Ryenn Micaletti at April 16, 2008 12:41 PM

In class last week, my group discussed how the young boy in “The Painted Bird” was the master of two worlds. The young boy was the master of two worlds because although he had been through so much at such a young age, he overcame the obstacles and survived. He was taken away from his parents and given to another caretaker. After two months of living with her, she died. He witnessed a lot of sexual acts during his time in the village. That is a lot for a six year old to take in and witness. He was basically passed from place to place and was left to fend for himself. But through all that he still found the courage to move forward and find his parents. Any other child would have been affected mentally but he still strived to survive in a rough situation.

Posted by: Shayla Sorrells at April 16, 2008 01:34 PM

In The Painted Bird, the little boy goes through a huge journey that has many little journeys along the way. The little boy bounces from home to home, place to place, while trying to survive and find his parents. He wants to survive and have the freedom to live when the war is over. Throughout the book he is literally fighting to fit in, to find a place that’s safe, and to finally get freedom to live. In the end he ultimately achieves that. He is reunited with his parents and although he doesn’t know whether he wants to be with them again; he has survived and has gained the freedom to live.
In the Hero’s Journey, the small journeys combine to make the bigger picture; the ultimately journey. Usually, the hero’s journey depends on his survival, but sometimes the ultimate journey is for the hero to die.
In this story, the little boy’s destiny is that he survives the journey. He does all the he needs to get by during the different trials that face him. In the end, he finds the freedom to live by surviving all the little obstacles that made up his journey. He is a survivor and is a true hero.

Posted by: Melissa L. at April 16, 2008 01:47 PM

In The Painted Bird, the little boy goes through a huge journey that has many little journeys along the way. The little boy bounces from home to home, place to place, while trying to survive and find his parents. He wants to survive and have the freedom to live when the war is over. Throughout the book he is literally fighting to fit in, to find a place that’s safe, and to finally get freedom to live. In the end he ultimately achieves that. He is reunited with his parents and although he doesn’t know whether he wants to be with them again; he has survived and has gained the freedom to live.
In the Hero’s Journey, the small journeys combine to make the bigger picture; the ultimately journey. Usually, the hero’s journey depends on his survival, but sometimes the ultimate journey is for the hero to die.
In this story, the little boy’s destiny is that he survives the journey. He does all the he needs to get by during the different trials that face him. In the end, he finds the freedom to live by surviving all the little obstacles that made up his journey. He is a survivor and is a true hero.

Posted by: Melissa L. at April 16, 2008 01:47 PM

The belly of the whale for the gypsy boy in Jerzy Kosinski's "The
Painted Bird" seems to start right at the beginning of the book, as the boy
is being forced from his old life and starts into this new life where he
eventually ends up traveling around after his foster mother dies. He
begins traveling around from town to town, and the people of the villages
are different ethnically, and spoke a different language. The people the
boy encountered where not able to understand much of what he was saying,
and looked down upon him as a Jew.


There also comes a time at the end of the book where the belly of the
whale seems to come again, and it is unclear if there is another story
starting. The boy is finally reunited with his parents and all the while
he starts to regret it, and begins to miss his old life. He regrets
showing the birthmark and now feels trapped. He describes a hare and how
it is irritated and unhappy in the cage, and it seems he is relating his
life as it would be with his parents.

Posted by: Samantha G at April 16, 2008 01:51 PM

The Road of Trials in “The Painted Bird” by Jerzy Kosinski

Jerzy Kosinksi’s book, “The Painted Bird” is a good example of literature that can be followed by using Joseph Campbell’s Monomyth model. The main character in the story experiences both the ordinary and special worlds, and crosses over the threshold of adventure. After crossing this threshold, the boy who is the main character comes across his first trial, and soon the reader learns that there are many trials that will follow.
It could be argued that the boy’s road of trials is almost literally a road that he travels upon. Although it is not paved, or stone, it is still a path through the woods and along the river that he makes from one small village to the next. The physical path that the boy takes isn’t necessarily the most important part of the journey, but rather what the boy learns at each stop along the path.
In chapter one, the boy is at his first stop along the path, living with a woman named Marta. It is here that the boy first realizes that he is different from all of the fair hair and fair skinned people he sees everywhere. The boy also gets his first taste of witchcraft, and back woods magic. Although she was not very caring and was very different from the boy, Marta did take care of him and made sure that he was fed and had water. It is at this first stop that the boy gets his first taste of self survival when Marta dies and he accidently sets her house on fire, leaving him homeless.
Chapter two brings the boy on his journey to the next village where and old woman named “Olga The Wise One” takes him in and teaches him valuable skills such as hunting and the importance of heat and fire, through the use of a “comet”. She also informs him that he is possessed by an evil spirit, and that his dark hair and eyes are the reason that the townspeople are frightened of him. During his time at Olga’s the boy learns how to take care of himself, and finds that it will be a very important skill. The boy likes Olga but is forced to leave when the townspeople throw him in the river.
After floating downstream for a few miles, the boy comes to the next village in his journey. It is here that he is taken in by a miller in the village who is nicknamed “jealous” because he always his wife of being unfaithful and beats her without proof. One of the affairs he suspects her of is with the plowboy on the farm. During dinner one evening, the miller asks the plowboy if he “lusts after” his wife. When the plowboy does not answer, the miller pokes out his eyeballs with a spoon, and crushes them under his boots on the kitchen floor. The young boy sees this happen and immediately runs away, frightened and stunned. His overcoming this episode was his first real experience with the violence that the boy would soon become accustomed to. Kosinski also uses this opportunity to show the reader how important memories are to the boy.
In chapter five, the boy is setting snares for his next host, Lekh. Lekh sells birds in the villages and is in love with the village harlot Stupid Lumidia. In this chapter the reader is shown why the book is named “The Painted Bird”. The boy likes Lekh, and does not mind setting traps for him. However, when a group of village women kill Stupid Lumidia, Lekh is overcome with grief and can no longer help the boy. The boy realizes that he will once again have to move on, and overcomes the loss of his friend. During this sequence of events, the boy first experiences “intimacy” and what it will mean to him in the future.
Upon leaving Lekh, the boy ends up with a carpenter and his wife who believes that he is evil and that his dark hair will attract lightening to their hut, and takes the boy to the middle of the field every time a storm approaches. This prediction seems to come true when the boy hides in the barn one night and lightening sets the building on fire. The boy knows that once the farmer catches him, he will be killed, so he tricks him into going to a military bunker the boy has found. The carpenter falls in and is killed by rats. In this chapter, the boy has gotten his first experience with either having to kill or be killed. He has also come to the realization that he indeed could be evil.
After fleeing from the carpenters, the boy ends up with a blacksmith’s family in chapter seven, where he is treated rather well. However, the townspeople do not agree with the blacksmith, and beat the family for hiding the boy. The townspeople then turn the boy over to German soldiers who order one soldier to take the boy out and kill him. However, the German soldier allows the boy to escape injury free. This chapter could be the first time that the boy is recognized for only being a child. There is no doubt that if he had been older, the soldier would have killed him. The fact that he was a child saved his life. This event is confusing to the boy because everyone wants to kill him in the name of the Germans, but it is the Germans who let him live.
In chapter eight, the boy finds himself in a new village and taken in by a well respected farmer. The boy becomes sort of a “side show” to the people, and they often got him drunk and made him perform. One day a group of boys attacks the young boy and he seriously injures one of them. Knowing that the wrath of the townspeople will soon be upon him, the young boy again flees homeless once again.
After walking for several days, the young boy finds shelter with a single, poor farmer. It is here that he first sees the trains of Jews being taken through the town and to concentration camps. The boy wonders what these people have done so terrible, and how long they must be punished for. One day the farmer orders the boy to flee because the Germans found out there was a “gypsy” in the town and they were coming to capture him. The boy fled, but was caught in a field when the German forces entered the town. Along with an older man, the boy is transported to a police station and along the way they are beat and have things thrown at them. At the station the young boy meets a German officer and is in awe of his presence. He is ashamed to be standing next to the man. A priest then steps in and offers to take the boy. In this sequence, the boy wishes that he were a German, and is ashamed to be a gypsy or Jew.
The priest gives the boy to a horrible man named Garbos who barely feeds the boy, kicks, beats, and tortures him and sets his dog loose on him. However, the boy gets to go to church, and thinks that prayers are the answers to his problems. He survives Garbo’s torture by constantly praying throughout the abuse. After tripping while being an altar server, the peasants throw the boy into a manure pit. Upon his emergence, the boy finds that he has become mute. He then escaped into the forest. The conflict between the witchcraft that he was taught and the new teachings of the church are evident in this chapter. He feels that the witchcraft has failed him and that perhaps the church could save him. This idea is shaken though after he is ostracized.
In chapter 12, the boy is given to a man named Makar, who has a son and a daughter. The daughters name was Ekwa, and at 19, taught the young boy how to have sex with her. The young boy seems to be in love with her and is happy with this home until he doesn’t properly follow an order from Makar, and is violently kicked in the stomach which makes him unable to work. Ekwa does not even want to be bothered with him, which breaks the boy’s heart. However, when the boy witnesses Ekwa copulating with a goat, and then her brother while the father watched, the boy leaves disgusted. He does not understand how Ekwa could prefer a beast to his gentle touch, and determines that the family must truly be evil. He then begins to think that the church has let him down, so he should align himself with evil instead of good.
Chapter 14 brings the next hut that the boy would live in. It belonged to a woman named Labina, who was an “escort” to the men of the village. Although the boy thought that Labina’s sexual exploitations were disgusting, he was treated well by her. One day the Kalamuks invade the village and the boy is witness to horrid acts of brutality including rape and murder. The boy then comes to the conclusion that he must be on his own because he has dark hair and is evil like the Kalamuks. God has deserted him. The Soviets eventually come in and save the village and take the boy into their care.
Although the boy will face more trials during his time with the red army, the orphanage and even when he is reunited with his parents, these events take place more during the exit of the special world. He is taken care of in all of these places, and his world has become a little more normal. Not necessarily better, but more normal.

Posted by: Jodi S. at April 16, 2008 02:15 PM

“The Painted Bird”, by Jerzy Kosinski
Call to Adventure-

In the story “The Painted Bird”, by Jerzy Kosinski, I was asked to identify the Call to Adventure in correlation with the “Monomyth”. My partner and I found that the call to adventure started when basically the story started. It was during World War II, and if you were a Gypsy, a Jew, or any other segregated group at that time, you went into hiding in hopes that the Nazi Regime would not find you.
The story opens up with the little boy being sent away from his parents literally, because they thought that it would be more-safe for him anywhere else then where they were stationed at the time. This was a very common thing that parents did during this time period because of the fear of the Nazi’s. However, the call to adventure in the “Painted Bird” shows symbolism in a sense that the act that his parents are trying to execute, symbolizes their love for their son and there want for him to be alive and safe after the way is over and done with.


Thomas A.

Posted by: Thomas A. at April 16, 2008 03:04 PM

Our group topic is "the call of adventure" Call of adventure means the turning point of the people's life. Everything in his life has been changed. In "The Painted Bird" when the child first leave his parents to avoid the Nazi's shambles is the call of adventure I think.
After that his life has been totally changed, he had to face a lot of painful, a world that he never see before, and after that he becomes the "painted bird" which can never come back.

Posted by: Yichuan Sun at April 16, 2008 04:16 PM

Natasha Hill
The Painted Bird
Supernatural Aid


Part of the monomyth is the hero receiving supernatural aid. In Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird, the boy receives many types of aid. He is aided by his parents, the people who housed him, by his lessons from Marta, Olga and the Soviets, he is helped by God (when he believes), by unexpected kindnesses and his own “street smarts”. However, I believe that the most useful aid the boy had was the “comet” and his knowledge of it’s powers. On page 28, the boy states that the “possession of fire, or a ‘comet’ of one’s own” was essential to survival. Literally because it could keep him warm, ward off potentially dangerous animals, cook food, and provide light for safer traveling. Metaphorically, the fire is a symbol for light and passion. Light symbolizes truth and knowledge. The boy states that “the first [fire] was harder to obtain-it required a great deal of experience. This also holds true for knowledge and truth. It takes years of experience to gain even a little of each of these. I also noticed that when the boy felt he had something to believe in (prayer/no prayer, God/no God, a safe home, magic, etc.) he did not use the comet. However, when he found that each of his beliefs were possibly wrong or danger would come, he would run and take his “comet” with him. It was as if he were holding onto the only thing that he knew to be faithful and unchanging. Also, because he typically used the comet when running away, it would seem that the comet represented his quest for “right”, acceptance, truth, love, and a supreme understanding of the world he was living in.

Posted by: Natasha Hill at April 16, 2008 04:26 PM

The Painted Bird & Joseph Cambell Theory

Freedom to live


After everything this young boy had suffered and his unfortunate accident in the blizzard he still has the will to talk and live. He recited Mitka’s songs, which is extremely significant because these songs were one of the only uplifting events he had throughout the war and moving from village to village. His freedom to live is also shown when he reacquainted himself with his parents, which was what he believed he wanted, but in reality it wasn’t what he wanted. However he continued to learn and to grow as a person which is a sign of the want to live.
This young boy had a very challenging childhood and he searched through the entire book for the next step or looking for the brighter side of life. “I had an overpowering desire to speak,” (p 213). I believe that this quote sums up this part of Cambell’s theory freedom to live because, having an overpowering desire to speak, in my opinion, was a foreshadow to have an overpowering desire to be heard and live on.

Posted by: Erin at April 16, 2008 04:40 PM

Heather Stull
Professor Hobbs
EL267.01
Reader Response
4-16-08

In Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird, the protagonist does not experience a literal
“Atonement with the father”. When the young boy is found by his parents, he begins to worry about the ramifications of belonging to someone; about having to listen to someone not because they are bigger than you but because they have certain undeniable rights to you (226). He begins to feel “like Lekh’s painted bird, which some unknown force was pulling toward his kind” (227). He is caught between feeling pity for his parents but also wanting to be on his own again and wanting to continue to wait for Gavrila to find him (226). His feelings only deepen after discovering that his parents have adopted another son, an orphan of the war (228-9). Although he is living with his parents, he does not completely abandon the lifestyle that he had before. He continues to meet with the Silent One, and begins wandering at night, befriending those who live drastically different than how his parents have chosen to (229-32). His parents are puzzled by his behavior and eventually he is put under the care of a ski instructor, seeing his parents only once a week (233).
The characters of Gavrila and Mitka serve as symbolic representations of a father figure to the young boy. The protagonist has a devotion to them, particularly Gavrila, which extends even beyond the time when he is reunited with his parents. Gavrila had lost his entire family shortly after the start of the war and treats the young boy like a son. He teaches the boy how to read, shares with him his views on religion and human history and teaches him about Stalin (186-95). Mitka watches over the boy when he is released from the hospital, assisting him with the rest of his medical care and ensuring that he gains weight by procuring the best of the food for him. He also taught the boy about poetry, music, machinery, and took him to the movies (197-8). These two soldiers had divided the responsibilities of a father between themselves. They took it upon themselves to provide care for him and to teach him things about the world and about humanity. The boy opened himself up to this opportunity with excitement and became devoted to the two men, forming a bond that never dissolves through the end of the story, at least as it exists in his own mind. Symbolically the boy gains atonement with a “father figure” through the two soldiers, obtaining that which he missed out on from his own father during the years of the war.

Posted by: Heather S. at April 16, 2008 04:59 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I asked to be revised. Anything posted below that missed the deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

Posted by: Lee Hobbs at April 17, 2008 05:06 PM

Hallie Geary
Dr. Lee Hobbs, PhD.
El267.01
30 April 2008
Revealing Equal Ethnicities in
Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird and Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path”
The history of mankind often shows a powerful ethnicity subjugating a weaker ethnicity. Most of the time, the more powerful ethnicity is portrayed as more civilized and technologically advanced, while the weaker ethnicity is uncivilized and backwards. Often the more powerful ethnicity will assume or try to prove a natural superiority to the subjugated ethnicity. This is the case in both Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird and Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path.” Both of these stories reveal a definite difference in the power of two ethnicities; however, both also reveal equality between the two by contrasting their views on civility and religion, and by the different outcomes of the main character’s journey.
The most contrasting ethnicities in Kosinski’s story are the rural peasants that the narrator lives with to the Kalmuks and the Red/Soviet army that he meets up with. The first similarity between the two classes is their levels of civility. The author, in a prologue to the book, describes the peasants as, “ignorant and brutal, though not by choice,” (Kosinski 4). This is a fundamental characterization of the class, because the peasants have no choice but to be ignorant and brutal because of the world they live in. It is more difficult to blame them for acting like animals when they have no opportunity for betterment and no idea that their actions are wrong. The Kalmuks, on the other hand, appear as “proud horsemen” with uniforms and guns at their disposal (Kosinski 176). They seem to have had the opportunity to choose a different path, but instead chose to “loot and rape in the manner of their war customs and manly traditions,” (175). The Kalmuks have the means change and civilize themselves, but lack the will to do so. Despite their technology, the more powerful and advanced Kalmuks certainly are not more civilized than the peasants, shown by the fact that the Kalmuks burst into town to rape, pillage, and murder the peasants in the most gruesome, humiliating, and painful manner they can think of (Kosinski 175-181). As a final contrast, the also technologically advanced Red Army appears and drives off the Kalmuks. The Red Army takes the narrator in and cares for him, even teaching him to read (Kosinski 181-186). The Red Army appears to be far more civilized than the peasants or the Kalmuks, but that sense of civilization proves to be shallow. When local villagers kill friends of Mitka, a legendary sharpshooter in the Red army, he shows that the same instincts that drive the villagers are present in the civilized armies by shooting and killing several random members of the village (Kosinski 200-205). Despite the rules and manners of the army, Mitka’s human nature takes control and calls for blood to revenge his fallen comrades. So, despite the different levels of technology and power, the three groups show equality in their true nature. The more powerful and advanced ethnicities are better able to conceal their savage nature, but they are also capable of far more damage when it is revealed.
The ethnical conflict in “A Worn Path” is between the Negro main character, Phoenix, and the white characters. Phoenix seems to be less civilized even at her first appearance, where she is wearing a “long apron of bleached sugar sacks,” and has “unlaced shoes,” (Welty 1). It is obvious from the description that Phoenix is fairly poor, which is confirmed later when she receives charity from the hospital (Welty 7). During her journey, Phoenix is attacked by a dog then saved by a white hunter. The white man helps her and the two exchange civil conversation (Welty 4), but this interaction soon proves to be as shallow as Kosinski’s portrayal of civility. Phoenix repays the white hunter by stealing a nickel that fell out of his pocket and the hunter lies and tells her that he would give her a dime if he had any money (Welty 4-5). Again both sides prove to be equally immoral and abandon the code of civility when it benefits them. Although these circumstances are far less drastic than in The Painted Bird and so the infraction seems to be less, the return to immorality is actually much more significant here because it is not a matter of survival but a matter of personal gain. Neither person is in circumstances that mandate any means for survival, so the deviation from civility is actually more drastic because it is unnecessary. Their infraction is worse because it is less needed, whereas Kosinski creates a story that requires brutality for survival.
Another difference between the two ethnicities in The Painted Bird is their views on religion. The peasants are extremely superstitious, even going as far as to rely on witch doctor like Olga for medicinal treatment (Kosinski 17-19). Their view of the Roman Catholic Church is not much better and, instead of learning and practicing the morals of the church, they attempt to gain exemption for sin by uttering prayers and only avoid sin for fear of God’s vengeance. The importance of the church and its ceremonies are just as obsessively strict and paranoid as the rest of the superstition, and even the smallest mistakes in the ritual of the church warrant a swift and severe punishment (Kosinski 130-142). The Red Army, on the other hand, places no faith in any God or superstition. As atheists, they place all their confidence in “The Party” which gains superhuman and almost God-like powers and control. Instead of God judging lives and deciding morality, The Party took the place of religion (Kosinski 187-195). Both rely on an obsessive order to attempt to gain control over their chaotic lives. The Reds, because there is some order to their lives, attempt to take all the control of their lives into their own hands. The peasants, whose lives are short and filled with violence, know they have no control over what happens to them and place all the power into a God or superstition. They try to find a reason for the misfortune that is a constant part of their lives and to control it by appeasing the deity that makes it happen. Both ethnicities are seeking the same thing, but because of a difference in power they seek it in different ways.
In “The Worn Path,” Phoenix shows the same kind of superstition in her journey as she speaks to herself, possibly asking a higher power to “Keep the big wild hogs out of my path. Don’t let none of those come running my direction,” (Welty 1). Throughout her journey, Phoenix talks to herself, animals, and any object she comes up against (Welty 1-3). Phoenix’s life is similar to that of the peasants from Kosinski’s story in that she spends much of her time in the forest, so she is aware of how often things happen by chance. Because she knows how chaotic and brutal the world and be and how little power humans truly have over it, Pheonix knows she cannot control her own fate, so she places control of her life into the hands of God or fate. The white nurses at the hospital, on the other hand, put faith only in their ritual and order. They are the most concerned with being able to fit Phoenix into a category, repeatedly asking her if she wants charity. One nurse recognizes Phoenix and asks about the grandson, then emotionlessly asks if he has died (Welty 6-7). Although they do not use superstition, the nurses rely on order to keep control over their lives and become agitated when Phoenix will not immediately fit into that order. In this story, like Kosinski’s, both ethnicities use ritual to maintain the illusion of control over their lives, with the weaker ethnicity praying to a higher power for protection and the stronger ethnicity using order to maintain control over life.
A final similarity between the two stories is in the journey of the narrator. Both stories show the narrator making a journey out of his/her and ethnicity to journey the territory of another ethnicity. The main difference between the two stories in this area is that in The Painted Bird the narrator is unable to return home. At the end, the boy returns to his family, but has been too affected by the his travels and growing up in savage lands to accept what his parents offer him, and he constantly slips out at night to return to the type of savage existence he has become accustomed to. Only returning him partially to the savage wilderness he grew up in allows him to find a kind of peace (Kosinski 231-234). Now that the narrator knows the true nature of man, he cannot accept the farce of civilization even in his own family.
In “The Worn Path,” on the other hand, Phoenix is able to successfully make her trip through the land of the white ethnicity, overcome her own lapse in memory, and return to her grandson with a resolve never to forget him again (Welty 6-8). Unlike in The Painted Bird, Phoenix is able to overcome her flawed human nature because of the love she has for her grandson. While the other narrator has great difficulty accepting the return to his family and his own ethnicity, Phoenix is happy to return to her grandson and leave the world of the white man behind. Both narrators have seen the true nature of humans, but only Pheonix is able to return to society and the love of her grandson. Kosinksi’s narrator is too altered by his experiences to find any bond with his family. Both narrators are changed by their journey, but Kosinki’s narrator is altered to reject his former home, while Pheonix resolves never to forget hers again. Both characters see the flaws of the other society along with the flaws of their own, but only Pheonix is able to accept the flaws of her own society and live there despite them.
Both of these stories show great conflict between ethnicities, and they also show great contrast between the habits of the ethnicities. However, in both stories the faults of one ethnicity are balanced by the same kind of faults in the other. Both authors show that the ethnicities are seeking the same ideas of comfort and safety, but their different levels of technology and power force them to seek it in different places. On the whole, both authors represent the ethnicities as superficially different, but equally savage at the core. The Painted Bird shows a humanity that is controlled completely by self-interest, and the narrator of that story is unable to accept the lie that civilization tries to give to him. “The Worn Path” shows humanity as being driven by self-interest but tempered by love, and so Phoenix is able to return home. Both stories, however, show humans as flawed creatures that easily fall into sin. Ethnicity may change what people use to fulfill their needs, but it cannot change the savage self-interest that resides in human beings.

Works Cited
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976.
Welty, Eudora. “A Worn Path.” 1940. An excerpt from An Introduction to Literature: Fiction, Poetry, Drama. Eds. Morton Berman, et al. Addison, 1996. 105-112.

__________________________________________________

I felt that this paper belonged in this section because I spent a lot of time making points about the ethnical struggles in The Painted Bird. I felt that anyone who has read The Painted Bird might get something more about the story from this essay. I also think that some of the topics below relate to this paper, so putting them together might spark even more ideas about the book. I think this is one of the best places for this paper.

Posted by: HGeary at April 30, 2008 08:41 PM

C. Bell
Lee Hobbs
EL267.01
American Literature: 1915-Present
30 April 2008---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Direct and Indirect Effects of War:
Johnny Got His Gun and The Painted Bird-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Throughout reading the The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski, I have noticed a commonality between it and Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo. Both of these novels involve war and dramatically develop the consequences that come with war. More specifically, each of these novels describes a person’s fight with war. Johnny Got His Gun involves an adult male who has fought in the war and suffered extreme consequences. The Painted Bird is about a young boy who is not fighting in the war, but does face cruel consequences because of the war. In each of these novels, war is represented as a violent and destructive monster that affects all people, whether they fight in the war or not. The outcomes of war are represented in each of the novels, whether it is a direct consequence from fighting in the war or an indirect consequence that is felt outside of the battle itself.
Johnny Got His Gun is a story about a character named Joe. Joe has definitely faced severe consequences from war. The story begins with a ringing sound. Joe wants the phone to stop ringing. Soon enough, he realizes that he no longer has sight and hearing and the phone ringing was all a dream. This is very disturbing to Joe. Joe then realizes that he no longer has arms, legs, ears, a nose, eyes, or a mouth. He is a stump. He figures this out because he still has feeling where his arm used to be. The doctor comes in to give him a shot in his left arm, and he realizes that it was too close to his head. From this, he concludes that he no longer has a left arm. Joe gets very upset because he does not think that the doctors should have the ability to just cut off a man’s arm. He also wonders what they did with his arm. He thinks that they should have buried it in the ground as though they were burying a person because his arm was once part of him.
Throughout most of the first half of the book, the reader listens to the conscious of Joe. Joe is wondering what his life will be like now that he no longer has any of his limbs or facial features. He gets upset because he realizes that he will never be able to do daily tasks anymore that he used to do without even thinking. He will never be able to run again or even walk down the street. He wonders if he will ever even leave the hospital again. Joe also gets worried because he does not even know his location. He is not sure if he is back in the United States or over seas still. He also does not know if his family knows he is injured and in the hospital. So not only did the war take his limbs and face away, but it also took away his family to his knowledge.
During the second half of the book, Joe discovers ways to tell time and then realizes that he can communicate to the outside world. He tries to perform Morse code to talk to the nurses and doctors. He realizes he can tell time based on when he can feel the warmth of the sun on his body in the room. He realizes that the temperature in the room rises during the day, so when the room cools down again he knows it is night time. He calculates how long the night lasts based on how many times the nurses come in and out of the room. Since Joe no longer can communicate the way he used to, he figures out a way that he can so that people will understand him.
In Johnny Got His Gun, Joe was directly affected by the war. Joe had fought in WWI. He was injured during the war and did not remember anything when he woke up in the hospital. Joe suffered a major consequence by fighting in the war. He lost most of his life. He still had his mind but he had no way to communicate to the rest of the world. He lost his sight and would never see his family again. He lost his hearing and would never hear his family again or hear himself talk. He lost smell and taste and would no longer taste or smell his mothers cooking. He would no longer walk or use his arms. Joe basically had no real life, although he could still use his mind.
While Joe lays there in the hospital, he remembers moments throughout his life. At certain points throughout the story, Joe wants to kill himself, but he cannot even do that. He explains that he can not even tell when he falls asleep or even when he is going to, it just happens. Joe is tortured throughout the whole story. He is tortured by his thoughts of being trapped inside his body for the rest of his life. He doesn’t understand why they are letting him live like this. He hates that he had to go to war. He wishes that he could speak to the rest of the world and explain his story to them. He wants to warn them about the war. He does not want anyone else to end up like him. Even in the end of the story when Joe finally communicates with the outside world, he is put to sleep by the doctors. They do not want him to be able to talk to the outside world. His story would cause too much trouble and indifference about the war. In his last chance to communicate and live an actual life, it is taken away and he is put to sleep. Knowing that you cannot live a normal life with communication, sight, hearing, taste, legs, and arms has to be the most unbearable thing to deal with.
The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski is a story about a young boy who is about six years old, who is sent away by his parents in the first few weeks of World War II. This story explains an indirect affect of the war on the young boy. During his journey from village to village, the young boy meets and lives with many people. In the villages, the boy is known as a gypsy or a Jew and many of the people are afraid of him. The people who take him in usually use him for work. The boy lives with people who teach him techniques that ultimately help him travel on his way after escaping from village to village. One of the main effects of the war on the young boy is his life on the run. He is constantly trying to stay alive and escape the people who want to kill him. Besides just avoiding the Germans, the young boy has to beware of the peasants or inbreeds that live in the villages through which he passes. Many of the peasants cannot even look the boy straight in the eye because they truly believe that the boy is a gypsy.
One drastic event that the young boy had to witness was a murder. The boy was living at the miller’s and the miller suspected his wife of having an affair with the plow boy. The miller invited the plow boy to dinner one night and the miller and the plow boy got into a fight. The young boy had to witness the miller plunge a spoon into the plow boy’s eyes and then twist the spoon till his eye popped out. (Kosinski, 38) The young boy could not believe what he had seen. After this event, the young boy decided to leave the house.
The next house that the boy ends up at is Lekh’s house. Lekh is a bird catcher. He caught and sold his birds for food. Lehk is in love with Stupid Ludmila who is a peasant girl that is a prostitute and is hated by the villagers. The young boy has to witness her getting raped and killed by the peasant people. First Stupid Ludmila is raped by the men from the village and then, when the men notice the women coming, they run and hide. Then the women came and held Stupid Ludmila down and began to hit her with rakes, scratch her skin with their finger nails, and ripped out her hair (Kosinski, 54). After all of this abuse, a woman came and shoved a glass bottle of manure into her. The glass shattered inside of Stupid Ludmila and the women kicked her to death. Lekh and the young boy witnessed the women do this to Stupid Ludmila. Lekh did not get there in time to save Stupid Ludmila and the young boy was hiding from the peasants. Once again, the young boy had to witness extreme violence even though he was not involved in the war. After this event, the young boy moved on again.
Another terrible event that happened to the boy was when he was thrown in the manure by the peasants. The peasants grabbed the boy and the crowd shouted “Gypsy Vampire” (Kosinski, 138). Then the peasants swung the young boy in the air and tossed him in the manure. The young boy could not breathe and was suffocating under the manure. He tried many times to kick himself out of the muck but he could not. Finally, he grabbed onto some weeds and pulled himself out of the manure. As the boy came out of the manure, he realized that he could not speak, he was mute.
All of these events and many more were because of the war. If the war had never begun, the boy would have never had to go through all of the events that he did. He would have never been sent away by his parents. As a young boy, around the age of six, he witnessed many events that could drastically affect him later on in life. He did not have the normal life of a six year old boy. Witnessing violence, murder, rape, incest, and taking physical abuse could have psychological effects on the young boy. He could develop a phobia in the future, or maybe an anxiety disorder. He could develop dissociative identity disorder or maybe even a borderline personality disorder. The possibilities are endless. For example, the boy went mute when he was tossed into the manure. That proves that the young boy had been through much more than he could handle.
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo and The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski both had representations of war in them. Johnny Got His Gun showed the consequences one may face going into war, whether they volunteered or were drafted, like Joe. Government officials may find war to be necessary for a country because they make the decision to enter the war. However, soldiers, like Joe, find it to be detrimental because they can end up severely wounded or even dead. The Painted Bird represented the effects one can undergo from war even if they did not fight in the war. The boy experienced several different events throughout his journey that severely affected him in many ways. All of this happened because of the war and his parents having to send him away. If it was not for war, neither Joe nor the boy would have lived their lives the way they were forced to by the wars.


Works Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: New York, 1965.

Trumbo, Dalton. Johnny Got His Gun. New York, 1939.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This analysis has been submitted to this blog because it analyzes the effects of war on the main character in The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski.

Posted by: C. Bell at April 30, 2008 10:50 PM

Michelle Eaglehouse
American Literature 1915 to present
Professor Hobbs
30 April 2008
War: Physical and Mental Effects portrayed in Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo and The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski
Although the decision to enter or begin a war is in the hands of people in power of nations, those that actually fight in the war or live in the countries involved with the war are greatly affected by the war both directly and indirectly, while those that decide to enter a war are not affected in the same ways. War affects so many people in a variety of different ways. Those that fight in the war are affected physically, mentally, and emotionally. The people that live in the countries that are involved with war are affected in several ways as well. Their lives can be completely changed whether the war is fought in their country or their soldiers are away fighting the war. The government officials or people in power that originally decided to go to war in the first place seem to have the least affects when the war is done. They do not have to go and fight in the war; they just stay in their countries and make sure the war goes the way they want it to go. They send commands to the Generals of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and other branches of military and then are not the ones that have to carry out those demands. Those that fight in the war and those that live in countries that are involved with the war are greatly affected by the war, which is portrayed in both Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo and The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski.
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo has the best representation of the affects war has on those that actually go into battle and fight. Joe, the protagonist of Johnny Got His Gun, did not make the decision to go to war, but was drafted when the President decided to enter the war. He did not think it was fair for him to have to fight in a war that he did not think should be happening in the first place. War is fought so that people can gain “liberty,” “honor,” and “decency.” Joe does not understand how men can risk their lives for such abstract words. Men go into war and are not even fighting for something concrete. He thinks that the only people that can actually define those three words are the men who lost their lives in the war and even they cannot define them because they are dead. Joe did not think that is was right that he was expected to fight for something that no one could define (Trumbo 110-119).
Among all of the mental affects Joe had from the war, he also suffered innumerable physical affects. In Chapter 3, Joe realized for the first time that he has been wounded in battle. When he finally regains consciousness, he quickly recognized that he could not hear or see (Trumbo 26). Also, he felt the doctors pinching him in his left arm, or what he thought was his left arm. He then realized that he actually did not have a left arm at all; it had been amputated (Trumbo 26-27). Joe was upset because he said that the doctors did not consider how this was going to affect his life. He had no right arm, so he was not going to able to work anymore. He said they were not concerned though because they still had both of their arms, which they used to cut off his (Trumbo 27). As the chapter progressed, Joe realized that the loss of his left arm was not the only injury that he has from war. Not only did he not have a left arm, but he also lost his right arm (Trumbo 38). Joe quickly realized that he did not have either of his arms, so he would never again be able to hold his girlfriend again. (Trumbo 38-39). As if losing his arms was not enough to deal with, Joe also wandered what they did with his arms that they cut off. He did not think that it was right for them to be able to decide to just throw them away. Joe thinks that they should have buried them in the ground because his arms were once a part of his body and now they are dead (Trumbo 28).
As Joe lay in his hospital bed, he would have flashbacks from war. He could hear explosions and see rockets and bombs flash in front of his eyes even though he could not actually hear or see at all (Trumbo 58). This showed that war had a great effect on Joe mentally. In Chapter 5, Joe also discovered that both of his legs had been amputated (Trumbo 60). This was devastating for Joe because he knew that he would never be able to walk or run again and it was all because of the war (Trumbo 60). As if losing both of his arms and both of his legs was not bad enough, Joe found that this was not the end of the injuries that he had. In Chapter 7, Joe felt a cloth over his face. He was unsure why they put a cloth over his face, but then he knew it was because he actually did not have a face. He had no eyes, nose, or mouth. Joe knew that his life would never be the same. He would not be able to tell the difference when he was sleeping or awake, he would never smell anything again, and he could never communicate with anyone ever again. (Trumbo 80-93). Once Joe realized he was nothing more than a stump in a bed, he tried to figure out a way that he could commit suicide. He thought that if he moved enough to move the tube that fed him, then maybe it would kill him (Trumbo).
In Chapter 13, Joe receives a pin from the military. Although this is a privilege and is something that Joe should be proud of, it upsets him. He is angry because he does not think that these men should be able to walk into his hospital room and pin a medal on his chest for fighting in a war that he did not want to fight in to begin with. He is upset because they are still able to walk, even though they are the ones that initially decided to enter the war. He does not think that it is fair that these men did not have to go to war and fight at all, but they are still able to walk in the room and pin a medal on his chest. He knows that he will never be able to walk again, but these men took part in making the decision to go to war and were able to walk into his hospital room and pin a medal on his chest. (Trumbo 158-159).
In The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski, the main character, referred to as the boy, was removed from his family at the young age of six years old. His parents sent him away during World War II. They did this because they were Jewish and Jewish people were being killed during this time. His parents thought that the only way to keep him safe was to remove him from the situation. They sent him to Poland where they thought he would be safe. The boy lived with a woman by the name of Marta (Kosinski 3). After two months, Marta died and the boy was left to fend for himself (Kosinski 13). The boy was taken in by a farmer who treated him very poorly. The farmer beat the boy and the boy was not happy there. The farmer did not want the boy anymore, so he put him up for sale (Kosinski 14-16). The boy was bought by Olga the Wise. She took him to her house and taught him many things. Olga taught the boy many life survival skills. The boy was comfortable with Olga even though the other people of the village would often set their dogs on him because they were threatened by him. Because the boy had dark hair and dark eyes, they were afraid of him (Kosinski 17-27).
The boy was finally comfortable after several moves since his parents sent him away. All of this changed one day when the villagers threw him in the river and he floated far away from Olga. The boy survives because of the skills that he was taught by Olga (Kosinski 27). After this event, the boy goes to another family. He is exposed to some traumatic events while he is with this family. He watches the miller gouge out his plowboy’s eyes during dinner because he thinks that the plowboy is interested in his wife. After this event, the boy decided to run away from this family too because he was traumatized (Kosinski 34-38). His life was changed several times throughout the book. All he wanted to do was find a place that he fit in. He was always fighting for his life and was never accepted by any of the people that he lived with. All he wanted to do was be reunited with his parents.
The boy eventually moved to a village that is mostly occupied by German soldiers. The boy lived with a blacksmith who is accused of helping “enemies of the Fatherland.” The boy was turned over to soldiers at a German outpost and was taken away to be killed by one of the soldier. The solider let the boy go (Kosinski 66-76). He then moved to another village where he saw trains of Jews headed toward concentration camps. He was eventually captured by Germans. He was then taken in by a priest and studied to become an altar boy. He made a huge mistake during one of the ceremonies and was thrown into a pit of manure. Once he emerged from the pit, the boy was mute. Being mute greatly affected his life.
Eventually, the boy is taken in by the Red Army. They taught him many skills that he lacked. One of the soldiers, Gavrilla, taught him to read and introduced him to the ways of the Communist Party. From the teaching of the soldiers, the boy decided that he wanted to live by the communist ways. Also, he realized from the actions of the soldiers that revenge is a responsibility that you have to take on sometimes.
At the end of the novel, the boy’s dream of being reunited with his parents finally came true. The soldiers took him to an orphanage when the war was over. His parents eventually found him at the orphanage and took him home. His reunion with his parents did not go the way he expected at all. He did not like being back at home. He did not like the rules and guidelines that he had to follow now that he lived back at home now. Also, he did not like the other child that his parents took in after the war. He was so irritated by him on night that he squeezed his hand until it broke. He got mixed in with people who roamed the streets at night, gambled, drank, and had sex. Doctors then advised his parents that he needed help. He was sent to the mountains in order to help straighten his life out. He was sent to the hospital one day after he fell skiing. He got a phone call while in the hospital, and decided to talk again (Kosinski 223-234).
Johnny Got His Gun and The Painted Bird are both very different books, but at the same time have a common theme. Both books show how war can greatly affect peoples’ lives in several different ways. Joe fought in the war and was severely wounded. His life was forever changed when he discovered that he no longer had arms, legs, or a face. The Jewish boy did not fight in the war, but was affected in several ways. He was sent away from his family at the age of six. He lived his life on his own for a very long time. He was reunited with his parents eventually, but his life was never the same. War played a large role in the lives of Joe and the Jewish boy, and they were not the ones that made the decision to go to war. Could it be possible that some people need to sacrifice their lives and happiness in order to make the rest of the world to be happy? If this is the case, how fair is this? War is something that greatly affects the lives of everyone, whether they fought in the war or lived in a country that was involved with the war.


References
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: New York, 1965.
Trumbo, Dalton. Johnny Got His Gun. New York: 1939.
-------------------------------------------------
I posted my paper on this blog because my paper was based on the novel The Painted Bird. My paper talked about the effects war had on the main character, the boy.

Posted by: Michelle E. at April 30, 2008 11:26 PM

Heather Stull
Dr. Hobbs
EL267.01
30 April, 2008
The Pulls of Racism
In
Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated
In both The Painted Bird and Everything is Illuminated, the characters are sometimes pulled together by the violent acts of racism, but far more often their lives are disrupted and pulled apart. The protagonist’s of Everything is Illuminated, Alex and Jonathan, form a friendship that develops out of their journey to Trachimbrod. Initially, the two are at odds with one another. Jonathan, a Jewish American, is ridiculed by Alex and his grandfather, his Ukrainian guides. Although they are living after World War II, Alex and his family exhibit many prejudices against Jewish people.
Alex is ignorant of his people’s history. He does not understand how the Poles and Ukrainian’s had treated the Jews during the War (Foer 62). He is filled with disbelief at the things Jonathan says to him and continues the historical trend of his ancestors by remaining skeptical of another culture’s practices and point-of-view. Near the end of their journey, new truths are exposed and Alex discovers the true history of his family, one that unites him indefinitely with Jonathan’s past. Through this they embark on a journey of self-discovery which shapes their friendship. Each documents the story of how they uncovered their past and in the history the line between them becomes blurred: “We are talking now, Jonathan, together, and not apart. We are with each other, working on the same story, and I am certain that you can also feel it. . . . I am you and you are me” (Foer 214). Although these two characters are brought together in the end, they are still greatly affected by the cultural divide that has persisted since the war. It pervades their initial relationship and also causes tension between all male members of Alex’s family. Most tragically, it separates the family from grandfather when he commits suicide to make atonement for the sins of his past.
The young boy of The Painted Bird is brought together with two officers of the Soviet Army, Gavrila and Mitka. Although these friendships are a result of the boy’s alienation, they aid him in becoming further alienated from his past self. Taking over the boy’s education, Gavrila provides texts which expose him to Soviet leaders and ideals. Gavrila tells him that: “people themselves [determine] the course of their lives and [are] the only masters of their destinies” (Kosinski 187). These teachings, along with Mitka’s radical demonstrations of justice, cause the boy to learn to depend only on himself, on no other human being, or even God. As a result, he begins to cherish the solitude of his earlier experiences as an orphan and tries to make the sensation endure. Thus, he is disturbed over the reunion with his parents; he “could not readily accept the idea of suddenly becoming someone’s real son. . . . A boy of my age. . . . should be able to choose for himself the people whom he wished to follow and learn from” (Kosinski 226-227). He feels smothered by the structure of everyday life and would rather be wandering alone, living a life of unpredictability (Kosinski 229). The boy has been forever changed, despite being reunited with his parents, he is never able to return to the son they once knew.
A result of the cultural discord within both novels is the separation from that which is familiar. The boy of The Painted Bird is forced away from his family and his home because of his ethnicity and the repercussions he may endure because of it. In what was initially an attempt to shelter him from severe circumstances and change, he is deposited into a world in which everyone looks and acts quite differently from him. He is persecuted for his uniqueness. The act that was supposed to deliver him from harm provided, in his solitude, an even larger arena for cruelty and prejudice.
In Everything is Illuminated, Jonathan journey’s to a country where he will face criticism for his heritage to discover the roots of his past and the stories of his ancestors who were pushed away for these same criticisms. On his journey, he faces opposition from his guides on many issues ranging from his appearance to his views about his culture’s history. The Ukrainian’s are prejudiced against him before ever meeting him. In Alex’s family, assumptions about the Jewish have been passed down and accepted from generation to generation. Alex idolizes Jonathan because he is American but does not embrace the Jewish side of him as if it somehow taints him.
Although he eagerly solicits knowledge of Americanisms from Jonathan, he ridicules the things that Jonathan tries to teach him about Jewish language and culture. This reaction is present not only with Alex and his grandfather but with several other Ukrainians such as the hotel keeper and the two waitresses. On his journey, Jonathan not only experiences the history of his ancestors physically- by being in the country of his grandfather’s birth, but mentally, as he is subjected to the criticisms and alienations that initially separated the Poles and Ukrainians from the Jews. In order to discover his ancestors Jonathan is forced to experience the modern existence of the prejudices that forced his people to flee.
Alienation is another result of racial prejudice. Ethnic conflict keeps the boy of The Painted Bird alienated from the peasants. Brod, from Everything is Illuminated is alienated from the other members of her shtetl. Both suffer acts of violence because of their ethnicity. After being torn from his home and family, the young boy is put in the care of a foster mother. She dies after only two months of caring for him and the boy is forced into wandering, seeking shelter in a remote village (Kosinski 3). He finds himself the object of scorn in a community filled with superstitions, many of which revolve around beings such as him self. The rich, educated boy from the city must now beg for food and shelter. Devoid of proper attention and love, the boy becomes like a roaming animal, being abused in the hands of all that take him in because of his ethnicity.
In addition to learning the social structures of the villages and the craft of homeopathic medicine, the superstitions of the villagers begin to etch themselves on the boys mind. As a younger child, he readily accepts the notions that his dark eyes can be the cause of great tragedy and hold the power to curse others. He becomes a victim of the prejudices and immediately begins to lose touch with all that was familiar. Even his parents, who share his appearance, seem to join the hierarchy of the villagers in his mind: “Did they [my parents] know that they should never drink or smile in the presence of evil-eyed people who might count their teeth? I would remember my father’s broad, relaxed smile and begin to worry; he showed so many teeth that if an evil eye were to count them, he would most certainly die very soon” (Kosinski 10).
Through each person that takes him in, the boy is exposed to deplorable, inhumane conditions. He is acquired, not out of love or kindness, but to fill a need that exists for his master. He is subjected to inhumane treatment, suffering from beatings, poor care, witnessing murders, and often forced to fight for his own life. While living this nightmare, the boy is growing up, defining himself and the world around him. Through his treatment as an outsider, exposed to brutal treatment and harsh living conditions in an ignorant society, the boy of The Painted Bird is forever changed. The experiences of his childhood have changed him into a person, that when reunited with his parents, is barely recognizable to them. Like the painted bird, the boy has been driven back to his kind (Kosinski 227). His only chance of living is to escape again. The attempt to save him from racial prejudice has caused him to be humiliated, abused, and transformed. His alienation from the peasants grows as he does, and soon encompasses not only his past but also his future with his parents.
Brod, of Everything is Illuminated, is immediately alienated by her cultural differences. Despite being lusted over for her beauty and mystery by some of the male shtetl members, she is ignored. Even the men who adore her do so in secret, joining in with the rest of the community in ridiculing her. From the start, she is an object to them, purely fulfilling sexual fantasy but not worthy of human love or kindness. She grows up alone as each generation discourages the next from associating with her. The villagers mock her, calling her “dirty river girl” and “water baby” (Kosinski 75). Because of the questionable details of her arrival into the shtetl, she is forever viewed with suspicion as if she were a curse set upon the town. In fulfillment to her own prophecy, she is raped one evening on her way home. Like the boy of The Painted Bird, her adolescence has been marked by abuse. The idea of the curse sets in upon her mind and she realizes that in order to escape this abusive alienation she must alienate herself even further by fleeing the shtetl.
As subjects of modern novels, the characters of The Painted Bird and Everything Is Illuminated, serve to illustrate two points. One, that far more often, cultural and ethnic discord ultimately cause destruction, alienation, and chaos. And two, that although the focus of the novels’ ethnic conflict, World War II, is in the past, the members of the Jewish community have been the subject of intense cruelty and ridicule in the past (Brod), the present (the boy of The Painted Bird), and the future (Jonathan).

Works Cited
Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002.
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976.
-------------------------------------------------
I chose to submit my final paper to this blog because the protagonist of Kosinski's novel was of significant value in proving my thesis. I studied the journey of the boy to see how is experiences during the war affected him.

Posted by: Heather S. at May 1, 2008 08:40 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

---------------

. . . If you are submitting to this blog post for your final exam, remember to add a few comments (after a line separator) at the END of your entry after the works cited (should be the FINAL, not first, revision of your term paper) explaining why this post was one of the most appropriate to your paper's topic/thesis. Don't forget that you need to do this for two blog entries and you need to submit a paragraph informing me of which two blog entries you submitted to and an explanation why to turnitin.com. All of these steps need to be completed to get credit for the final exam.

Good luck,

Dr. Hobbs

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." ~ William Butler Yeats

------------


Image Source: ">http://www.adolescentmind.com/images/HJ%20Images/HJ-Wkshp-Graphic.gif

*From April 2nd* Proceed as directed in class tonight:

Using Jerzy Kosinki's The Painted Bird as your text, discuss in more detail (a few paragraphs) the journey stage your group discussed tonight in class. I am looking for BOTH literal and symbolic interpretations of the stage you will be dealing with, e.g. Trumbo's protagonist may have left California as his "literal" departure point, but he may have left a "state of physical and mental health" as his symbolic departure place. Likewise, his entry threshold would be represented differently in the literal sense and in the symbolic/psychological sense.

*NOTE: As with all reading responses submitted to the English-Blog for EL 267, you must first submit the response to the proper space on www.turnitin.com (the date for which it was assigned). To get credit, the response must be present in both places by the deadline. Submissions to only one will not receive credit nor will late submissions, so beware!

-------------------------

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Holocaust Studies, please click HERE

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at May 6, 2008 10:56 AM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 October 2014

“Once, a lonely pigeon joined the flock. He was clearly unwelcome. When he began to court them, cooing gutturally as he approached them with a mincing step, they stood aloof and looked at him with disdain.” (Chapter 1, page 6, par. 5)

Question: How does what happen to the pigeon compare to what happens to the boy when he walks into the village after Marta’s hut burns down?

Answer: When the boy walks into the village, men and women start gathering around him and staring at him, like the chickens stared at him with disdain. The boy is taken away to a farm where people watch him like a spectacle. The crowd parts, like the chickens run from the hawk, when Olga shows up. Olga takes him away and uses him for her own purposes. Unlike the hawk, however, she does not rip him to bits with the intent of eating him.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 5, 2014 05:24 PM

Matthew Basin
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation In Narrative CA 02
5th October 2014

“ Early in the morning she took me to visit the village huts. The women and men crossed themselves when they saw us but otherwise greeted us politely. The sick waited inside.” (Chapter 2, page 18, par. 2 and 3)

Question:
At the beginning of this chapter, the young boy was looking for his parents, and runs for the peasants hut, (a.) how does he get treated while he was at the peasants village and (b.) does Olga fit the qualities to justifiably say that she is a “mother like figure” to the boy?

Answer:
In chapter two, a young boy runs towards the peasant’s village because the woman who was watching him has died, and he must fend for himself. Some dogs on chains meet him, and he immediately begins to call out for his mom and dad. Groups of people start to crowd him, which several people have dogs with them. When the group gets to him, they start to poke and prick him with sharp objects; someone in the group even hits him with a rock. Then a man comes from the crowd, puts a bag over his head, and takes him away back to his farm. The young boy says, “The man who had brought me began to whack my calves again. I jumped higher and higher, while the children and adults howled with laughter” (Kosinki 17). When Olga examines the young boy, she takes him, and he already knows he was bought. When she was showing him around, it was expected of him to do those tasks as she wanted them to be. The young boy says, “Olga showed me everything. Henceforth I had to take care of the fire, bring faggots from the forest, and clean the stalls of the animals. The hut was full of varied powders, which Olga prepared in a large mortar, grinding up and mixing the different components. I had to help her with this” (Kosinki 18).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 5, 2014 07:08 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
6 October 2014

“That was not the only incident in which I felt the repercussions of the Eastern Europe smear campaign. On several occasions I was accosted outside my apartment house or in my garage. Three or four times strangers recognized me on the street and offered hostile or insulting remarks. At a concert honoring a pianist born in my homeland, a covey of patriotic old ladies attacked me with their umbrellas, while screeching absurdly dated invectives.” (Afterward page xix, par 1, second edition)
This passage refers to the cruelty that the author faced in his homeland of Poland because of the outrage people had about The Painted Bird. Idnentify some reasons as to why there was outrage about the book in his country.

Answer: One of the biggest outrages about Jerzy Kosinski’s novel was that it was not written in his native language, and someone had claimed to him that because he wrote it in English, he would end his days “by cutting his throat in some seedy hotel on the Riviera.”(Kosinski xvi) Most Polish citizens never read the book since it was banned there, so people took others’ word for the most part about it. Kosinski identified that there was a nationalist group that was attempting to create a feeling of danger for the Jewish population because they were trying to make them leave the state. This was the perfect chance to create that fear.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 5, 2014 07:58 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
6 October 2014

“Her withered body constantly trembled as though shaken by some inner wind, and the fingers of her bony hands with joints twisted by disease never stopped quivering as her head on its long scraggy neck nodded in her every direction” (Kosinski Chapter 1, page 5, par. 2)

Question:

What is the importance of the description of his foster mother?

Answer:

Kosinski describes his foster mother, Martha, as an old fragile woman. This foreshadows her death later on in the story. The attention to detail of her weakness and superstitions, basically give away that she will not live much longer. This in turn, puts the “Gypsy” looking boy out on the streets alone.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 5, 2014 08:34 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
05 October 2014

“The flames started to lick her dangling hands as might an affectionate dog. They now left purple marks on her hands and climbed higher toward her matted hair.” (Chapter 1, page 12, par. 51, Jerzy Kosinski translation)

Question: This passage refers to the moment where the boy accidentally set a fire in Marta’s house because he got hungry and wanted light in the house. What factors played into who started the fire?

Answer: The factors that played into who started the fire were the pool of kerosene and the casting of the blue smoke. These factors were by the boy who wanted to eat something, and he was six-year-old. Marta is the old woman that took the six-year-old boy in when his parents shipped him away to avoid getting hurt from the war in Germany. Marta is an ancient woman that thinks that the boy is a Gypsy just because he has had brown hair and dark eyes. She thinks that he does spells of evil and that he and she should never make eye contact because according to her eye contact from a Gypsy can curse her. She was performing incantations and chants to herself to make her more immune to the curses from the boy. She would also pray for God’s help that she will go to heaven and not casted “down into hell for eternal torture by fire (Kosinski 7).” The way the fire touched Marta’s body it was like she wanted it to feel her and kill her so God can decide her fate and get away from the boy. When it touches her skin, it does not affect her with any pain. It is as if she wanted to die this way.


Work Cited
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 5, 2014 09:47 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
4 October 2014

“…and here she gave me a wary look – from a pair of black eyes set close to a hawk nose. Such eyes, known as Gypsy or witches’ eyes, could bring crippling illness, plague, or death.”
(Chapter 1: The Painted Bird, page 9, par. 1)


Question: This passage refers to one of the many superstitions that Marta has. (a.) What are two other superstitions that Marta believes in? (b.) Why is she so superstitious?

Answer: Occasionally, Marta would knead dough to bake it into bread. If the dough became sour, she would blame the child for “casting a spell” and told him that he would “get no bread for two days as punishment” (Kosinski 9). Marta also believed “each tooth counted would subtract one year from her life” if the child counted her teeth (Kosinski 10). As readers, we do not explicitly know why Marta is such a superstitious woman. However, it is mentioned that she a citizen of a “peasant, isolated and inbred” village in the “most backward parts of Eastern Europe” (Kosinski 3, 4). We can assume that her environment determines her strange beliefs.

Works Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. "1." The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. 3+. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 5, 2014 10:08 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
5 October, 2014

“Olga suspected me of being a vampire and now and then told me so. To restrain the desires of my evil spirit and prevent its metamorphosis into a ghost or phantom, she would every morning prepare a bitter elixir which I had to drink while eating a chunk of garlicked charcoal. Other people also feared me. Whenever I attempted to walk through the village alone, people would turn their heads and make the sign of cross.” (Chapter 2: Kosinski, pg. 21)

Question:
This passage refers to the boy being accusing of being a vampire, why Olga and the village did accused him of being a vampire, and why Olga give him medicine to get rid of his evil thoughts. What factors play a role in thinking that the boy is a vampire?

Answer:
The boy is considered an outcast due to him being a Jew or Gypsy because he has dark hair and olive skin the peasants treats him horribly. Olga, the spiritual doctor, suspected him being a vampire, so she gives him medicine to get rid of his evil spirits. The most important factor is that this boy betray in the story as a vampire due to his complexion is different from the villagers, and he travels from village to village.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 5, 2014 11:09 PM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 October 2014

“I usually remained in the hut, preventing an albino cat from killing a caged hen, which was black and of great rarity, and much valued by Olga" (The Painted Bird Chapter 2, page 21, par. 34, Jerzy Kosinski).

Question: According to the quote above, who is Kosinski referring to as the albino cat? Explain why the character(s) representing the cat are hunting the hen. Who is the caged hen? Explain why the person(s) representing the hen has to be caged. What disrupts their harmony?


Answer: The text above is explaining the narrator, a Jewish boy, relationship with the people of the village who are not supposed to harbor Jew’s during World War II. The albino cat from the text above refers to the villagers. They do not like the Jewish boy, the hen, because he has been out-casted from their society. He is a Jewish boy during Nazi headed World War II, and the people see him as an evil spirit whose very glace can curse them. The Jewish boy is trapped in his cage, the hut, because if he leaves the village people try to harm and kill him. His only protection is Olga, who is highly respected in the community, and brought him to work for her.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at October 6, 2014 12:55 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 October 2014.

QUESTION: Who is Martha? What is her role in the young boy’s life? Use quoted verses from the text to support your answer.
ANSWER:
Martha is an old, crippled, superstitious woman who is the first caregiver to the young boy, due to his separation from his parents because of the war. As such, Martha functions as a pseudo-nanny as well as assumes the mentor archetype as she shows the young boy appreciate nature, and the cycle of life from the animals around him, “She told me that the human soul… fire”, (Kosinski 7). In addition to this, she also teaches the young boy to accept the harsh reality of death from the hands of others, “I was horrified to see some village boys…was too late,” (Kosinski 7-8) as he watched the death of his squirrel friend, which Martha pays no attention. This obliviousness from Martha made the young boy learn and accept the harsh realities of the world that he lived.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 6, 2014 03:03 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
6 October 2014

“I could not understand why Martha did not discard her skin like the snake and start life all over again. When I suggested this to her she grew angry and cursed me for being a blasphemous Gypsy bastard, kin to the Devil.” (Chapter 1, page 8, par. 3-4, Kosinski)

Question:
This passage refers to protagonist’s suggestion to Martha for his suggestion to her illness. What is the misunderstood meaning behind telling Martha to “discard her skin like the snake and start life all over again?” For what reasons do the protagonist lack the inability to understand, what he said?

Answer:
Unlike snakes, humans cannot shed skin so when the protagonist suggests for Martha to shed her skin, he essentially told Martha to die. Due to the protagonist’s young age, the protagonist lacks knowledge about the world and learns from observation and from what other people tell him. “She told that the human soul discards the body in a similar manner and then flies up to God’s feet,” referring to how a snake sheds its skin, Martha tells the protagonist the human soul does this to discard the human body (Kosinski 8). However, when the snake shed its skin it appeared “suddenly thinner and younger,” (Kosinski 8) so as a child the protagonist assumed the same happened to humans, not understanding that what Martha meant was when a human “sheds it skin,” a human actually dies.

Work cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 6, 2014 08:37 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
6 October 2014

"She often became enraged when the dough she kneaded for bread turned sour. She blamed me for casting a spell and told me I would get no bread for two days as punishment." (Chapter 1 page four, par 2, iDoc translation)

Question: This passage is just one example of the unusual beliefs of Marta from pages 3-5. What are some of her other unusual beliefs that can be found in these pages? Explain the belief and explain Marta's reasoning for that belief (if any reason is given).

Answer: One unusual belief that Marta had was she would never drink any liquids in front of the boy or smile. Her reasoning for this was that it would give him a change to count her teeth and each tooth counted would subtract one year away from her life. Another unusual belief that Marta had was she would not allow the boy to look in her eyes or the eyes of any household animal. Her reasoning for this was that the boy would cause a disease or illness for one for looking into another's eyes since he had black eyes set close to a hawk nose. "She ordered me to spit quickly three times and cross myself if I ever accidently looked into an animal's eyes or her own" (4).

Posted by: summer taylor at October 6, 2014 08:55 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
5 October 2014

“Marta failed to appear, though I was still convinced that she could emerge unscathed. But when one of the walls collapsed, engulfing the charred interior of the hut, I began to doubt that I would ever see her again. In the clouds of rising smoke to the sky I thought I detected a strange oblong shape what is it? Could it be Marta’s soul making its escape to the heavens? Or was it Marta herself revived by the fire?” (kosinki 13)
Question: When the walls collapsed, and she did not see Martha she said she seen a cloud of smoke rising what was one of the first thoughts that came to mind.
Answer: One of the first thoughts that came to mind was it could have be Marta soul arising from the fire, “Could it be Marta’s soul making its escape to the heavens.” (Kosinki 13)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 6, 2014 09:44 AM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative
October 5, 2014

“In the clouds of smoke rising to the sky I thought I detected a strange oblong shape. What was it? Could it be Martha’s soul making its escape to the heavens?” (Kosinski 13).

Question:
In the end of the first chapter, there is a scene that explains when the boys caregiver, Martha, ends up burning in her house and sort of rising to the heavens. What does this scene symbolize?

Answer:
In Chapter one of the book, The Painted Bird, there is a scene that shows when the boys caregiver, Martha, dies and burns in her house. What this symbolizes is a new beginning for the boy. In the beginning of the chapter, there was a scene where Martha explains to him that a snake shedding his skin is sort of the beginning of a new life. Martha burning and dying is the boys way of starting a new life. That is shown in the following quote, “Martha and I had watched this transformation with amazement. She told me that the human soul discards the body in a similar manner then flies up to God’s feet” (Kosinski 7).

Also, if you were to think about a forest fire, you know that after the fire comes and wipes everything out, a new life slowly starts to emerge after that. That is another reason why I believe that this scene shows evidence of a new life for the boy.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at October 6, 2014 10:28 AM

Do Over, Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
6 October 2014

“That was not the only incident in which I felt the repercussions of the Eastern Europe smear campaign. On several occasions I was accosted outside my apartment house or in my garage. Three or four times strangers recognized me on the street and offered hostile or insulting remarks. At a concert honoring a pianist born in my homeland, a covey of patriotic old ladies attacked me with their umbrellas, while screeching absurdly dated invectives.” (Afterward page xix, par 1, second edition)
This passage refers to the cruelty that the author faced in his homeland of Poland because of the outrage people had about The Painted Bird. Identify some reasons as to why there was outrage about the book in his country.

Answer: One of the biggest outrages about Jerzy Kosinski’s novel was that it was not written in his native language, and someone had claimed to him that because he wrote it in English, he would end his days “by cutting his throat in some seedy hotel on the Riviera.”(Kosinski xvi) Most Polish citizens never read the book since it was banned there, so people took others’ word for the most part about it. Kosinski identified that there was a nationalist group that was attempting to create a feeling of danger for the Jewish population because they were trying to make them leave the state. This was the perfect chance to create that fear.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 6, 2014 10:43 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
6 October, 2014

Why were Mary and her husband headed to Switzerland? What will she get from trip? How does he cope with stressors while there?(Afterward, ix)

His wife had been battling a supposedly incurable illness for months and had come to Switzerland to consult yet another group of specialist. (IX)This was planned to be a long trip atleast longer then usual. Her husband had to find things to get off his mind off of things was hen his wife was confined to all day clinic e would hire a car and drive, with no destination in mind. Other days he rents a boat and goes out on the lake and just paddles around on the water. This is where he finds the isolation in your mind

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 6, 2014 10:50 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
6 October 2014

"I wondered whether my parents would ever find me again. Did they know that they should never drink or smile in the presence of evil-eyed people who might count their teeth? I would remember my father's broad, relaxed smile and begin to worry; he showed so many teeth that if an evil eye were to count them, he would most certainly die very soon." (Chapter 1, Page 10, Par. 6)

Question: This passage shows some of the boy's evolution in knowledge and character while he has been living with Marta. What else has Marta taught him? How has the boy's childhood been changed by Marta's care?

Answer: Marta has taught the boy many odd lessons, but she has also taught him some important ones. She taught him that all life is sacred which is evidenced when he is incredibly distraught over the death of his pet squirrel (Kosinski 8). Marta's care for the boy has altered his childhood drastically. If his parents had continued to raise him he would have most likely lead a comfortable life, filled with schooling and niceties. Marta's world is drastically different from his parents', and because of that he has learned lots of folk knowledge that, while being questionably beneficial at times, has certainly expanded his mind.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 6, 2014 10:53 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
6 October 2014

“With my friend dead I no longer had anyone to wait for in the morning. I told Marta what had happened, but she did not seem to understand.” (Chapter 1: page 20, par 28)

QUESTION:
This passage refers to the moment a friend of the author dies a horrific death. Briefly explain who this friend was, and how they died. What was the significance of this death?

ANSWER:
In chapter 1, the author finds friendship in a “small red squirrel” (Kosinski 20). The two became close as the squirrel would visit daily, playing with his hair, sitting on his shoulder “kissing his ears, neck and cheeks” (Kosinski 20).

One day the author hears voices, and hiding in the bushes watches in horror as village boys chase the squirrel through the fields. Once they caught the squirrel, they “poured some liquid from a can on it” (Kosinski 20). Then one of them takes a piece of smoldering wood and touches the squirrel who “immediately burst into flames” (Kosinski 20).

The death of the squirrel signifies the cruelty of people after the boys had done this terrible deed they stood there “laughing and prodding it with a stick” (Kosinski 20). It shows an inherent joy in the pain and suffering of others; happiness in cruelty.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 6, 2014 10:53 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
29 September 2013
Question: In chapter two, what did the peasant with a burlap sack do to the main character? Did the main character resist? If yes, how so?
Answer: The peasant grabbed the main character by the neck and slipped the sack over his head. Then he threw him to the ground and tried to knead the rest of his body into the ground.
The main character lashed out with his feet and hands. He bit and scratched; however, he was struck in the back of the neck and quickly lost consciousness.
Work Cited
Kosinski, J. (1995). The painted bird (2nd ed.). New York: Grove Press.

Posted by: Anet Milian at October 6, 2014 12:06 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
6 October 2014

“Was she really so indifferent to all this? Had her charms and incantations granted her immunity against a fire that turned everything else about her into ashes?” (Chapter 1: page 11, par. 8, Jerzy Kosinski)

Question: Through reading pages, 10-11 infer as a reader from details of the fire whether Marta made it out of the hut alive. Through details given in the passage what leads you to infer whether Marta wanted to leave the fire or was forced to die in the fire. Based off these pages include quoted passage for the given inference.

Answer: “She still had not come out. The heat was becoming unbearable.” (11) This quote from the passage shows evidence that the young boy had been waiting for some time to see Marta emerge from the hut. The young boy even discusses how the animals from the hut had to quickly escape the fire in order to stay alive. There was doubt beginning in the young boys mind later on that same page as he began to wonder if he saw Marta alive or her soul. Through details of the violence of the fire, my inference remains that Marta was forced to die in the fire.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at October 6, 2014 02:04 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
6 October 2014

“Suddenly Stupid Ludmila appeared, leading her huge dog on a rope.” (Chapter 5: page 52, par. 6, Jerzy Kosinski)

Question: Multiple times within pages 51-52, the young boy calls the character Ludmila, Stupid Ludmila. Through details given in these listed pages, include reasoning why Ludmila’s name changed to Stupid Ludmila. Use quoted passage to defend your argument towards Ludmila’s name change.

Answer: “They said that Stupid Ludmila had cast a spell over him and put fire in his lions, a fire that would drive him insane.” (51) The young boy shows evidence of the name change once he sees Lukh display qualities of his personality become twisted over love. Ludmila is portrayed as an overly sexual woman towards many of the men. The young boy sees this hurting Lukh and his interaction with her and seems to reconsider his judgments of her. This change continues throughout these pages and on because of the growing climax of the chapter.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at October 6, 2014 09:34 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
6 October 2014

“She still had not come out. The heat was becoming unbearable. I had to move to the far end of the yard. The chicken coops and the barn were now on fire. A number of rats, frightened by the heat, scurried wildly across the yard. The yellow eyes of a cat, reflecting the flames, gazed from the dark edges of the field. Marta failed to appear, though I was still convinced that she could emerge unscathed.” (Chapter 1: The Painted Bird, Page 13, Par. 2-3. Kosinski)

QUESTION: (a.) What was the boy reaction about losing Marta? (b.) What were his feelings and reaction to the fire and the destruction of the household?

ANSWER: “But when one of the walls collapsed, engulfing the charred interior of the hut, I began to doubt that I would ever see her again” (Kosinki, 13). He felt alone, and sad about not being able to find Marta, he had doubts he will find her through all of the flames and heat of the fire. At the moment the fire was happening her knew on what exactly to do. He knew that Marta would want him to set the animals free, and he did just that.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at October 7, 2014 12:44 AM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
6 October 2014

“Only when I knew I would never see him again did I realize how well he had known me and how much he loved me. He took great pains to formulate every lesson according to my particular cast of mind.” (Afterward: Kosinski, page XXV, par. 2)

Question: Kosinski is referring to a very special person in his life whom influenced his book, “The Painted Bird,” in a tremendous way, (a.) to whom is Kosinski referring to, and (b.) how has Kosinski’s book impacted various readers of his book? What type of people could relate to Kosinski’s book?

Answer: Kosinski is referring to his father who impacted his life and his book in a tremendous way. After Kosinski’s book was published in the United States, he came to find out through letters from readers that situations in his book were parallel to various situations in the readers’ life. Kosinski quotes, “These readers, particularly members of ethnic minorities and those who felt themselves socially handicapped, recognized certain elements of their own condition in the boy’s struggle…” (Kosinski XXV).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at October 7, 2014 04:53 PM

(Do over) Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 October 2014
“Once, a lonely pigeon joined the flock. He was clearly unwelcome. When he began to court them, cooing gutturally as he approached them with a mincing step, they stood aloof and looked at him with disdain.” (Chapter 1, page 6, par. 5)

Question: How does what happen to the pigeon compare to what happens to the boy when he walks into the village after Marta’s hut burns down?

Answer: When the boy walks into the village, men and women start gathering around him and staring at him, like the chickens stared at him with disdain. The boy is taken away to a hut “where peasants and their families came to stare,” (17). The crowd parts, like the chickens run from the hawk, when “one day, an elderly woman called Olga the Wise came to the hut,” (17) Olga takes him away and uses him for her own purposes. Unlike the hawk, however, she does not rip him to bits with the intent of eating him.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 7, 2014 07:53 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
7 Oct 2014

“A tall shepherd mounted the woman while she writhed below him, howling at his every move. The man struck open-hand blows at her breasts, leaned over and bit her nipples and kneaded her belly.” (Chapter 5, page 54, par 46)

Question:
When Ludmila whips the boy and his screams are herd by the other shepherds, (a.) How does Ludmila react when she hears the shepherds coming, what does she do while they are walking towards her and (b.) what happened to Ludmila when the mob of women get to her?

Answer:
In chapter five, when Ludmila found out Lekh had left many days ago, and he did not know where he went, she jumped for joy and grabbed a bottle of vodka. She orders him to the stable to have sex with him. When the boys’ screams are herd by the shepherds, she spreads her legs even bigger, and two of the men immediately start to take off their pants. The boy says, “When he finished and rose, another man took his place. Stupid Ludmila moaned and shuddered, drawing the man to her with her arms and legs” (Kosinski 54). A mob of women came behind from the cemetery, with shovels and rakes. The men put back on their pants but held down the girl. When the women got to her, they started to beat her and spit in her face. The women also beat her dog to death with shovel blows. “The women held Stupid Ludmila down flat against the grass. They sat hr hands and legs and began beating her with the rakes, ripping her skin with their fingernails, tearing out her hair, spitting into her face”(Kosinski 54).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 7, 2014 08:18 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
8 October 2014

“I made a promise to myself to remember everything I saw; if someone should pluck out my eyes then I would retain the memory of all that I had seen for as long as I lived.” (Chapter 4, par 1, Page 41)

Question: This passage is uttered by the narrator as he is leaving the miller’s home. Why does he make it a point to himself to always remember things he saw?

Answer: The boy had witnesses a terrible incident prior to escaping the miller’s home. The miller was under the impression that the plowman was messing around with his wife, so he resorted to “plunging a spoon into one of the boy’s eyes and twisted it.” (Kosinski 38) The boy had later wondered whether losing an eye would deprive someone of their memories as well, and since he was scared of this, he promised to himself that if it ever happened that he would not forget his memories.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 7, 2014 09:36 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative CA01
7 October 2014

Question:
In the story the boy talks about how the “comet” was an essential tool for survival because of the ease it is to use it. Besides a survival reason, why is the boy so attached to the comet?

Answer:
The boy is attached to the comet because it is a way that he could still have a part of Olga. The house they lived in is already burned down and this is far from the village so the only thing left is a technique she might have taught him. This is shown in the following quote, “But Olga was far away and I was without the comet” (Kosinski 31)

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at October 7, 2014 10:18 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
6 October 2014

“Lekh had a pimpled, freckled face.”
(Chapter 5: The Painted Bird, page 42, par. 3)


Question: The protagonist in The Painted Bird by Jerry Kosinski spends a portion of his life living with Lekh. (a.) Who is Lekh and what does he do for a living? (b.) Why does he accept the boy?

Answer:
Lekh is a loner – “Lekh had no family” and a respectable birds catcher and seller - “no one could compete with him in this” (Kosinski 42). Although Lekh is a loner, he accepted the boy because of his capabilities. He is “thin and light,” and able to fit into and set traps in small places, unlike Lekh.

Works Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. "5." The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. 42+. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 7, 2014 11:01 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
7 October 2014

“The plowboy was an orphan. It was his first season of work at the miller’s farm. He was a tall, placid youth with flaxen hair which he habitually pushed from his sweating brow. The miller knew that the villagers gossiped about his wife and the boy.” (Chapter 4, pgs. 35, Kosinski)
Question: This passage is refer to the plowboy, Mr. and Mrs. Miller. Why does Miller believes that his wife and boy are having a relationship?
Answer:
“The miller knew that the villagers gossiped about his wife and the boy.” Miller notice that the villagers are gossiping about his wife and the boy relationship. The way his wife “gazed into the boy blue eyes” is where the villagers talked about how she looks at the young boy. Mr. Miller thinks that his wife probably has feeling towards the boy. (Kosinski, 35)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 7, 2014 11:13 PM

DO OVER
Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
7 October 2014

“The snake sank into immobility with only very slow shivers running along its coiled body. Then calmly it crawled out of its skin, looking suddenly slimmer and younger. It did not wave its tongue any more but seemed to wait for its new skin to harden.” (Kosinski 7)

Question: The passage above talks about how the snake sheds its skin. What does Marta relate to the shedding of the snake skin?

Answer: Marta believes that the human soul does the same thing that the snake does when snakes shed their skin and let their new one harden. In the end God takes the human soul and either “turns into a heavenly angel, or casts it down to hell for eternal torture by fire.” (Kosinski 7)

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 7, 2014 11:17 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 October 2014

“I quickly climbed a tree and after scanning the countryside from its height I noticed the twinkle of comets” (Chapter 3, page 31, par. 3)

Question: How did the boy retrieve a comet after escaping from the river?

Answer: He climbed the tree and saw a group of people walking. They had comets, but the boy had to find a way around their vicious dog to steal one. Whenever the dog caught his scent, he hissed and the dog quickly went back to the path on the road. “When the cows moved closer to me I jabbed two of them with a sharp stick. They bellowed and started trotting followed by the dog. Then I screamed with a long, vibrating banshee howl” (Kosinski 32). He punched the nearest person in the face, took his comet, and ran. The others were too scared to investigate and ran off. He successfully retrieved a comet.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 7, 2014 11:31 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
7 October 2014

“The eye sprang out of his face like a yolk from a broken egg and rolled down the miller’s hand onto the floor. The plowboy howled and shrieked, but the miller’s hold kept him pinned against the wall. Then the blood-covered spoon plunged into the other eye, which sprang out even faster.” (Kosinski 38)

Question: Why did the miller invite the plowboy over for dinner, but ended up removing his eyeballs?

Answer: The miller did not like the plowboy because he had heard rumors that his wife and the plowboy would always look at each other, which was disrespectful to the miller. The miller invited the plowboy over for dinner to confront him. In the end he gauged his eyes out with a spoon so that he and the miller’s wife would no longer make flirty eye contact. “It was said that she changed when she gazed into the boy’s blue eyes. Heedless of the risk of being noticed by her husband, she impulsively hiked her skit high above her knees with one hand, and with the other pushed down the bodice of her dress to display her breasts, all the time staring into the boy’s eyes.” (Kosinski 35)

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 7, 2014 11:42 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation In Narrative CA 02
October 8, 2014


Question Pages 22-23:


What is the significance of Stupid Ludmila and Lekh’s profession as a bird catcher?


Answer:


Lekh describes stupid Ludmila as a great, beautiful, colorful bird. “ He made up tender songs for her in which she figured as a strange-colored bird flying to faraway worlds, free and quick, brighter and more beautiful than other creatures. (Kosiński Pg.23) Stupid Ludmila is an innocent character in the book who has been raped of her senses and therefore cannot fully integrate back into society that is why she lives on the outskirts. Lekh is in love with this woman, but she has no sense of deep compassion. Ludmilas interaction with the people is mostly just for sex that seems to be the only time she interacts with others. Ludmila depicts a great beautiful bird of all colors that no one man can capture, and this has become the bird catcher’s obsession.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 8, 2014 12:37 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation In Narrative CA 02
October 8, 2014


Question Pages 47-48:


In pages 47-48 the narrator is given a safe place to sleep and his hair is shaven to appear normal but he encounters fellow Jews on the railroad how does the protagonist’s life contrast with the other Jews on the railcars? How does he perceive the two situations?


Answer:


We see that the main character is secure in a haven even when the house is raided by Germans he remains hidden. Later on in this passage we see how the Jews are brought along the rail-carts and on their way to imminent death. “The gas chambers and ovens could not cope with the great supply of people; thousands of those killed by gas were not burned but simply buried in pits around the camp. (Kosiński Pg.48) We see the dire situation the boy is in and yet he still retains some childhood innocence as is fitting being some of the few pages the boy is in relative safety. “ I had no intention of being burned in such an ordinary camp-fire when others were incinerated in special and elaborate furnaces built by the Germans and equipped with engines more powerful than those of the largest locomotives. (Kosiński Pg.48) Instead of reacting with fear such as the one instilled in the reader the boy is rather defiant and quite innocent, possibly proving just how far he has gone over the edge. The boy instead believes that he would prefer to burn in a “special and elaborate” furnace like the other Jews in the rail-carts.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 8, 2014 12:38 AM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
8 October 2014

“Lekh had a pimpled, freckled face. The peasants claimed that such faces belong to those who steal eggs from swallow’s nests; Lekh himself asserted that this was due to his spitting carelessly into fire in his youth[.]” (chapter 5, page 42, par. 3)

Question: What is the significance of this quoted passage in relation to the rest of the story?

Answer: Swallows were considered “harbingers of spring and joy” (45) so anyone who injured the birds also injured possible joy. Lekh captured many birds, and he was almost the opposite of the sparrow. Lekh caused misery to the birds. He would paint the birds and release them back to their flock. From there, “the painted bird would be forced farther and farther away as it zealously tried to enter the ranks of the flock” (51). The bird would then be attacked by its flock until it fell from the sky and died. The scene could be foreshadowing of how a venerated member of society, painted in beautiful colours, is later outcast because of the changes they’ve made.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 8, 2014 01:32 AM

“Women often set dog on Ludmila. The largest and most dangerous one ever sent to attack her decided not to return” (The Painted Bird Chapter 5, page 48, par. 21, Jerzy Kosinski).

Question: Why did women set dogs after Ludmila? What happened to the largest dog after it decided not to return?

Answer: The women in the village set dogs after Ludmila because she tempts the male villagers. She roams around naked and has her way with them in the fields. They were jealous because “she lived in the forests, lured men into the bushes and pleased them so much with her voluptuousness that afterwards they could not even look at their fat and stinking wives” (Kosinski 49). The largest dog sent after Ludmila became her companion. It protected her and “she would always appear holding the animal by a rope. The other dogs would flee with their tails between their legs” (Kosinski 48). It was also said she laid with the dog how she laid with the men of the village.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at October 8, 2014 02:02 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 225CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
8 October 2014

“Then came an overcast day. Clouds of barely discernible shapes screened the skies like a thick feather bed, hiding the anemic sun. The wind whipped over the fields, wilting the blades of grass.” (Chapter 5: page 44, par 37)


Question:
Explain how this passage sets the tone of death for the character Ludmila. How does the use of certain colors amplify this effect?

Answer:
The mood becomes ominous when the forest, that was once full of life, had become deserted, leaving “only the snakes and lizards” (Kosinski 44). Everything starts to become gray, signifying darkness and death. The sun is blocked out, darkening the sky as the wind beats over dead “wilting blades of grass” (Kosinski 44).

The colors grey, black and brown, is repeatedly seen, placing much emphasis on these words. From the “blackened and brown” mildew of the huts. To the graying wings of the birds, and the “gray shagginess of the tall thistles” (Kosinski 44). A foreboding sense that something terrible is about to happen can be felt. Furthermore, the mention of “rotting stalks of potato plants” (Kosinski 44) signifies the rotting flesh of the dead, in this case Ludmila’s body.

Works Cited

"Read THE PAINTED BIRD Ebooks Online." IDoc.co. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Oct. 2014. .

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 8, 2014 06:07 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
7 October 2014

“Its light lured scores of odd insects out of the dark. I saw witches hanging from the trees. They stared at me, trying to lead me astray and confuse me.”
(Chapter 3, pg. 32, par. 5)

Question:
Referring to the comet, (a.) how does the effect of the comet transition throughout the chapter change (b.) how does the comet portray the forest surrounding the protagonist?

Answer:
From the description given by the protagonist, the comet symbolized “indispensable protection,” providing food and heat, warding off creatures and scaring away bandits (Kosinski 29). However, when the protagonist steals a comet from the villager, the lit comet produced a forest around the child of fear and darkness. Attracting “scores of odd insects,” revealing “witches hanging from the trees,” and bring attention to the “shudders of wandering souls,” the comet that once provided safety for the protagonist now only brought terror (Kosinski 32). The forest before the comet was dark and unknown; however, when illuminated the creatures became tangible, causing the protagonist to swing the comet wildly of fear (Kosinski 33). When the comet added light to the forest, what was dark became more noticeable causing the forest to appear eerier in the boy’s perception than before when everything around was in darkness.

Work cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 8, 2014 07:48 AM

DO OVER
Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
06 October 2014

“The birds played with me freely. The more furiously I swiveled my head to and fro, the more excited and bold they became. Seeming to avoid my face, they attacked the back of my head.” (Chapter 2, page 25, par. 4)

QUESTION: Who was getting attacked by the birds and why were they getting attacked by them? Why were the birds avoiding his/her face? Use quoted passages to support your answer.

ANSWER: The little boy that got purchased by Olga was in a hole for days and he got attacked by ravens. After a little Olga went and dug him out; after being in the hole for so long his health was bad. “Olga said that the cold earth had driven the sickness out of me. She said that the disease was picked up by a throng of ghosts transformed into ravens which tasted my blood to make sure that I was one of them. This was the only reason, she asserted, they did not peck my eyes out” (Kosinski 26).

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at October 8, 2014 08:30 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
08 October 2014

“The eye sprang out of his face like a yolk from a broken egg and rolled down the miller’s hand onto the floor. The plowboy howled and shrieked, but the miller’s hold kept him pinned against the wall.” (Chapter 4, page 38, par. 1)

QUESTION: Why did the miller do this to the plowboy? What was the miller so furious about that it got to this level?

ANSWER: The miller took the plowboy’s eyeballs out because he believed that his wife and the plowboy had something going on. The miller was furious about his wife putting her eyes on someone else, hearing from others that his wife was “flirting and lasciviously displaying her body in the fields and in the mill before a young plowboy” (Kosinski 34). Due to the fact that she never denied this, her husband was furious and went crazy on the plowboy.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at October 8, 2014 08:32 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
8 October 14

Question: “I was now living at the miller’s, whom the villagers nicknamed Jealous.” (Chapter 4, page 34, par. 1) From the text on pages 34-35, why would you conclude the villagers nicknamed the man as “Jealous”? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: From the text, I conclude that they call the man Jealous because his wife gets looks from all the men as they enter the room (Chapter 4, page 34, par. 3). Also, the man caught one instance of his wife flirting and flaunting her goods before a young plow-boy (Chapter 4, page 34, par. 4-5). The text leads the readers to believe that the wife is very attractive, and the man gets jealous anytime the wife talks to someone other than him.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at October 8, 2014 08:33 AM

REDO Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
6 October, 2014

Question: Why were Mary and her husband headed to Switzerland? What will she get from trip? How does he cope with stressors while there?(Afterward, ix)

Answer: His wife had been battling a supposedly incurable illness for months and had come to Switzerland to consult yet another group of specialist. (IX)This was planned to be a long trip at least longer then usual. Her husband had to find things to get off his mind off of things was hen his wife was confined to all day clinic e would hire a car and drive, with no destination in mind. Other days he rents a boat and goes out on the lake and just paddles around on the water. This is where he finds the isolation in your mind.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 8, 2014 08:38 AM

Bryce Veller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys in Narratives
08/10/2014

“The miller locked the inflamed female in the cellar and went to his mill, telling his wife that he would bring the plowboy home for supper”. (CH.4 pg.35, par.8)
QUESTION: What has been revealed about the situation between Miller’s wife and the plowboy? What do the cats symbolize in the passage?
ANSWER: The miller’s wife is having some affair with the plowboy. Miller beats his wife for her punishment, brings the plowboy home, and gouges his eyes out for his actions. The cats here in the passage represent sexually. The female cat is in heat, acting unusual like Millers wife. The tabby brought home represents the plowboy to calm her nerves.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at October 8, 2014 09:16 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 October 2014

Question: What does the boy say about Miller the man eyes out? What does he think will he lose? Do you think agree with the boy why or why not?(Kosinski pg40)

Answer: after he cuts out the man's eyes, and they are sitting together in the room the boy starts making assumptions make it okay for the eyes to be cuts out. Saying things such as “Maybe these eyes had not intention of serving anyone.”(Kosinski39) After sneaking out of the house the next morning as he passes the man with the bleeding eye sockets he thinks to stop but doesn’t. He starts to think that if you would loose your sight then you would lose the memory of everything you had ever seen before. Also, he says perhaps maybe he can dream but in his dream he can’t see anything (Kosinski40). He ends although on more positive not saying, without his eyes the plowboy would start seeing an entirely new, more fascinating world.”(Kosinski40) I do agree with the little boy’s thoughts about losing ones ability to see. Would hope that they can be in touch another way.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 8, 2014 09:21 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
8 October 2014

“Sometimes days passed and stupid Ludmilla did appear in the forest. Lekh would become a possessed by a silent rage. He would solemnly stare at the birds in the cages mumbling to himself. (Chapter 5 pg 50)
Question: Identify why Lekh became so rage when he did not see Ludmilla for days? Point a key point in the passage that gives the reader an idea on why he felt so in rage.
Answer: Ludmilla was a very interesting woman she was not like the average women in the village. Ludmilla was not married nor did she have children. According to the text “she lived in the forests lured men into the bushes and pleased them so much with her voluptuous breast that afterwards they could not even look at their fat stinking wives.” (Kosinski 49). This indicates that ludmilla could have been running her own personal escort service in the village and of course Lekh being aware of this could be a main factor on why he felt so in rage when he did not see her.

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 8, 2014 09:38 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 October 2014

“Lehk is the only man in the area who knew how to prepare a stork’s nest in advance, and his nests were never without,” (Chapter 5, page 43, par. 7)

Question: This passage refers to a man that the boy meets and assists animals that are in need of help. Is Lehk a form of hero? Why or if not what other roles could he be?

Answer: Lehk is not a hero because he plays more of a shapeshifter role in The Painted Bird. He starts as an assisting a stork by making a nest, but according to the boy’s interpretation of Lehk, and he kills the bird to paint them for his entertaining pleasure. “The peasants bartered food for Lehk’s birds, and he did not have to worry about essentials…(Kosinski 42).”

Work Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 8, 2014 10:21 AM

Do Over: Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
8 October 2014

“But I remembered the two things which, according to Olga, was necessary for survival without human help.” (Chapter 3: Kosinski, page 28, par. 1)

Question: What were the two things that the boy had learned from the old woman, Olga that were necessary for survival?

Answer: The boy learned about plants and animals and also the ability to use poisons and herbs to save ones life. Also the boy learned how to use fire for different things. In the text, Kosinski writes, “The first was knowledge of plants and animals, familiarity with poisons and medicinal herbs. The other was possession of fire, or a “comet” of one’s own” (Kosinski 28).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at October 8, 2014 10:34 AM

Jonah Robertson
Burgbsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
October 8 2014

"I walked more cautiously now, for I knew that eyeballs did not have strong roots. When one bent down they hung like apples from a tree and could easily drop out." (Chapter 4, page 40, par. 31)

Question: This quote exemplifies the odd things that the boy "learns" through his wandering. How could this alter his perception of the world differently than if he had been raised in a normal household?

Answer: Because of this boy's incredibly odd situation and upbringing his views on the world are quite unique. Between Marta teaching him about smiling and teeth (Kosinski 9-10) to Olga's folk remedies (18-19) he is learning new things about his world. If he had been raised in a normal setting he would have never learned these unique, if incredibly odd, things about the world around him. So, while he is going through a lot of hardship and pain, the boy is also learning from it, even if some of what he thinks he learns in completely ridiculous.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 8, 2014 10:52 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
3 October 2014
Question: What terrible things did the peasants do to Ludmila when she was at the cemetery and who tried to intervene?
Answer: The peasants held Ludmila down against the grass. They sat on her arms and legs and began beating her with rakes. Lekh tried to push through and fight, but they knocked him down and hit him brutally. (Page 54, Line 30)
Work Cited
Kosinski, J. (1995). The painted bird (2nd ed.). New York: Grove Press.

Posted by: Anet Milian at October 8, 2014 11:36 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
8 October 2014

“The miller bent over the plowboy and whispered something into his reddened ear… continued to clean the pots” (Kosinski 37).

QUESTION: The miller is illustrated as an abusive drunk, therefore: (a) are his actions towards his wife justifiable? (b) Are the series of events that occurred the responsibility of the plowboy? Use quoted passages to support your answer.

ANSWER: “I was now… had nicknamed Jealous.” (Kosinski 34), the above quote tells what the villagers thinks of the miller.The definition of Jealousy is having fear of being ousted or losing appreciation or position in the eyes of an individual. As such, the miller being defined as Jealous by his neighboring villagers, uses alcohol induced abuse to maintain his position in his wife’s life. “The woman cowered…begging forgiveness” (Kosinski 34-35); thus, these actions are justifiable in his eyes but amoral.
The plowboy however is just a victim of circumstance, because he is young and is being enticed by the miller’s wife “The woman breathed heavily… with difficulty” (Kosinski 37). Consequently, these events cause the plowboy to lose his eyes in an attempt for the miller to remain on his theoretical pedestal he thinks his wife has of him.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 9, 2014 09:42 AM

Do Over: Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 October 2014

“Martha became sick. She complained about a sharp pain… start life all over again.” (Kosinski 8)

QUESTION: Who is Martha? What is her role in the young boy’s life? Use quoted verses from the text to support your answer.

ANSWER: Martha is an old, crippled, superstitious woman who is the first caregiver to the young boy, due to his separation from his parents because of the war. As such, Martha functions as a pseudo-nanny as well as assumes the mentor archetype as she shows the young boy appreciate nature, and the cycle of life from the animals around him, “She told me that the human soul… fire”, (Kosinski 7). In addition to this, she also teaches the young boy to accept the harsh reality of death from the hands of others, “I was horrified to see some village boys…was too late,” (Kosinski 7-8) as he watched the death of his squirrel friend, which Martha pays no attention. This obliviousness from Martha made the young boy learn and accept the harsh realities of the world that he lived.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 9, 2014 09:47 AM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
8 October 2014

“One stormy afternoon the carpenter fell ill. His wife fluttered around him preparing bitter juices and could not bother to drive me outside the village.”

(Chapter 6: The Painted Bird, page 59, par. 3)


Question: During thunder and lightning storms, the carpenter sent the boy “outside the village” (Kosinski 59). However, in this instance, the boy stayed within the village. (a.) During the storms, why did the carpenter send the boy away? (b.) What commotion took place in the village when the boy remained there?

Answer: The carpenter, usually, sent the boy away during storms because he believed that his “black hair would attract lightning to their farms” (Kosinski 57). On the occasion that the boy did remain there, a bolt of lightning caused a wall to “burst into fire” (Kosinski 59). The “fire raged wildly” and “every living creature had rushed outside” (Kosinski 59).

Works Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. "6." The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. 58+. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 9, 2014 08:34 PM

(Do over) Olivia Ago-Stallworth
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
9 October 2014

“Then they tossed him a bone. He ran after it, wagging his scruffy tail, scaring the butterflies and trampling flowers.” (Chapter 7, page 75, par. 44)

Question: What happened to one of the men’s dog after the fight? Be specific.
.
Answer: After the fight the winning man threw a bone to his companion dog to go fetch. According to Kosinski, the dog was so happy frolicking in flowers, scaring butterflies and having a grand-old time chasing the bone that his master had thrown (Kosinski 75). As soon as the dog reached the location of the bone that was thrown by his master, the master shot him.

Work Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 9, 2014 08:56 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey of Transformation in Narrative CA01
9 October 2014

“The lighting was always described as a great fiery bolt hurled from the heavens.” (Chapter 6, Kosinski, 57-58)
Question: The passage refers to “lighting storms” strikes the village. What is the significance of rapturous storms the village felt?

Answer:
The villages felt that the lighting storms have “no human power” to extinguish the fires that were brought upon lighting striking their village homes. However, villagers felt that “Almighty” would reward somebody or punish by “Satan” on whom house will be burnt down, but also a person struck down by lighting. (kosinki, 57)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 9, 2014 09:04 PM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 October 2014

Question: What is found when the character approaches the area of the crying? Why is crying and why? What does he decide to do with his discovery?

Answer: When the boy hears crying he goes and investigates. When he approaches he says “I saw an overturned cart and horse, but no sign of a person” (Kosinski, 79). He goes closer to the horse and realizes that the horse is malnourished.The horse did not leave the area because it had a broken bone and part of it was sticking out of its leg. He decides to help the horse back to the village in hopes of finding its owner and gaining a better relationship with the locals. "I might even be able to stay on the farm" (Kosinski, 80).

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at October 9, 2014 09:17 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
10 October 2014

“I found a piece of smooth sheet metal and reflected a beam of sunlight into the interior”(Chapter 6, pg. 61, par.2).

Question: What does the boy find when he is in the forest on his own, and how does this help him escape again?

Answer: The boy finds an abandoned military bunker full of rats, but there are some valuable things there. “…broken ammunition crates, scraps of metal, and empty tin cans” (Kosinski 59). When he searches for another village, he realizes he went back to the one he fled from. The carpenter wants to put him in a sack and drown him, but the boy tells him about the bunker. The next day they set off, but the boy is tied to him with a string. When the carpenter is not paying attention, he yanks the string and the man falls into the bunker. The boy breaks off the string on a piece of metal and is able to escape (Kosinski 63-64).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 9, 2014 09:41 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
10 October 2014

“The blacksmith’s wife did not let me kill all the lice and bedbugs.” (Chapter 7, par 2, page 67)

Question: This passage is referring to the blacksmith’s wife’s tendency to keep the rodents of the house and not kill them. Why does she not allow the boy to harm these bugs? What does she do with them?

Answer: There were a lot of illnesses going around during the time the novel takes place, and while most people did not have an answer to the daily stomach bugs and flus, the blacksmith’s wife had her theory that seemed to be successful. Her theory involved using the lice, as well as a few other questionable items, and putting them together to make her bellyache cure, since the blacksmith got it quite often. The solution that she made was considered to be the “best medicine for a bellyache.” (Kosinski 67).

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 9, 2014 09:43 PM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
10 October 14

Question: “Then one of them decided I should be delivered up to the German outpost about a dozen miles from the hut.” (Chapter 4, page 34, par. 1) From the text on pages 69-70, why would you conclude the partisans wanted to take him all the way to the outpost? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: From the text, I conclude that they decided to take him to the outpost because they did not want the commander to have any more suspicion towards them (their village) in addition to their “tardy deliveries” (Chapter 7, page 70, par. 5).

Posted by: Blake Bromen at October 9, 2014 10:45 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
5 October 2014

Question pg. 52-53:
The book is filled with many superstitious. Give an example of superstitious behavior.
Answer:
The villagers Lekhe lives in are extremely superstitious and cruel. The villagers would make fun of Lekhe and say that Stupid Ludmila “had cast a spell over him and put fire in his loins, a fire that would drive him insane (Kosinski 52).”

Posted by: James Sierra at October 9, 2014 11:11 PM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 October 2014
“Winter did not loosen its grip. The heavy sky, filled with leaden clouds, seemed to weigh down on the thatched roofs. Sometimes a cloud darker than the others raced over like a balloon, trailing behind it a mournful shadow that stalked it as evil spirits stalk a sinner.” (chapter 8, page 77, paragraph 3)

Question: Even though the boy is alone and homeless during the winter, do the first nine paragraphs of chapter eight have a lighter tone than the rest of the novel before it?

Answer: Life seems to be easier for the boy during this winter. Food was scarce for villagers, but since the villagers did not leave their hurts because of the snow, the boy was able to steal “the best potatoes and beetroots” (78) from unattended barns. Even people that did see him suspected he was a wraith and “only sent dogs after [him]” (77). The boy had to sleep outside in the cold, but he was knowledgeable enough to burrow “into a hollow beneath tree roots, with a snowdrift for a roof” (78) to keep himself warm.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 10, 2014 12:48 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
9 October 2014

“However, the murderer, whose face I remembered… in one gulp” (Kosinski 86)
QUESTION: The boy in the story is applauded after witnessing the murder of the farmer knowing that the murderer is walking freely among the deceases’ family members. Despite his questionable upbringing, what does this say about his character as an individual?
ANSWER:
“At such times I was as tense as a drawn as … mopped the floor” (Kosinski 86), the above quote is indicative of the boy’s moral compass. He lives on the edge expecting the murderer to be brought to just but has a metaphoric gag due to his ‘Gypsy’ or ‘Jew’ like visage. However, he is hopeful that the murderer will be brought to justice based on the story he is told. Therefore, despite his exposure to violent situations and abuse he can keep his morality.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 10, 2014 02:14 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
10 October 2014

“When I came to, the carpenter was standing nearby preparing a sizable sack. I remembered that he used to drown sick cats in sacks like this.”
(Chapter 6, pg. 62, par. 3)

Question:
Referring to the quote, how does this symbolize the relationship between the carpenter and the protagonist?

Answer:
Like many of the protagonist other relationships, the relationship between him, and the carpenter is strictly based off the protagonist’s usefulness. Much like one of his farm animals, the carpenter takes care of the protagonist yet does not see him as an equal human being. “He placed me on a cart, and beating his ox frantically, drove me outside the village to a distant field and left me there,” succumbing to superstition; the carpenter tied the boy up like an animal and drove him out to the field daily (Kosinski 58). One day when the protagonist “caused” the barn to by being struck by lightning, his usefulness to the carpenter was completed.

Work Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 10, 2014 08:29 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 October 2014

Question: What were the two mishaps with the guns? What was there favorite shooting method? And what was a “prize find”?(Kosinski 89 chp8)

Answer: In this part of the book there has just been two gun mishaps the first was with a homemade pistol that blew up in the boy’s hand tearing of all fingers and an ear. The other one was a sick practical joke played on a paralyzed crippled son of one of his neighbors. They placed several rounds of rifle ammunition at the bottom of his comet when he went to lit it in the morning and swung it between his legs the cartridges went off. (Kosinski 89) Seeing these people loved guns so much they played a game or a shooting method called “powder up” to do this one took the bullet from the cartridge case and poured some powder out. Then this allowed for the bullet to be pressed deeper into the half empty case. The rest of the powder was placed on top then a doctored in this way and were either placed in a slot on the board of buried in the ground with just the tip showing. Then the powder on top was lit when fire hit the primer the bullets would shoot about twenty feet (Kosinski 89). In this book, the prize find was a time fuse the only thing that people traded for this was a homemade pistol or wooden stock.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 10, 2014 09:19 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
10 October 2014

Next morning the farmer took the two big strong horses out of his stable. He hitched them to a plow and drove them to the crippled horse waiting patiently by a fence. (Chapter 8)
Question: After witnessing the treatment of the horse by the farmer how did he feel during the process, provide details in the story of both the treatment of the horse and how he felt.
Answer: Feeling helpless he stood by watching how he could save then horses life, “ how could I convince him back to the farm for this …when the farmer approached the horse to check the position of the noose the cripple suddenly turned his head and licked the farmer face. The man did not look at him but gave him a powerful open-handed slap on the muzzle. The horse turned away hurt and humiliated.” (Kosinski 81)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 10, 2014 09:39 AM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
10 Oct 2014

“ The stabbed man tried to rise. He looked around with glassy eyes; when he saw me he tried to say something, but all that came out of his mouth was a half-chewed piece of cabbage. Once more he tried to stand up, but he wobbled and slid gently between the bench and the table.” (Kosinki pg. 85 par 36)


Question:
(a.)What happens to the man that was stabbed and what event was going on at the time and (b.) how did the boy react when he saw the man?


Answer:
In chapter eight, a neighboring family held a big wedding reception for their handsome daughter. The boy rushes to the table to grab food that he deserved from his performance and the boy slid behind some empty barrels while the men sat at the table. The men talked slowly and offered each other food. One of the men slowly reached into his pocket and took out a knife with a long pointed blade. He then stabs his companion unsuspectingly. “The body of the murdered man was not removed from the house immediately after the wedding. It was placed in one of the side rooms while the dead man’s assembled in the main room” (Kosinki 85). The boy was very scared and couldn’t stop trembling and ran to the barn. “Making sure that there was no one else about and trying in vain to stop trembling, I scurried out of the half-open door like a rat and ran to the barn” (Kosinki 85).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 10, 2014 09:46 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
10 October 2014

“I felt now like the mangy dog that the partisans had killed. They had first stroked his head and scratched him behind the ears. The dog, overwhelmed with joy, yapped with love and gratitude. Then they tossed him a bone. He ran after it, wagging his scruffy tail, scaring the butterflies and trampling flowers. When he seized the bone and proudly lifted it, they shot him.” (Chapter 7, page 75, par. 2)

QUESTION: Why did the boy feel like “the mangy dog”? From who was he trying to escape?

ANSWER: The boy felt like “the mangy dog” because he thought about escaping from the soldier but he realized that the soldier would be quick to shoot him and he would die midway because the forest was too far. The soldier actually let him escape and did not shoot him. At first the boy thought that “this was a clever way of tricking me; he was pretending not to look” (Kosinski 75-76).

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at October 10, 2014 09:51 AM

Bryce A Veller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in narratives
10/10/14

In the Village a story about a skull tumbling out of its respected grave and proceeded to roll down the hill towards town, carefully avoiding conflict with whatever situation it rolled into. Unstopped by distractions, the skull smartly waits for the right moment to strike. (Pg 86. Par.5)
QUESTION
What did the skull do, and why is it significant?
ANSWER
The skull got justice for its wrongful death by his brother to acquire all the family riches. The skull got vengeance on his brother by causing his horse cart to flip, killing him on impact.
After the farmers funeral who got murdered , the wife refused to clean the blood stains saying they are there as a power of vengeance that they will get there justice eventually for who ever done this. Just like in the skull and horse cart situation, justice prevailed in the long run.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at October 10, 2014 10:20 AM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
October 10 2014

"I grasped his neck, feeling it still pulse with life. I tried to persuade him to follow me; staying in the forest could only mean his death. I spoke to him about the warm stable, the smell of hay, and I assured him that a man could set his bone and heal it with herbs." (Chapter 8, Page2 79-80, Par. 14)

Question: Why is it so important to the boy that he save this horse? What does the horse mean to him?

Answer: The horse is lost and alone, abandoned by anyone who could care for it, just like the boy is. He empathizes with the horse, and thus wants to help it. However, just like him, the horse is left to the mercy of others and meets an unlucky fate (Kosinski 80). This caused the boy great emotional trauma, as this horse was one of the only other beings he met who he could empathize with.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 10, 2014 10:46 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 October 2014

“I understood neither the meaning of the Mass nor the role of the priest at the altar. All of this to me was magic, more splendid and elaborate than Olga’s witchcraft, but just as difficult to fathom.”

Question:
In this passage the main character discusses the differences of Olga’s witchcraft and the Priests Mass. Discuss how the Church and Priest differs from Olga and her witchcraft.

Answer:
The main character finds the newfound Church to be magical and fascinating. The wonders of the “stone structure of the altar, the finery of the cloths hanging from it,” and “the majestic tabernacle in which the divine spirit dwelled” (Kosinski 78) mystify him. The “fancifully shaped objects store in the sacristy” (Kosinski 78) left him in awe. A “flat burse in which the corporal was kept” (Kosinski 78) held his attention. The burse “resembled a harmonic” (Kosinski 78) and was bounds above “poor Olga’s hut” (Kosinski 78) in comparison. Olga’s hut, in comparison to the Church, was “full of its evil-smelling frogs, rotting pus from human wounds, and cockroaches” (Kosinski 78).

When Olga would perform ceremonies of magical incantations her “face had always taken on changing expressions that aroused fright or respect” (Kosinski 78). For instance, her eyes would roll as her head shook rhythmically as she “made elaborate movements with her arms and palms” (Kosinski 78).

On the other hand, the priest, “remained the same as in everyday life” (Kosinski 78) when performing mass. He “merely wore a different robe and spoke a different language” (Kosinski 79).

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 10, 2014 10:52 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 October 2014

“The loves of Labina and her guests were soon over. They were like short spring thundershowers that wet the leaves and grass but never reach the roots. I remembered how my games with Ewka never really ceased but only dimmed when Makar and Quail intruded into our lives. They continued long into the night like a peat fire whipped gently by the wind.” (Kosiński Pg. 83)

Question Pg. 83-84

How did the hero’s sexual experiences with Ewka differentiate with Labina’s nighttime friends?

Answer:

On pages 83-84, the young hero lives with an older, middle-aged woman named Labina who treats him quite kindly and is one of the few characters in the book that truly displays heart. Labina is a widower as her husband; Laba is no longer in the picture. Labina now spends her nights with other men of the village and the main character is asleep most of the time but witnesses some of the nightly visits. We see that he recognizes what Labina and her visitors are doing is sexual but he does not quite approve of it instead he prefers the long-drawn-out love that can come with passion.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 10, 2014 01:14 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 October 2014

“All the time I thought of Mitka’s teachings: a man should never let himself be mistreated, for he would then lose his self-respect and his life would become meaningless. What would preserve his self-respect and determine his worth was his ability to take revenge on those who wronged him” (Kosiński Pg. 110)

Question Pg. 109-110:

How have the lessons learned in the Narrator’s adventures especially the ones taught by the Red Army help him survive?

Answer:

The war is now over in the Painted Bird, but the action is not quite through yet. Many homeless children including our narrator are corralled into these orphanages that in many ways are like a jail run by the inmates. Since the main character lost his voice earlier in the book many take this as a sign that the boy is a moron and, therefore, gets picked on quite often. The Narrator learned with the Red Army that in order to live a healthy life one must respect themselves before finding meaning to their life. In this cruel and bleak world children are beaten to death or raped to death merely because the others did not respect them. The narrator fights back against any assailants and therefore survives the crucible that is the orphanage.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 10, 2014 01:33 PM

Aaron Virelli REDO
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 October 2014 68,69

Question: who were the mysterious mounted guests that would visit the black smith? Were they for or against blacksmith? What did they do to him late one night?

Answer: in this story the blacksmith is visited by a group of men that pass by from time to time reeking havoc. These men carried rifles and revolvers. (Kosinski68) The house members served these men as if these men were gods, but they were not they were partisans. These men were split into factions “whites” and “reds” one fighting for private ownership and the other fought for land for reform. Unfortunately, the armed men came with no good intentions. Having no problems with these men before one night out of nowhere the men arrived unknowingly arrived forcing use to hide. On that night, two men arrived armed their drug the half naked man outside got him on his knees and asked him a question “…you held enemies of the Fatherland”. The blacksmith threw up his hands swearing the name of the son and the holy trinity. (Kosinski 69) This is when they first hit him across the face. He kept denying that he had helped this is when they got a pole and smacked him in the face with it this is where he fell to the ground and started to get kicked and beaten on.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 10, 2014 04:38 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 October 2014

“They would search every house, they would find the boy, and they would also find me in my cellar. They would probably assume that I, too, had fallen off the train and would kill both of us together on the spot, punishing the whole village later.”
(Chapter 9, page 100, par. 21)

Question: According to Vogler, what archetype does the village play more of the “Ally” to the boy or the “Herald”? Explain.

Answer: The village plays more of an Ally to the boy because they were providing so much help for him. The man that he called “master” gave him a haircut and hat with a mask to hide the assumptions of being found out as a Gypsy from the rest of the village. The man has a wife, and they both show him this “well-stocked larder (Kosinski 95)”, and they let him eat their food. The quote displayed above was to describe what would happen if the boy were found by the Germans. If the Germans spotted the man and his wife hiding the little boy, not just them would be in trouble the whole village would be because they were assisting them some how some way.


Work Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 10, 2014 06:14 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 October 2014

“Still I was afraid of such attacks and did not have a moment’s peace. Every moment of the herdsmen, every sign of action toward me filled me with apprehension of some plot. “(Chapter 8: The Painted Bird, Page 88, Par. 2, Kosinki)

QUESTION: (a.) What were items that were always found in the woods? (b.) How were these equipment used?

ANSWER: “Their other games and schemes centered around military equipment found in the woods, mostly rifle cartridges and land mines, locally called “soap” because of their shape.” (Kosinki, 88) Broken rifles were also found in the woods, the boys would take out the barrels, cut them into shorter sections and bring them back to life forming into hand pistols whittled from branches. There was always the “powder up” method of shooting. The boys would try to impress girls by shooting bullets while holding the cartridge.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at October 10, 2014 11:44 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
13 October 2014

“I stayed awake at night worrying whether God would punish me too. Was it possible that God’s wrath was reserved only for people with black hair and eyes, who were called Gypsies?” (Chapter 9, page 97, par. 1)

QUESTION: Why was this little boy so terrified? Further explain why he thought that God was punishing people that looked like him? Use quoted passages to support your answer.

ANSWER: The little boy was terrified of getting “punished by God” because people that looked like him were getting taken into cattle cars that “carried Jews and Gypsies, who had been captured and sentenced to death” (Kosinski 96). He did not want this to happen to him because he was a Gypsy. He thought that God was punishing them because that is what everybody went around saying to people. “The said the Lord’s punishment had finally reached the Jews. They had deserved it long ago, ever since they crucified Christ. God never forgot” (Kosinski 96).

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at October 11, 2014 05:51 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
12 Oct 2014

“I tried to visualize the people who invented and made such fuses and mines. They were certain to be German. Didn’t they say in the villages that no one could resist the power of the German because he gobbled up the brains of the Poles, Russians, Gypsy, and Jews?” (Chapter 8, page 90, paragraph 63)

Question:
(a.) According to the book, what were the inventions he was talking about and what were they and (b.) what were his own opinions on how good of a chance he had surviving?

Answer:
According to the book in chapter eight, the inventions he was talking about were plows, scythes, rakes, spinning wheels, wells, and mills turned by a sluggish horse or sickly oxen. He also says, “The peasants’ plows, scythes, rakes, spinning wheels, wells, and mills turned by sluggish horses or sickly oxen were so simple that even the dullest man could invent them and understand their use and working” (Kosinski pg. 90). He says in the next paragraph that his chances of survival are obviously poor, and if he were to get captured again, he might not be so lucky. “If it was true that Germans were capable of such inventions, and also that they were determined top clear the world of all swarthy, dark-eyed long- nosed, black-haired people, then my chances of survival were obviously poor. Sooner or later I would fall into their hands again, and I might not be as lucky as in the past” (Kosinski pg. 90-91).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 12, 2014 03:50 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
10 October 2014

“Judas saw me hanging from the ceiling and immediately jumped up in an effort to reach my feet. I brought my legs up and he missed them by a few inches. He started another run and tried again, still missing. After a few more tries he lay down and waited.” (Chapter 11, Kosinski, Pgs.130-131)

Question: This passage refers to the little boy being lock in a room by a Garbos and hanging from the ceiling. What is the significance of this factor of this quoted played out in this story?

Answer:
The significance of this quoted is that the Garbos thought that the little boy will “fall down and be attacked by the Judas.” The Judas was waiting for the boy to get tried and fatigue to overcome the strength of the boy. The little boy continues to hang from the ceiling moving his arms and legs up and down and side by side. The Judas was shock that the boy still have the strength left in him, due to hanging from the ceiling for hours. The Judas finally leaps up into the air grabbing the boy foot, but “tore off the skin of his heel.” When the Garbos enter the room in disbelief, he eventually let the boy off the hooks. The quoted show a sign of test, allies, and enemies. (Kosinski, pgs. 130-132)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 12, 2014 05:59 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
10 October 2014

“Garbos was now convinced that I was in a Gypsy trance which would bring no good.”
(Chapter 11: The Painted Bird, page 128, par. 2)

Question: (a.) Why did Garbos think that the boy was in a Gypsy trance? (b.) How was Garbos’ fear “confirmed” (Kosinski 128)?

Answer: Garbos believed that the boy was in a Gypsy trance because he prayed constantly – “I muttered prayers continuously from dawn to dusk…” (Kosinski 127). In numerous ways, his fear was confirmed. Firstly, one of Garbos’ cows escaped and trampled a neighbor’s garden. “The neighbor was furious and rushed into Garbos’ orchard with an ax and cut down all the pear and apple trees in revenge” (Kosinski 128). Secondly, a fox “got into the henhouse and killed some of the best laying hens” (Kosinski 128). Lastly, Garbos’ dog killed his “fine turkey” he had bought at a “great expense” (Kosinski 128).

Works Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. "11." The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. 127+. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 12, 2014 07:10 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
5 October 2014

“I darted into the courtyard in complete confusion. In the surrounding huts people tossed in the darkness. The village was astir; shouting could be heard in every direction” (Chapter 6: Kosinski, page 59).

Question: From the quoted passage, (a.) what was the cause of the village becoming frightened and running around in the middle of the afternoon and (b.) what was also happening during this time?

Answer: There was a large thunderstorm brewing over village eventually producing lightning strikes frightening everybody. One of the farmers, whom the boy was staying with, barn, caught on fire due to it being struck by lightning. Kosinski writes, “In an instant the barn was jarred by an uncanny peal of thunder. A short while later a wall burst into fire, the tall flame glowing through the resin-soaked planks” (Kosinski 59).


Posted by: kyle VanBuren at October 12, 2014 08:31 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
12 October 2014

“Garbos was now convinced that I was in a Gypsy trance which could bring no good. I swore to him that I was only praying, but he did not believe me” (Chapter 11: Kosinski, page 128).

Question: With reference to the quoted passage, following Garbos’s felling that the boy was in a Gypsy trance, what later factors confirmed his overall fear of the boy?
Answer: Garbos believed that the boy had put a spell on him and became more fearful of him when one of his cows broke through the barn door going into his neighbors garden destroying crops, his neighbor chopping down several of his fruit trees because of the cow incident, and a fox getting into the hen house killing several of is prized hens. Kosinski writes, “His fears were soon confirmed. One day a cow broke through the barn door and went into a neighbor’s garden, causing considerable damage. The neighbor was furious and rushed into…” (Kosinski 128).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at October 12, 2014 09:31 PM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
13 October 2014

“The cold encased me. My mind was freezing. I was sliding down, choking.” (Chapter 13: page 101, par 22)


Question:
Describe how “The Boy” found himself in this situation. How did he escape this peril?

Answer:
A group of boys, who had seen "the boy" wandering to their village, threw him into an icy hole. They encircled him, pinning him down with a “long pole used for fishing in ice holes” (Kosinski 101). However, this long pole, which begins as a weapon against him, would later lead to his salvation.

The group of boys dragged him to the edge of the water, where they widened the icy hole, and threw him in, all together. To make sure “the boy” would not surface they pushed him “under the ice with the pointed end of the pole” (Kosinski 101).

The group of boys used the long pole to push “the boy” until he “slid underneath the ice” (Kosinski 101). After assuming, he was underneath enough ice to drown, the group of boys let go of the long pole. Which was a mistake, as “the boy” “could use the pole to push against the bottom” (Kosinski 101) lifting himself to the ice cut.

Using the long pole as a support, he “moved along underneath the ice” (Kosinski 101), until he reached the ice cut. With one last push, he emerged his head out the icy cold waters, where the “air felt like a stream of boiling soup” (Kosinski 101).

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 12, 2014 11:54 PM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
13 October 2014

“The Jewess was to spend the night at Rainbow’s home. That evening I was awakened by noises and cries from his barn.” (chapter 9, page 104, paragraph 1)

Question: Jews and gypsies who were captured by the Germans often threw their children out of moving trains in order to try to save them. In the case of the Jewish girl in chapter 9, was she fortunate for being thrown out of the train? Explain.

Answer: The Jewess girl was both fortunate and unfortunate. She was fortunate to have survived “with only a sprained shoulder and some bruises” (102) while many bodies littered the train tracks near the village. Her misfortune came from the peasants that watched the train tracks, however. The village head decided “she would be sent to the German post the next day” (103). Even worse, the man she had to spend the night with decided to rape her, got stuck inside her, and when he called out for help, the villagers killed her to free him. The boy didn’t look when they killed her, he “only heard the girl’s last piercing shriek” (106).

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 13, 2014 12:49 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
10 October 2014


Question pages 108-109:
Why did the farmer send the Gypsy to flee into the forest? How was it that the Gypsy found?
Answer:
The farmer sent the Gypsy to go to the forest because he heard the Germans were coming. The Gypsy hid in the fields of grain. The Germans found the Gypsy because “As the soldiers strode through the field, the crackling of broken stalks became loud. They almost stepped on me (Kosinski 108).”

Posted by: James Sierra at October 13, 2014 01:14 AM

Rebeccah Braun

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

13 October 2014

“The Jewess was to spend the night at Rainbow’s home. That evening I was awakened by noises and cries from his barn. At first I was scared. But I found a knothole through which I could see what was happening.” (The Painted Bird Chapter 9, page 104, par. 36, Jerzy Kosinski).

Question: What happened when the boy looked into Rainbow’s room through the knothole?

Answer: When the boy looked through the knothole, the girl was laying on a sack with Rainbow by her head. Rainbow moved quickly and started to undress the girl and then himself. He then forced himself upon her with her screaming. “She moaned and whined, uttering strange words in her language when his tough grew rougher” (Kosinski, 104). These actions continued until he noticed something was wrong and could not remove himself from the woman.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at October 13, 2014 02:27 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
10 October 2014

“It was a strange, dull penetrating pain. It must have been like the pain felt by a man Garbos mentioned in warning”
(Chapter 11, page 131, par. 2)

Question:
Referring to the proceeding story, how does the pain and punishment of the man relate to that of the protagonist?

Answer:
Through the pain and suffering the boy endures at Garbos’ house and throughout his life, the protagonist never seems to escape punishment. “I could almost see the man and hear him howling in the night, trying to raise to the indifferent sky his arms which hung by the bloated trunk of his body” (Kosinski 131-132). Much like the impaled man, the protagonist forces the struggle of not giving up in fear of death by Judas. Hanging on for his life, the protagonist reaches towards “the indifferent sky” through the word of prayer hoping that this will enable him some peace and save him. However, in contrast to the impaled man, the protagonist remains guilt free of the crime of hatred towards his people, punished based off his looks and the unsatisfied anger of Garbos. Persecuted unjustly, life at the hands of Judas, hanging by his hands, the protagonists struggle for life, much resembles that of Jesus over the man that the protagonist draws reference.

Work Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 13, 2014 08:28 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
12 October 2014

Question: why was he suddenly jabbed in the ribs? What was importance of this? ( pg. 137) Did he fail or succeed? (pg. 138)

Answer: As the service was going and out of nowhere he gets hit in the ribs by one of the alter boys he does not realize why this is happening. Moments later the acolyte turned toward him and whispered that he must carry the missal.(Kosinski) “I realized that it was my duty to transfer the missal from one side to the alter to the other. I had seen this done many times before. "An alter boy would approach the alter, grasp the missal together with the base which it stood, walk backward to the center of the lowest step in front of the altar, kneel holding the missal in his hands, then rise and carry the missal to the other side of the alter, and finally return to his place.”(Kosinski) When it became time for his turn, he got terrified and felt his legs trembling. The missal was the Holy Book filled with sacred prayers collected for the greater glory of God by the saints and learned men throughout the centuries, and it stood right before him.(Kosinski) Unfortunately when he got the holy book in his hands and started to walk he felt as if he was going to drop it of fall backwards and that’s just what he did as he was proceeding to walk back to the altar he feel raising an uproar are the service. Many people as he was getting drug out started the chant “gypsy Vampire”.(Kosinski)

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 13, 2014 08:57 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
13 October 2014

“This was only the beginning. From now on a different, easier life would begin for me.” (Page 136 par 3)

Question: This passage refers to when the boy is called in to replace an altar boy, and he is happy with this opportunity. Why is the boy excited about this opportunity? What do the people of the church think about him serving on the altar?

Answer: The boy is excited at this opportunity because he has been praying for a long time with the understanding that no one was listening to him, but now that he was going to be serving God as an altar boy, he feels that “someone up there had noticed (me).” (Kosinski 136) The boy is going to be on the altar, so he will be “close to Him, at His altar, with the protection of His vicar.” (136) It is an uplifting thing for the boy because he notes that now his life has taken a different direction and hopefully it is going to turn in his favor. The crowd inside the church did not have a positive response to this, because when they saw they boy, they drew attention to him, and among other things, the boy was “dragged under a cart and then tied to the tail of a horse.” (136) They did not like the idea of a “gypsy” serving in their church, and they made it known to the boy based on their actions.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 13, 2014 09:26 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
13 October 2014

“After each train had passed I saw whole battalions of ghost with ugly vengeful faces coming into the world. The peasants said with the smoke from he crematories went straight to heaven, laying a soft carpet at god feet.” (Chapter 9 p 95)
Question: The village people were so Interested in the people who were on the trains collected by the Germans. Identify what they village people liked collecting when the trains passed through with people collected by the Germans. What were their reactions give some the village people give examples from the text.
Answer: The village people collected the items that they found in between the rails from those who were caught by the Germans. “Along the embankment between rails we found innumerable scraps of paper, notebooks, calendars, family photographs, passport and diaries (Kosinski pg 101).The pictures were of elderly was in stiff clothing, also finding pictures of beautiful young girls and men as well. The reactions of the peasants the village was of laughter and giggles “ the peasants eagerly collected these article’s , the women and men giggled and whispered to each other about the pictures of the men and vice versa for the men about the pictures for the women.” (Kosinki pg102) .Some of the people of the village even collected these items, sold, and traded them.

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 13, 2014 09:56 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
13 October 14

Question: “One of the altar boys selected for the day had fallen sick with poisoning, she said. I had to go immediately to the vestry, change, and take his place at the altar.” (Chapter 11, page 136, par. 1) From the text on pages 135-136, in your opinion would you say the boy’s prayers were answered, and what were the bad part that came along with the good? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: At first glance, I would have said his prayers were answered; he got into the church despite the fact that he was not supposed to be there and was given an opportunity to be an altar boy. In addition, he said, “From now on a different, easier life would begin for me.” (Kosinski 136) However, he was still beaten immediately following this remark.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at October 13, 2014 09:59 AM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
October 13 2014

"He probably felt cheated, deceived. He would have preferred to cling to the warm bodies of his father and mother in the packed car..." (Chapter 9, Page 99, Par. 19)

Question: What comparison can be drawn between this dying boy and the story's Hero? How might their two situations be similar?

Answer: The boy that was thrown from the train was abandoned by his parents, just as the story's narrator is. They both are alone, lost, and scared. The boy from the train would have "preferred to cling to the warm bodies of his father and mother" (Kosinski 99) and it can be surmised that the narrator could feel the same way in regards to his parents. He might have been happier if instead of abandoning him like they did they simply brought him with them to any trials they might face.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 13, 2014 10:55 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 October 2014
“When the Germans were approaching and it was too late to run for the woods, my master his me in a skillfully camouflaged cellar beneath the barn.” (Kosinski 95)
QUESTION:
How does the famer in the above quote differ from the other famers who previously took in the boy? Are his kind actions expected or above what we expect from a farmer?

ANSWER:
The Farmer is like a breath of fresh air, “As I emerged from the bushes I nearly… without saying a word” (Kosinski 94), as he willingly takes the boy into his home and to his wife. Although, the farmer’s village is prone the regular raids by the German, the farmer and his wife made a cellar in which they hid the boy, instead of handing him over to the Germans. Moreover, to lessen the suspicion of the boy being a gypsy the farmer shaves his head, “My master realized… he shaved my black hair” (Kosinski 95). These actions, illustrates the couple’s kind-hearted nature towards the boy, maybe because they had no children of their own. In contrast to the actions of his previous masters where they chained him in the middle of the field during a lightning storm, or beat up on him whenever his master had too much to drink. In some ways, he was like a son to the couple.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 13, 2014 11:15 AM

Abrar Nooh

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL

12 October 2014


“I was being kept by a blacksmith who was also the head peasant of the village. He was well respected and esteemed by the villagers.” (Chapter 7, page 66, par. 2)


Question: This passage refers to the moment when the boy is describing his current situation and how it has improved from before. Why does the little boy feel much better with the blacksmith and the villagers?


Answer: The boy has realized that the blacksmith is well respected and “For this reason [he] was better treated here” (Kosinski 66). The villagers would only tease the little boy whenever they were drinking and felt tipsy. Every morning the boy would be served breakfast by the blacksmith’s wife and afterwards he would head to work. At this point the little boy felt useful and protected by the blacksmith and his family.

Posted by: abrar nooh at October 13, 2014 12:53 PM


Abrar Nooh


Dr. Hobbs


ENG 220CL


12 October 2014



“I watched them with fascination. If the miller had not been there I myself would have taken them. Surely they could still see.” (Chapter 4, page 39, par. )



Question: This passage refers to the moment when the boy shows some signs of innocence and youngness. What in this chapter shows that the little boy still thinks as a little boy?



Answer: In this chapter when the little boy saw the eyeballs on the floor, he was in shock for a moment but then he started to imagine what he could do if he had picked them from the floor. “Surely, they could still see. I would keep them in my pocket and take them out when needed, placing them over my own…. Perhaps I could attach them to the back of my head and they would tell me [….] what went on behind me (Kosinski 39). This paragraph really shows how the mind of a kid starts to imagine without caring or realizing the intensity of the situation or how the boy that had just lost his eyes was feeling. As a child one can hardly imagine the consequences of many tragic events.

Posted by: abrar nooh at October 13, 2014 12:57 PM

Abrar Nooh

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL CA13

12 October 2014


“Suddenly I realized that something had happened to my voice. I tried to cry out, by my tongue flapped helplessly in my open mouth. I had no voice.” (Chapter, page 140)


Question: This passage refers to the moment when the boy had escaped from the pit and was hiding from the church crowd. Then he tried to cry out but he could not. Why was the boy suddenly unable to make his voice sound?


Answer: The boy had been pulled out of the church because he was unable to keep his balance when he was holding the missal during the mass. The pressure of the congregation made him extremely uncomfortable and nervous at the same time, and when he fell on the floor and dropped the book, the congregation called him a Gypsy vampire (Kosinski 138). Because of this incident the boy was dragged into a manure pit without having any mercy on him (Kosinski 139). He then struggled to leave that mud of filthiness, and when he finally recovered, he was speechless. He could not believe what had happened but he feared that if the congregation saw him alive they would throw him back into the pit. He could not understand why this was happening, but all he wanted to do was cry, his misfortune even prevented him from making his voice sound (Kosinski 140). As he kept analyzing the situation he even thought that some greater force which he could not control, like God or his saints or other forces, could be the cause for the loss of his voice (Kosinski 141).

Posted by: abrar nooh at October 13, 2014 01:01 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 13 2014


“Mitka asked me for the binoculars. Before handing them back I had another quick glimpse of the village. I saw a tall man leaving a house. He stretched his arms, yawned, and looked at the cloudless sky. I could see that his shirt was wide open in front, and there were big patches on the knees of his pants. Mitka took the binoculars and placed them beyond my reach. Intently he studied the scene through his telescope. I strained my eyes but, without the glasses, could see only the dwarfed houses far below. A shot rang out. I started and birds fluttered in the thicket. Mitka raised his red, perspiring face and muttered something. I reached for the binoculars. He smiled apologetically and held back my hand.” (Kosiński Pg. 152)


Question Pg. #152-153:


Why did Mitka take revenge on the villagers? How does he justify this random killing?


Answer:


The Red Army is in many ways our narrator’s hero as they save his life and bring a temporary resolution to all of the bloodshed of the minority groups. The Red Army is not welcomed by the villagers in power however as they believe that communists want to socialize family life. This simple misunderstanding leads to deaths of some of the Red Army Soldiers. Mitka takes it upon himself to exact their revenge. “A man, no matter how popular and admired, lives mainly with himself. If he is not at peace with himself, if he is harassed by something he did not do but should have done to preserve his own image of himself, he is like the “unhappy demon, spirit of exile, gliding high above the sinful world.” (Kosiński Pg. 153)

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 13, 2014 03:05 PM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. Hobbs
10/13/14

Pages 82-83
Question: Within these two pages, the young boy lends a hand to an injured horse. Through quoted passage and traits displayed, describe ways the boy brings humanistic qualities to the horse.
Answer: The young boy brings personality to an injured horse when helping him to stand. “He lowered his head, ashamed and resigned.” (Kosinski 82) The young boy goes on to describe how he guided the horse out of the forest and convinced him to gain his health. The young boy even goes as far to say that his bone could be set and healed with herbs. The boy had heart and felt love for the horse as if he were a human in his hands. The boy describes how the horses’ life will be if he heals himself, he can enjoy life in the meadows, with the spring weather. “He listened, squinted at me from time to time to make sure that I was telling the truth.” (82) These descriptions of this warm-hearted reaction between horse and boy display the truth surrounding and the continuous hatred around.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at October 13, 2014 03:05 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
15 October 2014

“What mattered was that a man should consciously promote evil, find pleasure in harming others, nurturing and using the diabolical powers granted him by the Evil Ones in a manner calculated to cause as much misery and suffering around him as possible” (Chapter 12, page 152, par. 2)

QUESTION: Who is Makar consciously being evil to and finding pleasure from doing so? Why is he being so evil?

ANSWER: Makar is consciously being evil to Anton and Ewka, his “so-called” children. The boy believed that Makar was “in league with the Devil” (Kosinski 151) because it was said that those who were very successful in life did that. “From the moment of signing a pact with the Devil, the more harm, misery, injury, and bitterness a man could inflict on those around him, the more help he could expect. If he shrank from inflicting harm on others, he succumbed to emotions of love, friendship, and compassion, he would immediately become weaker and his own life would have to absorb the suffering and defeats that he spared others” (152). Therefore, Makar did not inflicting pain or harm upon others because he did not want any of that to turn on him.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at October 14, 2014 10:27 AM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 October 2014

QUESTION: pp 3-4
“He spoke a language of the educated class, a language barely intelligible to the peasants of the east.” (Kosinski 4) a. Who is the author referring to? b. Why is this important? Use quoted passages to support your answer

ANSWER:
In the passage, “He spoke a language of the educated class, a language barely intelligible to the peasants of the east.” (Kosinski 4), The author is referring to “the boy” who is being sent away. The reason the passage is important is because, most of the villages and towns in the eastern region did not have schools. In addition, most of the people were uneducated, which made the boy an outsider in what was already difficult times. “The villages in that region had been neglected for centuries. Inaccessible and distant from any urban center they were in the most backward parts of Eastern Europe. There were no schools or hospitals…” (Kosinski 4)

Works Cited
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. Vol. 2. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Novel. October 2014.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at October 14, 2014 11:05 AM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 October 2014

QUESTION: pp 3-4
“He spoke a language of the educated class, a language barely intelligible to the peasants of the east.” (Kosinski 4) a. Who is the author referring to? b. Why is this important? Use quoted passages to support your answer

ANSWER:
In the passage, “He spoke a language of the educated class, a language barely intelligible to the peasants of the east.” (Kosinski 4), The author is referring to “the boy” who is being sent away. The reason the passage is important is because, most of the villages and towns in the eastern region did not have schools. In addition, most of the people were uneducated, which made the boy an outsider in what was already difficult times. “The villages in that region had been neglected for centuries. Inaccessible and distant from any urban center they were in the most backward parts of Eastern Europe. There were no schools or hospitals…” (Kosinski 4)

Works Cited
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. Vol. 2. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Novel. October 2014.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at October 14, 2014 11:05 AM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
7 October 2014

QUESTION: pp 32-33
“Frightened, I swung the comet wildly. I saw unending rows of trees bowing obsequiously to me, inviting me to step deeper and deeper into their closing ranks.” (Kosinski 33) a. What is this passage eluding to? Why does the boy have to go into the forest? Use quoted passages to support your answer

ANSWER:
The passage “Frightened, I swung the comet wildly. I saw unending rows of trees bowing obsequiously to me, inviting me to step deeper and deeper into their closing ranks.” (Kosinski 33), is eluding to how the boy perceives the forest. It is dark, and he has just stolen the comet from a passing herder. The boy has to go into the forest because he wants to avoid the riverside villages in an effort to return to Olga. “I went ahead, firmly convinced that Olga’s spells would eventually bring me back to her.” (Kosinski 33)

Works Cited
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. Vol. 2. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Novel. October 2014.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at October 14, 2014 12:21 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
14 October 2014

“When Ewka fell asleep at my side, muttering through her dreams, I pondered all those things, listening to the sounds of the rabbits around us. There was nothing I would not do for Ewka. “(Chapter 12: The Painted Bird, Page 147, Par. 2, Kosinki)

QUESTION: What was the relationship between Ewka and the young boy? Use quoted passages from the passage to support your text.

ANSWER: The relationship between Ewka and the boy seemed like an intimate relationship. They were always hidden about the relationship which was kept in secrecy from the others. It was very affectionate in many ways.” I felt secure and happy” (Kosinki, 146). “I clung to Ewka in my dreams, seizing her like a spider, entwining as many legs around her as a centipede has. I grew into her body like a small twig, grafted on a broad-limbed apple tree by a skillful gardener”.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at October 14, 2014 02:43 PM

Abrar Nooh

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220

15 October 2014

“Life went on without Laba. Only the saying, ‘handsome as Laba,’ survived in the village.” ( page 166)

Question: This passage talks about how popular Labina’s husband was in his village. Who was Laba and why was he known as the handsome one?

Answer: Laba was the poorest farmhand in his village who eventually became Labina’s husband. He had all the physical characteristics of a handsome guy. He was tall and with blue eyes. Women desired him, and he knew it. He would work for the rich peasants and was usually humiliated since the peasants’ wives and daughters would look at him with lust (Kosinski 165). Unfortunately, he vanished without leaving any trace, and he could only be remembered by the people in the village as the handsome one (Kosinski 165).

Posted by: abrar nooh at October 14, 2014 03:47 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
12 Oct 2014

“The boys came closer. There were ten or more. Swinging their arms, supporting one another, they progressed steadily against the wind. The air threw their voices back; I could hear nothing” (Chapter 13, pgs. 159-160, par 15)

Question:
(a.) What happens to the young boy when he tries to get away from the big group and (b.) what is the group’s reaction to when the kid starts to fight back?

Answer:
In chapter thirteen, a young boy tries to pull away from the group that surrounds him; he ends up paying for it. Some of the people in the group jump on him and start to beat him up, which he started to bleed from the lip. “The others stood by calmly, but when I tried to get up, they jumped on me and twisted my arms behind my back. The group became excited. They hit me on the face and stomach. Blood froze on my mouth and closed one eye” (Kosinki pg. 159). The group is surprised when a young boy fights back and most of them scurry away with the two boys who are bleeding badly. “I tensed my muscles, withdrew one leg slightly, and kicked one of the boys bending over me. Another one tried to grab me by the legs; I kicked him across the throat with the skate. The rest of the boys panicked; most of them started dragging the wounded boys toward the village, leaving a bloody trail on the ice” (Kosinki pg. 159-160)

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 14, 2014 05:31 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
13 October 2014

“…when Anulka stepped out I uttered an unearthly howl and jabbed her in the ribs with a stick
(Chapter 12: The Painted Bird, page 155, par. 4)

Question: (a.) Why did the boy jab Anulka with the stick? (b.) How was he feeling at that moment?

Answer: The boy was watching the father of his girlfriend sexually assault her. “Makar knelt down…close to his daughter’s face” (Kosinski 155). He suddenly decided to “act” and he “hobbled outside” (Kosinski 155). Whilst trying to find his comet, he awoke Anulka who was sleeping in a hut – “I sneaked up to it, looking everywhere for the comet…the old woman woke up at that moment” (Kosinski 155). I believe that the boy jabbed her because he was feeling angry, jealous, yet numb. “The sight dribbled off my numb mind like a drop of freezing water descending an icicle” (Kosinski 155).

Works Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. "12." The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. 154+. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 14, 2014 08:54 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative
October 14, 2014

“I observed this spectacle as if paralyzed, unable to tear myself from the edge of the opening, lacking sufficient will power to cover it with the tin panel.”

Question:
Why do you think the boy was so sensitive to the man being eaten alive by the rats, if he has grown up seeing brutality such as those?

Answer:
The boy was still sensitive because even though he has been exposed to situations like that, he is still a young child and the fact that this time he actually causes the death of someone, it was a new, unexpected experience.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at October 14, 2014 09:42 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative
October 12, 2014

“Hanging on the strap I concentrated on my prayers to the exclusion of all else” (Kosinski 133).

Question:
After all this time that the boy had endured hardships and misfortunes in his life, why do you think he keeps praying and waiting for his prayers to be answered?

Answer:
The boy keeps his faith because even though he goes through many misfortunes, because he believes that there is still good out there and eventually he will get out because he has done it before.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at October 14, 2014 09:43 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
14 October 2014

“Although it was said in the village that I should be delivered to the Germans. Labina replied to such remarks with torrent of curses, shouting that all were equal before God and that she was no Judas to sell me for silver coins.” (Chapter 14, Kosinski 162-163)

Question: (a.) What is the symbolic relationship with Labina and the boy? (b.) Does the boy learn anything from Labina?

Answer:
The symbolic relationship with Labina and the boy is that Labina took in the boy as a caretaker. I feel that the boy does not learn anything from Labina. The boy goes through a trail of sociological awareness. The meaning of social awareness is the social consciousness that is shared within a community. The awareness is the problems the boy and villagers face on daily basics. (Kosinski, 162-163)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 14, 2014 11:05 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 October 2014

“I could not return to the village; I did not have the strength for the long struggle against the wind. I had no idea whether there were any farms in the vicinity, whether I could find them before nightfall, and whether they would give me shelter even if I found them.” (Chapter 13: page 157, par 8)

Question: In the short passage above the young boy has gone skating on ice. How does the young boy manage to get stuck outside of the village and why does he not go back to the village?

Answer: The young boy had left his village just like the other boys in order to find this "vast icy surface" (Jerzy Kosinski 157). When he finally stopped and reached for his comet he noticed it had been blown out. He was scared and feared for his life, not knowing what to do next. He could not return to the village because, he did not "have the strength for the long struggle against the wind" (Kosinski 157).

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at October 14, 2014 11:37 PM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220 Journeys of Transformative Narrative CA02
24 October 2014
Dr. Hobbs

Pages 105-106
Question: Within these pages, observations are made from pictures, which the towns’ people pass around. As a reader, form observations from these pages about the men and women looking at the pictures. Are the observations made considered normal for each gender? Do these pictures seem to separate or bring the town together? Consider using quoted passage in order to back up your argument.

Within these pages of the Painted Bird the opinions of pictures within the town, separates the genders because of their separate passion. As a reader, I have observed that the men act far different from the women when looking at pictures of their opposite gender. These difference of opinions seem to separate the town. “The women giggled and whispered to one another about the pictures of the men, while the men muttered obscene jokes and comments about the pictures of the girls.” (Kosinski 105) These given observations are considered normal for each gender however lead to treating the women unjustly in the end.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at October 14, 2014 11:38 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 October 2014

“When I reached the first trees my head was spinning. It seemed to be midsummer, and the golden ears of wheat were waving over my head and Ewka touched me with her warm hand.” (Chapter 13, page 161, par. 27)

Question: Describe in one word what this experience for the boy felt like when he touched the forest. Explain using quoted passages in your response.

Answer: This experience for the boy felt peaceful for him when he touched the forest. After being tortured by those boys in the icy water, it was what he needed exactly to wash this horrible doing. He was mentioning the relief that he received from the touch of the forest to his favorite foods. “I had visions of food: a huge bowl of beef seasoned with vinegar, garlic, pepper and salt; a pot of coarse gruel thickened with pickled cabbage leaves and pieces of succulent fat bacon; evenly cut slices of barley bread soaked in a thick borscht of barley, potatoes, and corn (Kosinski 161).”

Work Cited
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 14, 2014 11:40 PM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
15 October 2014

“I heard something that sounded like a chuckle in the whistling wind. I shivered at the thought that the Devil himself was testing me by leading me around in circles, waiting for the moment when I would accept his offer.” (Chapter 15, page 158, paragraph 1)

Question: The author mentions the Devil shortly before children from a nearby village attack the boy. How does the attack symbolize the boy’s fight with the Devil?

Answer: When the attackers surrounded the boy, “pretending [he] was exhausted and could not fight any more,” (159). In the chapter prior, the boy says that he “could become as prominent as any of the leading Germans,” (154). He speaks as though he is going to become evil he fights back he “kicked one of the boys bending over [him],” (159). When he stayed with Labina, he “went out to work as a domestic,” for food. He earned an honest living and did not hurt anyone without needing to continue living.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 15, 2014 12:06 AM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 October 2014

“I expected something terrible to happen to me. Instead, I was taken to the head of the village.” (Kosinski 149)

Pages 149-150
Question:
The young boy is caught within these pages and taken to the head of the village. Within the village many boys and girls live, the young boy observes many of them. One girl in particular is described different from the rest; how did the young boy portray Ewka? Use quoted passage from these two pages to support your answer.

Answer:
“Ewka was not liked by the villagers. The peasants said she had a ram in her eyes. They laughed at the goiter which was beginning to disfigure her neck, and at her hoarse voice.” (Kosinski 150) Many rumors circled that the whole family not just Ewka should be turned out of the village. Many towns’ people viewed each son and daughter as unusual or placed with some sort of negative affect against the village. Many spoke of Ewka having the ability to affect the cows, “The cows lost their milk in her presence.” (150) These negative attributes never seemed to affect the families ability to defend themselves.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at October 15, 2014 12:12 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
15 October 14

Question:
From the text on pages, 168-169, describe the scene of Laba’s death. Why was he killed? And how did Labina know there was something wrong, before she entered the hut? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer. (Chapter 14, page 169, par. 3-4)

Answer:
The scene of Laba’s death was described as a home invasion, in which Laba was killed and his riches stolen (Kosinski 169). Laba was hung with one of his neckties, from a large hook where he typically hung his suits. Labina knew there was something wrong because “there was no smoke pouring from the chimney, and there was no sound of Laba singing.” (Kosinski 169)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at October 15, 2014 06:23 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
15 October 2014

“When I reached the first trees my head was spinning. It seemed to be midsummer…”
(Chapter 14, pg. 161, par. 2)

Question:
(a.) How does the description of the environment change towards the end of the chapter?
(b.) What does this imply about our protagonist?

Answer:
“Every gust of wind robbed my body of precious warmth,” within the snow-covered environment, the protagonist just emerged from the icy cold water, turning the bearable cold into an icy death trap (Kosinski 161). Even though the protagonist’s “clothes froze solid and crackled at every movement,” when he reached the forest everything “seemed to be midsummer” (Kosinski 162). The shift in elements and surrounding were spurred by visions and disillusions as the boy began to collapse. The surrounding goes from a frozen forest to “the golden ears of wheat” and visions of warm food served by Ewka filled the protagonist’s head as he neared his preeminent death (Kosinski 161). “Everything dissolved into a sultry summer night, full of intoxicating moist, fragrant mists,” falling asleep in his world of illusion and the connotation of the term dissolved means the boy nears the end; however a person in the woods foreshadows his likely revival (Kosinski 161).

Work Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 15, 2014 07:56 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
15 October 2014

Question: Who returned back to the town after a year? Who was only one who had faith? How highly praised is he?(chp14 pg. 167) Is this best? Why or why not?(chp14 pg. 168)

Answer: Laba is a farm hand and one day he was working and never came back home after a few more days he didn’t show up. After everyone had forgotten, and one person only held faith, Labina she held strong to hope for his return although hope was running out. One summer day the unthinkable happened Laba returned and was praised at the most high. They dressed him up in the nicest attire, and the “peasants gasped in awe”(Kosinski 167). During the church ceremony, no one looked at the priest on the altar everyone focused on Laba and his wife dressed in black satin suit with a flowered skirt.(Kosinski 168) After mass everyone also waited for him offering him free dinners for his family. This changed his life forever this would be the last time he would ever work in the field and he rarely helped wife around the house this made him a little stuck up.(Kosinski 168)

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 15, 2014 08:55 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
15 October 2014

Painted Bird Pages 166-167

“Suddenly the doors of the hut opened and the crowd gasped with astonishment.” (Pg 167 par 5)

Question: This passage refers to when Laba returns back to his village. What makes the crowd so astonished when they see him? Why is it so shocking?

Answer: Before Laba disappeared, he was known as the poorest farmhand in their village, so when he returns and is wearing a “striped silk shirt with a stark white collar round his tanned neck and a garish tie.” (Kosinski 167) The peasants are shocked to see him wearing a suit and such nice clothes, so when they first notice him, they are very surprised. It is shocking to them because of how poor he was prior to leaving, and these kinds of things did not occur in the village. They are confused at how this transformation happened, which is noted by their reaction upon the first sight of him.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 15, 2014 09:28 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
15 October 2014

“In the dreams my artful hands induced wild passions in the village girls, turning them into wanton Ludmilla who chased me through flowery glades, lying with me on beds of wild thyme, among fields of goldenrod”. ( Chapter 12 pg 147)
Question: The young is now getting older, he begins to have dreams of women, but who is this triggered by? Why is he feeling these different kind of emotions and can he stop them? Use points from the text to support your answer.
Answer: The young boy is going through a stage of puberty. He is now understanding that he is not a young child anymore. He then meets a girl name Ewka who would flirt with him and motivate these uncontrolled emotions that he is having, “Ewka tried to make me become a man. She would visit me at night and tickle my parts.”(Kosinki 147). Continuing, “ I was surprised to perceive something I had not known before, things over which I had no control began to happen.”(Kosinski 147)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 15, 2014 09:37 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys In Narrative ENG220CL
The Painted Bird
15 October 2014

"I told the men to drop their weapons, and raise their hands; as soon as they obeyed, I picked up my camera.(Kosinski, Afterward, pg xvii, par.6)

Question: Why did he ask the men to drop their weapons?

Answer:
He asked the men to drop their weapons so that he could take pictures of them and identify them if he ever wanted to press charges against the men for attempted assault and forced entry.

Posted by: tashanna harris at October 15, 2014 09:40 AM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
15 October 2014

“I had already made a pair of skates, hoping that someday I would have to leave the village. I attached some thick wire to two long pieces of wood, curved at one end” (Chapter 13: Kosinski, page 156 and 157).

Question: Based on the quoted passage, (a.) where did the boy get the idea from to make the skates and (b.), how would he use the skates to escape the village?

Answer: The boy got the idea from the other boys in the village playing around. He saw them attach skates to their shoes and spread pieces of fabric over their heads allowing the wind to pull them along the ice (Kosinski 156). Kosinski writes, “I often watched the boys attach homemade skates to their shoes and spread pieces of canvas over their heads, and then let the wind push them over the smooth surface of the ice covering the marshes and pastures (Kosinski 156).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at October 15, 2014 09:41 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
15 October 2014

"Lekh spoke often of his birds. I listened avidly to everything he had to say. I learned that flocks of storks always came from beyond distant oceans on St. Joseph's day." (Chapter 5,page 43,par. 3)

Question:
who was the only one in town who knew how to prepare a stork's nest?

Answer:

"Lekh was the only man in the area who knew how to prepare a stork's nest in advance, and his nest were never without tenants." (Kosinski, pg 4)
He took pride in creating birds nest for such creatures.

Posted by: Tashanna Harris at October 15, 2014 09:49 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
15 October 2014

"Suddenly I realized that something had happened to my voice. I tried to cry out, but my tongue flapped helplessly in my open mouth. I had no voice."(Chapter 11, pg 140, par. 5)

Question:
What greater force did he eliminate from the reason why his voice had gone?

Answer:
He said it couldn't have been God or his saints. "God had no reason to inflict such terrible punishment on me"(Kosinski,141).He says he paid his dues such as praying and kept his days of wrong doing short.

Posted by: Tashanna Harris at October 15, 2014 10:07 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
15 October 2014

"Neither the thief nor any of the stolen objects was ever found. While I was still there rumors circulated that the thief was a cuckolded husband or fiancé."(Chapter 14, Pg. 170, par. 5)

Question:
Who was the main suspect for the stealing of those items? How did she react?

Answer:
The town thought that Labina was the thief. When she heard the town suspected her "her face grew livid, her hands shook, and a rancid smell of bitterness came from her mouth" (Kosinski, 170). She was in such disbelief that she went home to her husband and starting weeping.

Posted by: tashanna Harris at October 15, 2014 10:14 AM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
October 15 2014

"It was hard to believe that the local people regarded the wind as an enemy...They always said that the Devil was the master of the winds..." (Chapter 13, Page 157, Par. 7)

Question: Why does the boy relate to the wind so much? What similarities can be drawn between the wind and himself?

Answer: The boy sees the wind as a sort of kindred spirit, because they are both mistrusted and hated by the local people. They are both considered creations of the Devil, and both condemned for it. They both incite fear in the populace, who are incredibly superstitious (Kosinski 157-158) and fear anything they don't understand, whether it be the wind or a young, dark haired boy.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 15, 2014 10:38 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
14 October 2014
“Ewka did not like her brother and father. Sometimes she would not leave the house for days, fearing that Makar and Quail would force her to spend the whole afternoon with them in the goats’ stable” (Konsinski 145)
QUESTION:
(a) Who are Ewka, Makar, and Quail? (b) What are their relationships like? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer
ANSWER:
Ewka, Makar, and Quail are the new family the priest places him with after he is openly abused on Corpus Christi day when he dropped the missal. Makar is the father, Ewka, Quail his daughter, and son respectively. Ewka has a goiter and Quail no eyelashes, which was, frowned upon by the community “I often heard…house burned down” (Kosinski 144). However, their relationships were far from that of a happy family; they were incestuous, and the males can be inferred as partakers of bestiality, “Ewka used to… in there” (Kosinski 145). Ewka coerced the young boys into these ways to fulfil her desires “Sometimes she asked…to her body” (Kosinski 145) to which he was ignorant.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 15, 2014 11:23 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
15 October 2013
Question: What type of figure of speech is used on page 151.
Answer: The figure of speech is a simile and it reads as follows: “I felt as empty as a fish bladder punctured again and again and sinking into deep, muddy waters.” (Page 151, Line 33)
Work Cited
Kosinski, J. (1995). The painted bird (2nd ed.). New York: Grove Press.

Posted by: Anet Milian at October 15, 2014 11:58 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 15 2014


“I looked at the Silent One in anguish. He was staring at the man in disbelief. When he caught my glance he grabbed my hand and we quickly left the market. As soon as we reached the road, he fell down on the grass and cried as though in terrible pain, his words muffled by the ground. It was the only time that I had heard his voice.”


Question Pg. 181-182:


What is the significance of the man still being alive and why is the Silent One so emotional about it? What is the significance of this action?


Answer:


The silent one and the main character have figured out a way to manipulate the railroad tracks, and they delight in this realization that they have the power over lives and death. This fable comes closely after the story of Mitka and the perverted revenge he took on the people; this is in many ways a similar story of taking revenge too far. The main character had his teeth knocked out and thrown into a barrel; the silent one takes revenge by oiling the railroad tracks on the morning when most market people would be using the trains. The significance of this story is even while your intentions could be well placed, many times revenge killing will spread the issue even further. What interests me the most is how this story’s skeleton closely resembles how WWI began, revenge killing for Archduke Franz Ferdinand, which spread hate throughout Europe and ultimately drove the events in WWII.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 15, 2014 12:59 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 October 2014

"The extreme discrepancy between the facts as I knew them and the exiles' and diplomats' hazy, unrealistic view of the world bothered me intensely. I began to reexamine my past and decided to turn from my studies of social science to fiction" (Kosinski xi).

Question- Afterward xi-xii:
Why does he switch his studies from social science to fiction?

Answer:
He believed that politics offered only promises of a good future. Fiction, on the other hand, told things how they really were. "Unlike politics, which offer only extravagant promises of a utopian future, I knew fiction could present lives as they are truly lived" (Kosinski xi).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at October 16, 2014 08:49 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 October 2014

"And with a rapid movement such as women use to gouge out the rotten spots while peeling potatoes, he plunged the spoon into one of the boy's eyes and twisted it" (Kosinski 38).

Question- Pages 37-38:
What is the significance of the miller cutting out the plowboy's eyes?

Answer:
There were rumors swirling about what happened when the miller's wife stared into the plowboy's eyes. "It was said that she changed when she gazed into the boy's blue eyes. Heedless of the risk of being noticed by her husband, she impulsively hiked her skirt high above her knees with one hand, and with the other pushed down the bodice of her dress to display her breasts, all the time staring into the boy's eyes" (Kosinski 35).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at October 16, 2014 08:59 AM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
15 October 2014

“Mitka was one of the best liked and respected men in the regiment. He had a fine military record. On special Army days one could see decorations on his faded uniform which would be the envy of regimental or even divisional commanders. Mitka was a Hero of the Soviet Union, the highest military honor, and was one of the most decorated men in the whole division. (Chapter 17 Kosinski, pgs. 198)”

Question: In the passage Mitka is consider a Hero in the Soviet Union military. Why Mitka is a hero in the passage? In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of demonstrating “action” in the Hero archetype. How it related to Mitka in The Painted Bird?

Answer:
The villagers, citizens, and people in the Soviet Union Military look up to Mitka as a mentor or guardian, because he was the “Soviet Union, highest military honor, and was one of the most decorated men in the whole division.” In Vogler words, a Hero is the desired to be loved and understood and seeks self-expression the boy lookup to Mitka with so much “pride.” However, the citizens admire Mitka with his strong ability and his experiences in the military. (Kosinski, Pgs. 198)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 16, 2014 04:20 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
17 October 2014

“For a moment, as I looked at them, I felt great pride and satisfaction. After all, these proud horsemen were black-haired, black-eyed, and dark-skinned. They differed from the people of the people of the village as night from day. The arrival of these dark Kalmuks drove the fair-haired village people almost insane with fear.” (Chapter 15, page 176, par. 1)

QUESTION: Why did the arrival of the dark Kalmuks drive “the fair-haired village people almost insane with fear?”

ANSWER: The arrival of the dark Kalmuks drove the fair-haired village people insane because they were cruel. They were drunk men that “rushed into the huts and grabbed the women who were not hidden” (Kosinski 176). The men that tried to defend the women got killed. These Kalmuks went all over the village and raped women. They forced women to do things against their own will. “The soldiers had forced a woman to the ground. One soldier held her by the throat while others pulled her legs apart. The woman struggled and cried” (177).

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at October 16, 2014 04:59 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
15 October 2014

“Eventually Gavrila’s lessons filled me with a new confidence.”
(Chapter 16: The Painted Bird, page 191, par. 3)


Question: What are two lessons that Gavrila taught the boy?

Answer: Gavrila teaches the boy that God does not exist – “…God had nothing to do with the world. God did not exist” (Kosinski 187). The boy also learns about the noble Communist Party members. “In this world there were realistic ways of promoting goodness, and there were people who had dedicated their whole lives to it” (Kosinski 191).

Works Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. "16." The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. 191+. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 16, 2014 08:45 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
13 October 2014


Question pg. 186-187:
The boy finally finds someone that is kind to home, and mentors him. What does he learn from Gavrila?
Answer:
Gavrila teaches the boy how to read. The boy loves to read, one book in particular. In the book he reads, the life of the hero in the story mirrors that of his own. From the book, the boy learns as he states, “I read this book several times and it filled me with hope. (Kosinski pg. 168)”

Posted by: James Sierra at October 16, 2014 09:07 PM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
16 October 2014

“I hid in the raspberry bushes. Drunken Kalmuks were wandering around, and my chances of remaining there unnoticed were dwindling. I could not think any more; I was frozen with terror. I closed my eyes.” (Page 112, para 41)

Question:
Explain how “The Boy” manages to escape the Drunken Kalmuk in the Raspberry Bushes?

Answer:
The boy is hiding for his life during an attack of the Kalmuks, who brought rape and destruction to his current location. Seeking safety in a raspberry bush, the boy hid and witnessed the brutality of the Drunken Kalmuks as they trampled “people with their horses” (Kosinski 112).

As the boy remained in the raspberry bush, more drunken Kalmuks began wandering around his immediate vicinity, and “his chances of remaining there unnoticed were dwindling” (Kosinski 112). He closed his eyes for a second and reopened them to find “one of the Kalmuks staggering in his direction” (Kosinski 112). The boy attempted to lay still and remain unnoticed, but the soldier, while peeing, “lost his balance, stepped forward, and stumbled” (Kosinski 112) over the boy's head.

The boy “jumped up and tried to run” but was held by the solider and struck “in the chest with the butt of his rifle” (Kosinski 112). Although, the boy, injured, as “something cracked inside” (Kosinski 112) when hit by the Kalmuks gun. He still manages to trip the soldier and makes a run for it “zigzagging away toward the houses” (Kosinski 112). Here the boy “tore off a board from one of the barns, climbed in and hid in the straw” (Kosinski 112) where he would eventually fall asleep.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 16, 2014 09:46 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
16 October 2014

“He fooled me once” (Chapter 11, pg.132, par. 3).

Question: How was the boy fooled by Judas, and what was the outcome of this for the boy?

Answer: The boy was hung from the ceiling and Judas was loose on the floor below him. When he thought Judas was asleep, he let his feet hang freely only a few inches from the floor. “Judas instantly bounced off the floor, leaping like a grasshopper” (Kosinski 132). The boy did not get one of his feet up fast enough, and Judas bit his heal and tore his skin.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 16, 2014 09:50 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey is Narrative CA02
16 October 2014

"I read my first book with Gavrila's assistance. It was called Childhood and its hero, a small boy like myself, lost his father on the first page. I read this book several times and it filled me with hope. Its hero did not have an easy life either." (Chapter 16, page 186, par. 8)

Question: What does the main character mean by the book filled him with hope? Why is the young boy in The Painted Bird not have "easy life either"?

Answer: The young boy in The Painted Bird is filled with hope because of the book he is reading. He realizes that the main character in the book Childhood is also going through a rough time so he can identify with him. The young boy does not have an easy life because he was just shpt with a rifle, has no family, and he cannot read. Gavrila taught him how to read, who was a "political officer of the regiment" who also lost his family (Vogler 186).

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at October 16, 2014 10:29 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
16 October 2014
“I lay on my back looking at the clouds… to belong to everyone!” (Konsinski 173-174)
QUESTION:
The young boy senses that a change is coming; (a) is it a welcomed changed? (b) What are his future expectations resulting from this change?
ANSWER:
The Boy is at the forefront of the war between the Germans and the Red Army which causes an uproar, “Brother fought… in the village” (Kosinski 173), and sparked fear into the villagers. However, the boy sees this as a welcomed change and a moment of redemption, “I lay on my back looking at the clouds… to belong to everyone!” (Konsinski 173-174), he would have a chance at a normal life. He had a fantasy that he would have a family where he had many fathers, mothers, and siblings “Wherever I might go… brothers and sisters” (Kosinski 174) (via becoming communal property). In conclusion, it is a welcomed change by the boy who has endured abuse, but feared by the peasants “There seem…to be so afraid” (Kosinski 174), indicative of impending doom.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 16, 2014 10:31 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
16 October 2014

“The women sobbed and prayed aloud. Their husbands and fathers, sons and brothers, who were now locked in the houses, recognized their voices and responded with maddened shrieks.” (Chapter 15, page 178, par. 30)

Question: Just reading pages 178-179 alone, why did the fathers, sons, and brothers hear screaming from the younger and more desirable girls, when they were locked in the houses?

Answer: The husbands, fathers, sons, and brothers locked in the houses heard the younger and more desirable women screaming because the girls were being raped by half naked soldiers. The soldiers were chasing after them and raped them on horseback, while the women's males locked in the house (Kosinski 178).

Work Cited
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 16, 2014 11:08 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
15 October 2014

“Silently he watched my attempt to loosen the rope, which was rubbing the skin off my leg. Then he took a small jackknife out of his trouser pocket opened it, and moving closer held my leg with one hand, and with the other carefully cut the rope. He rolled it up and flung it over the embankment with a sweeping gesture.” (Kosinski 73)
Question pg. 72-73- Why did the soldier cut the ropes for the boy when his job is to show no mercy towards the Jews and Gypsies and to kill all the ones he comes in contact with?

Answer- The soldier was much different than most of the soldiers. He showed kindness toward the boy by cutting his ropes and letting the boy run free. The soldier probably felt sorry for the boy since he is young, although that goes against what he is “fighting” for. “The soldier turned toward me and pointing to the forest made a gesture with his hand which seemed to say, “run away, be off!” (Kosinski 76).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 16, 2014 11:54 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
17 October 2014

“Then a new kind of train appeared on the line. Living people were jammed in locked cattle cars. Some of the men who worked at the station brought news to the village. These trains carried Jews and Gypsies, who had been captured and sentenced to death.” (Kosinski 96)

Question pg. 96-97- Why were children being thrown out of the trains that carried the Jews and the Gypsies before they reached the concentration camps?

Answer: As the train would move toward the concentration camps every once in a while a child would be thrown out of the train. They would we thrown out so they might have a better chance of surviving, because if they reached their destination there was no chance of them surviving since they would be put in gas chamber. “Sometimes at night people traveling on the trains to the crematories would toss their small children through the windows in hope of saving their lives.” (Kosinski 98).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 17, 2014 12:17 AM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
17 October 2014

“Children followed the soldiers, asking for sweets.” (chapter 15, page 183, paragraph 1)

Question: How did the common people view the Soviet soldiers compared to the German soldiers?

Answer: The Soviet soldiers were well received by the common people. The Soviets provided medical care. The main character boy said he was “released from the regimental hospital” (185) and “a white coated doctor and his orderlies were treating the wounded women and children” (182). They also taught the boy to read and write. When the peasants brought out their homemade flags, “the soldiers greeted them with cheers” (182). As a contrast, the German soldiers would raid the villages often for food. They would rush “all over the house searching for food, chasing pigs in the fields, clumsily trying to catch chickens,” (95).

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 17, 2014 12:34 AM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220 Journeys of Transformative Narrative CA02
17 October 2014
Dr. Hobbs

“He kicked her in the belly while her mother crawled in the dust begging for mercy.” (Kosinski 189)

Pages: 189-190
Question: Within these two short pages, the author manages to describe the awful scene surrounding the young boy. With quoted passage describe the scene and how the author portrays the young boy may be feeling.

Answer: The author describes the scene through the young boy’s eyes, which creates more terror for the reader. The reader is forced upon this journey, which is filled with violence, rape, and death. The author describes in this scene, “the Kalmuks held her fast, forced her mouth open, and pushed the bloody scraps of flesh down her throat.” (Kosinski 189) The author wants the reader to know what is going on in the scene but also keep track of the young boy. The young boys emotions were plainly put, “my chances of remaining there unnoticed were dwindling. I could not think any more; I was frozen with terror.” (190) This allows the reader to feel the emotions from his perspective and know fully what is going on.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at October 17, 2014 01:39 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative ENG 220 CA01
17 October 2014

Question: On Page 192 of Jerzy Kosinski’s “The Painted Bird” the narrator states that “He himself [a man] became the composite of everything others said about him.” How do you think this philosophy has affected the boy throughout the story?

Analysis: Throughout Kosinski’s novel we experience the absolute depths of depravity that mankind is capable of through the eyes of the young boy. The horrific deeds being perpetrated around him may have influenced his views on race, himself, and his own basic sense of human empathy. The boy sees himself as less than the white people around him, and is treated as lesser because of the racist climate he is living in. The boy internalizes this racism and considers himself a mongrel and not as beautiful as the other children around him. I feel that because of his environment, he never had a chance to accept himself before others were able to reject who he was.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at October 17, 2014 04:56 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
17 October 2014

“Mitka had been looking after me ever since I entered the regimental hospital.”
(Chapter 17, pg. 197, par. 2)

Question:
What role does Mitka play in the protagonist’s life and how does this role differ from the other roles the protagonist has encountered?

Answer:
For the first time in a long while, the protagonist has a guardian who shows endless affection towards him. Mitka, unlike his past guardians, “fished out of the great cauldron the best pieces of meat,” and “sat with [him] for two days, holding [his] head back when [he] vomited” (Kosinski 197). Mitka went above and beyond really becoming a protector; however, he also served as a mentor, teaching the protagonist poetry, film, the art of sharpshooting. Besides being someone who cares for the child instead of seeing him as a labor worker, saw him as a child and in the eyes of the protagonist, he served as something he never had before, a role model. “If the war lasted until I was old enough to serve, perhaps I could become a sharpshooter, a hero about whom working people talked at their meals” (Kosinski 198). For the first time the protagonist has hopes, dreams, and aspirations, wanting to grow up and be like Mitka, something the protagonist has never truly had in his life.

Work Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 17, 2014 07:21 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
17 October 14

Question:
“I strained my eyes but, without the glasses, could see only the dwarfed houses far below. A shot rang out.”(Kosinski 204) From the text on page 204, what were Mitka and the boy doing up in a tree? How was the boy pulled into it? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer. (Chapter 17, page 204, par. 4-5)

Answer:
They were on a “mission” that Mitka was doing on his own without the army knowing. “I was filled with pride to be the person chosen to accompany him, and help a Hero of the Soviet Union in his mysterious mission.” (Kosinski 203). The boy was awoken by Mitka telling him to get dressed quickly. The boy had no knowledge of what Mitka was asking him to do he just did what he was told. (Kosinski 202)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at October 17, 2014 07:31 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17 October 2014

"The entered the attic and found me. They held me up by the neck, turning me around, punching me with their fists, pulling me by the hair" (Kosinski 70).

Question- Page 70-71:
What saved the main character from being murdered like the blacksmith and his wife?

Answer:
The German soldiers assumed he was a gypsy and knew that if they brought him to the outpost it would save them from suspicion and having to burn the whole town down. "Then one of them decided I should be delivered up to the German outpost about a dozen miles from the hut. According to him, this would make the commander of the outpost less suspicious of the village, which was already tardy in its compulsory deliveries. Another man agreed, adding rapidly that the whole village might be burned down because of a single gypsy bastard" (Kosinski 70).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at October 17, 2014 08:57 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 October 2014

Painted bird pages 202-203

“One night Mitka woke me up before dawn.”(Page 202 par 2)

Question: This passage refers to Mitka waking up the narrator, and embarking on a journey to leave their tent. What does the boy think of them moving?

Answer: The boy was awoken from his slumber, and he is unsure as to why they are leaving or anything about the situation. “I did not know where we were going or why.” (Kosinski) He was unclear of what was happening, but thought to himself that there may be something going on in Mitka’s life that he could not understand, so he was contempt and went along with whatever Mitka did. He also later notes to himself that even though he does not know what is going on, he is “filled with pride to be the person chosen to accompany him, and help a hero of the Soviet Union in his mysterious mission.” (202)

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 17, 2014 09:04 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17 October 2014

"From the balcony a male voice shouted "Gypsy vampire!" and several voices took up in the chant" (kosinski 138).

Question- Page 138-139:
Why did the peasants refer to him as a "gypsy vampire"?

Answer:
His dark hair and black eyes were taken as a sign of the devil. He also fell while transferring the missal from one side of the altar to the other and interrupted mass. "They had no doubt that I was a vampire and that the interruption of the high mass could only bode evil for the village" (Kosinski 139).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at October 17, 2014 09:07 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17 October 2014

"Thinking about it all, I admired Mitka more and more" (Kosinski 200).

Question- Page 200-201:
Why did the main character admire Mitka so much?

Answer:
He admired Mitka because he was trying to make the world a better place by actually doing something other than praying for things to get better. "Here lying a few feet from me, was a man who worked for a better and safer world, not by praying at church altars, but by excelling in his aim" (Kosinski 200).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at October 17, 2014 09:16 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 October 2014
201-202

Question: how many people lay dead on the floor? Who had done this? Who was Mikita?(Kosinski Pg 201)

Answer: there was laid on the ground all blooded up these men were solider in the army and had been beaten and killed with axe. The Peasants in this part out numbered them and decided to disarm and kill most leaving some badly wounded. (Kosinski) The man Mikita was a very high respected and highly ranked officer. This man was a hero from the Soviet Union.(Kosinski)

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 17, 2014 10:09 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
17 October 2014

“At noon village learned that the red soldiers had all hanged all the captured Kalmuks by the legs of the oaks trees along the river”. ( Chapter 15 pg 183)
Question: Eventually what happened to the Kalmuks? How was was the village people reactions?
Answer: According to the text “children followed the soldiers, asking for sweets. The men embraced them and played with them.” (Kosinski 183) and eventually “At noon village learned that the red soldiers had all hanged all the captured Kalmuks by the legs of the oaks trees along the river”. (Kosinski 183)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 17, 2014 10:22 AM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
October 17 2014

"The words of a psalm came in a mournful dirge from his toothless mouth. He was pointing the cross at his unseen enemies." (Chapter 15, Page 179, Par. 34)

Question: What quality of the people that the boy has been dealing with does this man best represent?

Answer: The man embodies the blind faith that is found throughout the boy's interactions in this story. Whether it be Marta's teachings (Kosinski 10) or Olga's (21-22), or the superstitions the boy encountered through the tale, there is a sense of mysticism and blind faith that is found in every one of the peasants the boy encountered. This old man, depending on nothing but a cross to fend off the Russian soldiers, embodies this faith, and it's faulty nature.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 17, 2014 10:46 AM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
17 Oct 2014

“Eventually Gavrila’s lessons filled me with a new confidence. In this world there were realistic ways of promoting goodness and there were people who had dedicated their whole lives to it” (Kosinski pg. 191, par 23)

Question:
(a.) How were the Communist party members selected and (b.) What does Kosinski mean by “the members of the party became tempered like steel”?

Answer:
The Communist party members were selected from the whole nation and given individual training/specific tasks to perform. There are also prepared to endure hardships and even death. “These were the Communist Party members. They were selected from the entire population and given special training, set particular tasks to perform. They were prepared to endure hardship, even death if the cause of the working people required it” (Kosinski pg. 191). What he means by “the members of the party became tempered like steel” is that everyone was used to the routine of doing the same training and was growing stronger each day. With each day of their training, they progressed in the special training given and specific tasks they would perform. “Through their constant watchfulness the members of the Party became tempered like steel. Among the Party members there were young and old, officers and enlisted men. The strength of the Party, as Gavrila explained, lay in its ability to rid itself of those who like a jammed or crooked wheel on a cart, impeded progress” (Kosinski pg. 192)

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 17, 2014 10:50 AM

Bryce A Veller
ENG220CL Journeys in Narratives
Dr.Hobbs
17 October 2014

“The peasants instantly recognized them. They screamed in terror that the Kalmuks were coming and that the women and children must hide before they could be seized”. (PG 175,par 3)
QUESTION: What is the significance of these Kalmuks, and why were they sent to the village?
ANSWER: Kalmuks are rouge deserters from the Soviets that have joined the German Army who permitted them to loot and rape in the manner of their war customs. They were sent to villages and town to punish those who are noncompliant and or standing in the way of the advancing Red Army. They came into the village and it exploded with panic as the Kalmuks terrorized the city dwellers.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at October 17, 2014 11:07 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
15 October 2013
Question: On page 191, what does the nameless character say about Garvilla’s lessons?
Answer: The nameless character says that Garvilla’s lessons filled him with a new confidence. Garvilla’s insights helped confirmed his existing thoughts. He realized that he had been cheated and that his prayers have been filled with meaningless words. He agreed with Garvilla when he said that priest don’t even believe in God and that they used him as a means to fool people and that churches were built merely for the purpose of “intimidating people through Gods presumed power.” (Page 190, Line 30)
Work Cited
Kosinski, J. (1995). The painted bird (2nd ed.). New York: Grove Press.

Posted by: Anet Milian at October 17, 2014 11:14 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 17 2014


“I had no peace for the first few days. The principal wanted me to give up my uniform and wear ordinary civilian clothes sent to the children by the International Red Cross. I nearly hit a nurse on the head when she tried to take away the uniform. I slept with my tunic and trousers folded under my mattress for safekeeping. After a while my long-unwashed uniform began to smell, but I still refused to part with it even for a day. The principal, annoyed by this insubordination, called two nurses and had them take it away by force. A jubilant crowd of boys witnessed the struggle. I broke from the clumsy women and ran out into the street. There I accosted four quietly strolling Soviet soldiers.”(Kosiński 126 iDoc)


Question 227-228:


Why is the Narrator so attached to the uniform of the Red Army?


Answer:


The young hero in this story was persecuted, chased and abused in nearly every city he comes across in the entire country. Some of the most horrific moments of the story are in the dense backward world that is rural Poland. When the hero and the village he is in are rescued by the Red Army from the horrid Kalmyk. The young boy is finally accepted and treated with genuine kindness by the soldiers and is even given one of their uniforms to feel included. The Red Army uniform is a symbol of stability, power and acceptance into something greater for the young hero in this unstable and rejecting world he finds himself in.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 17, 2014 01:16 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 October 2014

“Boys and girls battled for their lives and could not be separated. At night even worst things happened.” (Chapter 18, page 215, par. 37)

Question: What happened during the nights that were so worse? Were the nights worse for the girls or the boys? Explain.

Answer: The nights were so worse because the “Boys would assault the girls in dark corridors (Kosinski, 215).” The nights were particularly worse for the girls because it was not just the children who were girls that these awful boys attacked. They raped a nurse one time and kept her locked up in the basement for hours. These awful boys would ask more youngsters to cause torment to this poor nurse. This torture resulted in the nurse yelling and screaming, and an ambulance took her away (215). These horrible acts influenced other girls to like the attention they would get from the boys. “They stripped and asked boys to touch them.…. There were some who said they could not go to sleep without having had a man (215).”

Work Cited
Kosinski, Jerzy. The PAinted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. Print

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 19, 2014 12:41 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
19 October 2014

“They hid stores of butter, pork, and calves’ meat, rye and wheat. Some secretly dyed sheets red for use as flags to greet the new rulers, while others hid away in safe places crucifixes, the figures of Jesus and Mary, and icons. I did not understand all of it, but I sensed the urgency in the air” (Chapter 15: The Painted Bird, Page 173, Par. 4-5, Kosinski).


QUESTION:
(a.) What was the scene of this part of the story? (b.) Did the boy seem afraid, what were his feelings toward this unusual moment? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


ANSWER:
It was the end of summer, a hot night to be exact. The night seems very unusual than a normal night. The boy did not quite understand what was going on. “Flashes of lightning twinkled far away. People assembled in front of their houses” (Kosinski, 172). The boy also noticed that there was not anyone paying attention to him anymore. He did not seem afraid, he wandered among the huts, and laid across the fields hearing nervous whispers and prayers.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at October 19, 2014 02:37 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
19 October 2014

“I looked at his face while he was telling me all these things and held back my tears. Gavrilla also felt uneasy. I knew that he and Mitka had discussed my future, and if there had been any other solution they would have found it. ” (Chapter 18: The Painted Bird, Page 208, Par.2, Kosinski).


QUESTION:
What was happening in this scene? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


ANSWER:
Gavrilla explained to the boy that the war was ending, and that the country had been liberated from the Germans. “Lost children had to be delivered to special centers where they would be kept until it was determined if their parents were still alive” (Kosinski, 208). The boy was leaving Gavrilla, Mitka, and all the other friends he made in the military ground forces. Gavrilla promised him that if no relatives claimed him after the war ended, he promised he would take care of him, send him to school, and teach him to speak again.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at October 19, 2014 02:51 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative CA02
19 October 2014

“Without my comet I was afraid of them and tried to cut away at an angle..”(Kosinski 158).

Question:
Why do you think that the boy is so dependent of the comet?

Answer:
The comet was something that Martha taught the boy about and since Martha, being his protector, is now dead, he feels alone without it.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at October 19, 2014 04:24 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 October 2014

“…I felt within me life as pure as milk carefully strained through a cloth.”

(Chapter 18: The Painted Bird, page 218, par. 2)


Question: What made the boy feel so alive?

Answer: The boy and his friend would “put on a show” for the boys and girls at the railroad track (Kosinski 217). The boy would “lie down between the tracks, face down, arms folded” over his head (Kosinski 217). The train “swept” over his body and the “great engine rolled furiously” above his back (Kosinski 217). During this ‘show’, the boy would feel very alive because “nothing mattered except the mere fact of being alive” as he would “forget everything” (Kosinski 218). The boy who had been through so many terrible things that he had found “the great joy of being unhurt” in this experience.

Works Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. "18." The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. 218+. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 19, 2014 07:32 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
16 October 2014

“Only the group, which they called “the collective,” was qualified to determine a mans worth and importance” (Chapter 16: Kosinski, page 192).

Question: With reference to this passage, what did the boy mean when he observed this and what did he learn about the soviets?

Answer: In the story, the boy realizes while being with the Soviets, that one mans rating is established on what the other men think of him, not what the man thinks of himself. Kosinski writes, “In the Soviet world a man was rated according to others’ opinion of him, not according to his own” (Kosinski 192).

Posted by: Kyle VanBurn at October 19, 2014 07:51 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
19 OCT 2014

“I would much prefer to be alone again, wandering from one village to the next, from one town to another, never knowing what might happen. Here everything was very predictable”(Kosinski pg.229, par 19)

Question:
(a.) How does the young boy describe the apartment to be as and how does he describe his parents and (b.) who is the silent one he refers to?

Answer:
In chapter nineteen, a young boy mentions he says how it was very predictable, which he was talking about his house. He states it to be a typical apartment like home with one room, a kitchen and a washroom on the stairs. He describes his dad that his health wasn’t in good order and if anything upset him he would break out in a sweat and have to take pills for it. His mom was the one getting the food for the family and making sure the chores were done. “The apartment was small, consisting of one room and a kitchen. There was a washroom on the stairs. It was stuffy, and we were crowded, getting in one an other’s way. My father had a heart condition. If anything upset him, he grew pale and perspiration covered his face. Then he would swallow some pills. My mother went out at dawn to wait in the endless queues for food. When she returned, she started cooking and cleaning” (Kosinski pg. 229). The silent one is a friend of the young boy’s friend that he met up with and hung out with. “I often left secretly to meet up with the Silent One. One day he did not turn up at the appointed time. They told me later at the orphanage that he had been transferred to another city” (Kosinski pg. 229).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 19, 2014 07:52 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
19 October 2014

“The Silent One accompanied me in expeditions to the railroad station, where we made friends with departing Soviet soldiers” (Chapter 18: Kosinski, page 217).

Question: With reference to this passage, while at the railroad station with the Silent One, what were some of the mischievous acts that the boy and the Silent One committed together aside from making friends with the departing Soviets?

Answer: The boy and the Silent One stole and drunk mail mans bicycle and also went down to the nearby park by the railroad and watched the girls undress in the bathhouse. Kosinski writes, “Together we stole and drunken postman’s bicycle, went across the city park, still sown with land mines and closed to the public, and watched the girls undressing in the communal bathhouse” (Kosinski 217).

Posted by: Kyle VanBurn at October 19, 2014 07:53 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 October 2014

"My uniform was now open and the birthmark plainly visible. They bent over me, crying, hugging and kissing me. I was undecided again." (Chapter 19, page 226, par. 9)

Question: Why is the young boy feeling undecided yet again?

Answer: The young boy wants to be "found by Gavrila, and therefore it was wise not to run away" (Jerzy Kosinski 226). He knew that rejoining his "parents meant the end of all my dreams of becoming a great inventor of fuses for changing people's color, working in the land of Gavrila and Mitka, where today was already tomorrow" (Kosinski 226). He just could not accept the idea of becoming someone's real son.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at October 19, 2014 10:44 PM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220 Journeys of Transformative Narrative CA02
19 October 2014
Dr. Hobbs

Pages 217-218
“Human being, he said, is a proud name. Man carries in himself his own private war, which he has to wage, win, or lose, himself-his own justice which is his alone to administer.” (Kosinski 217)
Question: Through this quoted passage within these two pages, Kosinski displays how the young boy portrays Mitka. Display how between these two pages the young boy can receive many mixed emotions from Mitka’s decisions. Use quoted passage if possible to show the point you are trying to make.

Answer: The young boy within these two pages seems to display Mitka as a hero in a sense but also a revengeful one. The young boy seems to display his confidence and disbelief all at once in his emotions. “A man, no matter how popular and admired, lives mainly with himself. If he is not at peace with himself, if he is harassed by something he did not do but should have done to preserve his own image of himself, he is like the “unhappy Demon.” (218) The quote I believe sums up the respect yet confusion for Mitka’s decision.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at October 19, 2014 11:22 PM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
20 October 2014

“As soon as we reached the road, he fell down on the grass and cried as though in terrible pain, his words muffled by the ground. It was the only time that I had heard his voice.” (chapter 18, page 224, paragraph 1)

Question: What made the Silent One cry out?

Answer: The boy and the Silent one found a lever that, when pulled, would doom a train off a cliff. Shortly after, a milkman beat the boy up because he “stumbled against a tall table with dairy produce on it, knocking it over” (221). The Silent One decided to take revenge on the milkman by pulling the lever one morning because they thought that the milkman took the train to market. When the boys found out that they killed many innocent people, they were horrified.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 19, 2014 11:50 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
17 October 2014

Question 1:
The boy was afraid to fall asleep while living at the orphanage. Why was he afraid, and what would he do to sleep better?
Answer:
During his time at the orphanage, the boy was afraid to fall asleep because the other boys would play practical jokes on each other that could be painful. He states that he would sleep “in my uniform with a knife in one pocket and a wooden knuckle-duster in the other (Kosinski 216).”

Posted by: James Sierra at October 20, 2014 12:03 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
20 October 2014


“The smooth, polished words meshed with each other like oiled millstones ground to a fine fit. But reading was no my principal occupation. My lessons with Gavrila were more important.” (The Painted Bird Chapter 16, page 187, par. 8, Jerzy Kosinski).

Question: What lesson did the boy learn from reading Gavrila’s poetry?


Answer: They boy learned that God and the world were completely different things, and he did coexist because God did not exist. “The cunning priests had invented Him so they could trick stupid, superstitious people” (187, Kosinski). He saw religion as a tale for ignorant people who could not understand the natural order or things and did not have their own opinions or beliefs. He saw that Gavrila wrote that people determined their own life choices while religion dictates their path.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at October 20, 2014 12:20 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
20 October 2014

“The teachers and attendants could not handle this group, they often kept out of the way of the brawls, fearing the strong boys.” (The Painted Bird Chapter 18, page 215, par. 33, Jerzy Kosinski).

Question: What is the group that is being talked about in the passage above? What did the group fight about? What are some things they did?


Answer: The group being discussed in the passage above are the kids at the orphanage. They all had nicknames that described how they fought in the brawls at the orphanage. Some brawls were between two fights, but sometimes innocent orphans got involved. “The Cannon once threw a heavy boot at a young girl who apparently had refused to kiss him. She died hours later” (215, Kosinski). Other accounts of violence were kids being burned in a fire, a nurse being raped by multiple boys, and girls offering themselves for sex. One girl seduced men but then kicked them in the groin. The kids fought for their lives and could not be separated.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at October 20, 2014 01:02 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative ENG 220 CA01
20 October 2014

Question: What is the significance of the boy’s visions as he’s drifting in and out of consciousness while being pushed through the ice on pages 160-161?

Analysis: The significance of this particular scene in the novel was that the story had been about the boy coping with the horrific things going on around him. The boy, who in this scene is suffering the ultimate horror (death at the hands of another human being), copes by imagining a better life, one where at that very moment he is coming home to supper in the summer instead of drowning in the dead of winter. Kosinski goes back and forth from the two images rapidly, creating a sharp contrast between the boys’ feelings and his actual circumstances. This contrast, between the beautiful and the ugly, the innocent and the profane, is a common theme throughout the story. Even the fable of the painted bird is filled with beautiful imagery but a horrifying reality, as is the boy’s visions on pages 160-161.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at October 20, 2014 04:12 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
20 October 14

Question:
“He should be able to choose for himself the people whom he wished to follow and learn from.”(Kosinski 227). From the text on page 227, what was the big decision the boy had to make, and what did he ultimately choose? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer. (Chapter 19, page 227, par. 1-2)

Answer:
The boy had to decide whether he was going to stay with his birth parents. He wants freedoms but also feels for his parents and their situation. He just re-met them and is indecisive on how he feels about them. He ultimately says, “Yet I could not decide to run away.” (Kosinski 227)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at October 20, 2014 07:19 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
20 October 2014

“The Silent One squeezed my arm so hard that I jumped. At the same moment the train’s locomotive veered aside twisting violently as if pulled by some invisible force.”
(Chapter 18, pg. 222, par. 5)

Question:
How does the train crash change the characteristics of the Silent One?

Answer:
Rooted in revenge for harming the protagonist, the Silent One planned the train crash to kill the market man. “He stared at the train and suddenly he seemed much older” (Kosinski 222). Even before the crash happened, the protagonist notes a difference within the Silent One, as if a maturing occurred preparing him for the event he created. Breaking his vow of silence after realizing the market man did not die in the train crash, the Silent One “cried as though in terrible pain” (Kosinski 224). Grief stricken with the idea of killing many innocent people while the one guilty person escaped, the Silent One resembled that of the Nazis, who took millions of innocent people on trains to the concentration camps, where many of the people’s deaths awaited them.

Work Cited:

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 20, 2014 07:36 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 October 2014

Painted Bird Pages 225-226

“I could not readily accept the idea of suddenly becoming someone’s real son…”(Page 226 par 7)

Question: This passage refers to when the boy is reunited with his parents. Why is he so hesitant to live with them?

Answer: The boy has been used to always being on his own and performing on his own agenda, and the idea of living with his real parents and not doing that anymore was frightening to him. “But a boy of my age should be free from any restriction.” (Kosinski 226) A small part of him feels that he is growing old enough to not have to rely on his parents.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 20, 2014 09:08 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 October 2014

"As I listened to all this, I recalled the hare which Makar once caught in a trap" (Kosinski 227).

Question- Pages 226-227:
What made the main character compare his own life to the story of the hare?

Answer:
In the story, Makar was drunk and forgot to close the cage. The hare was able to walk out of the cage but ultimately came back. The main character was of the age where he could leave his parents but he did not. "But a boy of my age should be free from any restriction. He should be able to choose for himself the people whom he wished to follow and learn from. Yet I could not decide to run away" (kosinski 227).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at October 20, 2014 09:32 AM

Matthew Basin
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation In Narrative CA 02
20 October 2014

"Despite these grim recollections, there was something immensely tempting about lying between the rails with a train running above." (Chapter 18, page 223, paragraph 2)

Question: After seeing people get run over by trains, why did the boy lay between the rails of the train tracks and let the train run over them?

Answer: The boy let did this stunt with all of the other children watching for several reasons. The first reason was explained as a great satisfaction for being alive after the train ran over the tracks. This could be explained as a sort of adrenaline rush the boy got from being in a near death experience. He described it as, "a greater satisfaction than I had ever experienced in exacting the most vicious revenge from one of my enemies" (Kosinski, 223). Another reason the boy did this was because his fear when the train was coming made him forget all of his past fears and worry (and there were a lot of fears). The last reason was to win admiration from the other boys so they would stop picking on him and bothering him. Besides the Silent One, the boy did not have any friends at the orphanage, and all of the other children were mean to him.

References: Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove, 1995. Print.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at October 20, 2014 09:34 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
20 October 2014

“They seemed somehow familiar, and I could hear my heart beating under the star of my uniform. Forcing an expression of indifference, I scrutinized their faces.” (Chapter 19, page 225, par.4)

QUESTION: What was so special about this moment? Why was his heart beating so fast?

ANSWER: After going through so many struggles, the boy was finally before his parents. He looked for them for so long and the fact that they were finally there with him was unbelievable to him. At first he was hesitant about knowing if they were his parents but after he saw their reaction he knew they were. He was no longer an orphan and he did not know how to feel about that because he was so used to being on his own. “Yet I could not decide to run away. I looked at the tearful face of the woman who was my mother, at the trembling man who was my father, uncertain whether they should stroke my hair or pat my shoulder, and some inner force restrained me and forbade me to fly off. I suddenly felt like Lekh’s painted bird, which some unknown force was pulling toward this kind” (Kosinski 227).

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at October 20, 2014 09:39 AM

Bryce A Veller
ENG220CL Journeys in Narratives
Dr.Hobbs
20 October 2014

“They gave me a piece of paper on which I wrote that I was the Son of a Soviet officer who was at the front and that I was waiting on my Father at the orphanage. That the women hated the Red Army”.
QUESTION: Why did he get the Soviets in the street to help him?
ANSWER: He ran outside to escape to persecution of them taking away his uniform for they did not want him to wear it. Therefore, he signaled to the four soldiers that he was in trouble and that he had superiority because he told them his Father was an officer. They went into the orphanage and show the ladies that he was to be able to wear and do as he pleased.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at October 20, 2014 10:00 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
20 October 2013
Question (Page 222-223): What disaster occurred?
Answer: A train disaster.
Work Cited
Kosinski, J. (1995). The painted bird (2nd ed.). New York: Grove Press.

Posted by: Anet Milian at October 20, 2014 10:47 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
20 October 2014

“My father came back. Both he and my mother hugged me and looked me over and exchanged some comments about me. It was time to leave the orphanage.” (Second Edition, page 138, para 16)


Question:
Describe how the boy has changed, since his time wandering? How does it affect his view on his new life?

Answer:
After everything that he had been through, the boy found life with his parents in their small apartment to be “very predictable” (Kosinski 139). The boy longed to “be alone again, wandering from one village to the next, from one town to another, and never knowing what might happen” (Kosinski 139).

The boy started to doubt his parents love for him, causing him to think that it may be better for him to stay on his own. He was short tempered, breaking his adopted brother’s arm because one day he “annoyed him so much” (Kosinski 139). He no longer was the boy his parents first knew; he was much different now.

Works cited
"Read THE PAINTED BIRD Ebooks Online." IDoc.co. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2014. .

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 20, 2014 10:55 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
October 20 2014

"The lives of the people on the train were in my hands. All I had to do was leap to the switch and move the points, sending the whole train over the cliff into the peaceful stream below. All it needed was one push on the lever." (Chapter 18, Page 220, Par. 57)

Question: Why is the boy's power over the train so important to him? What does it represent that he has never had?

Answer: The boy has absolute control over the lives of the people on the train (Kosinski 220). Control is something he has never had before, something alien to him, and therefore quite intoxicating. Finally he can control something in his life, even if it's just the direction of the train. He most likely won't take the lives of the people on the train, but even the knowledge that he could instills a sense of power and hope in the boy that he has never really had throughout this story, not even when he was with the army.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 20, 2014 11:02 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
20 October 2014
“I broke from the clumsy women… of my uniform” (Konsinski 211)
QUESTION:
The young boy is now placed in an orphanage with the hope of being re united with his parents, (a) how does this make him feel? (b) What is his current mindset? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

ANSWER:
After an abusive few years, the young boy is ‘adopted’ by Mitka and Gavrila; Soviet officers and nursed to health. This show of affection invoked a sense of belonging, which he had never experienced with his parents. Thus, when he is faced with the realization that his parents may be alive he is resentful and repulsive at the mundane life he may return to, “my parents were dead… had upset me” (Kosinski 212). The young boy had experienced more than many would have seen in a lifetime at an early age, consequently, making him think that he was beyond the time for parents. Moreover, if his parents were found he would not be able to return to Gavrila and Mitka. Additionally, Gavrila treated him like a son as such he created a hero complex of Gavrila and Mikta, which he had to live up to which he did in his demeanor, “I wrote in chalk… I saluted stiffly…” (Kosinski 211-212).

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 20, 2014 11:11 AM

Tyler Sommers
Dr B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 October 2014


Painted Bird pages 29-30

“The comet was also indispensable protection against dogs and people. Even the most vicious dogs stopped short when they saw a wildly swinging object shoering sparks which threatened to set their fur on fre. Not even the boldest man wanted to risk losing his sight or having his face burned. A man armed with a loaded comet became a fortress and could be safely attacked only with a long pole or by throwing rocks.”(Kosinski 29)

What is the significance of the “comet”?
The comet could serve as protection and as a portable heater as desired. “The extinction of the comet was an extremely serious thing.” (Kosinski 29) Matches were very scarce in that area around this time period and not everyone had the capabilities to make a “comet.”

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at October 20, 2014 06:11 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 October 2014

Painted Bird pages 64-65

“Mad with greed, they tore from one another scrapes of clothing, skin, and formless chunks of the trunk. They dived into the center of the man’s body only to jump out through another chewed hole. The corpse same under renewed thrusts. When it next came to the surface of the bloody writhing sludge, it was a completely bare skeleton.” (Kosinski 64)

Question

What would happen to the remains of the bodies that were just left around?

Answer

Rats would eat the remains of the bodies that were just left behind. The passage above states what was seen before he frantically grabbed the carpenter’s ax and fled.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at October 20, 2014 06:19 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 October 2014

Painted Bird pages 134-135

“When I was slow at my work Garbos used to kick me and say that he would not shelter an idler, and threaten to send me to the German outpost.” (Kosinski 134)

When the boy was not being proficient in his work, what would Garbos do to speed up his productivity?

The passage above states that Garbos would use physical force to speed up his work as well as threaten to give him away to the German outpost. When this happened the boy would “work harder than ever to convince him of my usefulness.”(Kosinski 134) Unfortunately, Garbos was never satisfied.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at October 20, 2014 06:40 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 October 2014

Painted Bird pages 157-158

“As the wind whipped me I could hear other whispers, mutterings, and moans. The Evil Ones were interested in me at last.” (Kosinski 158)

Question
What did the Evil Ones do to the boy when they were finally interested in him?

Answer
Once the Evil Ones were finally interested in the boy the started tormenting him. “Now they dragged me through the frozen wilderness, threw snow in my face, churned my thoughts into confusion. I was in their power, alone on a glassy sheet of ice which the Evil Ones themselves had spread between remote villages.” (Kosinski 158)

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at October 20, 2014 06:58 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 October 2014

Painted Bird pages 193-194

“I felt lost in this maze. In the world that Gavrila was initiating me, human aspirations and expectations were entangled with each other like the roots and branches of great trees in a thick forest, each tree struggling for more moisture from the soil and more sunshine from the sky.” (Kosinski 194)

Question
What does the boy mean when he says that he is lost in the world that Gavrila was initiating him into?

Answer
Gavrila was introducing a new perspective of looking at life. “In Gavrila’s world the individual seemed to have many faces; one of them might be slapped while another was being kissed, and yet another went temporarily unnoticed." (Kosinski 193) This new perspective was not understood by the boy because it was very confusing. It was almost like Gavrila was bi-polar and for a little boy that would be very hard to understand.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at October 20, 2014 07:10 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 20 2014


Question #9:


Violence in all of its contemptible forms, e.g., violence to animals, violence to men, violence to women, and violence to children, pervades twenty-first-century narrative. Whether the violence is sexual or comes as a result of weapon, the point, here, is the same: it is violence. Award-winning, and critically-acclaimed, television series such as The Walking Dead, Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones, Dexter, Sons of Anarchy, Vikings, (to name only a few) brutally represent this theme, and more. Films, such as Fight Club, 300, The Passion of the Christ, etc., and cinematic series, such as Saw, Hostel, The Hannibal Lector Films, Kill Bill, etc., do too. So, why is it, that a desensitized, postmodern millennial culture can still say it is somehow “shocked” and repulsed/revolted by a novel from 1965 such as Jerzy Kosiński’s novel, The Painted Bird? Really? Of course the content is deplorable/despicable; that seems to be the point. But, what differentiates the hopelessness of The Painted Bird from the hopelessness of a society that gets its thrills from works such as the ones just mentioned (I have deliberately not mentioned the titles of any current, violent video games). How is The Painted Bird worse (or, is it worse)? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


Modern society has grown to favor the trend of horror movies, violent video games, as well as some unique adaptations of sexual pleasure. Being the month of October this trend is very much heightened, and there are many times when I find that I cannot simply go home, relax and watch some television. You can, at any given time of the day any state, any channel and I guarantee one of the commercials will be some form of a horror movie. Real horror has its place in life, but I do not believe that society as whole experiencing themes in movies like Saw, Hostel and Texas Chainsaw Massacre is the best thing. The themes presented in The Painted Bird are a realistic interpretation of a child’s life in a backwards, WWII Poland. The story paints a vivid reminder of what humans will do when they are in a confused, starved and abused state. Jerzy Kosiński presents this evil in a way that is talked to and becomes close, a friend and it is only all too familiar to what we know we could do. The Painted Bird does present the same themes as the movies I mentioned earlier such as confinement and torture as well as the preservation of human remains. The Painted Bird presents this evil in a different light, instead of pure, uneducated violence we are presented with the whole of the picture and a lesson we can learn.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 20, 2014 11:50 PM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
21 October 2014

Question: Who was he waiting for to adopt him? Did he want this yes or no? Who waslooking for a letter from who? Did it appear? And whom was he plotting on towards the end?(kosinski)

Answer: he was thinking if he should stay and wait for Garvrila this was going to be the person that would take care of him but he did not enjoy it was to predictable.(kosinski). He was waiting on letters hopefully coming back to him form Mikita and Garvrila but they never came. Towards the end he goes to the movies losing one of his coins by the time he geyts to the counter the ma n put his ticket aside. The boy bloodied up his nose after falling on the cobblestone when he was being pushed out. He retuned he told home to go to the back of the line this started the first thought in his head

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 21, 2014 10:14 AM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Nat arrive CA01
21 October 2014

Question: Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965) seems to be “an exercise in violence and the depravity of people, who victimize each other without hesitation” (Spoiler Dessert, 2012). Consider this passage: “The only law was the traditional right of the stronger and wealthier over the weaker and poorer.” Here, Kosinski introduces the theme of class conflict into the mix of injustice. Point to as many examples as possible from the story where this conflict occurs. What is the significance of this theme to the story? Explain your response.
Answer: In the book The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski the boy goes through many violence by being beaten, set adrift, spit on, used for bait by lighting, consider a witch, raped, and being kill by a German soldier. This conflict is introduce as a mixture of injustice because the boy is label as a Gypsy or Jew, due to, his appearance. These are some examples of conflict that the boy goes through on his journey. In chapter six, the boy was used for bait to attract lighting, “The carpenter and his wife were convinced that my black hair would attract lighting to their farm. It was true that on hot dry nights when the carpenter touched my hair with a flint or a bone comb blunish yellow sparks jumped over my head like the Devil’s lice. (Kosinski, Pg. 57)” When a storm come the boy is taking into an open field, but one day the carpenter forgets the boy and lightning started striking villagers huts and killed people. In chapter seven, the “blacksmith family” is where the blacksmith likes beaten on the boy. "The blacksmith liked to slap my face when he was tipsy and I got in his way, but there were no other consequences. (Kosinski, Pg. 66)" Another, example in chapter seven is the boy continues on his journey, where the boy was captured by German Soldiers. The German Soldier was ordered to killed and burned the boy, but was afraid to kill the boy even was scared to look at the boy. However, the German Solider fakes the boy killing and lets him run free through the forest. The significance of the story is that the boy goes on a journey to find hope again, but Kosinski gives readers an explanation on where the world have no reason to find hope.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 22, 2014 03:27 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
22 October 2014

Question #3
Who transforms in this novel and why? Is this anyone redeemed? Point as many examples as possible from the story?
In the story, the painted bird it is really hard to say whether or not if any character has that moment of heroism or I made a type it type of feeling. The unnamed boy in the story just does not stand out to me as a hero of any sort! He repeatedly is mistreated and runs from the village to village without a plan of any sort. Now for a transformation I can say that the unnamed boy did transform but only to an older man that experiences different things, Finally having experiencing sexual feelings for a young girl etc. However in this novel I don’t Believe anyone was redeemed in any sort.

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 22, 2014 09:43 AM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
22 October 2014

Question:
It is clear that, through the trials and tribulations of the protagonist in Jerzy Ksoinski’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965), the nameless boy should have died a thousands deaths. Speak to the boy’s independence and tenacity in this narrative; how is it that this child found the strength to survive the atrocities he endured?

Answer:
In some instances, the boy was freed without having to do anything. For instance, when the German faked his death and let him run away. Other times, he relied on reciting prayers to give him the strength and will to live. For example, when he was hanging from the ceiling and Judas was on the ground the first time this occurred, the boy recited his prayers. This gave him the strength to hold on until the man came back and took him down (Kosinksi 132).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 22, 2014 10:12 AM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 October 2014

“He was covered with dust and his shirt clung to his perspiring body. I gathered that he must have been out all night. He signaled me to follow him. I dressed quickly and we were soon outside with no one the wiser.” (Chapter 18, Kosinski Pgs. 222-223)
Question 222-223:
In this passage, Why the Silent One and the boy like to take walks at night. What is some key factors of this quoted? Did the Silent One know something horrible was about to happening at night?
Answer:
The significance of this quoted is that the Silent One and the boy like to play on the railroad tracks at night. Where the boy would lay down on the tracks and get back up before the train starts to come towards him. I feel that the Silent One know something horrible was about to happening that night regarding the train. “The Silent One squeezed my arm so hard that I jumped. At the same moment the train’s locomotive veered aside, twisting violently as if it was pulled by some invisible force. (Kosinski, Pg. 222)” The train start to lose control like somebody was playing with the train tracks.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 23, 2014 01:16 AM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 October 2014


Question 7: Discuss the significance of the title of Jerzy Kosiński’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965). Why is it an appropriate title? What does it reference, SPECIFICALLY, from the story? What might the symbolic nature of the painted bird be, i.e., what might it represent from the narrative? Explain your response.


Answer: The title of the book refers to the time the boy spends with Lekh. Lekh would take a bird he captured and paint it “in rainbow hues until it became more dappled and vivid than a bouquet of wildflowers,” (50). Lekh would then release the bird into its flock and watch as the painted bird desperately tried to rejoin it. The flock of birds would then attack the painted bird simply because it colored differently from them. The Painted Bird is an appropriate title for this book because the young boy is very much like the painted bird Lekh would release. The boy was attacked and discriminated against because he was an olive-skinned, black-haired, dark-eyed boy in a country of fair-skinned and light-haired people. The painted birds in Lekh’s story symbolize the boy throughout the entire novel.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 23, 2014 02:42 PM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220 Journeys of Transformative Narrative CA02
22 October 2014
Dr. Hobbs

Question #10:

It is noteworthy that Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965) has represenations or references to “concentration camp scenes, no descriptions of mass slaughter, and hardly any Nazis” (Septimus). Yet, when it was published in 1965, the book “was lauded as one of the most poignant and powerful evocations of the Holocaust, particularly because it was not a prototypical example of WWII literature.” (Septimus). Obviously, the novel is work of fiction, and obviously, the Holocaust itself is not fictional. So, how do we, as readers, reconcile the two (if we are to believe the novel’s initial accolades)? In other words, how can a fictional (and fable-like) narrative also seem so “true” for so many persons who experienced (and students who have studied) the historical Holocaust? Can a collective experience be condensed/ reduced to the experience of one, fictional individual, such as the protagonist of The Painted Bird? If so, how? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

The Painted Bird is a narrative which collectively displays the feel of the Holocaust in the view point of a young boy. The story never eases into the violent feel of this event for the reader. The reader is taken on a ride with descriptions of rape, death, and abuse from many parties in the area. The narrative does an excellent job of displaying these feelings through one young boy, which portrays a lot of pressure for one individual to handle. This is also a lot for the reader to go through emotionally with one character throughout his journey. The realistic feel of the narrative causes this emotional pull. The Diary of Anne Frank is a novel which I feel can compare to The Painted Bird. Even with the similarity of one individuals story centered around the Holocaust, The Painted Bird remained with a mysterious quality which caused readers to question the fable experiences.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at October 23, 2014 04:11 PM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
23 October 2014

Question #7: Discuss the significance of the title of Jerzy Kosinski's novel, The Painted Bird (1965). Why is it an appropriate title? What does it reference, SPECIFICALLY, from the story? What might the symbolic nature of the painted bird be, i.e., what might it represent from the narrative? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The title is in specific reference to when Lekh catches birds, paints them bright colors, and releases them back into the wild (Kosinski 51). This is symbolic of the boy's continued harassment and estrangement by the people he meets. The painted bird is apparently different, just like the boy, and as such is seen as a dangerous and evil being by the other birds. The boy is seen as different due to his hair and skin color, and therefore is considered evil by the other humans he encounters. They turn upon him, even though they are functionally the same, just as the birds were.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 23, 2014 08:25 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Kyle VanBuren
Ashley G.
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative CA01
23 October 2013

Question:
One way to understand “the boy” in Jerzy Koisnsji’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965), is as “possession.” How is the nameless boy objectified in this narrative, how is he something (to be) possessed by others? Point to as many examples as possible from the story. Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the test (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

There are numerous of examples that shows how the boy was objectified in the novel. There was the time that the boy was beat up along with Stupid Ludmila and Lekh just because he was in their group ( Kosinski 47). The time that the boy was being threatened by the carpenter, resulting in the carpenters death. Lastly, when the boy was constantly tortures by Garbos. He is possessed by others because that’s exactly what he was considered, a possession, a piece of property. When the village owners would keep him all they had to do was threaten to report him to the Germans, or kill him and he would do whatever was asked like a puppet. There is an example of this in this quote, “Garbos would take me to the house and practice, at first casually and then more eagerly, new ways of flogging me” (Kosinski 121).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at October 23, 2014 08:51 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Transformation of Narrative
23 October 2014

“I started detaching the skin with added care, pulling it slowly toward the head, when suddenly a tremor ran through the hanging body. Cold sweat covered me. I waited a moment, but the body remained still. I was reassured and, thinking it an illusion, resumed my task. Then the body twitched again. The rabbit must have only been stunned.” (Kosinski 149)
Question: In the scene where the young Gypsy boy and Makar were chasing the partially skinned rabbit, could that be a foreshadowing for a scene that occurs later on in the book?

Answer: The scene that the young gypsy boy and Makar were chasing around the partially skinned rabbit could be foreshadowing for a scene later on in there book where the Kalmuks destroyed a village where they set fire to houses and barns, rapped many women and children of the village, and attacked the men that were trying to protect their wives and daughter. This relates to the Rabbit because the rabbit was being tortured by being skinned alive just as the people of the village were being tortured by the Kalmuks. The rabbit was also being chased around, while already being severely harmed just as the villagers were being chased around by the Kalmuks, afraid to be harmed even more.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 23, 2014 09:00 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Transformation in Narrative CA01
23 October 2014

“The screams of raped women were heard in ll the houses. One girl somehow managed to escape and ran out half naked, with blood streaming down her thighs, howling like a whipped dog. Two half-naked soldiers ran after her, laughing.” (Kosinki 177)
Question: Why were the Kalmuks performing these horrible acts, as described in the quote above?

Answer: During the time, there was a lot of violence, racism, and prejudices. Which means there was a lot of hate, anger, and evil. The Kalmuks were just adding to the evil by attacking villages and hurting all the villagers by burning down their homes, raping the women and children, and hurting the men.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 23, 2014 09:34 PM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
24 October 2014

Question:
One way to understand “the boy” in Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965), is as “possession.” How is the nameless boy objectified in this narrative i.e., how is he something (to be) possessed by others? Point to as many examples as possible from the story. Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
"The boy” is seen as a possession because of his skin tone, eye and hair color. Many of the villages he visits refer to him as a “Gypsy bastard” (Kosinski 21). Therefore, many of the villages “the boy” came across for shelter and food, would mistreat him. Nobody wanted to take care of “the boy” as they found his very presence to be a bad omen. Furthermore, the various villages felt they would be punished by the Nazi’s if they were caught harboring a Jew or Gypsy. Leading to “the boy” being looked upon as a mere object, a possession, something akin to an animal that would help you carry out your daily activities.

In the village “the boy” was held as a spectacle for the villagers. Think of a performer with a monkey, in which the performer would make the monkey do tricks to appease the crowd. The man would whip “the boys” legs making him “hop like a frog” (Kosinski 26). The act amused the village men who “would roar” while “the women would titter” (Kosinski 26).
Next, “the boy” was owned by Lekh, for whom "the boy" set snares. Lekh simply kept him because he “was very small, think, and light” (Kosinski 39). Allowing the boy to “set traps in places where Lekh himself could not reach” (Kosinski 39).

Another village regarded “the boy” as entertainment. His master would order him “to display my urban language to the guests, and to recite the poems and stories I had learned” (Kosinski 61). Here “the boy” was an act, and his show was one the villagers greatly enjoyed. His presence here was simply for a laugh or a joke.

In the next village “the boy” bargained with a man claiming he would “milk his cows...and cast spells of all kinds against human and animal ills” (Kosinski 67). For food and a place to sleep, “the boy” bargained and was taken in by a man. Although, he did all those things, his real role was a spell caster. It was this skill that intrigued his patron, and was why the man bothered to give “the boy” a place to stay.

Works Cited
"Read THE PAINTED BIRD Ebooks Online." IDoc.co. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2014. .

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 23, 2014 11:16 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratvie CA02
23 October 2014

“The driver started the engine. Mitka patted me on the shoulder and urged me to uphold the honor of the Red Army. Gavrila hugged me warmly, and the others shook hands with me in turn as though I were a grownup. I wanted to cry but I kept my face straight and laced tight like a soldier’s boot.” (Kosinski 209)
Question: Why did the young Gypsy boy not want to leave Gavtila, Mitka, and the other Red Army soldiers when there was hope that his parents would find him at the orphanage.
Answer: The young Gypsy boy did not want to leave the Red Army camp because that was the first place he had been since he had to leave his parents where he was not abused. He learned many things in the Red Army camp and also made friends with the soldiers. The young Gypsy boy had been traveling alone through the villages that somewhere along the way he forgot that there was such thing as love and protection.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 23, 2014 11:22 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
23 October 2014

Question: Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird is a postmodern novel in many ways. If you are a reader looking for redemption, or hope, you probably won’t find it there. Demonstrate the “deep-rooted pessimism” in The Painted Bird by pointing out each other the places in the narrative that hopelessness occurs? What might Kosinski be trying to say about his view of humanity in the narrative?

Answer: In Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird, most of the book contains scenes where horrible acts are committed. The part of the novel where the most horrible acts happened at one time was when the Kulmuks destroyed the village and rapped many women and children, and even one man. “One of them rushed into a house and brought out a small girl of about five. He lifted her high so that his comrades could see her well. He tore off the child’s dress. He kicker her in the belly while her mother crawled in the dust begging for mercy. He slowly unbuttoned and took down his trousers, while still holding the little girl above his waist with one hand. Then he crouched and pierced the screaming child with a sudden thrust.” (Kosinski 180)
In this novel, Kosinski’s view of humanity is that we are all equal, but we do not treat each other as if we are equal just because someone may be different. This idea is illustrated when Lekh would capture birds, paint them with very colorful colors, and then release them back into the forest with their same species bird. The other birds would not recognize the colorful bird as one of their own. The birds would attack the colorful bird until it laid dead. The birds killed one of their own just for being different.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 24, 2014 12:15 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
24 October 2014

Question 3:
One postmodern theme that seems evident in Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965), is the lack of a redeeming character. The lack of any “glorified character of moral stature” (Spolier Dessert, 2012) seems to challenge Campbell’s edict that a hero must transform, in some way. But, does it? The fact that renowned critics Lev Grossman and Richard Lacayo selected this novel for Time Magazine’s “100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005” speaks to the fact that, at least, some people, find this to be a “memorable” story. Who transforms in this novel, and why? Is anyone redeemed? Point to as many examples as possible from the story. Explain your response.

Answer:
The protagonist boy within the story undergoes a transformation on his of the world and his parents. “I was weak and cold and hungry. I had no idea what to do or where to go. My Parents were still not there” (Kosinski 14). Beginning off as a naïve child, the protagonist seems lost at every turn throughout the journey. With the unending hope that his parents will return for him, he constantly wonders where and why they left him. However, a transformation does occur, the child matures throughout the story both physically as he ages and mentally, as he realizes his parents may never return. Once reconciled with the idea that he may never return home, the protagonist finds refuge in the Red Army under the supervision of Gavrila and Mitka. “But I wanted to be found by Gavrila, and therefore it was wise not to run away. I knew that rejoining my parents meant the end of all my dreams of becoming a great inventor of fuses for changing people’s color, of working in the land of Gavrila and Mitka, where today was already tomorrow” (Kosinski 226). The protagonist boy’s journey starts with a naïve child looking for his inner desires and callings, shifting between houses and only seeing the worst of the world at times. However, though his goals and dreams do not seem to possess a redeemed quality, in regards to his shifting view throughout the story, these hopes and dream present a better desire than some of his others. When the protagonist seemed at his worst, with the German power at its greatest, the boy began to think that the only way in life to become successful lied within having blonde hair, fair skin, and blue eyes. Then once the Red Army came, and the protagonist saw that many of the soldiers looked similar to him and that they overcame the German power, he saw that hope and a bright future did exist outside of being a German soldier. Now though this redeeming transformation of disappointing viewpoints and the more typical transformation of maturations and shifting of desires, the unnamed boy connects to the hero archetype through these changes. From village to village, the boy learned something new and exotic aiding in his transformation of maturity, knowledge, and self-worth/desires through the novel.

Work Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 24, 2014 07:09 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
24 October 2014

Question #7- Discuss the significance of the title of Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird(1965). Why is it an appropriate title? What does it reference, specifically, from the story? What might the symbolic nature of the painted bird be, i.e., what might it represent from the narrative? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The idea of the painted bird comes from chapter 5 in the story, and refers to what Lekh does with his collection of birds. Some days he would have some rage built up in him, and choose the strongest bird he had and would paint it a different color and release it to the forest. This was a very cruel act to do because once the other birds in the forest saw a bird that appeared different from it’s own kind, a flock would swarm and attack the painted bird and would usually kill it. “The Painted Bird circled from one end of the flock to the other, vainly trying to convince its kin that it was one of them. But, dazzled by its brilliant colors, they flew around it unconvinced.” (Kosinski 51) This is an appropriate title because it represents the trials that the boy is going through because he looks different from everyone. The area he is in does not have people with dark hair and dark eyes like he does, but people automatically assume it makes him a gypsy and not one of them. The crowds do the same things to him as the other birds did to the painted bird; they see someone that looks different from the rest, and their reaction is to attack and get that outcast away from the community.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 24, 2014 08:25 AM

do-over Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 October 2014

"While the adults usually left me alone, I had to watch out for the village boys"

Question: What are some of the things that the village boys do to the gypsy boy? (Chapter 9, page 163, par 6)

Answer: They threw "soap" (land mines) at him. They found broken rifles in the woods and they would take them apart and shorten them down so they could use them and they would shoot at him; they also shot at each other when the got into fights. The boys would also play jokes on the gypsy boy as well as each other by putting bullets into a boys comet so when it was lit the bullets would explode. "When the unsuspecting boy lit his comet in the morning, and swung it between his legs, the cartridges went off" (Kosinki 164).

Posted by: summer taylor at October 24, 2014 08:39 AM

do-over Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 October 2014

"I pondered various ways of casting a spell on Garbos, but nothing seamed feasible." (Chapter 11 page 199, par 2)

Question: How does the boy try to place a spell on Garbos? What happens?

Answer: The boy tries several ways to place a spell on Garbos. One of these ways is by catching a certain kind of moth and breathing on it three times. This is suppose to kill the oldest member of the family. The boy found the certain type of moth, but the spell backfired on him and his spell killed a pet turtle that was actually older than Garbos. "I rushed in there, hoping to find him breathing his last and calling for the priest, but he was only bending over the dead body of a small dead turtle he had inherited from his grandfather" (Kosinki 200).

Posted by: summer taylor at October 24, 2014 08:49 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
24 October 2014

Question: 10. It is noteworthy that Jerzy Kosiński’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965) has representations or references to “concentration camp scenes, no descriptions of mass slaughter, and hardly any Nazis” (Septimus). Yet, when it was published in 1965, the book “was lauded as one of the most poignant and powerful evocations of the Holocaust, particularly because it was not a prototypical example of WWII literature.” (Septimus). Obviously, the novel is work of fiction, and obviously, the Holocaust itself is not fictional. So, how do we, as readers, reconcile the two (if we are to believe the novel’s initial accolades)? In other words, how can a fictional (and fable-like) narrative also seem so “true” for so many persons who experienced (and students who have studied) the historical Holocaust? Can a collective experience be condensed/reduced to the experience of one, fictional individual, such as the protagonist of The Painted Bird? If so, how? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: I feel as readers we look to the real facts even though I know this may be a work of fiction what it based off of is real for example just because the kid might not be truly real that most likely happened to many other real little boys. This was a time where families were being split and that was the last they saw them. This fictional book shows his bad experience but through him we can inference what a lot of other behaviors too form others around him. He even sees a man being beaten and had his eyes removed form his head for no reason.(Kosinski 39) All though the collective experience was so heavy you feel I can not be carried by just one boy but it is him and with in him that you can see that collective group going through that experience he sees what’s happening to all groups even to him this helps us get a real understanding of things that happened during the holocaust. Furthermore, this book and the adventure they take you on through the little boys eyes gives you very good description of the tragedy we call the holocaust.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 24, 2014 08:50 AM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
19 OCT 2014

Question 3:
One postmodern theme seems evident in Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965), is the lack of a redeeming character. The lack of any “glorified character of moral stature” (Spoiler Dessert, 2012) seems to challenge Campbell’s edict that a hero must transform, in some way. But does it? The fact that renowned critics Lev Grossman and Richard Lacayo selected this novel for Times magazine’s “100 Best English Language Novels from 1923 to 2005” speaks to the fact that, at least, some people, find this to be a “memorable” story. Who transforms in this novel, and why? Is anyone redeemed? Point to as many examples as possible from the story. Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
In the Painted bird, the one person who transforms in this book to me is the young boy. There are many reasons why he has transformed in this book. One example is when the lady dies and he leaves to go to another village to not be captured by the Germans. He transforms from getting away of being a young boy because he is thinking outside the box. He is thinking that he is on his own and cannot survive on his own. He gets bought by a lady named Olga and he lives in her hut. “Olga showed me everything. Henceforth I had to take care of the fire, bring faggots from the forest and clean the stalls of animals. The hut was full of varied powders, which Olga prepared in a large mortar, grinding up and mixing the different components. I had to help her with this” (Kosinski pg.18) Throughout the book, the young boy transforms because he constantly thinks of his parents but has to get accustomed to his new lifestyle.

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 24, 2014 08:56 AM

do-over Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 October 2014

"He would unleash Judas ad threaten to set him against the slanders." (Chapter 11, page 129, par 7)

Question: What would the other villagers say about Garbos and his Jewish girl that he used to take care of?

Answer: The villagers would make fun of Garbos when his crops died or his animals got sick and they would say it was because of how he had treated a young Jewish boarder that had run away from her parents. He would beat and rape the girl, and force her to commit other acts that they would only allude to. "They would say he used to beat he daily, rape her, and force her to commit depravities until she finally vanished" (Kosinski 129).

Posted by: summer taylor at October 24, 2014 09:01 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 October 2014

Question #4: Jerzy Kosiński’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965) seems to be “an exercise in
violence and the depravity of people, who victimize each other without
hesitation” (Spoiler Dessert, 2012). Consider this passage: “The only law was
the traditional right of the stronger and wealthier over the weaker and poorer.”
Here, Kosinski introduces the theme of class conflict into the mix of injustice.
Point to as many examples as possible from the story where this conflict
occurs. What is the significance of this theme to the story?

Answer: Since this book's time period is the Holocaust, it goes into different types of classes. The first class is the Germans. They perceive themselves as "better" and of a "higher" class than others because they are white skinned and mostly have blonde hair and blue eyes. The other class of people that is explored in this book are the Jewish and the Gypsy class. This class is thought down of because of their religion and their features. These people normally have a bit of an olive coloring to their skin and have dark hair and dark eyes. They were looked down on by the German people because of these reasons and because Hitler told the Germans to think this way or run the risk of him and his soldiers killing their families for helping the Jewish and Gypsies. There are many examples of class wars and prejudices in The Painted Bird because this is what almost the entire book is about. One of the best examples of this is in Chapter 11 of the book. "Pointing to me he shouted that one look was enough to tell that I was an unbaptized Gypsy bastard... He argued that keeping me might expose him to great danger, since the German often visited the village, and if they found me it would be too late for any intervention" (Kosinski 128).

Posted by: summer taylor at October 24, 2014 09:38 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
23 October 2014
QUESTION:
5. Remember that, at the end of Jerzy Kosiński’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965), the child is given a book that is about Russian author Maxim Gorky’s childhood. It has been suggested that the collective work of Gorky (a.) demonstrates a casual violence in which (b.) “characters are killed offhand with little dramatic attention” showing (c.) “the world through the horrible actions of its people,” sometimes (d.) “through the visage of children.” Show how Kosinski “tipped his cap” to Gorky by using these same themes (a. to d.) in The Painted Bird (Spoiler Dessert, 2012). Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

ANSWER:
The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosiński tells the tragic story of a young boy who was separated from his parents at tender age due to war, and had to endure abuse after his foster family died. Kosiński book mirrors that of Maxim Gorky’s Childhood as it gives a casual air to horrifying abuse, which compounded by the fact that it is from the viewpoint of a child. “I read my first book with Gavrila’s assistance. It was called Childhood and its hero, a small boy like me lost his father on the first page.” (Kosiński 186), the beginning of both stories is marked by tragedy and is seen when compared. For Gorky to tell the death of his father on the first page illustrates lack of dramatic attention, which is mirrored again by Kosiński, “And with a rapid…onto the floor” (Kosiński 38), the miller gouges out the eyes of his ploughboy over then rocks himself to sleep only after stepping on the expelled eyeball. Gruesome as the act is the miller persona is that of it being a mundane task. Consequently, this act is view by the young hero of the book the miller’s children making this scene seem like a page out of Gorky’s Childhood.

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 24, 2014 11:18 AM

10. It is noteworthy that Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, the Painted Bird (1965) has representations or references to “concentration camp scenes, no descriptions of mass slaughter, and hardly any Nazis” (Septimus). Yet, when it was published in 1965, the book “was lauded as one of the most poignant and powerful evocations of the Holocaust, particularly because it was not a prototypical example of WWII literature.” (Septimus). Obviously, the novel is work of fiction, and obviously, the Holocaust itself is not fictional. So, how do we, as readers, reconcile the two (if we are to believe the novel’s initial accolades)? In other words, how can a fictional (and fable-like) narrative also seem so “true” for so many persons who experienced (and students who have studied) the historical Holocaust? Can a collective experience be condensed/reduced to the experience of one, fictional individual, such as the protagonist of The Painted Bird? If so, how?
I believe that it is true that the collective experience of many can be reduced to the experience of one. I believe that the Painted Bird, although it is fictional, clearly shows the reality of what happened during the Holocaust. During that time, there were many people opposing against the Nazis and people feared for their lives and those of their families. “Because of the prewar anti-Nazi activities, …, they had to go into hiding to avoid forced labor in Germany or imprisonment in a concentration camp.” (Kosinski 3). Also in the Holocaust, people of Gypsy or Jewish descent were put under “the harshest penalties at the hands of the Germans.” (Kosinski 4). In conclusion, I believe that the experiences of the protagonist in the book truly reflect the life conditions during the Holocaust of many people that were victims of the German Nazis.

Posted by: abrar Nooh at October 24, 2014 06:15 PM

Abrar Nooh
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL
24 October 2014

“All cats are the same in the dark, says the proverb. But it certainly did not apply to people” (Chapter 19, page 231)

Question: This passage talks about how people are so alike during the day but at night they were the complete opposite. What did they boy see during his night prowl to make him think this way?

Answer: The boy had noticed that during day time people look very similar “running in their well-defined ways” (Kosinski 231). On the other hand, at night time men would be drinking and women would wear very short, and tight clothes while waiting for men to ask for their services. The book makes it easy for the reader to understand what services the women were giving to the men in the following passage; “From behind the anemic city shrubbery one heard the squeals of couples making love” (Kosinski 231). Furthermore, people engaged in criminal activities that “could get them years in prison” (Kosinski 232). The world was at war at night time since the militia would organize manhunts and civilians would even dare to kill soldiers (Kosinski 232).

Posted by: abrar Nooh at October 24, 2014 06:15 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
26 October 2014

QUESTION:
Jerzy Kosinski’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965) is a postmodern novel, in many ways. If you are a reader looking for redemption, or hope, you probably won’t find it there. Demonstrate the “deep-rooted pessimism” (Spoiler Dessert, 2012) in The Painted Bird by pointing out each of the places in the narrative that hopelessness occurs? What might Kosinski be trying to say about his view of humanity in this narrative? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
In The Painted Bird novel, there has been several moments where hopelessness occurs. Throughout the entire book the boy had occasions where he found himself being desperate, without hope. In the beginning, the six year old boy was left behind by his parents because they thought he would have a better chance to survive than he would have had if he stayed with them. After his parents leave him he is abandoned and by his looks, he is considered Gypsy and for some reason the local peasants despised and hated him. The hate slowly became cruel and heartless treatment; the boy becomes a victim of various kinds of physical and mental health. “In sending their child away the parents believed that it was the best means of assuring his survival through the war” (Kosinski, 3). “No one wanted to keep me. Food was scarce and every mouth was a burden to feed. Besides, there was no work for me to do. One could not even clear manure out of barns which were banked up to the eaves by snow. People shared their shelter with hens, calves, rabbits, pigs, goats, and horses, men and animals warming each other with the heat of their bodies. But there was no room for me” (Kosinski, 77). Kosinski was trying to show his personal views of humanity in the narrative. He wanted to show his readers his aspects and opinions on wars in different countries; how millions of people have to live while a war is going on in their country. Readers have found the novel to be an example of the Holocaust in a child’s perspective.

Work Citied:
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976. Print.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at October 27, 2014 12:01 AM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
29 October 2014

“’You can come with us,’ he said. ‘Don’t say any more. Poor fellow.’”

(Ch 17. The Shining Wire: Watership Down, page 118, par. 4)


Question: The group of rabbits were attempting to make it up the hill but it had may wires. The author suggests that a rabbit was injured - how?
Answer: The group of rabbits recognized Strawberry, a deceitful rabbit – “Strawberry came through the hedge by the crab-apple tree…” “We don’t care for creatures who deceive us” (Adams, 118). The author suggests that the rabbit was injured - In a “pitiful whimper, he said, ‘the wires’” (Adams, 118).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 28, 2014 10:31 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2015

“Spring was coming. Ice was breaking up on the river and low rays of the sun penetrated the slippery coils and eddies of the rushing water. Blue dragonflies hovered above the current, struggling with the sudden bursts of cold, wet wind. Wraiths of moisture rising from the sun-warmed surface of the lake were seized upon by the gusts and eddies of the wind and then teased out like wisp of wool and drawn up into the turbulent air.” (Chapter 2: page 22, par. 1, Kosinski)

Question: This passage refers to an unusual occurrence coming. What was the “unusual” occurrence coming to many women and their babies? Who did the people go searching for help and mercy?

Answer: The “unusual” occurrence coming to the women and their babies was a massive plague. Kosinski writes, “Yet when the eagerly expected warmer weather came at last, it brought along a plague. The people whom it struck, wiggled with pain like transfixed earthworms, were shaken by a ghastly chill, and died without regaining consciousness.” (Kosinski 22) This passage tells what danger the women and babies were in. However, they had no choice to deal with it and suffer from it. The disease had built into a monster and practically taken each life away in an instant. The people were in search of God when this dastardly plague came. Kosinski also writes, “The villagers would come to the thresholds of their huts, raise their eyes from the earthly dust, and search for God. He alone could assuage their bitter sorrow. He alone could bestow the mercy of serene sleep on these tormented human bodies.” (Kosinski 22) This passage seems as if the people are desperate for their lives. They wanted Him to help. People wondered if God would answer their prayer, but God did not come. Instead, He waited and watched the torment they went through.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 20, 2015 01:28 AM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
20 February 2015

“I stared at a few of them straight in the eye, and they would rapidly avert their eyes or spit three times and drop their eyes.” Page 17

Question: In this passage, the main character is intentionally staring directly into the eyes of those who abused him. Why does he do this?

Answer: The main character does so because Marta told him that, because of his, “Gypsy eyes” (Kosinski, 9), he could bring “illness, plague, or death,” (Kosinski, 9) to anyone or anything with whom he made eye contact. Thus, in this passage, the main character is attempting to get revenge on those who have mistreated him by attempting to curse them with great illnesses and possibly death.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 20, 2015 11:52 AM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
20 February 2015
“Her withered body constantly trembled as though shaken by some inner wind, and the fingers of her bony hands with joints twisted by disease never stopped quivering as her head on its long scraggy neck nodded in every direction (Chapter 1, pg. 6, par. 2).”

Questions: This passage refers to the overall condition of the main character’s caretaker. How does the main character view Martha as a person?


Answers: He views Martha as just another elderly people as well as shown a sense of sympathy and appreciation towards for taking care him when his mother passed. He explains, “She was old and always bent over, as though she wanted to break herself in half but could not. Her long hair, never combed, had knotted itself into innumerable thick braids impossible to unravel (Kosinski 5).”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at February 20, 2015 12:14 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative
20 February 2015


“As a I drifted across the lake, I felt haunted by a sense of hopelessness; not merely loneliness, or the fear of my wife’s death, but a sense of anguish directly connected to the emptiness of the post-war peace conferences.”

Question: The quoted passage above reflects some of the writing of Kosinski. The Jewish boy described in the opening pages also has some knowledge of political events. What other passages suggest that this boy is knowledgeable on geopolitics.

Answer: For the young Jewish boy growing up under very challenging conditions there is a sense that he must be aware of current events for his own benefit and even survival. There are many reasons that knowing about the happenings in the world would benefit him. This information could impact the characters ability or inability to re connect with his parents. The young Jewish boy expresses some interest in science and literature when Kosinski acknowledges “I began to reexamine my past and decided to turn from my studies of social science to fiction. Unlike politics, which offered only extravagant promises of a Utopian future, I knew fiction could present lives as they truly lived.”

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at February 20, 2015 12:59 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
20 February 2015


“We arrive at a farm. I smelled manure and heard the bleating of a goat and the mooing of a cow. I was dumped on the floor of a hut and someone whacked the sack with a whip. I leapt out of the sack, bursting through the tied-up neck as if burned. The peasant stood there with a whip in his hand. He brought it down on my legs. I hopped around like a squirrel while he continued whipping me. People entered the room: a woman in a stained, pulled-up apron, small children who crawled out like cockroaches from the feather bed and from behind the oven, and two farmhands.” (Kosinski 7-8)

Question: This passage refers to the boy’s experience right after being kidnapped from the village street after Marta’s death. How do you think his reactions show his emotions about his new situation?

Answer: Kosinski’s young boy was “chilled and terrified” (7) upon entering the village, which he is tormented and kidnapped on the village street. When arriving at the farm, his fear is evident from his “bursting through the tied-up neck as if burned” (7), illustrating an example of human’s flight or fight reaction. Furthermore, his comparison of his reaction to that of “a squirrel” connects back to Chapter 1’s incident of the neighborhood boys lighting his squirrel friend on fire (Kosinski 3).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 20, 2015 01:01 PM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 On a Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 February 2015

“Although Olga spoke in a strange dialect, we came to understand each other quite well. In the winter when a storm raged and the village was in the tight embrace of impossible snows, we would sit together in the warm hut and Olga would tell me of all God’s Children and of all Satan’s spirits. She called me the Black One.” (Chapter 2, page 17-18).

Question:

In Chapter Two of The Painted Bird, (a.) Why does Olga believe the narrator is that of God’s Children or Satan’s spirits? (b.) What were the properties of being one of God’s children/Satan’s spirits and how does Olga handle the narrator being one of God’s children/Satan’s spirits?

Answer:

Olga believes the narrator is “possessed by an evil spirit” (Kosinski 17). Olga realized that the narrator was possessed because she “recognized by his bewitched black eyes [that] did not blink when they gazed at bright green eyes” (Kosinski 17). That doesn’t faze Olga though because every morning she would “prepare a bitter elixir [the narrator] had to drink while eating a chunk of garlic charcoal” (Kosinski 18). That elixir restrained the evil spirit within the narrator.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at February 20, 2015 01:03 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
20 February 2015

"The snake sank into immobility with only very slow shivers running along its coiled body. Then calmly it crawled out of its skin, looking suddenly thinner and younger." (Chapter 1 pg. 7)


Question: In Chapter 1 of The Painted Bird, the boy noticed that the snake would shed its skin and became like new. How does this affect the way he thinks about Marta's death. How does the boy act during the fire towards Marta?


Answer: In this chapter, the boy says that he came to the conclusion that Marta was waiting for a change of skin like the snake, and he determined she was not to be disturbed (Kosinski 11). He said, "I went back to sleep, having nothing else to do, confident that when I woke up Marta would be scurrying around the kitchen humming her mournful psalms." (Kosinski 11). He thinks that she is shedding her skin like the snake did when the snake went into hiding.
During the fire, the boy tried his best to wait for Marta to get out of the chair and get out of the fire. He called out to Marta, and then when she did not mover, the boy had to leave. (Kosinski 12).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at February 20, 2015 01:19 PM

(REDO) T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2015

“Spring was coming. Ice was breaking up on the river and low rays of the sun penetrated the slippery coils and eddies of the rushing water. Blue dragonflies hovered above the current, struggling with the sudden bursts of cold, wet wind. Wraiths of moisture rising from the sun-warmed surface of the lake were seized upon by the gusts and eddies of the wind and then teased out like wisps of wool and drawn up into the turbulent air.” (Chapter 2: page 22, par. 1, Kosinski)

Question: This passage refers to an unusual occurrence about to come. What was the unusual occurrence coming to many women and their babies? Who did the people go searching for help and mercy?

Answer: The unusual occurrence coming to the women and their babies was a massive plague. Kosinski writes, “Yet when the eagerly expected warmer weather came at last, it brought along a plague. The people whom it struck, wiggled with pain like transfixed earthworms, were shaken by a ghastly chill, and died without regaining consciousness.” (Kosinski 22) This passage tells what danger the women and babies were in. However, they had no choice to deal with it and suffer from it. The disease had built into a monster and practically taken each life away in an instant. The people were in search of God when this dastardly plague came. Kosinski also writes, “The villagers would come to the thresholds of their huts, raise their eyes from the earthly dust, and search for God. He alone could assuage their bitter sorrow. He alone could bestow the mercy of serene sleep on these tormented human bodies.” (Kosinski 22) This passage seems as if the people are desperate for their lives. They wanted Him to help. People wondered if God would answer their prayer, but God did not come. Instead, He waited and watched the torment they went through.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 20, 2015 01:57 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
20 February 2015

"She called me the Black One. From her I learned for the first time that I was possessed by an evil spirit, which crouched in me like a mole in a deep burrow, and whose presence I was unaware." (Kosinski 20)

Question: From this passage, how does the young boy seem to feel about the new identity Olga has given him?

Answer: The young boy seems to be both anxious and accepting of this new identity that Olga has introduced him to. He proceeds to explain the different factors that also come along with being known as the 'Black One' (Kosinski 20). The young boy says, "What is more, pregnant women would run away from in panic" (Kosinski 21). This statement is another indication of how he has to deal with people either avoiding him or being scared of him.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 23, 2015 09:39 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 February 2015

"Then we would go into the thick of the forest. There Lekh took out the painted bird and ordered me to hold it in my hand and squeeze it lightly. The bird would begin to twitter and attract a flock of the same species which would fly nervously over our heads. Our prisoner, hearing them, strained toward them, warbling more loudly, its little heart, looked in its freshly painted breast, beating violently." (Kosinski 50)

Question: When the young boy says "Our prisoner, hearing them, strained toward them, warbling more loudly, its little heart, looked in its freshly painted breast, beating violently", what symbolic meaning/description is his statement indicating?

Answer: This statement the young boy makes is symbolic of his current life hardship of dealing with isolation from his family. His description of the bird represented his anger towards the struggles he was living through and his life, in general. Symbolically, the bird is representing the young boy, and the bird's flustered actions are representing the young boy's emotional struggle.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 23, 2015 12:18 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
23 February 2015

“I was myself now a bird. I was trying to free my chilled wings from the earth. Stretching my limbs, I joined the flock of ravens. Borne abruptly up on a gust of fresh, reviving wind, I soared straight into a ray of sunshine that lay taut on the horizon like a drawn bowstring, and my joyous cawing was mimicked by my winged companions (Ch. 2, pg. 50, par. 3).

Questions: This passage refers to the main character’s feeling of acceptance. How does this say about the main character’s opinion about the situation?


Answers: He feels that he’s connected to the bird in a sense that he sees himself as one of them. He further explains that “I was myself now a bird” which seems as if it’s a form of symbolism of how truly connected he is to his birds. He even goes as far as imagining him “soaring straight into a ray of sunshine that lay taut on the horizon like a drawn bowstring (Kosinski 50).”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at February 23, 2015 12:30 PM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 February 2015

"Once a lonely pigeon joined the flock. He was clearly unwelcome." (Kosinski, Chapter 1, Page 6)

Question: Could the pigeon be a metaphor for the boy who is trying to find a place to stay, with people who aren't like him.

Answer: The pigeon is not necessarily welcome with the hens because of the difference in looks. This is the same as the boy trying to join communities that he does not fit in at. It says, "Once a lonely pigeon joined the flock. He was clearly unwelcome." (Kosinski 6) This is the same for the boy, he is lonely because he doesn't have his parents around, and his foster Mom died.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at February 23, 2015 12:30 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
20 February 2015

“When I awoke, Lekh was still kneeling by Ludmila’s body, his hunched back shaken by sobs” (Page 55-56. last paragraph of page 55 to the first sentence on page 56)

Question: In this passage, we see Lekh sobbing over the body of his lover. How did she die?
Answer: Ludmila dies to an angry mob of women who find her sleeping with the men of the village. They began, “beating her with rakes, ripping her skin with their fingernails, tearing out her hair, spitting into her face” (Kosinski, 54). They then violated her with a bottle and kicked her until she had died.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 23, 2015 12:53 PM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 February 2015

"Lekh viewed bats with disgust, regarding them the emissaries of evil spirits, looking for fresh victims, capable of attaching themselves to a human scalp and infusing sinful desires into the brain." ( Kosinski, Chapter 5, Page 45)

Question: How does Lekh feel about bats?

Answer: Lekh has multiple views on birds and animals. He believes that they have a direct correlation of the way people's lives go. Bats are one animal that he does not appreciate. He goes so far to say, "Lekh viewed bats with disgust, regarding them the emissaries of evil spirits, looking for fresh victims, capable of attaching themselves to a human scalp and infusing sinful desires into the brain."(Kosinski, 45) He pretty much thinks of bats as evil spirits, while other birds he thinks of as people.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at February 23, 2015 12:54 PM

Duane Daye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 February 2015

“Sometimes the quarrel did not end. The enraged miller lit candles in the room, put on his boots, and beat his wife. I would cling to a crack in the floorboards and watch the miller lashing his naked wife with a horsewhip. The woman cowered behind a feather quilt tugged off the bed, but the man pulled it away, flung it on the floor, and standing over her with his legs spread wide continued to lash her plump body with the whip. After every stroke, red blood-swollen lines would appear on her tender skin.” (Chapter 4, page 34, par. 3)

Question: According to the story, why did the miller beat his wife with a horse whip repeatedly until she crawled towards him and beg forgiveness? Where was the boy the entire time this was happening and did he try to stop the situation?

Answer: The miller was enraged because supposedly “his wife of flirting and lasciviously displaying her body in the fields and in the mill before a young plowboy” (Kosinski 34). The boy was asleep in the miller’s attic and was “was awakened by their quarrels” (Kosinski 34) in the middle of the night. The boy did not get involved and instead just sat back and watch from a crack inside the floorboard.

Posted by: Duane Daye at February 23, 2015 01:05 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 February 2015

"The woman breathed heavily, placed her hands under her breasts and squeezed them, clearly unaware of herself." (Chapter 4, page 38).

Question: In this chapter, the boy is staying at the miller's home with his family. The passage above refers the wife's actions at the dinner table with the miller and the plowboy. What does the miller do after this towards the plowboy? How does his wife react?

Answer: After the wife did this, the miller whispered something in the plowboys ear and asked him if he lusted after his wife. He also pushed him against the wall when he tried to leave and gouged an eye out with a kitchen tool. After that, he pushed him and kicked him out of his home. The miller's wife initially tried to stop the miller from hurting the plowboy, but when he gouged an eye out, she screamed and ran for her children in their rooms. (Kosinki 37-38)

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at February 23, 2015 01:25 PM

Bobbi Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
English 220CL
20 February 2015
From pages 19-20
“Although Olga spoke in a strange dialect, we came to understand each other quite well.”(Kosinki,19).

Q: The boy is referred to as “the black one” in the book, how does this description describe more than just his appearance thus far in the story?
A: For the boy, Olga and Marta both tell him his black eyes will cast spells if he looks directly into another beings eyes. However, Olga tells him that if he looks into a sick persons eyes he is able to remove the illness which plagues them. “Olga would tell me of all God’s children and all of Satan’s spirits.”(Kosinski, 19). Olga teaches the boy, how to maintain the hut which the share and various medical remedies she herself makes. But he is still seen as trash to the villagers when he walks by himself. He is also more educated than most of the other people, despite this he is made fun of as if the opposite were true. But is appearance and is actions both combine to have people view him as the black sheep.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at February 23, 2015 01:34 PM

Bobbi K Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL
23 February 2015
“It all ad happened in a moment. I could not believe what I had seen. Something like a glimmer of hope crossed my mind that the gouged eyes could be put back where they belonged.” (Kosinski, 38).
Q: How does this moment effect the main character?
A: This moment, is one of the first moments, were the main character is exposed to blunt and brutal actions of the world. It does not directly cause him to become cold or closed off, rather to take in the experience of what is happening and take away a learning moment. He is constantly learning from the events, which are taking place around him. “The miller, paying no attention to me, seated himself on the bench and swayed slowly as he fell asleep. I stood up cautiously, lifted the bloodied spoon from the floor and began to gather the dishes.” (Kosinski, 39). This statement, shows that the actions which just took place, are not things that are viewed as out of the regular norm. Even though the boy, is startled by what just happened, he stills learns to go about his usual business.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at February 23, 2015 01:48 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 CA01
23 February 2013
“ I marveled at Marta. Was she really so indifferent to all this? Had her charms and incantations granted her.” “She still had not come out. The heat was becoming unbearable. I had to move to the far end of the yard.”(Chapter 1 Kosinkiski page 13.)
Question: What was going on that Marta overtly showed indifference too? Also, why would she use charms in the first place?
Answer: The house was on fire, and Marta didn’t care, possibly do to her old age as she was described to be “ A snake ready to molt.” She had started making incantations because she believed that the boy was a demons of sorts, possibly due to anti-Jewish propaganda .”

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at February 23, 2015 02:17 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 February 2015
Pgs. 43-44: The Painted Bird

“Lekh had no family. His hut was filled with birds of all varieties, from the common sparrow to the wise owl. The peasants battered food for Lekh’s birds, and he did not have to worry about essentials: milk, butter, sour cream, cheeses, bread, hunter’s sausage, vodka, fruits, and even cloth. He would collect all this from the nearby villages while carrying around his caged birds and hawking their beauty and signing abilities” (Chapter 5, page 42, par. 3 Kosinski).

Question: What is Lekh most passionate about and how does he keep up with his daily routine in pursuing this interest? What does he do when he sees birds that looked abandoned?

Answer: Lekh is passionate about collecting birds “from the common sparrow to the wise owl” (Kosinski 42). He upholds his collection by having intelligence about each bird he collected and studied. Kosinski also says he “understood secrets of the hawk’s flight and admired the stork’s patience in hunting for frogs. He envied the nightingale its song” (Kosinski 43). This passage relates to Lekh’s passion for birds because he likes the nature of all birds and is willing to keep them safe in every way possible. He remained inside his hut comforting each bird he collected. Kosinski mentions when Lekh was a young boy, he escaped his home and came across different kinds of forests and started to catch birds. Kosinski then writes, “He knew the courting habits of the bullfinch; jealous fury of the landrail, circling a nest abandoned by its female; and the sorrow of the swallow whose nesting place was wantonly destroyed by young boys” (Kosinski 43). This passage narrates that Lekh uplifts each abandoned bird or nest and attempts to nourish each one to keep them alive. Lekh was the only man that knew how to care for the birds he collected and studied.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 23, 2015 02:18 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 February 2015
Pgs 71-72 of Painted Bird

“Tired by the sun and by my uncomfortable position, I dozed off into half-sleep. I dreamed I was a squirrel, crouching in a dark tree hole and watching with irony the world below. I suddenly became a grasshopper with long, springy legs, on which I sailed across great tracts of land. Now and then, as if through fog, I heard the voices of the drivers, the neighing of the horse, and squeaking of the wheels” (Chapter 7, page 71, par. 3 Kosinski)

Question: What is the irony the young boy narrating the story sees when he hears the drivers’ voices, neighing of horses, and squeaking of the wheels?

Answer: The young boy had sprung up into place because the German soldiers were coming into the village. The peasants did not quite know what to do at this moment, but tried to imitate the soldiers standing at attention. The irony was when one soldier approached the young boy and inspected him. He did not have a clue on what was going on. Kosinski writes, “The bespectacled soldier approached me, wordlessly untied the rope with which I had been tied to the cart, looped one end of the rope around his wrist, and with a movement of his hand ordered me to follow him” (Kosinski 72). This explains the young boy was uncertain how to react to the actions of the soldier. However, he was too afraid to think what would happen to him if he did follow the soldier. He thought to himself that he would be shot or even burned alive. He began to think of the many ways he could die but did not have a good idea on to what was going to be his fate.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 23, 2015 08:53 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03
24 February 2015
The Painted Bird
Quote: “With my friend dead I no longer had anyone to wait for in the morning. I told Marta what had happened, but she did not seem to understand. She muttered something to herself, prayed, and cast her secret enchantment over the household to ward off death, which, she maintained, was lurking close by and trying to enter.” (Kosinski 8)
Question: Why is it that he thought of squirrel as his friend? Why may it seem that Marta is thinking that death may be “lurking close by”?
Answer: Since it seemed that the boy never went out, was always in the hut, and that none of the villagers liked him he did not have many friends. The squirrel was the only living being that was around him quite a bit, because of that he considered the squirrel that “visited the hut … daily” his friend (Kosinski 7). I think that Marta thinks that death is coming and is nearby, because the squirrel had died, and she may just have that kind of feeling. Many people have that kind of feeling and fear that can come and go, and may mean something. Even though later on the readers do find out that Marta does die.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at February 24, 2015 05:38 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03
24 February 2015

The Painted Bird

Quote: “The most important hour of his [Lekh’s] day was nearing. A woman locally nicknamed Stupid Ludmila was waiting for him in some distant forest clearing known only to the two of them. I would proudly trot behind him, the bag of twitching birds slung over my shoulder” (Kosinski 47).

Question: Who is Stupid Ludmila, and why is she called this? Why does he fear her?

Answer: Ludmila is known as Stupid Ludmila. She is a “strange …[large] built and [above average height] … woman” that lived in the forest (Kosinski 47). He feared her because of the way that she looks, and that she lived in the forest. The village people picked her on and had stories made up about her; Lekh never told her about them. She lived in the forest because of her horrible fiancé that “enticed her outside the village where an entire herd of drunken peasants raped her until she lost consciousness” all because she refused to marry her fiancé.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at February 24, 2015 07:40 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
23 February 2015

“ I watched them with fascination. If the miller had not been there I myself would have taken them. Surely they could still see. I would keep them in my pocket and take them out when needed, placing them over my own. Then I would see twice as much, maybe even more. Perhaps I could attach them to the back of my head and they would tell me, though I was not quite certain how, what went on behind me. Better still, I could leave the eyes somewhere and they would tell me later what happened during my absence” (Kosinski pg. 39, para 1).

Question: This passage is referring to the seven-year old boy’s thoughts regarding the plowboy’s eyes that were gouged out by the miller. Why would a young boy think of these kinds of uses for eyes that “could still see” and in what ways does this refer to his difficult life circumstances?

Answer: In Kosinski’s The Painted Bird, the child lives a forced nomadic lifestyle since his parents sent “to the shelter of a distant village” (1). Since then the boy has encounter many different people and places. This need to see twice as much, see things happening behind him, both physically and metaphorically, represents his need for “protection against dogs and people” (28). While after the gouging incident, the boy wonders is losing sight also “deprives a person…of the memory of everything he had seen” (40) which prompts him to remember everything he witnesses his entire life.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 24, 2015 08:06 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
24 February 2015


Question: Pages 68-69, who was the blacksmith, and did he actually provide support to the Germans. How were the partisans so sure of the fact that the blacksmith was indeed supporting the Germans? What did the partisans want from the blacksmith?


Answer: The blacksmith was a common person with an uncommon skill, this skill making him a major asset for soldiers from both sides of the war. The blacksmith did provide support to the Germans for a return in currency, although he was supposed to be on the partisan’s side, therefore he was viewed as a traitor and beaten. The partisans who came to the blacksmiths home were not positive that there accusations were justified by any means, but they acted as brute soldiers and nothing was going to stop them at that time.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at February 24, 2015 08:12 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
20 February 2015

Pg. 20

“This evil spirit with dwelled in me attracted by its very nature other mysterious beings.” (Kosinski 20)

Question: In this passage, the young boy explains his being. According to his statement, does the boy understand how his new identity will alter his life? Explain.

Answer: in this passage, the young boy seems to be learning how to accept and cope with his new identity. The young boy is beginning to understand how his life will alter with this evil spirit taking his life into a different direction before he met Olga. So yes, the evil spirit that has been identified inside of the young boy is causing him to accept the reality of his new life (Kosinski 20).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 24, 2015 08:43 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
19 February 2015

“I slept and woke by turns. The wind raged over the graves, hanging wet leaves on the arms of the crosses. The spirits moaned, and the dogs could be heard howling in the village.” (Kosinski 54).

Question: explain the setting, mood of Ludmila’s passing, and how it effected Lekh?

Answer: the setting and mood is based on Lekh’s devastation about Ludmila’s death. The atmosphere was gloomy and melancholy. Lekh was impacted to the point of depression and did not find the interest to associate with anyone.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 24, 2015 09:29 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
25 February 2015

“I wore big wooden shoes bound with long strips of cloth. The width of the footwear, coupled with my light weight, enabled me to move over snow quite well without sinking to my waist. Wrapped up to my eyes, I roamed the countryside freely, meeting no one but ravens” (Kosinski pg. 75, para. 2).

Question: The passage is referring to the boy’s life during winter, how does he feel about the circumstances that are brought about by the winter? Does he share in the sentiments of the villagers or does he hold other opinions?”

Answer: The boy shares the opposite sentiment of the villagers. The villagers remain shacked up with livestock while he can roam “the countryside freely.” Acquiring sufficient food was no task since he could “easily scare them [dogs] away” with his various distraction technique and comet. The “heat of the comet” provided comfortable warmth that lasted all night (74-75).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 24, 2015 09:42 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
24 February 2015

“All I could hear was the tumult of voices. No one followed me. I knew I could never go back there. I continued into the forest, looking carefully through the undergrowth where there were still many cartridges, soaps, and fuses to be found.” (Kosinski 91).

Question: when the young boy states, “I knew I could never go back there,” what does this foreshadow?

Answer: This statement indicates that his life of continuing to find safety both mentally and physically will continue since the fire. This occurrence foreshadows the young boy’s uncertain journey to safety (Kosinski 90).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 24, 2015 09:46 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 February 2015
“I tried to visualize the people who invented and made such fuses and mines. They were certain to be German. Didn’t they say in the vi9llages that no one could resist the power of the German because he gobbled up the brains of the Poles, Russians, Gypsies, and Jews?”(Chapter 8, pg. 90 paragraph 4)
Question: Who does the boy believe made the fuses? And why?
Answer: The boy believes that the Germans made the fuses because the way he grew up the Germans were almost a legendary force that was unstoppable. Kosinski says “I wonder what gave people the ability to invent such things.” (90)

Posted by: William Pereira at February 24, 2015 10:22 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 February 2015

“She called me the Black One, from her I learned for the first time that I was possessed by an evil spirit, which crouched in me like a mole in a deep burrow, and of whose presence I was unaware. Such a darkling as I, possessed of this evil spirit, could be recognized by his bewitched black eyes which did not blink when they gazed at bright clear eyes. Hence, Olga declared, I could stare at people and unknowingly cast a spell over them.” (Chapter 2, pg. 20 paragraph 1)
Question: What did Ogla call the boy and why?
She called him the Black One because he was possessed by a spirit and could put spells on people. “She called me the Black One, from her I learned for the first time that I was possessed by an evil spirit, which crouched in me like a mole in a deep burrow, and of whose presence I was unaware. Such a darkling as I, possessed of this evil spirit” (20)

Posted by: William Pereira at February 24, 2015 10:23 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 February 2015

"He took out a cigarette from his breast pocket and lit it, carefully extinguishing the match. Silently he watched my attempt to loosen the rope, which was rubbing the skin off my leg." (Chapter 7, pg. 73)

Question: This passage refers to he soldier who took the boy out by the forest to with orders to kill him and set his body on fire. What does the soldier do for the boy right after this passage that lets you know that the soldier may not be all that he appears to be?

Answer: Right after this sentence from the passage, the soldier cuts off the rope for the boy that was tied around his legs. He then rolled it up and "flung it over the embankment with a sweeping gesture" (Kosinski 73). This lets the audience know that the officer may not be all that he appears to be because he was given orders to kill the boy. Also, when the boy first met the soldier he did not smile or act friendly. So this is unusual and unexpected behavior from the soldier.

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at February 25, 2015 10:50 AM

Christina Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: A Journey in Narrative CA02
23 February 2015

“Lekh had a special affection for cuckoos. He regarded them as people turned into birds—noblemen, begging God in vain to turn their back on humans.” (Chapter Five of The Painted Bird, Page 42 paragraph 2).

Question: In Chapter Five in The Painted Bird, (a.) what did Lekh say the qualities of the cuckoo were? (b.) Why does he believe the cuckoos were once noblemen?

Answer: In Chapter Five in The Painted Bird, Lekh says that the cuckoos’ voice has many meanings. He goes on by saying that, “a man hearing it for the first time in the season should immediately start […] counting his money to secure the at least the same amount” (Kosinski 42). As for thieves, if they hear the voice of the cuckoo, their plans of robbery would be “unsuccessful” (Kosinski 42). He believes the birds are noblemen because of the “manner they raised their young” (Kosinski 42). The way the birds raised their young was

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at February 25, 2015 11:11 AM

Christina Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: A Journey in Narrative CA02
25 February 2015

“The animal was so thin that I could see its every bone. Every Strand of emaciated muscle hung like wet rope. It looked at me with dim bloodshot eyes that seemed about to close. It moved his head feebly, and like a froglike croak rose up in its thin neck.” (Chapter Eight, pages 77, second paragraph).

Question: In Chapter Eight of The Painted Bird, (a.) How did the narrator bring the horse back to the town? (b.) What were the fates of both the horse and the narrator at their arrival to the town?

Answer: In Chapter Eight of The Painted Bird, the narrator brought the injured horse by “[speaking] to him about the warm stable, the smell of hay, and [he] assured him that the man could set his bone to heal it with herbs” (Kosinski 77). Slowly, with patience and encouragement, the horse and the boy made it to the town. Upon their arrival, the one who owned the horse examined both the horse and the narrator. After the examination, “the farmer decided to take [him] on as a workhand in the yard and in the fields” (Kosinski 78). As for the horse, he was put to death and his body parts served different uses.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at February 25, 2015 11:11 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 February 2015

"I felt as though I was falling down a deep well with smooth, moist walls coated with spongy moss. At the bottom of the well, instead of water, there was my warm, secure bed where I could safely sleep and forget about everything." (Kosinski 84)

Question: Based on the young boy's thoughts, what can you conclude about how he feels about his occupation of reading poetry to drunken people?

Answer: The young boy says, "Where I could safely sleep and forget about everything," this thought he expresses indicates that he is struggling with what his life has become. It is clear he is struggling to accept and come to terms with who he is and what he is forced to do by his master. Trying to forget about everything implicates the only time he can avoid facing reality and his day by day struggle for survival and safety is when he is in his safe and secure bed which is isolated from all of that unfortunate reality (Kosinski 84).

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 25, 2015 12:10 PM

Bobbi Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
25 February 2015
Pgs. 79-80

“He chased away the dogs and examined the broken leg, after which he declared that the horse would have to be killed.” (Kosinski, 80).

Q: How do you imagine that the boy felt after his journey of back the horse just to hear it would be put down? How does this relate to his previous experiences, thus far in the novel?

A: So far in the course of this novel, the boy finds himself always moving always wandering. He never stays very long in one place or village. “I was frightened to find myself entirely alone.” (Kosinski, 28). After managing to bring the horse back to the village, his feelings upon hearing the animal is going to die anyway are mute. He is worn from his journey, and knows all parts of the animal will be used for one purpose or another. Thus, he does not feel sorrow, at least not outright anyway. If he does feel sorrow, then he does not mention it.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at February 25, 2015 01:50 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr.Hobbs
English COA1 Journey’s Into Narrative
2/22/2015

The Painted Bird: by Jerzy Kosinki, is a story set in the mist of World War II. During the duration of the war the Germens committed mass atrocities against anyone who opposed them. They were especially gruesome too shooting anyone who sympathies with them and even burning their body’s.
Using pages 71-73 do you believe that the boy will survive or why you believe he will be murdered? Explain why you believe this and provide textual evidence.
I believe the boy will survive, because the guard, “patted him on the head before he untied his hands,” and took him away, this happened in the second paragraph of page 72.If they, are use to mercilessly killing people then no gestures of humanity are needed, such as patting on the head.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at February 25, 2015 02:10 PM

Jasmine Weaver
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01 25 February 2015

“Marta, I concluded, was waiting for a change of skin and, like the snake she could not be disturbed at such a time. Though uncertain what to do, I tried to be patient.” (Chapter 2 pg.22 par.3)

Question: When Marta died what was the boy’s reaction and what did he do when he woke up?

Answer: In the story “The painted bird” Marta died and the little boy was in denial we he first saw her. He tried to talk to her, tickle her hand, and he moved her head but she didn't respond to anything. “Marta, I concluded, was waiting for a change of skin and, like the snake she could not be disturbed at such a time. Though uncertain what to do, I tried to be patient. (Kosinski 22)” When he woke up he tried to light the oil lamp but accidentally burned the house down and ran away.

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at February 25, 2015 02:15 PM

Adam Alexander

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220Cl On The Proverbial Road CA01

25 February 2015


Question: What is the boys thought process as he is being chased by the mob?

Answer: As the boy is running from the mob, to his house and near the farm, his thoughts are going wild, making quick decisions to save himself. He says, “My thoughts were scattering like scared chickens” (92), meaning that they were racing and going into all different directions. He thinks of solutions and ideas very quickly because of the face paced action going on around him. He says, “Suddenly I remembered the fuse and the mines. I dug them up quickly. With trembling fingers I stuck the fuse between the tightly lashed soaps and lighted it with the comet,” (92). Words like “suddenly,” “scrambled,” and “quickly” show how frantic he is. After he sets off the explosion, he runs into the forest, still on edge commenting that he “could never go back there” (93)

Posted by: Adam Alexander at February 25, 2015 02:51 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Jorneys in the Narrative
26 February 2015

Question: “ I came to conclusion that Garbos’s seemingly unmotivated fits of rage must have some mysterious cause.” Why is this happening and does it have any real significance to the story?
Answer: It is clear that depicted in these few pages that this experts is related to there is common use of PTSD being a real problem within this organization the story is taking place. This quote struck my interest because I am interested in the topic of PTSD and better understanding it. However, it was shown as I read on that there was no real significant correlation to the rest of the story, other than giving a little bit of insight to the craziness of war.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at February 26, 2015 08:15 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
26 February 2015

“When the village boys who were lying in wait for me in the forest caught me at last, I expected something terrible to happen to me. Instead, I was taken to the head of the village.” (Kosinski 140)

Question: based on the young boy’s experience, why was the boy so surprised?

Answer: The irony of this situation is significant because it symbolizes the constant expectation of disappointment and fear the young boy feels. When the young boy experiences the ironic occurrence, he is anxious about what is to come. This beginning paragraph symbolizes uncertainty and suspicion of what the young boys is about to face.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 27, 2015 12:02 AM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01

16 February 2015

“Noises woke me. I opened my eyes, uncertain of my surroundings .I was fused with the earth, but thoughts stirred in my heavy head .The world was graying .The fires had gone out .On my lips I felt the cold of streaming dew .Drops of it settled on my face and hair .” (Chapter 2: page 24, par .3, Kolinsky)

Question: In this passage it shows that character is going through a major incident. Is this incident framing the character mindset? Are the surroundings of the character location affecting the mindset of the main character ?

Answer: This incident is framing the character mindset into a very dark place. When reading the text you can tell by how he is describing his surroundings. The boy described, “In terror I watched their shining black-feathered tails and darting eyes .They stalked around me, nearer and nearer, flicking their heads toward me, uncertain whether I was dead and alive (Kinioki,24). The boy’s imagination became darker and gruesome when viewing all of the ravens around him .

Posted by: Marie Destin at February 27, 2015 01:11 AM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
27 February 2015

“I heard the distant sound of the organ and human singing and I reasoned that after the Mass the people might come out of the church and drown me in the pit if they saw me alive in the bushes”
-Page 140 (second paragraph, first sentence)

Question: “Why do the churchgoers distrust the main character?”

Answer: The main character attempted to win over their trust in a service by transport of the missal however the missal was too heavy for him and he ended up dropping the holy book which angered the churchgoers greatly. Before throwing him in a large pit of sitting manure they shouted insults at him, such as “gypsy vampire” (page 138, Kosinski).

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 27, 2015 01:20 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
27 February 2015

“I felt the gaze of the entire crow on me. At the same time the organist, as if to attach deliberate importance to this scene of a Gypsy assisting at the altar of God, suddenly hushed the organ.” (p.137, para. 6)

Question: This passage is referring to the boy’s participation as the altar boy during High Mass. What is the author’s purpose for including this passage?


Answer: Throughout the Painted Bird, this young boy has been regarded as a gypsy, a vampire, and other undesirable kinds of people. The purpose of this paragraph is to foreshadow his failure during High Mass. He realized he “would not have strength enough to life it [the tray]” (Kosinski 137) all the way to the altar. This paragraph also represents a self-fulfilling prophecy of the character. He refers to himself as a Gypsy. Later on, he receives punishment for his failure as people shout “Gypsy vampire” (138) while dragging him to a pile of manure.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 27, 2015 01:36 PM

Bobbi Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
27 February 2015

“Hanging on the straps I concentrated on my prayers to the exclusion of all else. When my strength ebbed I told myself that I should be able to last another ten or twenty prayers before I dropped down.” (Kosinski, 133).

Q: How does this excerpt describe the theory of the Hero’s journey? Briefly explain.
A: The Hero, in any story must look to overcome a challenge, which is set before them. For the main character here, he must keep hanging on and thus as a result becomes stronger. His becoming stronger is part of the cycle of the Hero’s journey as they go from the ordinary world to that of non-ordinary one. The characters, story so far represents the cycle of the journey and how it moves from one section to the next making the Hero stronger.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at February 27, 2015 11:43 PM

Jasmine Weaver
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01 28 February 2015

“The carpenter and his wife were convinced that my black hair would attract lightning to their farm. It was true that on hot dry nights when the carpenter touched my hair with a flint or a bone comb bluish-yellow sparks jumped over my head like “the Devil’s lice.”” (Chapter 6, pg.45, par.1)

Question: Why did the carpenter put a padlocked chain around his ankle and send him outside the village?

Answer: In chapter 6 the carpenter and his wife thought of his hair as bad luck. “The carpenter and his wife were convinced that my black hair would attract lightning to their farm. It was true that on hot dry nights when the carpenter touched my hair with a flint or a bone comb bluish-yellow sparks jumped over my head like “the Devil’s lice.”” (Chapter 6, pg.45, par.1)

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at February 28, 2015 01:46 PM

Jasmine Weaver
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01 28 February 2015

“One day I heard the priest explaining to an old man that for certain prayers God granted from 100 to 300 days of indulgence. From all this I understood that those who say more prayers earn more days of indulgence, and that this was also supposed to have an immediate influence on their lives.” (Chapter 11, pg. 81, par 2)

Question: What made the boy start praying a lot?

Answer: When the boy heard about prayer he felt like he had never understood the value of prayer but once he started praying a bin in Heaven would open up for him and would start collecting days of indulgence. “One day I heard the priest explaining to an old man that for certain prayers God granted from 100 to 300 days of indulgence. From all this I understood that those who say more prayers earn more days of indulgence, and that this was also supposed to have an immediate influence on their lives.” (Chapter 11, pg. 81, par 2) “I saw in my mind unending Heavenly pastures full of bins, some big and bulging with days of indulgence, others small and almost empty. Also, unused bins to accommodate those who, like myself had not yet discovered the value of prayer.” (Chapter 11, pg. 81, par 4)

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at February 28, 2015 02:10 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 March 2015

“The cold incased me. My mind was freezing. I was sliding down, choking. The water here was shallow, and my only thought that I could use the pole to push against the bottom and lift myself to the ice-cut. I grabbed the pole and it supported me as I moved along underneath the ice. When my lungs where almost bursting I was ready to open my mouth and swallow almost anything, I found myself near the ice-cut. With one more push my head pooped out and I gulped the air that felt like a stream of boiling soup.” (Chapter 13, pg. 160 para. 4)

This passage refers to the boys struggle in the water and push physically to the brink if death. What were his first visions after escaping the water?

His first thoughts once he escaped the ice water was of food. He envisioned “a huge bowl of beef seasoned with vinegar, garlic, pepper and salt; a pot of coarse gruel thickened with pickled cabbage leaves and a piece of succulent fat bacon; evenly cut slices of barely bread soaked in a thick borsht of barley potatoes and corn. (Kosinski161)

Posted by: William Pereira at March 1, 2015 07:52 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys In the Narrative
1 March 2015

Question: “When Ewka fell asleep at my side, muttering through her dreams, I pondered all those things, listening to the sounds of the rabbits around us.” What is the significance of this scene and is this woman a Major role in the rest of this novel, and if so how does she play this role.

Answer: That quote is showing how even in times of extreme stress and misery there can be good and peace that can be found. This is a very crucial scene where the author is showing that there can be peace in war time. This lady Ewka is a symbolic gesture of peace.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at March 1, 2015 07:55 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03
27 February 2015

The Painted Bird
Pg 77-78

Quote: “Well-rested dogs now roamed about the farmhouses, and I could steal food no more and has to be on my guard every minute.” (Kosinski 78)

Question: Why is it that he could not be able to steal more food?

Answer: Because it was winter, he was able to go to the village people’s farms and take food. He did not only steal food; he took food that was good, as in “the best potatoes and beetroots” (Kosinski 78).

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at March 1, 2015 11:15 PM

Jasmine Weaver
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01 2 March 2015

“There the great Stalin watched over them, worked for them all, devised the best ways of winning the war and destroying the enemies of the working masses.”
(Chapter 15, pg.144, par 4)

Question: Why did the main character regret all of his prayers?

Answer: In chapter 15 he talks to Gavrila and feels like everyone had found a new leader that helped more accurately. “There the great Stalin watched over them, worked for them all, devised the best ways of winning the war and destroying the enemies of the working masses.”

Posted by: Jasmine Weaver at March 2, 2015 01:30 AM

Adam Alexander

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road CA01

2 March 2015

“But I was left alone with a dog that had no chance of achieving a better life, even though it was one of God’s creatures.

Question: How do the boys feelings of the dog reflect how he feels about himself?

Answer: At this point, the boy is talking about a day of Church in which everyone expected to go, except himself and the dog. He says, “everybody went to church that day: the sinners and the righteous, those who prayed constantly and those who never prayed the rich and the poor, the sick and the well” (Kosinski 135). He then compares himself to the dog in the fact that they are both alone, commenting that even though the dog is a creature of God (as is himself), he was still not given an equal chance or one at all. The boy does realize in some way that he and everyone else is a creation of God, but that life is not “fair” due to the many instances in the book that he experiences as well as the situations he sees other experience.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at March 2, 2015 03:11 AM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 February 2015
Pgs. 107-109 of Painted Bird

“German detachments began to search for partisans in the surrounding forests and to enforce the compulsory deliveries. I knew that my stay in the village was reaching its end” (Chapter 10, pg. 108, par. 1 Kosinski).

Question: When the German detachments came to the village to impose essential deliveries, what were they more focused on doing in doing besides making these distributions?

Answer: The Germans were more focused with an unexpected Jew hiding amongst the people in the village. Kosinski writes, “One night my farmer ordered me to flee at once to the forest. He had been informed of a coming raid. The Germans learned that a Jew was hiding in one of the villages. He said to have lived there since the outbreak of the war… It was an overcast night, but the clouds began separating, stars sprang out, and the moon revealed itself in all its eminence. I hid in a bush” (Kosinski 108). This passage refers to the narrator because he knows he is the Jew the Germans are looking for. He was petrified because as soon as he started for the forest, keeping far from the village, he knew that German soldiers had surrounded the field. He was in grave danger or so it might have seemed. He had been suspected to be the Jew.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 2, 2015 10:02 AM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 February 2015
Pgs 156-157 of Painted Bird

“Flying along that endless white plain I felt free and alone like a startling soaring in the air, tossed by every flurry, following a steam, unconscious of its speed, drawn into an abandoned dance” (Chapter 13, pg. 157, par. 2, Kosinski).

Question: What was the one thing that freighted people about the air and caused the narrator to rest while skating across the ice?

Answer: The one thing that made people afraid was the wind. It acted as a dark threat towards those who challenged its power. Kosinski writes, “Trusting myself to the frenzied power of the wind, I spread my sail even wider. It was hard to believe that the local people regarded the wind as an enemy and closed their windows to it, afraid that it might bring them plague, paralysis, and death” (Kosinski 157). This passage refers to the narrator resting at one point not knowing that the wind can act as the Devil “Master of the winds” (Kosinski 157). The wind passed out the Devil’s commands and threats.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 2, 2015 10:56 AM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: A Journey in Narrative CA02
27 February 2015

“On the day of the feast Garbos went to the church early in the morning. I remained at the farm bruised and aching from my last beating. The broken echo of tolling church bells rolled over the fields and even Judas stopped lounging in the sun and listened” (Chapter 11, Page 132 Second paragraph)

Question: In Chapter Eleven of A Painted Bird, (a.) why did it go silent when the bells went off and what was important about this day? (b.) Who attended the feast and why was the narrator upset?

Answer: In Chapter Eleven of A Painted Bird, they all passed because it was “Corpus Christi” (Kosinski 132). This day was important because the Son of God would make himself present “more than on any other feast” (Kosinski 133). On this day, everyone attended church, the avid church goers and the heathens and those in between. The narrator was upset because he was” left alone with a dog that had no chance of achieving a better life, even though it was one of God’s creatures” (Kosinski 133).

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at March 2, 2015 11:06 AM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: A Journey in Narrative CA02
02 March 2015

At that time of the year it was not very difficult to escape from a village. I often watched the boys attach homemade skates to their shoes and spread pieces of canvas over their heads, and then let the wind push them over the smooth surface of the ice covering the marshes and pastures” (Chapter 13, Page 154, 1st paragraph).

Question: In Chapter Thirteen of A Painted Bird, the boys in the village make their own skates in an attempt to escape, How does the narrator do this? Does he make it?

Answer: In Chapter Thirteen of A Painted Bird, the narrator was prepared for this winter because he “already made a pair of skates” (Kosinski 154). These were made in advanced to prepare him for his attempted departure. He made the skates out of “two long pieces of wood, curved at one end” (Kosinski 154) and attaches them to boots he made himself. Unfortunately, he was caught and beaten for being a “Gypsy Bastard” (Kosinski 156).

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at March 2, 2015 11:07 AM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
2 March 2015

“Handsome Laba no longer worked in the fields. He even refused to help his wife in the house. He passed his days bathing in the lake”
-Page 168 (Last paragraph, first few sentences)

Question: “What was the turning point in Laba’s character?”

Answer: Handsome Laba’s character changed when he arrives in the village after disappearing for several days with a heavy chest and fancy clothing. It is assumed that the chest is full of riches and all of the villagers now respect him for owning it. Even when Laba goes to church, “…no one looked at the priest or the altar. They watched the right-hand corner of the nave where Handsome Laba sat…” (Kosinski, page 168).

Posted by: Bryan Hess at March 2, 2015 12:29 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
2 March 2015

“Winter did not loosen its grip. The heavy sky, filled with leaden clouds, seemed to weigh down on the thatched roofs. Sometimes a cloud darker than the others raced over like a balloon, trailing behind it a mournful shadow that stalked it as evil spirits stalk a sinner (Ch. 8, pg. 165).”

Questions: How is the weather affecting the main character?


Answers: No one wanted to take his in during the winter which made him have to” wander around in old rags (Kosinski 165).” This shows that the main character is greatly saddened and desperate for food in the recent weather (Kosinski 50).

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at March 2, 2015 01:44 PM

.
Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 February 2015

The priest is the man we all look to in times of need, for even when we have nothing we have GOD. So it seems that everyone in this town worships the priest, he even takes advantage of some the woman. While everyone works, he spends his day bathing or sitting in his treasure room.
Late after bathing Labina finds him hanging from a neck tie, do you think this suicide? If so explain why, if not explain why a homicide could have occurred?
I believe it was a homicide because page (169)describes Laba treasure chest was described as, “on the floor the lay chest with its lid torn off.” I believe this because there is no reason for Laba to rip off the top of his chest open when he has the key, and in addition to that, living at such a high stature in such an unfortunate time resentment would have built.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at March 2, 2015 01:57 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
02 March 2015

“Labina stayed home, half dead with exhaustion and humiliation, caring for the farm, the horse, and her husband’s treasures. For handsome Laba time had stopped, but Labina aged rapidly, her skin sagging and her thighs growing flabby.” ( Kosinski 166)

Question: explain Labina’s last days. Were they last days of enjoying what is left of life or did she seem to be somber and disappointed with the conclusion of her life?

Answer: Labina seems to be in a disappointed mind set about her life. According to the passage, Labina has accepted that her life will come to a short end without achieving particular goals in her life (Kosinsky 166-167).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at March 2, 2015 11:02 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in the Narrative
3 March 2015

Question: Pages 144 – 146. “I often heard peasants mutter that Makar’s strange family should be turned out of the village and his house burned down. But Makar did not listen to such threats.” Who are the Makers and why are they subject to such hatred and scrutiny?

Answer: The quote taken from the text is expressing once family’s struggles during the harsh times of war and adversity. This family was under such scrutiny and generally disliked by the surrounding community, was because the community viewed them as different and questioned where their loyalties lie in regards to the war efforts. They were viewed as different from the majority primarily for these suspicions.

Posted by: matthew lemonis at March 3, 2015 07:37 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03
2 March 2015

The Painted Bird

Quote: “Life went on without Laba. Only the saying ‘handsome as Laba,’ survived in the village. A lonely year without Laba passed. People forgot him, and only Labina believed that he was still alive and would return” (Kosinski 166-167).

Question: Why did Labina “believed that” Laba was not dead and that he would once return from the field he walked into about a year ago?

Answer: Labina did “fall in love with and married Laba” so she cared for him and wanted to be optimistic (Kosinski 166). Or it could be that she could just sense it like how Marta sensed that death was lurking. However, Labina was right; Laba did end up alive.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at March 3, 2015 08:44 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03
3 March 2015

The Painted Bird

Quote: “Many of … [the women] flirted openly with the soldiers, trying to lure them in the direction of their husbands or brothers” (Kosinski 196).

Question: Were the women luring the soldiers to their “husbands or brothers” to lower the number of soldiers or for another reason?
Answer: The women could have been lurking in the men on purpose for multiple reasons. Either way the soldiers went to the villages and “trade[ed] with the farmers and [was able to] meet village girls” (Kosinski 196-197). Along with them going to the villages, they would be “severely beaten, and … some … [would end up disappearing] altogether” (Kosinski 197).

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at March 3, 2015 10:28 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 March 2015
Pgs. 194-195 of Painted Bird

“I felt lost in this maze. In the world into which Gavrila was initiating me, human aspirations and expectations were entangled with each other like the roots and branches of great trees in a thick forest, each tree struggling for more moisture from the soil and more sunshine from the sky” (Chapter 17, page 194, par. 2, Kosinski)

Question: What is the narrator worried about in his future life?

Answer: The narrator is worried about who he will become in the Soviet Party. He does not have a clue what his fate will be. He knew that the life of the Soviet grownups was not very easy. He knew he had another decision to make. He had to choose a path of survival. Kosinski writes, “I was worried. What would happen to when I grew up? How would I look when seen through the many eyes of the Party? What was my deepest core: a healthy core like that of a fresh apple, or rotten one like the maggoty stone of a withered plum?” (Kosinski 194) This passage relates to the narrator by bringing tension and suspense. He wondered what would happen to him if he did not choose the right path, but also by if he didn’t choose a path at all. He is nervous to learn the ways of Gavrila.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 3, 2015 11:14 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
03 March 2015

“There the great Stalin watched over them, worked for them all, devised the best ways of winning the war and destroying the enemies of the working masses. His mind was filled with concern for all the suffering people, even those in distant countries still living under terrible oppression (Kosinski 187).”

Question: based on this passage, is Stalin perceived as the hero or the enemy? Explain

Answer: Stalin is presented as someone who is protecting and providing for people in need. Although in reality, Stalin is known as the enemy. It is unusual that Stalin is described by the young man as a hero. Based on this passage, the young boy explains Stalin as the hero of the war at the point in time (Kosinski 187)

Posted by: Hatim Shami at March 3, 2015 11:29 PM

Adam Alexander

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01

4 March 2015

“…he found the hole in the attic roof and the empty chest. All his fine clothes were gone. Only a single necktie remained, lying like a severed flower in the trampled straw” (Kosinski 170).

Question: What does this mean to Laba and how does he react to this?

Answer: Kosinski writes “Laba’s reason for living has disappeared with the contents of his chest,” (170). He then goes on to list things that Laba would never be able to do again because he would not have the materials to do so. These included looking handsome at funerals, weddings, and by the lake. Laba is a person who cares about self-display, so the fact that their source of security was stolen leaves them with nothing. He takes the necktie and hangs himself.
“It was common belief that the rope of a suicide brings good luck. I hoped I would never lose the necktie,” (171).

Posted by: Adam Alexander at March 4, 2015 02:02 AM

Adam Alexander

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01

4 March 2015

“Mitka had been looking after me ever since I entered the regimental hospital” (Kosinski 197)

Question: What kind of person/ friend is Mitka to the narrator?

Answer: Mitka takes care of the narrator while he is at the hospital, attending to his many needs and influencing in many ways. First, the narrator talks about how Mitka helped him recover health wise. Kosinski writes, “Thanks to his feeding I gained weight… He also assisted in my painful injections, boosting my courage before medical examinations. Once when I got indigestion from overeating, Mitka sat with me for two days, holding my head when I vomited and wiping my face with a wet cloth” (197).

Mitka also entertains the narrator and teaches him some of the arts. He says, “Mitka introduced me to poetry and sang me songs, strumming an accompaniment on his guitar. It was Mitka took me to the regimental cinema and carefully explained the films,” (197). He comments shortly after that Mitka was one of the most liked and respected men in the regiment. Mitka is a caring friend to the narrator, willing to help him back to health, but also to take the time to be a good friend to him and introduce him to so many things.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at March 4, 2015 02:21 AM

Marie Destin

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 220CL CA02

20 February 2015

“Stupid Ludmilla was a strange woman and I feared her increasingly. She was well built and taller than, the other women. Her hair seemingly never cut, cascaded down her shoulders .She had large breasts, which hung nearly to her belly, and strong muscular calves.” (Chapter 5, page 47, par.22)

Question: This passage describes the oddness of Ludmilla appearance that is very strange when being compared to other women. However, when being strange she still had an admirer named Lekh. If Ludmilla wasn’t unknown or an outcast would Lekh still infatuated with her?

Answer: In the quote above Lekh is describing the beauty of Ludmilla when observing her unique beauty. While others in the village torture her with “Women often sent dogs towards Ludmilla “(48) because she was promiscuous and an outcast. However, Lekh never spoke about Ludmilla in a negative light in the text the boy stated that Leah will only “Lekh never repeated stories about Ludmilla.He only mentioned once when she was very young and innocent her parents ordered her to get married to the son of the village psalmist, who known for his cruelty and ugliness (48).

Posted by: Marie Destin at March 4, 2015 03:43 AM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 March 2015

"When some of the Red soldiers showed their Kalmuk-like Uzbek or Tartar faces the women screamed and recoiled with fear, even though the faces of the recent arrivals were smiling. A group of peasants marched into the field carrying red flags with clumsily painted hammers and sickles." (Chapter 15, page 182).

Question: This passage refers to the peasants in the village coming to greet the Red soldiers. How did the Red soldiers react to the peasants coming to greet them? How was this different than the visitors before them?

Answer: The passage shows the first sign that the visitors are different than the previous visitors. It says "...even though the faces of the recent arrivals were smiling." This means that the previous arrivals were not smiling or friendly in any manner. After the peasants marched to the soldiers, the soldiers greeted them with cheers. The regimental commander came out of his tent to meet them. She shook hands and invited them inside. The doctor treated the wounds of the women and children. Soldiers embraced the children and played with them. The visitors before were not polite in any way and took advantage of the village. The Red soldiers strung up the previous visitors by their legs in the trees. They had a common enemy. (Kosinski 182-183).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at March 4, 2015 12:44 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys in Narrative CA09
4 March 2015

Question: Kosinski describes what appears to be rape. He then compares the two bodies to dogs that can not separate themselves. What information suggests that this was Rainbow committing a rape.

Answer: The opening lines suggest that Rainbow has violated the Jewess girl in a number of ways. Kosinksi describes the event from watching through a knothole in the barn. He expresses “Then Rainbow with a quick movement pulled the dress off the girl’s shoulders. The strap gave way. The girl tried to escape but Rainbow kneeled on her long hair and held her face between his knees.”(Kosinksi, 104). Rainbow was allowing the Jewess to stay on his property and then took advantage of her in a violent rape.

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at March 4, 2015 01:14 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 On a Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 February 2015
“After witnessing the gruesome slaughter of his friends this man kept his composure and restrained himself when there mangled bodies were taken away, he held his anger into all were of site. At this time he got his telescope and his rifle, then we together disappeared into the mist. We found a tree with a good vantage point and waited for are targets.” In chapter 17, Page 202.
Question:
In chapter 17 of the Painted Bird, why do they go out so secretively? And how does the narrator feel about this?
Answer:
They, go out when nobody is around because they are not supposed to take vengeance, this is shown by “Mitka waking up before dawn, we cautiously bypassed the sleeping village.”203) The narrator is happy because he is being acknowledge, this is express by the narrator on page (202)”I was felt with pride being the one to accompany him on his mission.”

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at March 4, 2015 01:53 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 On a Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA01
March 4th 2015
“After witnessing the gruesome slaughter of his friends this man kept his composure and restrained himself when there mangled bodies were taken away, he held his anger into all were of site. At this time he got his telescope and his rifle, then we together disappeared into the mist. We found a tree with a good vantage point and waited for are targets.” In chapter 17, Page 202.
Question:
In chapter 17 of the Painted Bird, why do they go out so secretively? And how does the narrator feel about this?
Answer:
They, go out when nobody is around because they are not supposed to take vengeance, this is shown by “Mitka waking up before dawn, we cautiously bypassed the sleeping village.”203) The narrator is happy because he is being acknowledge, this is express by the narrator on page (202)”I was felt with pride being the one to accompany him on his mission.”

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at March 4, 2015 01:54 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 March 2015
Pgs. 213-214 of the Painted Bird

“We all looked at one another with loathing and fear. One never knew what one’s neighbor might do. Many of the boys in the class were older and stronger than I. They knew that I could not speak, and consequently believed that I was a moron. They called me names and sometimes beat me up. In the morning when I came to the classroom after a sleepless night in the crowded dormitory I felt trapped, fearful and apprehensive” (Chapter 18, page 213, par. 1, Kosinski).

Question: Given the passage above, what is a specific example that the narrator says in this chapter that he uses to get his mind off of the maltreatment he receives from his class?

Answer: The narrator recalls Mitka’s teachings: a man should never let himself be mistreated, for he would then lose his self-respect and his life would become meaningless. He remembers this set of guidelines so that he can overcome these hardships and move on the trail of survival. Kosinski writes, “A person should take revenge for every wrong or humiliation. There were far too many injustices in the world to have them all weighed and judged” (Kosinski 214). This passage refers to the narrator motivating him to keep moving forward on his journey. When he is faced with these kinds of obstacles, he learns to commemorate what he was taught by Mitka.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 4, 2015 05:12 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
05 March 2015

“After the incident, I went out only at night. My parents tried to protest, but I would not listen. I slept during the day and at dusk I was ready to start my night prowl.” (Kosinski 229)
Question: According to this passage, why does he only go out at night?

Answer: The young boy explains why when he states, “I was soon familiar with the night city. I knew quiet lanes where girls younger than myself solicited men older than my family. I found places where men dressed in smart clothes with gold watches on their wrists traded in objects the very possession of which could get them years in prison” (Kosinski 229).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at March 5, 2015 08:00 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 March 2015

“Many soldiers were already assembled at the guard line. Several soldiers covered with blood knelt r stood surrounding for motionless bodies laid on the ground. (Ch. 17, pg. 201, para. 1)

Question: In this passage the boy describes the dead soldiers. How and why did the soldiers die?

Answer: The soldiers died from a neighboring village’s peasants who disarmed the soldiers and killed them with axes because they were jealous of their women. “We learned from their incoherent words that they attended a feast at a nearby village and had been attacked by some drunken peasants who had become jealous of their women. The peasants had outnumbered and disarmed them. Four of the soldiers had been killed with axes and the others badly wounded.” (201 Kosinski)

Posted by: William Pereira at March 5, 2015 10:12 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 March 2015

"All I had to do was leap the switch and move the points, sending the whole train over the cliff into the peaceful stream below. All it needed was one push of the lever..." (Chapter 18, pg. 220)

Question: This passage refers to the boy thinking about the spur at the crossing that was never finished due to the war. How does the boy feel, or think, about pushing the lever and sending these people into the stream over the cliff?

Answer: The boy felt "a sense of great power" (Kosinski 220). He kept thinking about how the lives of all the people on the train were in his hands. He could let them keep going or kill them all. He compared that feeling with the men who ordered and organized people being carried into gas chambers and crematories on the train. He said that they must have enjoyed the feeling of complete power over their uncomprehending victims. All they had to do was issue the order just like all he had to do was push the lever. He said that to have the ability to decide these people's fate was a "magnificent sensation." He was sure if the source of pleasure stemmed from knowing he could do this or on its use. (Kosinski 219-220).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at March 6, 2015 11:07 AM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
6 March 2015

“It mattered little if one was mute; people did not understand one another anyway.”
(Page 233. Second Paragraph. Fifth sentence.)

Question: In this quote the character is referencing to the fact that he is mute. At what point in the story did he become mute?

Answer: The character became mute after a group of villagers threw him into a large, rotting pit of old manure. As we read in Chapter 11, the character remarks, “Suddenly I realized that something had happened to my voice. I tried to cry out, but my tongue flapped helplessly in my mouth” (Kosinski, 140)

Posted by: Bryan Hess at March 6, 2015 12:21 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
6 March 2015

“Rainbow’s hut adjoined my master’s. His barn shared a wall with the barn in which I slept. (Ch. 9, pg. 225).”

Questions: The following passage explains Rainbow’s home among the characters; how come Rainbow doesn’t mate?


Answers: Rainbow’s last wife died and due to that he couldn’t decide on a mate. The main character explains “His wife had died some time ago but Rainbow, still young, could not decide on another mate. His neighbors used to say that those who stared at rainbows too much could not see an ass in front of their faces (Kosinski 225).’’

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at March 6, 2015 12:48 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
6 March 2015


Question: In general, the name of this novel does not directly correlate to the majority of the plot that this story is told in. I personally do not see where the title “The Painted Bird” comes into play, in a sense of foreshadowing or any sort of plot correlation.

Answer: The major correlation with the title to the plot of the novel, was a scene in the novel where the main character was introduced to a painter. The painter catches a bird, continues to paint the bird, but when he releases the bird and it attempts to rejoin the flock, it is viewed as different and attacked resulting in falling from the sky. The correlation that I see is that of the time period during which the story is taking place, as well as the boys journey through out this time period.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at March 6, 2015 01:01 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
5 March 2015

P213-215

"It was obvious the Soviets were near; the Red Army, the commissars had arrived" (Kosinski 214)


Q:

What archetype do soviets best function as in this chapter?

A:

The soviets function best as heralds here, announcing the coming of a new "strange world" within the current one.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at March 6, 2015 01:17 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01
4 March 2015
In the last chapter the narrator has been returned to his parents, and after seeking medical evaluation. The Dr. prescribed being out in the open away from the city. So the narrator is sent the mountains to live and get some fresh air away from the city.
In the mountains the mentor began to pray, after hearing a prayer how does the narrator feel about God. Are there any other example to back your claim?
The narrator seemed, jaded towards the Idea of a higher power, he comment on his mentors lifestyles, “the old man cold not except the idea that he was alone in the world, and could not expect assistance from anyone.” This thought, alone gives you and understanding of the character perspective, we now understand that he is a realest

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at March 6, 2015 01:18 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
February 26

Pg.113-115

"I could not understand what he wanted from me or why he beat me. I tried to keep out of his way. I did as I was told, but he continued the beatings." (Kosinski 115)

Question: Based on this passage, how do the young boy's thoughts about his continuous beatings similarly resemble his life in general?

Answer: The young boy's statement is a similar resemblance to his life because he implies that regardless of his hopes and efforts to avoid any more trouble, trouble will always follow and be present in the young boy's life. He says, "He often asked me that question, and I did not know what to reply. When I failed to answer he would hit me." The young boy gives several examples of his constant disappointment that result from his high efforts (Kosinski 115). These occurrences are not only statements about what he actually experiences, but also has similar parallelism to his life.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at March 8, 2015 10:26 PM

Celina Tahsini, Will Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 March 2015

Question #5

Answer: Kosinski's novel is through the perception of the young boy. Kosinski tipped the cap when the only book addressed to the novel was Gorky's book, "Childhood". Kosinski indicates and emphasizes that Gorky's book reiterates Kosinski's purpose of using Gorky's meanings of text, lessons, and themes.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at March 8, 2015 10:48 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 March 2015

"Then he opened the door wide. A man and a woman stood inside. They seemed somehow familiar, and I could hear my heart beating under the star of my uniform." (Kosinski 221)

Question: Based on his thoughts, who does the boy implicate think those two familiar faces are? (Pgs 221-222)

Answer: From the nervous thoughts, the boy is realizing and contemplating more and more that those two people may potentially be the two very significant people in his life. The young boy states, "Forcing an expression of indifference, I scrutinized their faces. The resemblance was striking; these two could be my parents. I clutched my chair while thoughts raced through my mind like a ricocheting bullets. My parents...I didn't know what to do; admit that I recognized them or pretend that I didn't?" (Kosinski 222). The boy has a chaotic thought process as he gets closer and closer to who could potentially be his parents.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at March 8, 2015 11:16 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
2 March 2015

“I also began to understand the extraordinary success of the Germans. Didn’t the priest explain once to some peasants that even in remote times that the Germans delighted in waging wars? Peace had never appealed to them. They did not want to till the soil, they had no patience to wait all year for the harvest. They preferred attaching other tribes and taking crops from them. The Germans probably were noticed then by the Evil Ones. Eager to do harm, they agreed to wholesale to them. That is why they were endowed with all their splendid abilities and talents. That is why they could impose all their refined methods of wrongdoing on others. Success was a vicious circle: the more harm they inflicted, the more secret powers they secured from evil. The more diabolical powers they had, the more evil they could achieve.” (Kosinski, 153 para 2)

Question: In this passage, Kosinski’s young boy is crediting all of the wrongdoings of the German Nazi’s on an outside force known as “the Evil Ones.” What kind of insight on humans and human nature does this boy seem to have? Is it pessimistic or optimistic?

Answer: This young boy’s view of the world gradually goes from optimistic, through his belief of being reconnected with his parents and progresses to pessimistic. He becomes cynical in this section, in which he feels as if he “has already been recruited by the powers of Evil” (154). The insight that this paragraph provides is a kind of sideways hopeful thinking. Instead of attributing all of the horrible things this young boy has heard the Nazi’s do, he blames the ‘Evil Ones’. This means that an anonymous force is the cause of the war, the separation of his family, and all the horrible things that occurred to him. Even though the German’s “agreed to sell out” (153) to this evil force, this force was “the source of their power and strength” (154), therefore taking the complete responsibility off the German’s shoulders.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at March 8, 2015 11:26 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
4 March 2015

“During such talks I swelled with pride. I sat next to Mitka, leaning on his strong arm, listening intently to his voice, so as not to miss a word of what he was saying or the questions of others. If the war lasted until I was old enough to serve, perhaps I could become a sharpshooter, a hero about whom working people talked at their meals.” (Kosinski 198, para. 4)

Question: Throughout his travels, this young boy has not regarded someone as highly as he admires Mitka. What does his actions and thoughts say about the kind of relationship he has with the sharpshooter, Mitka?

Answer: This young boy has lacked attachment to other people for quite a long time. Once the audience is introduced to Mitka, we learn that he “had been looking after me ever since I entered the regimental hospital” to assist in the young boys care (197). Mitka’s soft side for poetry and singing to our young boy seems to be the only safe compassion he has experienced. The affection that the young boy has for Mitka resembles a kind of paternal admiration as he wishes to “become a sharpshooter” (198) and as he “admired Mitka more and more” for his career (200).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at March 8, 2015 11:39 PM

Bryan Hess and Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
9 March 2015

Question: Jerzy Kosiński’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965) seems to be “an exercise in violence and the depravity of people, who victimize each other without hesitation” (Spoiler Dessert, 2012). Consider this passage: “The only law was the traditional right of the stronger and wealthier over the weaker and poorer.” Here, Kosinski introduces the theme of class conflict into the mix of injustice. Point to as many examples as possible from the story where this conflict occurs. What is the significance of this theme to the story? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: When Kosinski first mentioned class conflict in The Painted Bird, it was far from an alien concept to the novel. In fact, a good portion of this book revolves around class conflict. When the Germans were in power, most of the villages that the main character hid in had mixed feelings about him. Some felt that he should be mistreated simply because his skin and hair were darker than the majority of the people. In one instance, the main character was forced to carry a church missive, which he accidentally dropped during a mass. The churchgoers, already angered by the fact that a boy with dark skin and eyes was engaging in their church service went in a fit of rage when he dropped said missive. They called him names, such as “gypsy vampire,” (Kosinski, 138) and proceeded to throw the main character into a pile of manure as a form of punishment. This was a case of people using strength in numbers to oppress a minority group. This sort of class conflict that is still very much alive today. We can even flip the tables and look at an example of similar class conflict of when the Russians took over. In one scene, the main character uses the Soviet bias against those with wealth in order to manipulate Russian soldiers into destroying a teacher’s office. The Soviet’s power did not come from wealth but rather a large population, weaponry, and political swing. When the main character exploited the Russian soldier’s hatred of those with wealth by accusing his principal of exploiting her lay employees, “one of [the soldier] systemically smashed flowerpots in the principal’s carpeted office, the others chased the nurses…” (Kosinski, 211).

Posted by: Bryan Hess at March 9, 2015 01:00 PM

Adam Alexander, Hatim Sharim, and Sergio Velezquez

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220Cl On the Proverbial Road CA01

6 March 2015


Question: One way to understand “the boy” in Jerzy Kosiński’s novel, The Painted Bird (1965), is as “possession.” How is the nameless boy objectified in this narrative, i.e., how is he something (to be) possessed by others? Point to as many examples as possible from the story.

Answer: We would describe him as a possession, because he gains attachment to all beings who are positive or negative to him. I believe this is the natural thing to do because he is still a child and up until 18 most kids are attached to their parents. He is objectified, by the people around him as well as himself. On page 233 of the painted bird he is happy to be acknowledged by his mentor, despite the fact that he thinks his religious practices are complete folly.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at March 9, 2015 02:02 PM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01

27 February 2015

Pages 87-88

“On the other hand , I knew that the workings of justice were often exceedingly slow .In the village I had heard a tale about a skull which tumbled out of a grave and proceeded to roll down an incline , in between the crosses ,carefully avoiding beds of blooming flowers .(Kosinki , page 86 , paragraph 4) “ Question: When the boy was explaining the tale of the skull, would the boy gain justice from all his wrongdoers such as the skull?

Answer :The young man spoke of the tale describing the justice system of the village.That it shows the victim gaining justice from their death andt the young man engaged in the tale to show the work of justice. This gives the young man hope when it comes to justice. In the text, the young man stated that truth will always prevail “So it believed that neither rain nor fire nor wind could ever wipe out the stain of a crime.For justice hangs over the world like a great sledgehammer lifted by a mighty arm, which had to stop for a while before coming down with terrible force on the inspecting anvil.” (Kosinski, page 87, Paragraph 4). However, being who is justice will be tough for him to find when being consider freak of nature.

Posted by: Marie Destin at March 9, 2015 03:31 PM

Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
13 March 2015


Question: In Kosinski’s The Painted Bird, our young boy hero he experiences ‘Crossing of the Threshold’, he is experiences the ‘Test, allies, enemies’ stage, and also experiences the lowest point in his story known as the ‘Belly of Whale’. Identify these stages using the Vogler text and the Painted Bird.


Answer: Upon the beginning of Chapter 1 of the Painted Bird, the boy and the audience are already in the Special World of Marta’s hut. This means the threshold of the boy’s life before the outbreak of World War II, life with his parents, is his ordinary world (Kosinski 1). The boy experiences tests, allies, and enemies (mostly enemies) throughout his life with Marta, Olga, and the various villagers ( Kosinski 3,37). The boy’s “belly of the whale” situation would be his time living with Garbos and the incident in the Catholic church. Specifically the incident when he drops the tray, is thrown into the “inmost cave” of manure and becomes mute (ch. 11).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield at March 20, 2015 11:15 AM

Google
My Blog

Creative Commons License
This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Some rights reserved. 2006.