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January 09, 2013

Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace" - An Illuminating Class Discussion


Image Source: http://www.mnh.si.edu/earth/images/6_0_0_GeoGallery/specimen4081_1.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by lhobbs at January 9, 2013 02:01 PM

Readers' Comments:

13 November 2008

ENG 122 Students,

In regard to the instructions you received in class today, please discuss Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace" below in accordance with the question YOU were assigned.

Discussion Questions for Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”

 

1.)    What are the symbolic implications of the necklace?

2.)    What are anecdotes? Is this story an anecdote?  Why or why not?  Do we use tales like “The Necklace” to point out moral lessons today? Explain. What other examples of this kind of moral instruction can you think of in popular literature?

3.)    How did an evening at a ball offer Mathilde a chance to present herself in a new guise (if you don’t know the word “guise,” look it up)?

4.)    What do we learn from the story about the structure of French society at the time “The Necklace” was written?

5.)    What symbols for wealth and station could be used in a story like this written for today?

6.)    Compare and contrast the lives of Mathilde and her friend Mrs. Forrestier. How are they alike? How are they different?

7.)    Define irony. Is “The Necklace” ironic? Why or why not? Explain.

8.)    What kind of occupation do you think Mister Loisel (Mathilde’s husband) has? Why are they not able to easily repay Mrs. Forrestier?  Why is this important to the story?

9.)    Does Mathilde’s core character or personality change throughout the story? What kind of person would you say she was at the beginning? What kind was she at the end?

10.) Mr. and Mrs. Loisel are the most important characters in the story.  How important are the other characters? Look through the text and decide how much would we know about Mathilde if the other characters were absent from the story? What do the other characters “tell” us about Mathilde?

11.) Which “disaster” is the biggest for Mathilde? Losing the necklace or not telling the truth? Explain.

12.) Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that “women have no caste or class.” Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

 

*Don't forget to the second part of this assignment for Nathaniel Hawthorne HERE: ">http://www.english-blog.com/archives/2008/11/into_the_woods_with_hawthornes_young_goodman_brown_1.php

If you are going to the Southern Journeys event for extra credit, I'll see you there Friday.

ALSO!

Just a little reminder of how papers 1 and 2 will factor in to your final overall score for the course (in case you missed a class meeting where I discussed it):

In short, per our syllabus breakdown, the sum of all the small formal papers for this class (including the annotated biblio.) count for 50% of the total final grade for the course. This is on the syllabus

As stated clearly on the syllabus, for this to “add up” correctly, each paper must count for 10 points.

With that in mind, what might seem “odd” to you (at first) is that on papers #1 and #2, you were scored on a “20 point scale” (instead of a 10-point scale). I did this on purpose to help you learn your way around a research paper. It was always my intention to convert these back to a 10-point scale to make theme fit the model.

So, now I’m doing it. To make Papers 1 and 2 compatible with everything else that is scored on a 10-point scale, they must be now be “converted.” That means that an A (20-19 on the 20-point scale) now becomes a 10 in the 10-point scale. A “B” (18-17 on the 20 point scale) becomes a 9 in the 10-point scale, and so. Just so you know, this benefits you. If you made the low end of a "C" on the 20-point scale (16-15) points, you now have a solid C (8 points) in the 10-point scale. Zeros still covert to Zeros (only received for incomplete submissions). Just so you know, on the 10-point scale, a 10=A, 9=B, 8=C, 7=D, and 6 & Below=F.

Conversion Table

 

New Numerical Score

Letter Grade

Old Numerical Score

10

A

20-19

9

B

18-17

8

C

16-15

7

D

14-13

6 & below

F

12 & below

 

After today, when you look at turnitin.com, you will that I converted papers #1 and #2 to the proper 10 point scale. If you are doing the OPTIONAL (not required) extra credit for me at the Southern Journeys, I will raise them up a grade after I get all of the pieces you are required to submit (response on the blog and the photo evaluation form).

Note that the annotated biblio. and paper #3 will be evaluated on a 10-point scale right from the start—no conversion involved. Remember that the final longer research paper has its own category (see the syllabus for details).

If you are confused, see me in my office. Don’t worry—all this works out to your advantage, not your loss.

With kind regards,

Dr. Hobbs


-------------------------------

Dr. Hobbs,

(1.) What are the symbolic implications of the necklace?

I am in group 1 and there was a discrepancy about what the implication of the necklace actually was. So we conjoined the two meanings and concluded our answer.

To me, the symbolic implication of the necklace is something like the, "American dream". The American dream is something that no one actually knows what it is but they work hard to get it even if in actuality it does not exist.

The necklace is similar to me because she worked hard for 5 years for something that he thought was real and did not know was fake and its actually value did not exist.

Donetta
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature MWF 11:45-12:45

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at January 24, 2007 03:17 PM

24 January 2007

Professor Hobbs,

Today in class the question I had to answer was whether or not Guy de Maupassant (1.) thought that trying to be someone you aren't was a "bad" thing and (2.) if this was part of his little anecdote's message. This was question #14.

Although, I don't personally believe that persons who try to be someone that they aren't are necessarily bad people (It seems that we all like to "try on" something new when we are younger to find out who we are/what we like), but it does seem to be that Mr. Maupassant was saying something like "it's just best if you try to be yourself." Or, maybe, stop trying to impress the world with what you have (by pretending you have it) and just go with the strengths and talents you already have! Otherwise, you might pay a big price later for this kind of superficiality.

We have to remember that not only was Mr. Maupassant a Frenchman, he was also from the 1800s so his culture and social values may have been different than ours are today. Women, in the U.S. at least, couldn't even vote at this time (they got that right in 1920). There was a definite "caste" built in between men and women in Western society in the 1800s and it would be good if we could try to remember that when we read a story such as this.

On the other hand, there were issues of class, economic class that is, that Mathilde had to deal with (not being as "well-off" as her friend Jeanne, for instance) that has not really "gone away" from today's world. We are not living in a "classless" society and there is a definite, ever-widening gap between the "haves" and the "have-nots." It appears to me that Mathilde felt she was a "have not" and would go to great length to pretend that she was. Ironically, her years of hard labor to repay her husband's debtors just rubbed in her fact all the more. She would have to work her fingers to the bone to have the things that Jeanne *seemed* to have. In that regard, things are the same today as they were then.

I look forward to reading and discussing "Young Goodman Brown" as our next assigment!

Sincerely,

Dudley D.
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature MWF 11:45-12:45

Posted by: D. Dooright at January 24, 2007 03:36 PM

Shayne Schmidt

Question 11:

The other characters in the story really are not that important as Mathilde. The reason is because the story shows only her actions and dreams. Also the story shows how spoiled and ashamed she is of her social status. Even if the others characters where absent from the story you would know everything about Mathilde’s personality because of her actions and daydreams of a better life. The others characters such as her husband kind of tell us how unhappy she is because of her social status. He implies this when he offers to buy her a new dress to wear.

Posted by: Shayne Schmidt at January 24, 2007 04:49 PM

Q: What symbols for wealth and station could be used in a story written like this today?


Symbols of wealth today are much flashier than they were in the old days. In “The Necklace”, the woman was so excited about wearing a single diamond necklace. You can find woman wearing an assortment of diamonds and gems all over their body. A woman’s dress might even use diamonds as part of the design. I think the brand name would have been an important part of the dress too. There is not much chance a rich couple would be riding home in a carriage today either. A limo would be waiting out front for them. The described the house they lived in as being an attic flat in the end of the book. Today they might describe a less fortunate family’s home as an apartment. Also in the end of the book, the woman had to write to her friend about the lost necklace. Today everyone has a phone at hand in their home. There are many more things that may have been portrayed or described differently in a story written like this today.


Andy Hood
Group 6

Posted by: Andy Hood at January 24, 2007 06:39 PM

(7.) Compare and contrast the lives of Mathilde and her friend Mrs. Forrestier. How are they alike? How are they different?

Though the main character, Mathilde, of Guy de Maupassant’s, “The Necklace,” seems a great deal different than her friend, Mrs. Forrestiere, there is actually a lot more than meets the eye when it comes to their similarities. For instance they both, as all hopefully already know, are women. Aside from stating the obvious, they also both enjoy lavish material possessions. This is seen throughout the story by Mathilde’s yearning for the life of a queen, and Mrs. Forrestiere’s seemingly owned life of a queen. Though this next similarity between the two of them changes as the story progresses, in the beginning they were both beautiful women. In a way it can be seen as similar that they both lied at one point or another during the story. Mrs. Forrestiere lied, although valid arguments could be made, about the necklace being fake to begin with, and Mathilde lied in telling Mrs. Forrestiere that the clasp broke on the necklace and it was getting fixed, when really it was nowhere to be found.
However, there are also very distinct differences between the two women. Right away one sees that they are clearly both on a different page when it comes to lifestyles. Mrs. Forrestiere, a very wealthy person, heavily contrasts Mathilde, who became depressed at the thought of never being able to live the life of her friendly counterpart. Inverse to what was said before, at the end of the story their appearances differ greatly, as Mathilde appears worn and old, and Mrs. Forrestiere appears clean and youthful. Mathilde appears throughout the story depressed about the life that she was leading, while Mrs. Forrestiere felt as though fully content with everything she had going in her life. Finally, and similar to the last point made, Mrs Forrestiere seemed kind and helpful when Mathilde was in need of jewelry, but Mathilde always seemed as though she only cared about herself and her situation.

Posted by: Colin Hough at January 24, 2007 07:54 PM

“The Necklace”

7. Mathilde and her friend Mrs. Forrestier are very similar and different in many ways. They are similar in the fact that they are both women, in other words neither woman has a job or makes money in their society. However, Mrs. Forrestier is of a higher, richer social class than Mathilde. Due to this Mathilde is very unhappy and ashamed of her life, unlike Mrs. Forrestier, who is very happy with her life. Both women are also different in the way they act and think. Mathilde thinks only of herself, where as Mrs. Forrestier is a very kind and helping person. For example, Mathilde is very selfish in looking beautiful for the ball that she needs jewels, so she goes to Mrs. Forrestier who is very helpful to Mathilde by allowing her to borrow her jewels. At the start of the story Mathilde and Mrs. Forrestier are both very beautiful, but as time passes in the story Mathilde grows old and worn in her appearance and Mrs. Forrestier remains beautiful. Both women are also dishonest in the story when it comes to the necklace. Mathilde is dishonest because she lied to Mrs. Forrestier about losing the necklace and buying a new one, which led to her haggardness. Mrs. Forrestier is dishonest in the fact that she didn’t tell Mathilde that they were fake diamonds and not real ones, had Mathilde known this she would not have worried as much about losing them.

Katie Kovac
English 121 003

Posted by: Katie Kovac at January 24, 2007 08:41 PM

Group 6

Question 6: What symbols for wealth and station could be used in a story like this written for today?

Answer: In the story The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant, the necklace is the easily identifiable symbol of wealth and status. Mathilde yearned for the diamonds of the sparkling creation for what those shined orbs represented, not necessarily for what they were. In the same sense, symbols of wealth and prestige can still be found easily today. The rapper with the five Escalades and the two Hummers; he doesn’t need that many vehicles for his bachelor self by any means, but yet he has them—it shows how wealthy he is that he can afford luxuries he will never need or probably ever use. People do not need plasma screen televisions, extremely overdone and luxurious month upon month long vacations, or that extra baker’s dozen of maids and butlers to clean up the everyday little messes. Why then does a certain small percentage of the population undertake such pleasures for themselves? Simply because these material symbols represent a higher lifestyle with riches and status that some strive for. Not to say that a desire for luxuries is a bad one, but by having such things, one adopts a certain elevation of status through the owning. Mathilde of days gone by had her diamonds; today we have our BMW’s. Both represent the wealth Mathilde strove for, the symbols simply moved ahead a few generations.

Posted by: Erin Knisley at January 24, 2007 08:52 PM

Carlos R. Gonzalez


(4.) How did an evening at a ball offer Mathilde a chance to present herself in a new guise?
Mathilde was able to be something / someone she is not, like a fairy tale. Once she put on the dress and the necklace she was portraying an individual in a higher social and economic class. She enjoyed a night of activities that she usually does not have the chance to. She stood behind a mask as her dreams came true for one night.

Posted by: Carlos R. Gonzalez at January 24, 2007 09:16 PM

An anecdote is defined in a dictionary as “a short narrative of an occurrence”. An anecdote could be in the form of a tale like The Boy Who Cried Wolf or used to reference something that has happened. Usually, when anecdotes are in stories or tales, they are there to extend the message of a certain moral. Other examples of these types of anecdotes in literature are; Tortoise and the Hare, Little Red Ridding Hood, Three Little Pigs. Anecdotes are popular in literature, and can be found in a lot of writings and spoken stories.

Posted by: Greg Crossland at January 24, 2007 11:19 PM

Jan. 24, 2007

Professor Lee Hobbs,

In my group #12, I had to answer the question that states, What is the biggest disaster for Mathidle? Not telling the truth or the losing the necklace. Explain.

I believe the biggest disaster that Mathidle did was not telling the truth. If she would have went up to Mrs. Forresier, after she had lost it, then it would have been a lot easier for Mathidle and her husband to pay the debt to get another necklace. I’m sure if Mrs. Forresier found out, she probably wouldn’t be the kind of person who would have someone slave their life, just to repay for a necklace. Mrs. Forresier seems like a caring person who is willing to understand the problem if something goes wrong.


Your Student from Humanities Literature,
Jenny T.

Posted by: Jenny Troutman at January 25, 2007 02:23 PM

The word anecdote, according to Webster's Dictionary is defined as, "a short narrative of an occurance." After looking up this defination, our group came up with a few examples that would be considered anecdotes. Our examples were as follows, Tortous and the Hare, The Boy who Cried Wolf, and The Three Little Pigs. We thought these were considered anecdotes because they all had a moral in the end of the story.
Thank you,
Amber Dunmire

Posted by: Amber Dunmire at January 25, 2007 03:00 PM

9) Mr. Loisel is a clerk for the Ministry of Education. I believe this job is something along the lines of a secretary, performing tasks such as keeping and organizing files and doing other minor tasks in the office. The reason they can’t easily repay Mrs. Forrestier is because a clerk isn’t a high paying job, and it also sounds like a competitive field when he says “I had a lot of trouble getting the invitation. Everyone wants one. The demand is high and not many clerks get invited.” So with a lot of people able to do this job there is probably a lot of people who will work for low pay. People would rather make a small amount of money than none at all. On this salary alone it would take a very long time to come up with the money for a diamond necklace.

Posted by: Jeff Hoover at January 25, 2007 03:33 PM

24 January 2007

Professor Hobbs,

Today in class my group had question #13. Guy de Maupassant writes in the first paragraph that “women have no caste or class.” Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

Around the time the story took place, women probably didn’t have much of a class, whether it is social or economic class women tended to be looked down upon. Their class was almost determined for them, dictated by what type of class their husband was. So back then, I think women had a caste that was permanent and they could work to gain a higher class but it really didn’t matter because they still weren’t as “high” as the men. Today, women have more choices and I believe that they can establish their own class by working hard and accomplishing something in their life. Women are more successful today because they are given the chance to be, unlike Mathilde.

I feel men were some what born into a class and follow their family, job wise. If they were born into a wealthy family they obviously will be in a higher class and I don’t think there caste would change either. Today there is just more opportunity to establish your class early on in your life. Caste is permanent but class can change, I believe you can set your caste early in life and your class can change anytime whether you’re male or female.

Posted by: Lorin Gdula at January 25, 2007 03:45 PM

10) In the beginning of the story Mathilde feels that material things are very important in life. Because she doesn't live a wealthy life, she is jealous of people who do. After her experience with the diamond necklace, she realizes that there are more important things in life. She works hard to pay off her debts and learns a lot from her experince. Mathilde's personality changes for the better by the end of the story.

Posted by: Erin Rock at January 25, 2007 05:42 PM

Derek Hensley
Eng 121.003

(5.) What do we learn from the story about the structure of French society at the time “The Necklace” was written?

We learn that French society at that time did not appear to have a middle class. Either one was wealthy or one did not have much. Members of the lower class of society did not live the same type of lifestyle as the rich lived. The Higher class individuals seemed to have more opportunities, and obviously lived much more lavishly than lower class citizens. The Author made it seem like the lower class was looked at differently as apposed to people with money, as is the case in many cultures even today.

Posted by: Derek Hensley at January 25, 2007 05:52 PM

Lyndsay Krall

Group 7 question:

Compare and contrast the lives of Mathilde and her friend Mrs. Forrestier. How are they alike? How are they dead?


Similarities:
• They are both women
• Both women enjoy nice and expensive things
• In the beginning of the story both women are considered to be very beautiful
• Both women can be considered dishonest, seeing as how Mrs. Forrestier never told Mathilde in the beginning that the necklace was merely costume jewelry, and Mathilde wasn’t honest about losing the necklace


Differences:
• Social status
• By the end of the story, Mathilde has become very old and worn-out looking, while Mrs. Forrestier remained youthful and beautiful
• Mrs. Forrestier is proud of who she is, while Mathilde longs to be someone else
• Mrs. Forrestier is willing to share and help others, while Mathilde seems selfish and only worries about herself

Posted by: Lyndsay Krall at January 25, 2007 06:02 PM

Professor Hobbs,

Today in class my group had to answer What are anecdotes? Do we use anecdotes like “The Necklace” to point out moral lessons today? Explain, which was (question 2)

Anecdotes are short stories told about an interesting incident it is usually an anecdote is based on real life, an ancedote can be just like a fable for example little red riding hood. Yes, I beleive that we still do use ancedotes today to point out moral lessons. Examples of anecdotes would be stories that pertain to real life, in a sense to teach a lesson to the reader and readers.

Sincerely
B. Decker

Posted by: Brooke at January 25, 2007 06:34 PM

9.) What kind of occupation do you think Mister Loisel (Mathilde’s husband) has? Why are they not able to easily repay Mrs. Forrestier?

In the beginning of “The Necklace”, the story explains that Mathilde grew up poor, with a family of clerk and copyists, and she settled for a marriage with Mister Loisel, a minor clerk. A minor clerk gives the impression that this is a low ranking occupation, and he is probably not paid well. It seems that Mathilde and Mister Loisel grew up in the same economic class. Mister Loisel may have a hard time finding a higher paying job due to his economic status or lack of higher education. It takes the Loisel’s ten years to repay Mrs. Forrestier because Mister Loisel is only able to find work in lower-class jobs.

Jen Naugle

Posted by: Jen Naugle at January 25, 2007 06:42 PM

#9 Mister Loisel’s occupation is a clerk, which further means that he is some kind of a sales person. At this time period there were an abundant number of clerks which lead to competitive pay, and not many hours to spread through all the clerks. The author referred to him as a “frugal clerk” stating that his pay makes him have to pinch pennies and live a thrifty life style. This is why it took the Loisel’s so long to pay off the debt from replacing the lost necklace.

Posted by: Nicole Novak at January 25, 2007 06:56 PM

Professor Hobbs,

I had to answer question 13.
13. Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that "women have no caste or class.“ Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

I believe, given the particular time period this was written, it's possible that women may have been thought of as having no caste or class. This may have also just been the author's opinion, but this story was also written in 1884...in France.

I on the other hand, believe that as a part of society, women do have a determined caste and/or class based on:
1.) the family she comes from, and
2.)who she marries.

Regardless of time period, these two factors will almost always contribute to where a lady stands in society.

Men on the other hand carry a class and caste based on different factors. Like women, men will still be partially determined by the family into which they are born. After that, if the man's family is capable of schooling him, he may go on to pursue a career that would further determine his caste and class. The more money that can be fronted for education, the better the job, the higher the place in society.

Joe T
ENGL 121 sec 003
group 13

Posted by: Joe T at January 25, 2007 08:33 PM

Question 13: Maupasant, the author wrote in the first paragraph that “women have no caste or class”. Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men? Do they have a caste or class?
The term “caste” can be defined as a social class. The term “class” has to do with your income such as the working class. Every man and woman is born into a specific caste that they cannot change. Therefore, I do not agree with the statement “women have no caste or class”. Now whether or not she is in a specific class varies. Usually women back then were placed into whatever class their husband was in. He was the one who was allowed to work, putting the food on the table, while the woman didn’t have such freedoms. If the man she married were rich, they would have been in a higher class. That doesn’t mean class cant change. People can become either richer or poorer in time.

Posted by: Tina Walter at January 25, 2007 08:52 PM

(4.) How did an evening at a ball offer Mathilde a chance to present herself in a new guise?

Mathilde was able to use her evening at the ball as a chance to present herself in a new guise. In other words, she was able to take on a new appearance or image while at the ball. Mathilde had dreamt of living the life of the upper class with expensive clothing and fancy belongings. However, on the contrast, she lived a very simple life with plain foods, a standard house, and plain clothing/belongings. During her evening at the ball, Mathilde was able to put on a fancy dress and an expensive diamond necklace to fit in with the economic class of citizens that were also in attendance. As she mingled and enjoyed herself, she felt that she fit in with the upper class wealthy people and was fulfilling her fantasy of being one of them. Although she knew she was not truly rich, her outward appearance and ensemble created an image that she was in fact a rich respectable woman. Such an opportunity to pretend allowed Mathilde to escape her life and almost go undercover in the disguise of someone she wished to be. As the people accepted her, she shined more brightly as she felt that this appearance would give her the happiness she dreamed of day in and day out in her real lifestyle.

Posted by: Bettina Herold at January 25, 2007 09:21 PM

The symbolic representation of the necklace has great implications regarding Mathidle’s feelings and wants. The necklace represents wealth and the luxurious that she can not afford in real life. Having the necklace on makes her into some whom she is not both physically and mentally. She is much happier when she appears to come from a wealthier status. Thus the necklace almost symbolizes a second life, which is the life she wants to achieve and have.

Posted by: Sheryll Daugherty at January 25, 2007 09:51 PM

Justin Bleggi Group 2

Q. What is an anecdote? Do we use anecdotes like “The Necklace” to point out moral lessons today? Explain.

An anecdote is a short story that recounts an event in order to convey an idea, moral, or information. Short stories such as “The Necklace” by de Maupassant, Aesop’s Fables, parables from the Bible, and fairy tales are all examples of anecdotes. Modern anecdotes can take form in speeches or sermons, newspaper articles, and magazine articles (e.g. Reader’s Digest, Time) to name a few. The anecdote, when used as a public speaking device is an excellent way of imparting an idea to an audience that might not be able to grasp an abstract of the idea.

Posted by: Justin Bleggi at January 25, 2007 10:28 PM

5.What did we learn from the story about the structure of French society at the time “The Necklace” was written?

The structure of France was set up in a way that you were either rich or poor and the poor had no connections to the upper class. In most cases, the poor seemed to be jealous of the rich. Money was very important to the French society. Everyone wanted to be rich and material things were of utmost importance.

Posted by: Jaime Hersh at January 25, 2007 10:44 PM

6.) What symbols for wealth and station could be used in a story like this written for today?

In Guy de Maupassant’s the Necklace, Mathilde wishes to live a life of luxury. She dreams of a fine-looking home, rich meals, beautiful clothes, and breathtaking jewelry. During 1800s, when this story takes place, she could not possibly ask for anything more. Today however, symbols of wealth have grown exponentially. They include all of the above mentioned items, and also include everything brought by new technology.

Instead of worrying about a carriage a person of wealth would travel in the latest model car, boat or plane. The rich have the luxury of traveling in style with expensive label names and lavishness features in there cars. They may choose to live elaborate lifestyles by traveling to exclusive places all over the world, or by having extraordinary parties. Their mansions at home would be filled with the most expensive furniture, plasma screen televisions, and the most up to date computers available. The rich can sport the latest fashions and chat on a phone with every possible feature. They, like Mathilde wanted, would have the best that they could dream up. Social status is determined by ones ability to own or experience the finer things in life. Basically, the better your “stuff” the higher your social status.

Erika Knox
Humanities Literature
M/W/F 11:45-12:45

Posted by: Erika Knox at January 25, 2007 11:02 PM

11. How important are the other characters? What would we know about Mathilde if the other characters weren't present? What do the other characters "tell" us about her?

It's evident even without other characters that Mathilde is spoiled, yet ashamed of her social status. Her actions, as the narrator describes them, speak louder than any words or dialogue. When she scurries away, this is shown. We would still know this without other characters, except maybe her husband. He "tells" us that Mathilde is very selfish, and despite his hard work, she still wants more. She's unhappy due to her lack of material wealth and is ashamed of it.

Posted by: Kendra Sledzinski at January 25, 2007 11:04 PM

Today i was an SA!

Brooke DECKER

Posted by: Brooke at January 25, 2007 11:25 PM

13) Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that "Women have no caste or class.“ Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

I do not agree with Maupassant with this issue. In order for a person to be included in a society they must have a caste or a class. When a woman is born, she becomes a member of the caste and class that her family is in. In the time period this story was written, 1884, there was a certain permanence given to the caste or class a family possessed. People were seen to marry within the economic or social class they were born. While this may have been so a century ago, today this caste system does not exist in every country. In America, there is no such caste system. There is, however, a breakdown of class. If a man or a woman strives to elevate their economic status, they have the resources and opportunities to do so. Men, as well did belong to a class and caste when this story was written. The job that a man would have in the future was predetermined by their social class, giving him is permanent caste and class.

Stephanie Vrabel

Posted by: Stephanie at January 25, 2007 11:36 PM

(10.) Does Mathilde’s core character or personality change throughout the story? What kind of person would you say she was at the beginning? What kind was she at the end?

Yes, I do think Mathilde’s core character changes throughout the story. In the beginning of the story Mathilde is concerned about how much money she has and she wants more expensive clothes and more material things. She is really unhappy with the way her life is in the beginning of the story. By the end of the story, Mathilde definitely changes because she had to learn to work for the things she owned and therefore she appreciated them more. She is happier at the end of the story because she learned to appreciate her life for what it is now and stopped longing after a life that she couldn’t have.

Posted by: Rebecca at January 26, 2007 12:38 AM

Melisa Parsons
Group #11


11.) How important are the other characters in the story? Look through the text and decide how much would we know about Mathilde if the other characters were absent from the story? What do the other characters “tell” us about Mathilde?


In “The Necklace “the other characters are not significant but since the author gives the readers background on how women were looked upon at this time it explains Mathilde’s insecurities. Women were judge by their beauty and the things they possessed ,although her husband wanted to please her by inviting her to this special event , Mathilde did not want to feel like everyone was looking down on her because she was not wealthy like the other wives. Mathilde’s husband actions shows that although his wife’s feelings were probably superficial to him he knew it would make her happy to have something knew to wear so he gave up money that he have saved for a special event for himself. Mathilde buys a new dress and she still was unsatisfied which tells us that no matter how much she has she will always want more.

Posted by: melisa Parsons at January 26, 2007 12:43 AM

Professor Hobbs,

Irony is the use of words to convey a meaning that is opposite of its literal meaning.
An example of irony in this story called, “The Necklace” is when Mathildes feels her friend is respected because she wears and owns beautiful clothing and jewelry. Mathilde is asked to go out and she does not want to because she does not have anything nice to wear and she does not think she will get respect from other people. She ends up borrowing her friends’ piece of jewelry, which is a diamond necklace. She ends up losing the necklace and her and her husband work hard for ten years to get the money back to repay her friend. When she finally repays her friend, she realizes that the necklace was actually costume jewelry, or fake. So, Mathilde thought the whole time that her friend is only respected because of her “nice things”, and that is not true. The meaning of this story is you do not have to have to have expensive jewelry to get and have respect.

Deidra K.

Posted by: Deidra K. at January 26, 2007 09:30 AM

Professor Hobbs,

Question 5: What do we learn from the story about the structure of French society at the time “The Necklace” was written?

From the story “The Necklace,” we can get a general understanding of the French society. The story is based on two separate classes of people; the rich and poor. From reading this story we can learn how the two classes compare to one another. It seems that there is a great amount of friction between the two classes over the power of money. Money seems to be the most important factor in living a great life. Because of this issue the two classes began to create a jealous personality between one another. Instead of living life with love and compassion, the structure of the French society seems to focus more on materialistic things. For example in “The Necklace,” the necklace symbolizes to Mathilde happiness and power. However, after the necklace is taken off she goes back to being an unhappy woman. Between these two points in the story there is a dramatic change in her personality, because of her unrealistic dream of being rich. Overall we can learn that money and materialistic objects have created a impact of the structure of the French society.

April H.

Posted by: April H. at January 26, 2007 09:32 AM

Steve Petrone

10. Yes Mathilde’s personality changes throughout the story. In the beginning of the story she is very unhappy and frustrated with her cheap lifestyle. She longs for wealth and expensive luxuries but she cannot have them. By the end of the story she is accustomed to her poverty stricken lifestyle and takes some matters into her own hands like housework. She is no longer jealous of her friends. She no longer dreams about the rich and wealthy life and accepts her new way of life for what it is.

Posted by: Steve Petrone at January 26, 2007 11:04 AM

Prof. Hobbs,

Group Activity Question 3. Anecdote- A short narrative of an occurrence.

Three examples of moral instruction in popular literature are Tortoise and the Hare, The Boy who Cried Wolf, and Three Little Pigs.

Lauren W.
ENGL 121

Posted by: Lauren W. at January 26, 2007 03:36 PM

Hello Class,

Today, we discussed Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace" in our class meeting. All of you who had a chance to speak had wonderful things to contribute. Let's keep this spirit of participation going for all of our future meetings .

I feel I need to say thanks to all the groups who discussed today but didn't get to speak due to restraints on time. For two meetings now we've begun with group 1 and closed up shop before we had a chance to get down to group 13. Our next meeting will change that (someone please remind if I am the one who forgets). Next time, we'll begin with group 13.

By now, you should be getting a pretty good idea of what “literature” is all about from the course readings you’ve done since the beginning of the course. Now, we will be shifting gears into some ways to “write” about literature. Hopefully you have gained something useful from the first half of the “Preliminary” chapter in WAL about how to take notes on your readings (underline/highlight & write copiously in the margins!) and how to think about writing about literature. So, for the next class meeting (Friday):

1. Read WAL 27.5 to 52 (&) WAL 222-230 “Young Goodman Brown”
2. Type up your answer to today’s group activity question in a word document, spell check it, grammar check it, proofread it and have someone you trust proofread it for mistakes. Your answer should sound thoughtful and cogent.
3. Copy-and-paste your polished answer (should be at least a good paragraph) into the comment box of this blog entry. You may have to scroll down to find it. After you click “submit” you won’t see your answer right away. I have to go back into the blog later and “approve” it. So don’t worry, it's there!

If you need to look at the story again, and you still haven't purchased the textbook, you can find a copy of the story online by clicking HERE.

In case you've forgotten the questions, here they are. Each group member must do this for himself or herself. Even though you have the same question, you might have different answers, which is okay. In fact, I DON'T want to see the same answer duplicated three times.

Here are the questions*:

(1.) What are the symbolic implications of the necklace?
(2.) What are anecdotes? Do we use anecdotes like “The Necklace” to point out moral lessons today? Explain.
(3.) Define “anecdote.” What other examples of this kind of moral instruction can you think of in popular literature?
(4.) How did an evening at a ball offer Mathilde a chance to present herself in a new guise?
(5.) What do we learn from the story about the structure of French society at the time “The Necklace” was written?
(6.) What symbols for wealth and station could be used in a story like this written for today?
(7.) Compare and contrast the lives of Mathilde and her friend Mrs. Forrestier. How are they alike? How are they different?
(8.) What is irony? How is this story ironic?
(9.) What kind of occupation do you think Mister Loisel (Mathilde’s husband) has? Why are they not able to easily repay Mrs. Forrestier?
(10.) Does Mathilde’s core character or personality change throughout the story? What kind of person would you say she was at the beginning? What kind was she at the end?
(11.) How important are the other characters in the story? Look through the text and decide how much would we know about Mathilde if the other characters were absent from the story? What to the other characters “tell” us about Mathilde?
(12.) Which is the biggest disaster for Mathilde? Losing the necklace or not telling the truth? Explain.
(13.) Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that "women have no caste or class.“ Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

Just in case you were absent today for some reason and forget your group #, here is the (hopefully) groups list:

Group 1: Sherrie, Donnetta, and Pat
Group 2: Justin, Kristin, and Brooke
Group 3: Greg, Amber, and Lauren
Group 4: Erika G., Bettina, and Carlos
Group 5: Jaime, Derek, and April
Group 6: Erin K., Erika K., and Andy
Group 7: Lyndsay, Katie, and Colin
Group 8: Tatiana, Kyle, and Deidra
Group 9: Jeffrey, Jen N., and Nicole
Group 10: Steve, Erin R., and Rebecca
Group 11: Kendra, Shayne, and Melisa
Group 12: Jenny T., Thomas, and Ashley
Group 13: Joe, Lorin, Tina, and Steph

By the way, today's SAs are exempt from this exercise since they were not in the groups today to discuss the answers to their group's questions. Today's SAs should respond simply with "Today I was an SA" and leave their name so I'll remember when I pull out the gradesheets.

Also, a few of you've asked if you can see the results of the survey you took. Absolutely! If you are interested to see what the class has (or hasn't) read and seen, click on the following link:

http://www.surveymonkey.com/Report.asp?U=316934562730

There are only 39 responses (one was from me, as a test) so it looks like one or two people didn't participate. I was hoping to get some higher percentages on at least one or two examples from each genre, but, alas, it seems we'll have to deal with about an 86% commonality tops.

A few parting words. We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

In your journals, please write down the following words that have come up in class on several occasions: (1.) elite (2.) canon (3.) class (4.) caste (5.) irony (6.) anecdote (7.) guise

Source: Some ideas for study questions gleaned from Jane Quest's wonderful resources HERE.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this assignment has now passed. Comments are no longer being accepted for this exercise

~Lee

Posted by: Lee Hobbs at April 4, 2007 06:21 PM

5.What symbols of wealth and station could be used in a story like this written today?
Symbols of wealth and station that could be used in a story like this written today includes homes; the area you live in, clothes, cars, bags, and shoes.

Posted by: Dominique Smith at November 15, 2008 10:38 PM

6. Mathilde and Mrs. Forrestier are both uppity and insolent in manner. In other words, they both act like they have a lot of money. However, the difference is that Mrs. Forrestier is wealthy and Mathilde is just faking it.

Posted by: Thomas Moona at November 17, 2008 11:32 PM

Question #7

The Necklace is very ironic because it puts a woman who thought that she was getting a diamond necklace but in reality she got a necklace made of costume jewelry. The ironic part of the of the whole story is that she drove herself and her family down to misery for just a piece of "fake" jewelry.

Posted by: Martin M. Mune at November 18, 2008 07:26 AM

#2. An anecdote is a short account of a story. This story could be considered am anecdote because it is based around one event, the ball. I do believe that we still use them for lessons even today because as children we have all those songs that tell us our lessons and now as a young adult, when I watch televison or a movie, there is always a story and a lesson that can be learned from that story.

Posted by: Danielle Dunlevy at November 18, 2008 11:38 AM

discussion question number 10
the other characters in the story are important because they set up the stage for the story. with out other characters mathilde would seem like a normal person with out any thing wrong with her but since we see the other characters she becomes self concsience about her money. the other characters tell us that mathilde is all about keeping up with the joneses, when she does not have the means to do so. she wants to apear to be rich and have all these material possesions but in reality she cant afford them.

Posted by: John Bron at November 18, 2008 12:19 PM

1.) What are the symbolic implications of the necklace?

The symbolic implications of the necklace are that Ms. Loisel should not try to be something that she’s not. When she lost Mrs. Forrestier’s necklace she should have spoken up. If Ms. Loisel would have spoken up and told the truth, then she would have found out that the necklace Mrs. Forrestier gave her was only costume jewelry and she probably only had to pay about 500 francs instead 34,000 francs. A problem with our society today is that when a person gets into trouble they try to cover it up before standing up for their actions. In a way the necklace represents “cover ups.”The reason people feel the need to stop being truthful and try to be someone they are not.

Posted by: Mary Chuhinko at November 18, 2008 12:19 PM

discussion question number 10
the other characters in the story are important because they set up the stage for the story. with out other characters mathilde would seem like a normal person with out any thing wrong with her but since we see the other characters she becomes self concsience about her money. the other characters tell us that mathilde is all about keeping up with the joneses, when she does not have the means to do so. she wants to apear to be rich and have all these material possesions but in reality she cant afford them.

Posted by: John Bron at November 18, 2008 12:19 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at November 19, 2008 12:07 PM

Brittany Thunberg
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA16
January 21, 2009


(Maupassant, Guy de.“The Necklace.” Writing about Literature by Edgar V. Roberts. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson 2006. 5-13.)


Guy de Maupassant begins his short story “The Necklace”, by introducing readers to main character Mathilde Loisel. Maupassant describes Mathilde as, “one of those pretty charming women, born, as if by an error of destiny, into a family of clerks and copyists.” (pg 5) Maupassant portrays Mrs. Loisel as an unfortunate woman who has everything going for her except the fact that she was born into a poor family with no title in society. Maupassant really digs deep into Mathilde’s unhappiness, he intensely describes to readers how miserable and unhappy Mrs. Loisel is. Mrs. Loisel’s greed and selfish ways are displayed throughout the work and enable her to appreciate the simple things in life.
When Mr. Loisel comes home one day, he has an invitation to an upscale ball. He expects his wife to be nothing but happy, however, he is mistaken. Mathilde is not only disappointed with the invitation, but outraged that he would even expect her to attend this lavish ball. This contradicts everything that Maupassant has described Mathilde to be. “She suffered constantly, feeling herself destined for all delicacies and luxuries.” (pg 5) If her obsession with expensive things and having a deluxe lifestyle is enough to make her completely miserable then why would she be angered with the idea of attending a ball where she would be in the company of everything she desires?
Mathilde explains to her husband that she could not bear to be in the company of such luxury while she looked like a commoner. After Mathilde manipulates her husband into buying her a new gown for the ball, she refuses to attend the ball without jewelry; she feels that she will not fit in without being draped in expensive jewelry of some kind. “I’ll look like a beggar. I’d almost rather not go to the party.” (Maupassant 7) After suggesting several solutions to the problem Mathilde finally agrees with her husband’s suggestion to borrow some jewelry from her wealthy friend Mrs. Forrestier.
Mrs. Loisel has everything she desires the night of the ball. “She danced joyfully, passionately, intoxicated with pleasure, thinking of nothing but the moment, in the triumph of her beauty, in the glory of her success.” (Maupassant 8) After the ball instead of being grateful and appreciative for the night, she is once again overcome with envy and bitterness and is disgusted with the buggy her and her husband have to take home. When Mathilde realizes that she has lost the necklace that Mrs. Forrestier lent her, this is the turning point in this short story. The Loisel’s are forced to take out loans and spend their life savings on buying a replica of the lost diamond necklace.
After the years of hard-work and desperation Mathilde has aged and now truly understands the hardships of the needy. The narrarator refers to Mathilde now as Mrs. Loisel to convey to the reader that she is no longer young and beautiful but aged and haggard. When Mathilde sees Mrs. Forrestier ten years later on the streets she tells her of her hardships and miserable life that she had to spend working to recover from the debt she and her husband put themselves in paying to replace her necklace. The moral of the story is understood when Mrs. Forrestier explains to Mrs. Loisel that the necklace she lost so long ago was merely costume jewelry.

Posted by: Brittany Thunberg at January 27, 2009 12:50 AM

Sasha-Ann Jarrett
Dr. Hobbs
English 122-CA17
January 26, 2009
Maupassant, Guy de. “The Necklace” A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader. Pearson Education Inc., 2005
Greed Comes Home To Roost
The title plays an important part in this short story, as “the necklace” is what makes up the entire plot of the story. Without this exquisite piece of jewelry, the story would not have had the same effect on the reader. The main character of “The Necklace” is Mathilde Loisel, and the story is based on her accompanied by the necklace. Mathilde is a middle class woman who was never satisfied with being at her societal level. One evening her husband decides to cheer her up by bringing home an invitation to a ball, but instead of being happy, Mathilde turns down the offer because she claims she has nothing to wear. Her husband then makes a suggestion that she should go and borrow jewelry from a wealthy friend of hers to wear with the dress that he has given her the money to buy. Mathilde decides to borrow a diamond necklace or so she thought. Just as fate would have it, Mathilde losses the necklace. Mathilde’s fantasies about being wealthy, then come in, as they are so strong that they to translate into jealousy causing her to be ungrateful.
According to Edgar V. Roberts “a trait is a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive ways,”…page 64, jealousy can be identified as one. Jealousy is a trait as it is repetitive throughout the story and is perfectly portrayed by Mathilde. She is constantly jealous of those who she perceives to be above her class, and measures this by what people acquire. Her jealousy is so intense that it dampens her relationships both with her husband and a friend. Mathilde is jealous of the only friend she has, who is wealthy. She cannot bear to observe the lifestyle of her friend.
She seems to be materialistic at the beginning of the story as all she does is dream about the finer things in life rather than appreciating what she has. The relationship between her husband and her is strenuous, however he constantly tries to make her happy and says endearing things to her like “Ah, good old boiled beef’…page 53. He says this to point out to his wife that he is happy with the life he is living and she should be too. Pointing out to the reader that Mathilde is ungrateful of what she possesses and the husband thinks so too.
This jealousy led to Mathilde’s ungratefulness, because if she was satisfied with her status in life she would not have found it necessary to borrow the diamond necklace from her friend. She strongly believes that the necklace would have added value to her being and would better identify her with a higher social class. The author illustrates Mathilde’s ungratefulness through her actions and allows us to get a better understanding of her. Her husband suggests buying flowers and making a corsage out of them, because he knows that they are financially incapable. But, Mathilde gets upset with him for even suggesting that. By getting upset is an action the author uses to show the reader how ungrateful she is, especially to her husband, as she knows that he is making a wise decision.
Mathilde had to adjust to certain circumstances causing her to recognize the value of things she possessed; she now has to put away her pride. She had to adjust to being poor and pondered on life without the necklace and wondered if she would have been the same or a changed person. This shows us that she is a round character as she displays a dynamic personality. If the necklace was not there, would Mathilde have been the same as she was? Eventually her jealousy and greed would still cause negativity within her life.

Posted by: Sasha-ann Jarrett at February 2, 2009 08:53 PM

Josh Green
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA17
2/25/09
Theme of Maupassant’s “The Necklace”: Just Costume Jewelry
The Necklace, by Guy de Maupassant, is a tale of heartbreaking irony that leads a simple couple in France to the rock bottom of debt. In my opinion, an important driving theme of the story is Mathilde’s obvious class conflict. Mathilde always wants more, she’s unhappy with the mediocrity of her life and her aspirations of a wealthier lifestyle are anything but unattainable in her position. She’s married to a common clerk who is fully content with his life, but she has no desire to settle into this mentality with him.
The narrator begins by explaining Mathilde’s feelings of despair in her low social class, “She suffered constantly, feeling herself destined for all delicacies and luxuries. She suffered because of her grim apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, ugly curtains” (Maupassant 5). This simple living killed her daily. She was a prisoner inside her ordinary life.
Mathilde’s character strives to live a lavished life whenever possible which leads her to bad decisions. She manipulates her husband for personal gain and as Roberts says, “characters and their actions can often be equated with certain ideas and values.” (Roberts 123). “She thought for a few moments, adding things up and thinking also of an amount that she could ask without getting an immediate refusal and a frightened outcry from the frugal clerk.” (Maupassant 7). I believe she represents a sense of unhappiness through greed. This also goes well to explain “interlocking ideas” when she obtains the necklace then looses it while be carless during the dinner party. (Roberts 123). Thus her experiences in debt and lower class living change her personality completely, “she had become the strong, hard, and rude woman of poor households.” (Maupassant 11).
Turns out Mathilde’s lost necklace was of no value and all her toils were in vein. If only Mathilde could have owned up to her mistake, she could have saved her and her husband years and years of anguish and labor. In the end it was her selfish dreaming and her greed that proved to be her downfall. I believe there’s a lesson to be learned from Mathilde’s misfortunes and that lesson is to just live life and be thankful for what you have.

Works Cited

Maupassant, Guy de . “The Necklace.” Writing about Literature by Edgar V. Roberts. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006. 5-12.
Roberts, Edgar V. “Writing about Literature” Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006.

Posted by: Josh Green at March 2, 2009 10:30 PM

Josh Green
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA17
2/25/09
Theme of Maupassant’s “The Necklace”: Just Costume Jewelry
The Necklace, by Guy de Maupassant, is a tale of heartbreaking irony that leads a simple couple in France to the rock bottom of debt. In my opinion, an important driving theme of the story is Mathilde’s obvious class conflict. Mathilde always wants more, she’s unhappy with the mediocrity of her life and her aspirations of a wealthier lifestyle are anything but unattainable in her position. She’s married to a common clerk who is fully content with his life, but she has no desire to settle into this mentality with him.
The narrator begins by explaining Mathilde’s feelings of despair in her low social class, “She suffered constantly, feeling herself destined for all delicacies and luxuries. She suffered because of her grim apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, ugly curtains” (Maupassant 5). This simple living killed her daily. She was a prisoner inside her ordinary life.
Mathilde’s character strives to live a lavished life whenever possible which leads her to bad decisions. She manipulates her husband for personal gain and as Roberts says, “characters and their actions can often be equated with certain ideas and values.” (Roberts 123). “She thought for a few moments, adding things up and thinking also of an amount that she could ask without getting an immediate refusal and a frightened outcry from the frugal clerk.” (Maupassant 7). I believe she represents a sense of unhappiness through greed. This also goes well to explain “interlocking ideas” when she obtains the necklace then looses it while be carless during the dinner party. (Roberts 123). Thus her experiences in debt and lower class living change her personality completely, “she had become the strong, hard, and rude woman of poor households.” (Maupassant 11).
Turns out Mathilde’s lost necklace was of no value and all her toils were in vein. If only Mathilde could have owned up to her mistake, she could have saved her and her husband years and years of anguish and labor. In the end it was her selfish dreaming and her greed that proved to be her downfall. I believe there’s a lesson to be learned from Mathilde’s misfortunes and that lesson is to just live life and be thankful for what you have.

Works Cited

Maupassant, Guy de . “The Necklace.” Writing about Literature by Edgar V. Roberts. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006. 5-12.
Roberts, Edgar V. “Writing about Literature” Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006.

Posted by: Josh Green at March 2, 2009 10:31 PM

John Winans
Eng 122
Dr. Hobbs
04March2009
Was it Worth it? The Price of a Dream
In the story of “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant the use of a necklace as a symbol of wealth turns into lesson on honesty when left in the hands of a careless friend. It can be frustrating as a woman of the 19th century due to her place in society, but may also be rewarding if seen in the wealthiest of company. In order to impress onlookers, sometimes jewelry can persuade them into thinking one human is of more stature than another, but how far is a woman willing to go and at what cost will she impart? When caught in such a situation we see that the character of Mathilde would be better off honest of her mistake.
Mathilde is one woman whom has always dreamed of being wealthier than she was, not content with what she has she seeks to at least portray herself as being better off. The opportunity arises for her to attend a party of the elite, in order for her to misguide others into believing she belongs she talks her husband into spending money they do not have on luxurious dressings.
“Suddenly she found a superb diamond necklace in a black satin box, and her heart throbbed with desire for it. Her hands shook as she picked it up. She fastened it around her neck, watched it gleam at her throat, and looked at herself ecstatically.”(Maupassant, 7)
. Enter the necklace, borrowed from a friend without knowledge of worth Mathilde agrees to return it soon after the party only to lose it and having to replace it without being caught. If only she were honest about losing it she would have saved herself a lifetime of toil.
The allegory here is that the necklace was an item that was out of reach for her status. The desire for it like her desires for the finer things in life would lead to her demise. If she did not allow herself to let temptation overrule moral judgment she would have not been put into the position of jeopardizing her honesty when she lost it and lied about it. This cost her several times more hours, money and years than what the necklace was worth since it was just fake diamonds after all. This allegory finally leads to morals learned like: not to desire more, not to allow temptation to overcome judgment and integrity, and above all else be honest of your mistakes. The symbol of the necklace ultimately being fake shows that living a fake life, one that is not what it appears, can literally cost you your life. Was it worth it?


Works Cited

De Maupassant, Guy. “The Necklace”. Edgar V. Roberts. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2005. 5-12
Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2005.


Posted by: John Winans at March 10, 2009 06:23 AM

Joshua Brinson Brinson 01
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA17
05 march 2009


The use of symbolism in The Necklace

In the story The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant, there were many ways he incorporated symbolism throughout the story. The most symbolic aspects of the story to me were the way that Maupassant separated the poor and rich class by things such as jewelry, clothing, and appearance.
As stated in my first paragraph Maupassant uses symbolic references of clothing and jewelry to separate the classes. He does this by saying how richer women had a great since of style and taste and how they had more “finesse and elegant taste.” (pg 53) Also in the story he described, using symbolism, how Mathilde looked at the servant as a simple country girl that only did housework just because of the way she dressed and looked. (pg 53) jewelry also played a big role in the story as far as symbolism because even after Mathilde’s husband paid for her to get a new dress for the party, she still didn’t believe she looked good enough because she didn’t have any jewelry to wear, which symbolizes that if you wore jewelry you would fit in more with the rich class. (pg 55)

Brinson 02
Appearance also played a huge role as symbolism for The Necklace because that was another way that Maupassant seemed to separate the classes. In the story, when Mathilde was at the party, she was the most beautiful women there. This symbolizes that if you wear expensive looking jewelry and a nice dress you where looked at as a high class women even though Mathilde was really not. (pg 56) Another way that Maupassant uses appearance to symbolize the different social classes was when he described Mathilde at the end of the story. He said that Mrs. Loisel became “the strong, hardworking, and rude woman of poor households.” (pg 59) This symbolizes that the women that were in poor families all looked an acting the way that Mathilde did after hard work for ten years. He also used symbolism to show that the richer friend, Mrs. Forrestier, still looked “youthful, beautiful, and attractive.” (pg 60)

So that’s how Maupassant uses symbolism to separate the two social classes of rich and poor in the short story The Necklace. The way that he uses things such clothing, appearance, and jewelry to symbolize different classes is in my opinion correct because that is the way that most of us characterize people in world now. So I think that his use of symbolism was great.


Brinson 03
Works Cited
Maupassant, Guy de- The Necklace, A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 2005

Posted by: joshua brinson at March 10, 2009 10:35 AM

Josh Green
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA17
6, April 2009
Research Proposal: Maupassant’s Archetypal Approach
I have chosen to focus my research paper on the short story “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant. The paper will break down the importance of the archetypal approach in the story, or rather the opposite archetypal method. I found that Maupassant puts a cynical twist on the age old fairytale Cinderella. Instead of the uplifting rise to wealth from the position of servitude, Maupassant’s character Mathilde faces the decent from middle class to the slums thanks to her irresponsibility and dishonesty.
My research topics will include different examples of classic archetypes, focusing mainly on the fairytale Cinderella, the psychological nature of archetypes and The Necklace’s unusual take on the archetypal method. The Cinderella research will involve finding similarities and differences between the characters Cinderella and Mathilde from beginning to end of both stories. The bulk of my researching will come from Carl Jung and his psychological theories on archetypes and his studies on the conscious and unconscious state of mind. Since Jung’s studies are the base for any archetypes, I will be referencing them quite often in my paper. Then of course I will explain my overall reason for choosing the archetype method because of its presence in the short story the Necklace.
I plan on picking up more research material as the paper progresses and using the key archetype and Jung research should make my paper a quality one with many details as well as connections between all the researches and the short story.

Works Cited
Brown, Marcia. Cinderella. New York, New York: Simon and Schuster Children's Publishing Division, 1954. The tale of a young woman who goes from servant to princess because
of the curiosity of a prince. This timeless fairytale displays good fortune for only the most deserving of people and will be my main comparison and contrast to the necklace.
Campbell, Joseph, and Carl Jung. The Portable Jung. 7th ed. New York, N.Y.: The Viking Press, 1974. The Portable Jung focuses on the collected compilation of all Jung’s most well known works including his theories of unconscious thought and archetypes. These theories will help with psychologically analyzing my characters.
Dowling, Colette. The Cinderella Complex. New York, NY: SummitBooks, 1981. Dowling attempts to pinpoint the very identity of females and the typical situation women face with their independence and internal struggle. The book sheds a little light on what the female characters go through in the stories and how they feel about the role they play.
Maupassant, Guy de . “The Necklace.” Writing about Literature by Edgar V. Roberts. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006. 5-12. This classic tells the story of a French woman and her husband struggling out of debt in order to pay for a fake necklace that was worth little to no value in the end. This will be my focus with the archetypal method and Jung’s many studies of the human psyche.
O'Connor, Peter, and Carl Jung. Understanding Jung, Understanding Yourself. Mahwah, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1985. Yet another collection of classic studies by Carl Jung that will shed light on his theories and give better understanding as to why the characters play certain roles on the short story The Necklace. Psychological understanding will be the key to my research paper.
Roberts, Edgar V. “Writing about Literature” Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006. The many works of writing styles and methods by Roberts that will help my define the topic of the archetypal method. Then show me how to use it as effectively as possible in my paper.

Posted by: Josh Green at April 16, 2009 01:23 AM

Allyn Tuff
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II
14 April 2009
How The Necklace is a Display of What Marxism Believes
This informative paper will be proving that the Short Story The Necklace, by Guy De Maupassant, is a display of Marxist Theory and it’s claim that inequality between economic classes causes social cause malaise to people living in a country. This will be brought out by giving a brief summary of the story so that the audience has an understanding of what happened in the story. Then I will give the history of the author Guy De Maupassant and how his time period and his social and economic status could explain why he would write a story about the problems with social and economic inequalities. After that I will on tell you about Karl Marx and what he believed Marxist to be. To add on to the list, I will lastly use the book Writing About Literature by Edger V. Roberts. This text will give additional information about Karl Marx himself, and Marxism.
The recourses I will be using in this paper is an article titled “Marxism” from the Encyclopedia Of Philosophy, which will explain the basic information about Marxism such as where it derived from, and what it means. I will also be using the book The Art of Fiction by Henry James, which gives information about Guy De Maupassant’s past and where he grew up. The last resource I will be using is an Essay from the book Literature and Society by George J. Worth. This will explain what social and economic situations were going on during the time that Guy De Maupassant was living.

Works Cited
Donald M. Borchert. “Encyclopedia Of Philosophy.” Marxism. Farmington Hills, Michigan. Thompson Gale, 2006. 735-741. This is an article from an encyclopedia of philosophy. It will be used to explain what Marxist Theorists believe about social and economic inequalities.
Guy De Maupassant. “The Necklace.” Mary McAleer Balkun. A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader: Literature. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. Pearson, 2005. 53-60. This is the primary text of the paper and will be used to display how Marxist theory is shown within it’s wording.
George J. Worth. “Maupassant In Victorian England.” Bernice Slote. Literature and Society. Omaha, Nebraska. University of Nebraska Press, 1964. 30-37. This is a newspaper article that explains what kind of social and economic status that Maupassant had which might have lead to him writing a story about social and economic class inequalities.
Henry James. “Guy De Maupassant.” The Art of Fiction. New York, New York. Oxford University Press, 1948. 70-96. This is an article from the Oxford University Press. It will explain where Maupassant is from, and his background information of where he grew up, how he started writing, etc.
Edger V. Roberts. “Economic Determinism/Marxist.” Writing About Literature. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. Pearson, 2006. 188-189. This is an article that helps give additional information about Karl Marx himself, such as what he believed.

Posted by: Allyn Tuff at April 16, 2009 07:48 AM

Dr. Hobbs
ENG 225
27 February 2009
Symbolism in Guy de Maupassant’s The Necklace
Maupassant’s The Necklace is a short story of a woman who dreams of living the elegant lifestyle. The main character Matilda was born into the caste of middleclass clerks, but she dreams of being able to talk and walk with the wealthy upper class. One day her husband brings her home an invitation to a very exclusive ball, Matilda complains because she doesn’t have anything to wear. She borrows a diamond necklace and loses is that night, forever working in poverty to replace the necklace. The story is told to show how much Matilda wanted to be seen as upper class, but now she will live in real poverty forever working off the debt of a piece of jewelry. The Necklace symbolizes Matilda’s attempt to break out of 19th century French caste system. It’s show her will, to try and change the class systems, but it reminds us of what can happen when we try to be something we are not.
The Necklace which is the major symbol of the story is a contextual symbol. The reason it is contextual is because it is private to the text. It’s just like Edgar said “Objects and descriptions that are not universal symbols can be symbols only if they are made so in the work.”(Edgar 130). The necklace usually stands for jewelry in everyday life, but in this piece of literature it stands for progression to the upper class, right back to poverty. Matilda spends the rest of her life working off a piece of jewelry, when she could have easily just lost her friend by never returning it. This showed that Matilda was a strong willed woman. A strong willed woman could have changed her social class with out a piece of jewelry; Matilda just hadn’t seen that yet.
I believe the whole story can stand for the allegory, don’t pretend to be something your not. I believe this because this exactly what Matilda did. She paid a big price; her consequence was to spend the rest of her life in poverty and debt. This all stemmed from that one night. If she had been contempt with who she was, she would have never gone to the ball and lost the necklace. She was just to hell bent on hanging out with the wealthy. “I have been deprived the riches of most women” (Maupassant 54). The allegories moral is be your own person and you will succeed in life.

Work Cited

Roberts, Edgar. Writing About Literature. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006. 126-143.
Balkun, Mary. A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader Literature. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006. (19-23 )


Posted by: ryan baumgardner at April 16, 2009 09:55 PM

Allyn Tuff
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA 16
21 April 2009
The Necklace’s Display of Marxist Theory
Marxist Theory has been around since the mid 1800s. In the midst of the theory being born and maturing there was an artist whose name was Guy De Maupassant. Maupassant wrote the short story The Necklace, which is where I bring in my thesis that the story The Necklace was written to display Marxist theory’s claim that inequality in social class causes malaise to the people living in a country.
The Necklace is about a woman named Mathilde Loisel, who wants desperately to be envied and looked up to. The problem was she was “born, as if by destiny, into a family of clerks and copyists” (Maupassant 53). The story introduces a struggle with Mathilde’s desire to be in a higher social class, but her current economic class quashes her dreams of being in it. The story later goes on to tell of how she borrowed her higher classed friend named Mrs.Forrestier’s necklace for a social banquet. When she returns to her house she finds that she has lost the necklace. After searching almost everywhere, she ends up having buy a replica of the necklace for 36,000 Francs so her friend wouldn’t know that she lost it. After paying the jeweler half of the price that she owes, she works her entire life to pay the jeweler back, while struggling to survive in a class that was now even lower then she started in. In the end she comes across Mrs. Forrestier (who is the friend that she borrowed the necklace from), and found out that the necklace was made of fake diamonds and easily could have been replaced with a modicum of money. The story’s plot contains elements of a term called “historical materialism” (Borchert 735). Historical materialism or the materialistic conception theory (as Karl Marx wished to say) is “the search for causes among human societies that creates the necessities of life” (Borchert 735). To relate this to the story, Mathilde was given an image that a higher economic status is what is expected of people in order to be part of a higher social class. This caused Mathilde to crave that diamond necklace that she thought was a necessity because it had an expensive look to it, which would make people believe she was a wealthy person. What actually happened was Mathilde was manipulated into thinking that the necklace gave her a higher economic status. According to Donald M. Borchert, “manipulation is primarily economic activity, or [it is] affected by it” (737). What Borchert means is that whenever manipulation takes place, it usually deals with economics and people’s desire to be higher up on the economic ladder. Many things add up in The Necklace that can prove that it contains Marxist elements such as class struggle, historical materialism, and economic manipulation. With that in mind, why would Maupassant want to write a story about Marxism?
Henry James, the author the book The Art of Fiction once said “Maupassant does not write with his best pen; the philosopher in his composition is perceptibly inferior to the story-teller” (71). Later in the text, he goes on to say “In short, as a commentator M. De Maupassant is slightly common, while as an artist he is wonderfully rare” (James 71). When dissecting these phrases, I understood that James felt when Maupassant tried to write about philosophy, he had difficulty being persuasive about his philosophical theory. What he could do extremely well was write amazing stories that would explain his philosophical opinion through their plots. I found this to be genuine evidence that The Necklace had a Marxist based plot. Maupassant was “Born Aug. 5, 1850 [and died] July 6, 1893” (Webster introductory). He was thought to have been born in “Chateau de Miromesnil,” (Webster paragraph 1) but later lived with his mom in Villa des Verguies, which was extremely stable economically. Being in a luxurious situation gave Maupassant a lot of opportunities to meet various authors and poets like “Gustave Flaubert” (Webster paragraph 3). Flaubert was “a friend of Maupassant's mother, and when Maupassant returned to Paris [from war] in 1871 Flaubert was asked to keep an eye on him” (Webster paragraph 3). Flaubert also helped in introducing the young Maupassaunt “to some of the leading writers of the time, including Émile Zola, Ivan Turgenev, Édmond de Goncourt, and Henry James” (Webster Paragraph 3). This is most likely where Maupassant was able to hear of the philosophical ideas that those writers spoke of. According to George J. Worth, who wrote a newspaper article for the University of Kansas, “Maupassant was bound to exert an influence on the new patterns” (Worth 30). This means Maupassant had an influence for writing about new patterns of European society. This is where Karl Marx fits into the ideas expressed by Maupassant.
During Maupassant’s lifetime, European culture was experiencing influence from a philosopher and political theorist named Karl Marx, of which Marxist theory is named. Karl Marx was born in “1818 [and died in] 1883” (Roberts 188). According to Edger V. Roberts, author of Writing About Literature, Marx had a theory that “the primary source of life was economic, and he saw society as an opposition between capitalist and working classes” (188). Marx was also credited the founder of Communism by many people. Roberts also wrote that “The concept of cultural and economic determinism is one of the major political ideas of the nineteenth century” (188). He later wrote “The Literature that emerged from this kind of analysis features individuals in the grips of the class struggle” (188). The individual that Guy De Maupassant (who published literature during the 19th century and during Marx’s time of lecture) features in his short story is Mathilde who, like Roberts said is experiencing a struggle between the capitalist class and the working class. In The Necklace, Maupassant used the literature style that was a result of Marxism called Proletarian Literature. Roberts also defined Proletarian Literature, saying that it “emphasizes persons of the lower class; the poor and oppressed who spend their lives in an endless drudgery and misery, and whose attempts to rise above their disadvantages usually result in renewed suppression” (188). Proletarian Literature (derived from Marxism) according to Robert’s explanation, is a perfect example of how Maupassant displays Marxism in The Necklace because it is exactly what happens to Mathilde.
The Necklace and many other stories written by Maupassant expressed opinions and emotions that Maupassant had experienced and comprehended throughout his life. According to the Merriam Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature, Maupassant “volunteered to serve in the army [in the Franco-Prussian War], and his firsthand experience of war was to provide him with the material for some of his finest stories” (Webster paragraph 1). With this experience of war, Maupassant could have seen many disturbing things and killed many men. This would most likely cause Maupassant to grow angry towards the European philosophy and desire a change so that war would come to an end. With this thought in mind, Marxism could have easily been a desire for Maupassant to express through The Necklace because of it’s new and efficient beliefs. This brings me to my conclusion.
Maupassant was living in a time where Marxism was fully alive and very closely scrutinized to see if it was possible, and if it would work. Being that this philosophy was so popular in the European culture, Maupassant definitely could have wrote his story The Necklace with the elements of Marxism. Nobody will ever know what Maupassant’s real opinion of the European culture was, or that The Necklace really was based on Marxism. Nevertheless, the reason that I, and hopefully my audience believes my thesis that Maupassant’s The Necklace is based on Marxist theory’s claim that inequality in social class causes malaise to the people living in a country is right is because of the hard facts that were displayed in infra. These were facts such as where Maupassant grew up and who he was associated with. Other statements that prove my thesis are the ones about Proletarian Literature that suggested that The Necklace was about a person who is struggling between the capitalist and working classes. All of the Facts that were given throughout this informative paper should give plenty of reason to believe the The Necklace contained Marxist elements, and that the Marxist theory’s claim about economy and social classes causing Malaise to countries. In the end, it is up to the audience to decide what they think after reading this paper.


Works Cited
Donald M. Borchert. “Encyclopedia Of Philosophy.” Marxism. Farmington Hills, Michigan. Thompson Gale, 2006. 735-741. This is an article that tells about Marxist beliefs. It will be used to explain what Marxist Theorists believe about social and economic inequalities.
Guy De Maupassant. “The Necklace.” Mary McAleer Balkun. A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader: Literature. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. Pearson, 2005. 53-60. This is the primary text of the paper and will be used to display how Marxist theory is shown within it’s wording.
George J. Worth. “Maupassant In Victorian England.” Bernice Slote. Literature and Society. Omaha, Nebraska. University of Nebraska Press, 1964. 30-37. This is a newspaper article that explains what kind of social and economic status that Maupassant had which might have lead to him writing a story about social and economic class inequalities.
Henry James. “Guy De Maupassant.” The Art of Fiction. New York, New York. Oxford University Press, 1948. 70-96. This is an article that gives biographical information about maupassant. It will explain where Maupassant is from, and his background information of where he grew up, how he started writing, etc.
Edger V. Roberts. “Economic Determinism/Marxist.” Writing About Literature. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. Pearson, 2006. 188-189. This is an article that helps give additional information about Karl Marx himself, such as what he believed. It will be used to further the information given for this paper
“Maupassant, Guy de.” Merriam Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature. Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster, 1995. Literature Resource Center. Gale. ICUF. 19 Apr. 2009 . This is an article that gives information of Maupassant’s life. It will be used to tell about how he was introduced to other philosophers.

Posted by: Allyn Tuff at April 23, 2009 12:05 AM

Josh Green
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA17
16, April 2009
Maupassant’s Anti-Archetypal Approach in The Necklace
I have chosen to focus my research paper on the short story “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant and the archetypal method. This paper will break down the importance of the archetypal approach in the story, or rather the opposite archetypal method used to twist the common perception of popular fiction. I found that Maupassant puts a cynical twist on the age old fairytale Cinderella. The story of Cinderella is the tale of a young girl forced to serve but able to win the heart of a Prince and become the princess of all the land. She rose from rags to riches because of her good faith and perseverance but instead of the uplifting rise to wealth from the position of servitude, Maupassant’s character Mathilde faces the decent from middle class to the slums due to her irresponsibility and dishonesty.
My research topics include different examples of classic archetypes and folklore, focusing mainly on the fairytale Cinderella, the psychological nature of archetypes and The Necklace’s unusual take on the archetypal twist. The Cinderella comparison will involve finding similarities and differences between the characters Cinderella and Mathilde from beginning to end of both stories. The bulk of my researching will come from Carl Jung and his psychological theories on archetypes and his studies on the conscious and unconscious state of mind compiled by Joseph Campbell. Since Jung’s studies are the base for any archetypes, I will be referencing them quite often in this paper. The Necklace is a unique story with a twisted ending that contradicts all previous archetypes in the history of literature.
Carl Jung is renowned for his psychological studies of archetypes and the human psyche. Jung states that there are as many archetypes as there are typical situations in life, (O’Connor 17) but unlike the typical situation in most literature, Maupassant’s character Mathilde faces a much grimmer fate. In the Robert’s text, archetypes are defined as certain patterns in human life that are similar or symbolic in throughout various cultures and historical times (Roberts 190). In Cinderella’s case there’s the helpless, underappreciated young woman who, by magical circumstances, makes it to a ball where she meets a most handsome prince. They fall in love after their brief meeting showing that love can truly come from first sight then he searches for her hoping to make her his queen. In the end her evil step-mother and step sisters get what they deserve and she marries the man of her dreams. That kind of happy fairytale ending is typical for our culture and really everyone’s culture. It takes a brave author to write a story whose ending is one of regret and irony.
Mathilde doesn’t necessarily suffer from the same troubles as the normal women do in most folklore but she does still suffer greatly from the Cinderella complex. Colette Dowling attempts to define women as being motivated by an unconscious desire to be taken care of as a fear of independence and Mathilde certainly wishes she could break that barrier. Maupassant opens The Necklace by expressing Mathilde’s feelings of despair in her low social class, “She suffered constantly, feeling herself destined for all delicacies and luxuries. She suffered because of her grim apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, ugly curtains” (Maupassant 5). This simple living killed her daily. She was a prisoner inside her ordinary life. She served no one but she still longed for more out of life. Mathilde married a common man because of love and then she felt she could no longer be independent or happy without wealth in her current class. This again ties into her conscious train of thought and her collective unconscious. Jung concluded that there was a myth-creating level of mind, common to both psychotics and normals and common also to people of different times and different cultures. This level of the mind he came to call the collective unconscious. (O’Connor 14)
The character Mathilde embodies is one whose life is completely normal but she is still stuck in the common role of the house wife. Denied independence and the life she truly wants for herself. So she goes to the extremes and manipulates like an example of an evil archetype would do to get what she wants. Also playing off the thought that all women are manipulative and deceiving behind the backs of others. The Necklace finds some common grouds with the typical archetypal approach but it’s truly the twisted ending that sets Maupassant apart from other authors.
When Mathilde is invited to the dinner at the Ministry of Education she immediately gets the notion that this is her chance to shine and it’s her chance for a night of independence. She immerses herself fully into the wealthy lifestyle with a new dress and a beautiful necklace borrowed from her friend. This situation is similar to Cinderella’s invitation to the kingdom for the ball, but instead of a necklace, Cinderella receives a beautiful pair of glass slippers. So far Maupassant sets the story up in a classic fashion with all the correct components that would follow in the footsteps of the most timeless fairytales but this is where his evil genius comes in. Mathilde makes her way to the ball feeling prettier than ever. She receives a great deal of attention and all in attendance admire her for both her beauty and wits. By the end of the night, Mathilde and her husband are in for the evening when she realizes that the beautiful and seemingly expensive necklace she borrowed was now nowhere to be found. There was no noble prince in this story to back her up. The story now takes a turn towards the harsh reality, showing us that fairytale ending don’t always come true and that happiness is no certainty in us human beings. After losing the necklace, Mathilde finds herself in a personal dilemma between telling her friend about her lost necklace and owning up to her irresponsibility or find a way to replace it. Unfortunately she chooses the hard way that would only cause her more trouble in the years to come.
The question is why did she decide that going out of her way to replace the necklace was the best option? Maybe she thought that trying to fix the situation without her friend’s knowledge would make her feel less guilty and maybe even cover up the fact that there was ever a disturbance in the first place. After all what a person doesn’t know won’t hurt them. So Mathilde and her husband let their unconscious need to fix the problem get the best of them and instead of making the rational decision they began to shop for other necklaces similar to the one that was lost. When they finally found the necklace they needed they began to take out a series of loans that would drive them deep into debt. The couple took several jobs and personal loans to pay for this expensive piece of jewelry, never saying a word to Mathilde’s friend for fear of scrutiny. They lost their comfortable home and gained a deal of hardship. Mathilde’s experiences in debt and lower class living change her personality completely, “she had become the strong, hard, and rude woman of poor households.” (Maupassant 11). She becomes the very opposite of what she always wanted and the opposite of what we are accustomed to in our literature. Years and years later Mathilde find her friend on the street but her friend barely recognized her because she was no longer a gently pretty woman of the middle class, the lifestyle and hard labor made her older and gray. Mathilde tells her about the whole necklace ordeal and how she and her husband had been working for years to pay it off. It turns out that the necklace was nowhere near the value Mathilde originally thought, it was worth about as much as Mathilde’s dress she wore to the dinner that night years ago. Mathilde’s lost necklace wasn’t worth the precious time put into redeeming it and all her toils were in vein. If only Mathilde could have owned up to her mistake, she could have saved her and her husband years and years of anguish and labor.
That type of ending is unusual among many works of literature and in a way it brings a sense of realism to this fairytale fiction genre. It promotes despair and regret rather than that typical “everyone lives happily ever after” garbage. This work teaches more valuable lessons of responsibility and not taking your life for granted because you could always be worse off. I must agree that the warm feeling you get after reading about a character’s triumphs is great but the archetypes aren’t always followed piece by piece and The Necklace is a prime example of one of those unique piece of literature. “Archetypal images hold out the great possibility of making conscious certainly deeply held and felt unconscious forces. In this way, they further the psychological evolution of mankind. In the image form some contact can be made with archetypal forces, and man can take one small step toward self-realization” (O’Connor 23)

Works Cited
Brown, Marcia. Cinderella. New York, New York: Simon and Schuster Children's Publishing Division, 1954. The tale of a young woman who goes from servant to princess because
of the curiosity of a prince. This timeless fairytale displays good fortune for only the most deserving of people and will be my main comparison and contrast to the necklace.
Campbell, Joseph, and Carl Jung. The Portable Jung. 7th ed. New York, N.Y.: The Viking Press, 1974. The Portable Jung focuses on the collected compilation of all Jung’s most well known works including his theories of unconscious thought and archetypes. These theories will help with psychologically analyzing my characters.
Dowling, Colette. The Cinderella Complex. New York, NY: SummitBooks, 1981. Dowling attempts to pinpoint the very identity of females and the typical situation women face with their independence and internal struggle. The book sheds a little light on what the female characters go through in the stories and how they feel about the role they play.
Maupassant, Guy de . “The Necklace.” Writing about Literature by Edgar V. Roberts. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006. 5-12. This classic tells the story of a French woman and her husband struggling out of debt in order to pay for a fake necklace that was worth little to no value in the end. This will be my focus with the archetypal method and Jung’s many studies of the human psyche.
O'Connor, Peter, and Carl Jung. Understanding Jung, Understanding Yourself. Mahwah, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1985. Yet another collection of classic studies by Carl Jung that will shed light on his theories and give better understanding as to why the characters play certain roles on the short story The Necklace. Psychological understanding will be the key to my research paper.
Roberts, Edgar V. “Writing about Literature” Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006. The many works of writing styles and methods by Roberts that will help my define the topic of the archetypal method. Then show me how to use it as effectively as possible in my paper.

Posted by: Josh Green at April 23, 2009 11:38 AM

I'm interested in the late 19th century idea in France that ambition could prove ultimately futile. Was it that thinkers realized that so much of what people thought of as important was in fact built on sand? Within a few years of this story's publication the Panama Canal debacle precipiated a financial crash. I came across some thoughts on the French Romantic artist William-Adolphe Bouguereau was practically ridiculed by the Avant Garde. Was this beacuse he was a bourgeois painter who aspired to the greatness of Raphael?

Posted by: Andrew at February 6, 2011 11:57 AM

Jessica Torrent
Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
Course ENG 122 CA05
Date Janurary 14th 2013

6) Describe what kind of life Mathilde dreamed about. Provide specifics. Can you see any patterns to her desires?

Mathlide dreamed about a household with luxurious items, that inspired wealth. "she daydreamed of larde, silent anterooms, decorated with oriental tapestries and lighted by high bronze ffloor lamps, with two elegant valets in short cullottes..." (Roberts 53)

Posted by: Jessica Torrent and Octavia Robinson at January 14, 2013 10:15 AM

Colby Johnson,Rannell Smith
Dr. Hobbs
English122 CA05 Question 4 Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace"

Question: "How would you describe the appearance of Mathilde and her apartment?"

Answer: I would describe the appearance of Mathilde and her apartment as very plain and drab. The text says this in the opening paragraph,"She had no dowry, no prospects, no way of getting known,courted, loved, married by a rich man". The text talks of her apartment in paragraph 3. "She suffered because of her apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture,ugly curtains. All such things, which most women other women in her situation would not even noticed, tortured her and filled her with despair."

Posted by: Colby Johnson at January 14, 2013 10:17 AM

Question: Identify all of the characters in this story.


Answer: There are four characters identified in this short story. They are Ms. Foster, Mrs. George Ramponneau, and Mr. and Mrs Loisel. The protagonist of this story is Mrs. Loisel. (Page 54)

Posted by: Erica, Layth, Ryan at January 14, 2013 10:21 AM

Sarah Hatcher (Group 5)
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 133 CA05 Academic Writing 2
14 January 2012

Question 5: Why was Mathilde unhappy with her life at the opening of the story?

Answer: Mathilde was a woman who always wanted to live the rich and fancy life. The problem was she married a clerk who was a middle class man, and settled to living that life. In the story it says she " suffered constantly feeling herself destined for all delicates and luxuries," (4). Also, everything reminded her of her middle class life, such as the apartment she lived in with, "drab walls," and "ugly curtains," (5).

Posted by: Sarah Hatcher at January 14, 2013 10:52 AM

Alexandra Rivera-Vega
Peter Mercadante
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05 Academic Writing 2
14 January 2013


Question: Describe the economic status of Mathilde Loisel. How would you categorize her economic class?

Answer: Mathilde Loisel economic status was nothing at first because as the story states she was an error to destiny. "She had no dowry, no prospects, no way of getting known, courted, loved, married by a rich and distinguished man." (page 1, paragraph 1) But she eventually settles for a middle marriage with a minor clerk in the Ministry of Education. As the stories progresses she is never satisfied with her life and the thing she has, she wants to live a finer life. "She daydreams of large, silent anterooms, decorated, etc." (Paragraph 3, page 1) Her need to need more glamorous, she gets herself and husband into a situation that she has to pay off a couple of people and ended being really poor. "They dismissed the maid; changed their address; rented an attic flat." (Paragraph 98, Page 3)

Posted by: Alexandra Rivera-Vega at January 14, 2013 11:57 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA05 Academic Writing II
14 January 2013

Question: Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that "women have neither rank nor race." Some translations read "caste or class." Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

Answer: In the context of this story specifically, I disagree with the author's statement. Maupassant illustrates the life of Mrs. Loisel by describing her life at home, and he also describes her fantasies of living in a higher class. "She suffered because of her grim apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, ugly curtains." (The Necklace, 53). Maupassant uses imagery in this part of the story to convey an idea that, in fact, Mrs. Loisel can be placed in a certain caste or a class. Men, as well, can be put into a caste or class. Both Mr. and Mrs. Loisel were financially put into a lower class while having to pay the 36,000 francs for the diamond necklace. They spent 10 years working multiple jobs to pay off the necklace, which put them in a lower class than before Mrs. Loisel lost the necklace.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at January 14, 2013 03:58 PM

Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
15 January 2013

Question: Describe the economic status of Mathilde Loisel. how would you categorize her economic class?

Answer: Mathilde Loisel's economic status acually changes throughout the story. She is born into a poor lower class family that has nothing, which leaves Loisel with no title, friends of status, or any chance for a higher pristine life. However later on she marries a middle class clerk who works for the Ministry of Education. Life still is not how she wants it to be as the friends she has made now live a better life than her. She feels she has nothing of value to her. One day her husband invites her to a lunch-in with the highest powers in his profession. She know she will amount to nothing if she goes and declines it at first, but later reconciles and decides to attend when her husband tells her she should ask her friends to help her look ravishing.After all the excitement the couple returns home only to find she has lost the diamond necklace her friend lent her. So long story short, they cant find it anywhere and eventually end up having to buy a new one to replace the one they lost. The necklace is beyond their price range but they take out many loans to pay for it. 10 years go on living as a poor, broke, penniless working woman to pay all the loan sharks the money back that they own. So Lousel in fact goes farther away from her dreams of a prestige life. She goes from very little, to something, to nothing.

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at January 15, 2013 02:17 PM

Adrianna Johnson and Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04 Discussion Question "The Necklace"
15 January 2013

Question #9: Do you think Mathilde recognized good quality jewelry?

No, we don't think she recognized good quality jewelry. If she did, then when she lost the original necklace that only cost five hundred francs that Mrs. Forrestier had lent her she would have known it was not that expensive. Whereas, the one that she bought back was thirty six hundred francs. We believe her poor background that she grew up in also played a major role in her not knowing good quality jewelry.

Posted by: Adrianna Johnson at January 15, 2013 05:09 PM

Chris Lavie
Dr Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
14 January 2013

Question: Identify all of the characters in this story.

Answer: The characters of this short story are Mr and Mrs Loisel (whose first name is Mathilde; see page 55 and line 22) and Mrs Forestier (whose first name is Jeanne; see page 60 and line 107). Three other characters are also mentionned in this short story but they don't have an important role and are just mentioned: The Chancelor of Education, Mrs George Ramponneau (see invitation card page 54) and the jeweler (page 58 and line 92)

Posted by: Chris Lavie at January 15, 2013 06:50 PM

Terrance Browne
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA-05 Academic Writing II

Question:"Why was Mathilde unhappy with her life at the opening of the story?"
January 15, 2013

Answer: Mathilde was unhappy with her life due to the fact that she settled into a marrying a middle class worker, she was also born into a family with little money being that they were a family of clerks. She also really wanted the life of luxuries and living in an grim apartment with "drab walls,threadbare furniture,ugly curtains"(The Necklace 3) she was no where near close to living that life.

Posted by: Terrance Browne at January 15, 2013 10:47 PM

Question: 7.) Describe Mathilde’s reaction after reading the invitation.

Answer: Mathilde is a poor woman who does not receive very many nice things. When she gets the invitation, she is excited but soon realizes that she doesn't belong there and has nothing fancy to wear. She feels as though she will not be able to fit in.

Posted by: allison knipe at January 15, 2013 11:33 PM

Marquisa Turner
Anastasia DeMaio
Dr. Hobbs
English 122-CA01
15 January 2013


Question: What did Mathilde’s husband surrender in order to provide the money for a dress? Was this a big sacrifice for him?

Answer: Mathilde’s husband surrendered his shotgun for lark-hunting, “He blanched slightly at this, because he had set aside just that amount to but a shotgun for Sunday lark-hunts the next summer with a few friends in the Plain of Nanterre” (Roberts 26). This was a big sacrifice for him and this is determined by the quote above, when the author uses the word blanched to describe how her husband was feeling. The word means to turn pale, and when someone turns pale over anything that means it is a serious matter that it made his blood stop flowing for a moment.

Posted by: Marquisa Turner at January 15, 2013 11:57 PM

Question: What kind of financial arrangements did the Loisels make with the
Jeweler for the replacement necklace?

Answer: Stunned when Mathilde loses the necklace, her husband decided they would have to find a replacement. They find a replica of the necklace priced around forty thousand francs. After borrowing money, they bought the necklace and returned it. Mrs. Forrestier was not happy with how long the process took to deliver the necklace back. She stated with a scolding voice “ You should have brought it back sooner; I might have needed it”. Ten years go by and Mathilde has completed hard labor such as housework, cleaning dishes and other dirty jobs to pay back the people she borrowed the money from. After all of this, Mathilde ran in to Mrs. Forrestier and told her about how she bought a new necklace to replace hers. Mrs. Forrestier laughed and said, “ Oh poor Mathilde, but mine was only costume jewelry.”

Posted by: Tori Thomas at September 4, 2013 04:05 PM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA 08 Academic Writing II
5 September 2013

Question: Describe what kind of life Mathilde dreamed about. Provide some specifics. Can you see any patterns to her desire.

Answer: The author of this story describe Mathilde desires and dreams at the beginning of the story. Maupassant mention that: “She daydreamed of large, silent anterooms, decorated with oriental tapestries and lighted by high bronze floor lamps, with two elegant valets in short culottes dozing in large armchairs under the effects of forced-air heaters. She imagined large drawing rooms draped in the most expensive silks, timable values. She dreamed of the perfume of dainty private rooms, which were designed only for intimate tête-à-tête with the closest friends, who because of their achievements and fame would make her the envy of all other women” (The Necklace 1). Mathilde long for a rich life with all the luxuries that its included. Even when she sat to have dinner with her husband, the author said that: “She dreamed if expensive banquets with shining placesettings, and wall hangings portraying ancient heroes and exotic birds in an enchanted forest. She imagined a gourmet-prepared main course carried on the most exquisite trays and serve on the most beautiful dishes, with whispered gallantries” (The Necklace 1-2). The dissatisfaction of her life made Mathilde develops a pattern that does not matter what she was doing or which way she was looking, the idea of another life was always in her mind.

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at September 4, 2013 11:41 PM

Ti'rani Rye, Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122-CA08 Academic Writing II
04 September 2013

Group 1: Question 7
Scribe: Ms. Rye
Researcher: Ms. Liller
Question: “Which disaster is the biggest for Malthilde? Losing the necklace or not telling the truth? Explain.”

Answer: Opting out for the lie is the kiss of death in this story. The couple both readily agreed on lying to Mrs. Forrestier once they realized the necklace was gone and nowhere to be found. The husband instructed his wife to write Mrs. Forrestier “that you broke a clasp on the necklace and that you’re having it fixed” and she eagerly did so. The naivety and pride that clouded the judgment of the couple caused them the 10 years of hardships and agony to pay off the debt of covering their lie. When sharing the truth with Mrs. Forrestier could have saved them. Proof of this is the conversation shared at the very end piece of the story where Mrs. Forrestiere reveals to Malthide that her necklace was nothing but costume jewelry, even worse “at most, it was worth only five hundred francs!” This conversation could have been shared a decade earlier and the couple could have saved themselves many years of humiliation, hard work, and possibly their dignity. Losing the necklace was merely the inciting incident but the lie was cataclysmic.

Posted by: Rebecce Liller, Ti'rani Rye at September 5, 2013 10:18 AM

Ti'rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122-CA08 Academic Writing II
05 September 2013


Question: Do you think Mathilde recognized good quality jewelry?
Answer: No, I do not think Mathilde has the ability to recognize good quality jewelry. As soon as she saw the necklace her “heart throbbed with desire for it. Her hands shook as she picked it up. She fastened it around her neck, watched it gleam at her throat, and looked at herself ecstatically.” The pride that is so evident in this character wouldn’t have reacted so astonished and respectful if she knew that the jewelry was a fake.

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at September 5, 2013 02:18 PM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122-CA08 Academic Writing II
September 5th, 2013

Question 17: Describe in your own words how the Loisels’ lives changed after they had paid for the new necklace.
Answer: The Loisels’ lives changed after they had paid for the new necklace because paying the debt forced them to work extra jobs and get rid of servants as well as make them move to a cheaper place to live. The husband had to take a second job and Mathilde had to do all the cooking, cleaning, shopping, and other household work herself. All of this extra work had aged her greatly and as the author says, “She had become the woman of impoverished households- strong and hard and rough.” (Maupassant 5). This is a big change to how their lives were before because although they were not rich, they were not in debt and had a nice, decent clean home, and had some servants to help her around the house. They had food to eat every night, and even though they were not fancy meals, the meals were plentiful. Mathilde thought that the life she had was poor and never truly satisfied her, was actually the best life she ever had. Mathilde gave up her old life for one night of luxury, which then ended in a lifetime of misery.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 5, 2013 07:07 PM

Sade Loiseau
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
6 September 2013

Question 5: 5.) Why was Mathilde unhappy with her life at the opening of the story?
Answer: Mathilde was unhappy with her life because she poor. She had people around whom had money and living well. On page 53 line 3.

Posted by: Sade Loiseau at September 5, 2013 07:19 PM

Question #16: What kind of occupation do you think Mister Loisel (Mathilde’s husband) has? Why are they not able to easily repay the cost of the replacement necklace? Why is this important to the story?




Answer: Mister Loisel states on page 54 that he is a clerk. Through deductive reasoning, it seems he is a clerk to the Chancellor of Education because he was invited by the Chancellor to the dinner. Mister Loisel probably doesn’t have a very high position in his office. This is important to the story because he is in the lower position like most people of this day. He has a job to barely make his living situation comfortable before the necklace was lost. After the necklace was lost his job allowed him to live poorly and still be able to pay his loans. Mrs. Loisel also had to find a job to help pay the loan they acquired.

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas at September 5, 2013 08:24 PM

Alex Koufas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II
6 September 2013

Question: Identify all of the characters in this story.

Answer: Mathilde Loisel - She borrows a diamond necklace from her friend Madame Forestier, then loses the necklace and must work for ten years to pay off a replacement.

Monsieur Loisel - Mathilde’s husband. When Mathilde loses the necklace, Monsieur Loisel sacrifices his own future to help her repay for the necklace.

Madame Forestier - Mathilde’s wealthy friend. Madame Forestier lends Mathilde the necklace for the party. She is horrified to realize that Mathilde has wasted her life trying to pay for a replacement necklace, but it turns out that the original necklace had actually been worth nothing.

Posted by: Alexandra Koufas at September 5, 2013 08:44 PM

Julieann Sauter and Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
6 September 2013
The Necklace
4. Define irony. Is “The Necklace” ironic? Why or why not? Explain.
Irony is when the result of a situation is opposite of how the situation is portrayed. In the end, “The Necklace” is ironic. Mrs. Forrestier depicted being wealthy throughout the entire story. On page 60, Mauspassant writes, “My poor Mathilde! But mine was only costume jewelry. At most, it was worth only five hundred francs!...” This quote is pure irony because it is the opposite of what the reader was expecting to happen.
Another part of the story where irony is present is when Mathilde is envious of Mrs. Forrestier. Mathilde is convinced she is an upscale, wealthy woman. However, Mrs. Forrestier just does a great job of tricking everybody into thinking that way. In the second paragraph, Mauspassant writes, "She was a simply person, without the money to dress well, but she was as unhappy as if she had gone through bankruptcy..." Mathilde is convinced that upscale society is a wonderful thing and she has a desire of being a part of this whole different world. However, we find that her "dream" isn't what she thought it was. In the end, Mathilde realizes she was being envious and wasted her time working so hard to repay all her loans when it could have all been avoided in the beginning. This is an example of irony because Mathilde thought living this life would be so wonderful when it was the exact opposite.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 5, 2013 11:32 PM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
6 September 2013

Question: What did Mathilde’s husband surrender in order to provide the money
for a dress? Was this a big sacrifice for him?

Answer:
In order for Mathilde to go to the party, she demanded a new dress. Her husband loves her very much and knows how important this party is to her. He knew buying her a new dress was the right thing to do. He had been saving for a while to buy a new shotgun but sacrificed it all to enable Mathilde to buy her new dress.
This seems to be a very big sacrifice on the part of Mathilde’s husband. Mathilde knew he had been saving and had around five hundred francs. This is the amount she told him she needed in order to buy a new dress. He answered by saying, “Alright, you’ve got four hundred francs, but make it a pretty dress,” (Maupassant 55). This quote reveals that Mathilde’s husband wants to do whatever he can to satisfy Mathilde, while still keeping his own wants and needs in the back of his mind. Although he kept some of the money for his new shotgun, giving Mathilde four-fifths of his savings is still a big sacrifice on her husband’s behalf.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 6, 2013 12:49 AM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II
5 September 2013

Question #18: "How did Mrs. Forrestier react to meeting Mathilde, years later, when they crossed paths on the Champs-Elysees?"

Answer: When approached by Mathilde, Mrs. Forrestier showed no sign of recognition towards the now worn and tired woman. She exclaims after being greeted by name from Mathilde, "But...Madam!...I don't know...You must have made a mistake" (Maupassant 60). It is clear through Mrs. Forrestier's response that Mathilde's hard work paying off her debts had caused a great change to her outer appearance. Once realizing the identity of her long ago friend, Mrs. Forrestier responds, "Oh!...My poor Mathilde, you've changed so much" (Maupassant 60). I almost find it funny that Mrs. Forrestier's reaction is so alarming since her own jewels are the reason that Mathilde now looks the way she does. The meeting of the two on the Champs-Elysees then ends with Mrs. Forrestier feeling sympathetic towards Mathilde and all that she had gone through. In surprise Mrs. Forrestier reveals to Mathilde that there was no need for such hard work because her diamonds were costume jewelry, only worth five hundred francs (Maupassant 60).

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 6, 2013 01:12 AM

Question 6
The other characters are important because they define and give detail to Mrs. Loisel's character. An example of this would be when Mrs. Loisel talks about her wealthy friend,"She had a rich friend, a comrade from convent days, whom she did not want to see anymore because she suffered so much when she returned home." Mrs. Loisel is described as miserable because her friend has all the luxuries that she cannot have. without these other characters, we would not know so much about Mrs. Loisel and her envy with the wealthy.

Posted by: Taina & Ryan at September 6, 2013 02:47 AM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing 2
5 Sept 2013

Question: Describe Mathilde's reaction after reading the invitation.

Answer: Given that Mathilde and her husband are less fortunate, her reaction to the invitation was not a happy one. Mathilde was angry and hurt by the invitation because she had nothing to wear to this party that was in high demand. He says, " She looked at him angrily and stated impatiently: "what do you want me to wear to go there?" ( Maupassant 3). Mathilde asking her husband the question of what he wants her to wear shows her frustration towards him at that time.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at September 6, 2013 03:01 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
6 September 2013

Question: #21) "Compare and contrast the lives of Mathilde and her friend Mrs. Forrestier. How are they alike? How are they different?"

Answer: The two women in the story La Parure, Mrs. Loisel and Mrs. Forrestier, are similar in a way that many women are, but they differ dramatically in their financial situations and satisfaction in life. Both women appear to have a desire to dress in a fancy manner; the author, Guy de Maupassant, says, concerning the objects of nice dresses and jewelry, that Mathilde Loisel “loved nothing but these”(54). Mrs. Loisel is described as a woman who craves beautiful clothing and jewelry. When Mrs. Forrestier shares her jewelry with Mathilde, the author says that Mrs. Forrestier brings out “a large jewel box”(56), indicating that she owns beautiful jewelry to wear. The women, however, are living two very different lives because of their financial situations. The author conveys the fact that Mathilde is a woman who must live off of a small amount of money when he states the aspects that “make working-women the equals of the grandest ladies”(53). On the other hand, Mrs. Forrestier obviously has great wealth. The various types of jewelry revealed when this lady opens her jewel box(56) express this fact. These two women also differ in how comfortable they are in their social standing. Ms. Loisel, who is described in the beginning of the story, pages 53-55, as a woman desiring to own more luxurious items, is not satisfied in her present situation. Mrs. Forrestier, however, does not appear to be upset in her situation in life.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 6, 2013 10:51 AM

Ryan Voss,
Margerie Rojas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122

QUESTION: Define anecdotes? Determine if the story is an anecdote? Do we point out moral lessons using tales like the necklace? Are there other short stories that have the same moral lesson as the necklace.
ANSWER: An anecdote is a short, amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person. This story is an anecdote, we found this out in reading the passage. I found out that the girl lied to save herself in replacing the necklace. A similar anecdote to the "necklace" is the story "the boy who cried wolf", people use this story to compare things every day.

Posted by: Ryan Voss at September 6, 2013 11:58 AM

Ryan MacCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
6 September 2013


Question: 4.) How would you describe the appearance of Mathilde and her apartment?

Answer: The appearance of Mathilde is very simple. According to Maupassant, “She was a simple person, without money to dress well…” (53). Her apartment on the other hand, is quite negative and seemingly dark. The apartment itself made her suffer for all “delicacies and luxuries” (53). Her apartment is described as, “grim with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, and ugly curtains.” (53) Mathilde’s apartment contributes majorly to her sadness, as the gloomy and dark surroundings around her make it all worse for her.

Posted by: Ryan MacCarthy at September 6, 2013 12:02 PM

Luis Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122
6 September, 2013

Question 15 – What was Ms. Forrestier’s Reaction when “her” necklace was finally returned?
She was a tad upset because the she had lent it out for one night and did not get it back until days later. She snapped at Mrs. Loisel with “you should have brought it back sooner; I might have needed it” on page 59 when she tried returning the borrowed jewelry.

Posted by: Luis Martinez at September 6, 2013 12:51 PM

Tori Thomas and Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA08


Question: Why do the woman sympathize with Mrs. Wright? Does their sympathy grow in stages in response to various events? Why do they defend her to the men?

Answer: The Women sympathized with Mrs. Wright because they understood her life and everything she suffered from before this event. Mrs. Hale remained the same throughout the entire story expecting to find Minnie anywhere in the house. She also believed from the very beginning that Mrs. Wright was innocent. Her sympathy did grow almost to the point when she blamed herself for not doing something to prevent this event from happening, like she stated in the story “I stayed away because it weren’t cheerful-and that’s why I ought to have come”. This is basically saying she regrets not doing something to prevent this. The woman defends Mrs. Wright because the men honestly could never understand what happened or what she has experienced.

Posted by: Tori Thomas at September 6, 2013 01:53 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
5 September 2013

The Necklace: Question 3
“Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that “women have neither rank nor race.” Some translations read “caste or class.” Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?”

The wealth and status of women at the time were determined solely by whom they married. They had the potential to marry into wealth or up in social class. Men had far less mobility. Their class determined what jobs they could have, which determined how wealthy they were, which determined what class they fell into. Great upheaval occurred when wealth was achieved without social class, like in The Great Gatsby.

Jury of Her Peers: Question 3
“How do the men and women investigate differently? Why don’t the men find evidence that the women do?”

The men know very little about the day to day activities of their wives and therefore do not see the significance of many things around the house. The men’s investigation is too broad and big-picture for this particular case. They are searching for a motive that is logical to them. In contrast, the women’s investigation is limited to a few rooms and the specific details of Mrs. Wright, someone who they understand and can sympathize with. Her motive is rooted in deep psychological damage that the other women recognize, not a logical decision that the men can find evidence for.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at September 6, 2013 01:56 PM

Tori Thomas
Dr Hobbs.
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
6 September 2013

Question: Why do the woman sympathize with Mrs. Wright? Does their sympathy grow in stages in response to various events? Why do they defend her to the men?

Answer: The Women sympathized with Mrs. Wright because they understood her life and everything she suffered from before this event. Mrs. Hale remained the same throughout the entire story expecting to find Minnie anywhere in the house. She also believed from the very beginning that Mrs. Wright was innocent. Her sympathy did grow almost to the point when she blamed herself for not doing something to prevent this event from happening, like she stated in the story “I stayed away because it weren’t cheerful-and that’s why I ought to have come”. This is basically saying she regrets not doing something to prevent this. The woman defends Mrs. Wright because the men honestly could never understand what happened or what she has experienced.

Posted by: Tori Thomas at September 6, 2013 01:58 PM

Ryan Voss
Dr.Hobbs
ENG- 122-CA08 Academic Writing II
6 September 2013

10.) How did an evening at a ball offer Mathilde a chance to present
herself in a new guise (if you don’t know the word “guise,” look it up)?
Why did Mathilde feel she had a better presentation of herself, a new guise?
Answer: Mathilde was dressed beautifully, she was a poor girl and had never been fancied up like an upper class girl. Mathilde finally had something to wear after saying “Nothing, except I have nothing to wear and therefore I can’t go to the party.”(maupassant) Mathilde’s night turned around when she borrowed the necklace. She felt elegant and popular that night.

Posted by: Ryan Voss at September 6, 2013 02:01 PM

Ti'rani Rye, Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
4 September 2013 (Revised on 6 September 2013)
Question: “Which disaster is the biggest for Malthilde? Losing the necklace or not telling the truth? Explain.”
Answer: Opting out for the lie is the kiss of death in this story. The couple both readily agreed on lying to Mrs. Forrestier once they realized the necklace was gone and nowhere to be found. The husband instructed his wife to write Mrs. Forrestier “that you broke a clasp on the necklace and that you’re having it fixed” (Maupassant 58) and she eagerly did so. The naivety and pride that clouded the judgment of the couple caused them the 10 years of hardships and agony to pay off the debt of covering their lie. When sharing the truth with Mrs. Forrestier could have saved them. Proof of this is the conversation shared at the very end piece of the story where Mrs. Forrestiere reveals to Malthide that her necklace was nothing but costume jewelry, even worse “at most, it was worth only five hundred francs!” (Maupassant 60) This conversation could have been shared a decade earlier and the couple could have saved themselves many years of humiliation, hard work, and possibly their dignity. Losing the necklace was merely the inciting incident but the lie was cataclysmic.

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at September 6, 2013 02:18 PM

Ti'rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
5 September 2013 (Revised on 6 September 2013)
Question: Do you think Mathilde recognized good quality jewelry?
Answer: No, I do not think Mathilde has the ability to recognize good quality jewelry. As soon as she saw the necklace her “heart throbbed with desire for it. Her hands shook as she picked it up. She fastened it around her neck, watched it gleam at her throat, and looked at herself ecstatically.” (Maupassant 56) The pride that is so evident in this character wouldn’t have reacted so astonished and respectful if she knew that the jewelry was a fake.

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at September 6, 2013 02:19 PM

Maryerie Rojas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
7 September 2013

Question #16: What kind of occupation do you think Mister Loisel (Mathilde’s husband) has? Why are they not able to easily repay the cost of the replacement necklace? Why is this important to the story?

Answer: Mister Loisel states that he is a clerk (Maupassant 54). Through deductive reasoning, it seems he is a clerk to the Chancellor of Education because he was invited by the Chancellor to the dinner as seen on the invitation (Maupassant 54). Mister Loisel probably doesn’t have a very high position in his office. This is important to the story because he is in the lower position like most people of this day. He has a job to barely make his living situation comfortable before the necklace was lost. After the necklace was lost his job allowed him to live poorly and still be able to pay his loans. Mrs. Loisel also had to find a job to help pay the loan they acquired.

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas at September 7, 2013 06:39 PM

Maryerie Rojas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
7 September 2013

Question #16: What kind of occupation do you think Mister Loisel (Mathilde’s husband) has? Why are they not able to easily repay the cost of the replacement necklace? Why is this important to the story?

Answer: Mister Loisel states that he is a clerk (Maupassant 54). Through deductive reasoning, it seems he is a clerk to the Chancellor of Education because he was invited by the Chancellor to the dinner as seen on the invitation (Maupassant 54). Mister Loisel probably doesn’t have a very high position in his office. This is important to the story because he is in the lower position like most people of this day. He has a job to barely make his living situation comfortable before the necklace was lost. After the necklace was lost his job allowed him to live poorly and still be able to pay his loans. Mrs. Loisel also had to find a job to help pay the loan they acquired.

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas at September 7, 2013 06:39 PM

Tori Thomas
Dr hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08

Question: What kind of financial arrangements did the Loisels make with the
Jeweler for the replacement necklace?

Answer: Stunned when Mathilde loses the necklace, her husband decided they would have to find a replacement. They find a replica of the necklace priced around forty thousand francs. After borrowing money, they bought the necklace and returned it. Mrs. Forrestier was not happy with how long the process took to deliver the necklace back. She stated with a scolding voice “ You should have brought it back sooner; I might have needed it”. Ten years go by and Mathilde has completed hard labor such as housework, cleaning dishes and other dirty jobs to pay back the people she borrowed the money from. After all of this, Mathilde ran in to Mrs. Forrestier and told her about how she bought a new necklace to replace hers. Mrs. Forrestier laughed and said, “ Oh poor Mathilde, but mine was only costume jewelry.”

Posted by: Tori Thomas at September 8, 2013 03:50 PM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
8 September 2013

Question: Do you think Mr. Loisel enjoyed the ball?

Answer: In my opinion, I believe that Mr. Loisel enjoyed the ball for a good amount of time, but once midnight hit he didn't enjoy the ball like his wife did.

Proof: (p.5, paragraph #54)

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at September 8, 2013 06:10 PM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
5 September 2013

Question 17: Describe in your own words how the Loisels’ lives changed after they had paid for the new necklace.

Answer: The Loisels’ lives changed after they had paid for the new necklace because paying the debt forced them to work extra jobs and get rid of servants as well as make them move to a cheaper place to live. The husband had to take a second job and Mathilde had to do all the cooking, cleaning, shopping, and other household work herself. All of this extra work had aged her greatly and as the author says, “She had become the woman of impoverished households- strong and hard and rough.” (Maupassant 5) This is a big change to how their lives were before because although they were not rich, they were not in debt and had a nice, decent clean home, and had some servants to help her around the house. They had food to eat every night, and even though they were not fancy meals, the meals were plentiful. Mathilde thought that the life she had was poor and never truly satisfied her, was actually the best life she ever had. Mathilde gave up her old life for one night of luxury, which then ended in a lifetime of misery.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 8, 2013 06:20 PM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
8 September 2013

Question: Describe what kind of life Mathilde dreamed about. Provide some specifics. Can you see any patterns to her desire.

Answer: The author of this story describe Mathilde desires and dreams at the beginning of the story. Maupassant mention, “She daydreamed of large, silent anterooms, decorated with oriental tapestries and lighted by high bronze floor lamps, with two elegant valets in short culottes dozing in large armchairs under the effects of forced-air heaters. She imagined large drawing rooms draped in the most expensive silks, timable values. She dreamed of the perfume of dainty private rooms, which were designed only for intimate tête-à-tête with the closest friends, who because of their achievements and fame would make her the envy of all other women” (The Necklace 53). Mathilde ling for a rich life with all the luxuries that it’s included. Even when she sat to have dinner with her husband, the author says, “She dreamed of expensive banquets with shinning placesettings, and wall hangings portraying ancient heroes and exotic birds in an enchanted forest. She imagined a gourmet-prepared main course carried on the most exquisite trays and serve on the most beautiful dishes, with whispered gallantries” (The Necklace 53-54). The dissatisfaction of her life made Mathilde develops a pattern that does not matter what she was doing or which way she was looking, the idea of another life was always in her mind.

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at September 8, 2013 06:35 PM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
5 September 2013
(Redo)

Question #18: "How did Mrs. Forrestier react to meeting Mathilde, years later, when they crossed paths on the Champs-Elysees?"

Answer: When approached by Mathilde, Mrs. Forrestier showed no sign of recognition towards the now worn and tired woman. She exclaims after being greeted by name from Mathilde, "But...Madam!...I don't know...You must have made a mistake" (Maupassant 60). It is clear through Mrs. Forrestier's response that Mathilde's hard work paying off her debts had caused a great change to her outer appearance. Once realizing the identity of her long ago friend, Mrs. Forrestier responds, "Oh!...My poor Mathilde, you've changed so much" (Maupassant 60). I almost find it funny that Mrs. Forrestier's reaction is so alarming since her own jewels are the reason that Mathilde now looks the way she does. The meeting of the two on the Champs-Elysees then ends with Mrs. Forrestier feeling sympathetic towards Mathilde and all that she had gone through. In surprise Mrs. Forrestier reveals to Mathilde that there was no need for such hard work because her diamonds were costume jewelry, only worth five hundred francs (Maupassant 60).

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 8, 2013 09:11 PM

Julieann Sauter and Madison Owens (Group #2)
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
6 September 2013

Question #4: Define irony. Is “The Necklace” ironic? Why or why not? Explain.

Answer: Irony is when the result of a situation is opposite of how the situation is portrayed. In the end, “The Necklace” is ironic. Mrs. Forrestier depicted being wealthy throughout the entire story. Maupassant writes, “My poor Mathilde! But mine was only costume jewelry. At most, it was worth only five hundred francs!...” (Maupassant 60). This quote is pure irony because it is the opposite of what the reader was expecting to happen.

Another part of the story where irony is present is when Mathilde is envious of Mrs. Forrestier. Mathilde is convinced she is an upscale, wealthy woman. However, Mrs. Forrestier just does a great job of tricking everybody into thinking that way. In the second paragraph, Maupassant writes, "She was a simply person, without the money to dress well, but she was as unhappy as if she had gone through bankruptcy..." (Maupassant 53). Mathilde is convinced that upscale society is a wonderful thing and she has a desire of being a part of this whole different world. However, we find that her "dream" isn't what she thought it was. In the end, Mathilde realizes she was being envious and wasted her time working so hard to repay all her loans when it could have all been avoided in the beginning. This is an example of irony because Mathilde thought living this life would be so wonderful when it was the exact opposite.

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 8, 2013 09:17 PM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CA08
6 September 2013

Question: What did Mathilde’s husband surrender in order to provide the money
for a dress? Was this a big sacrifice for him?


Answer:
In order for Mathilde to go to the party, she demanded a new dress. Her husband loves her very much and knows how important this party is to her. He knew buying her a new dress was the right thing to do. He had been saving for a while to buy a new shotgun but sacrificed it all to enable Mathilde to buy her new dress.
This seems to be a very big sacrifice on the part of Mathilde’s husband. Mathilde knew he had been saving and had around five hundred francs. This is the amount she told him she needed in order to buy a new dress. He answered by saying, “Alright, you’ve got four hundred francs, but make it a pretty dress,” (Maupassant 55). This quote reveals that Mathilde’s husband wants to do whatever he can to satisfy Mathilde, while still keeping his own wants and needs in the back of his mind. Although he kept some of the money for his new shotgun, giving Mathilde four-fifths of his savings is still a big sacrifice on her husband’s behalf.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 8, 2013 09:20 PM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
5 September 2013
(Redo)

Question #18: "How did Mrs. Forrestier react to meeting Mathilde, years later, when they crossed paths on the Champs-Elysees?"

Answer: When approached by Mathilde, Mrs. Forrestier showed no sign of recognition towards the now worn and tired woman. She exclaims after being greeted by name from Mathilde, "But...Madam!...I don't know...You must have made a mistake" (Maupassant 60). It is clear through Mrs. Forrestier's response that Mathilde's hard work paying off her debts had caused a great change to her outer appearance. Once realizing the identity of her long ago friend, Mrs. Forrestier responds, "Oh!...My poor Mathilde, you've changed so much" (Maupassant 60). I almost find it funny that Mrs. Forrestier's reaction is so alarming since her own jewels are the reason that Mathilde now looks the way she does. The meeting of the two on the Champs-Elysees then ends with Mrs. Forrestier feeling sympathetic towards Mathilde and all that she had gone through. In surprise Mrs. Forrestier reveals to Mathilde that there was no need for such hard work because her diamonds were costume jewelry, only worth five hundred francs (Maupassant 60).

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 8, 2013 09:20 PM

Luis Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA08
6 September, 2013

Question 15 – What was Ms. Forrestier’s Reaction when “her” necklace was finally returned?

She was a tad upset because the she had lent it out for one night and did not get it back until days later. She snapped at Mrs. Loisel with “you should have brought it back sooner; I might have needed it” on page 59 when she tried returning the borrowed jewelry.

Posted by: Luis Martinez at September 9, 2013 12:04 AM

Luis Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA08
6 September, 2013

Question 15 – What was Ms. Forrestier’s Reaction when “her” necklace was finally returned?

She was a tad upset because the she had lent it out for one night and did not get it back until days later. She snapped at Mrs. Loisel with “you should have brought it back sooner; I might have needed it” on page 59 when she tried returning the borrowed jewelry.

Posted by: Luis Martinez at September 9, 2013 12:04 AM

Taina Valcarcel
September 9, 2013
ENG 122 Academic Writing II-CA08
Dr. Hobbs
Q Why was Mathilde anxious to hurry away from the ball?
Answer:
Mathilde was in a hurry to leave the ball because she did not want anyone to see her wearing a rundown coat with her beautiful dress and diamond necklace. In the story, the author writes, “He threw, over her shoulders, the shawl that he had brought for the trip home-a modest, everyday wrap, the poverty of which contrasted sharply with the elegance of her evening gown” (Maupassant, 56). This stated to the reader that she was ashamed to be looked upon with such a ragged piece of clothing with her beautiful look, and so she decided to hide away her shame and rush out of the ball.

Posted by: Taina Valcarcel at September 9, 2013 04:53 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
9 September 2013

Question #21): "Compare and contrast the lives of Mathilde and her friend Mrs. Forrestier. How are they alike? How are they different?"

Answer: The two women in the story La Parure, Mrs. Loisel and Mrs. Forrestier, are similar in a way that many women are, but they differ dramatically in their financial situations and satisfaction in life. Both women appear to have a desire to dress in a fancy manner; the author, Guy de Maupassant, says, concerning the objects of nice dresses and jewelry, that Mathilde Loisel “loved nothing but these”(de Maupassant 54). Mrs. Loisel is described as a woman who craves beautiful clothing and jewelry. When Mrs. Forrestier shares her jewelry with Mathilde, the author says that Mrs. Forrestier brings out “a large jewel box,” indicating that she owns beautiful jewelry to wear(de Maupassant 56). The women, however, are living two very different lives because of their financial situations. The author conveys the fact that Mathilde is a woman who must live off of a small amount of money when he states the aspects that “make working-women the equals of the grandest ladies”(de Maupassant 53). On the other hand, Mrs. Forrestier obviously has great wealth. The various types of jewelry revealed when this lady opens her jewel box(de Maupassant 56) express this fact. These two women also differ in how comfortable they are in their own social standing. Ms. Loisel, who is described in the beginning of the story, as a woman desiring to own more luxurious items, is not satisfied in her present situation(de Maupassant 53-55). Mrs. Forrestier, however, does not appear to be upset in her situation in life.


Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 9, 2013 09:48 AM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
5 September 2013

Question: Describe Mathilde's reaction after reading the invitation.

Answer: Given that Mathilde and her husband are less fortunate, her reaction to the invitation was not a happy one. Mathilde was angry and hurt by the invitation because she had nothing to wear to this party that was in high demand. He says, " She looked at him angrily and stated impatiently: "what do you want me to wear to go there?" ( Maupassant 3). Mathilde asking her husband the question of what he wants her to wear shows her frustration towards him at that time.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at September 9, 2013 10:54 AM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
5 September 2013

Question: Describe Mathilde's reaction after reading the invitation.

Answer: Given that Mathilde and her husband are less fortunate, her reaction to the invitation was not a happy one. Mathilde was angry and hurt by the invitation because she had nothing to wear to this party that was in high demand. He says, " She looked at him angrily and stated impatiently: "what do you want me to wear to go there?" ( Maupassant 3). Mathilde asking her husband the question of what he wants her to wear shows her frustration towards him at that time.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at September 9, 2013 10:55 AM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
5 September 2013

The Necklace: Question 3
“Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that “women have neither rank nor race.” Some translations read “caste or class.” Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?”

The wealth and status of women at the time were determined solely by whom they married. They had the potential to marry into wealth or up in social class. Maupassant states that they are all equal and their status is merely a function of chance saying,”Their inborn finesse, their elegant taste, their engaging personalities, which are their only power, make working class women the equals of the grandest ladies.” (Maupassant 1). Men had far less mobility. Their class determined what jobs they could have, which determined how wealthy they were, which determined what class they fell into. Great upheaval occurred when wealth was achieved without social class, like in The Great Gatsby.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at September 9, 2013 12:44 PM

Sade Loiseau
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
6 September 2013

Question 5: Why was Mathilde unhappy with her life at the opening of the story?

Answer: Mathilde was unhappy with her life because she poor. “All such thing which most other woman I her situation would not even have noticed-- (Maupassant, 53)”. She had people around whom had money and living well and she had to pay attention to things that would stop her from being like the other around her.

Posted by: Sade and Luis at September 9, 2013 01:21 PM

-----------------


*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 11, 2013 11:16 PM

Gabriela Caminero
DR. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
19 January 2014

Question #4:
How would you describe the appearance of Mathilde and her apartment?

Answer:
The appearance of Mathilde changes throughout the story. In the beginning of the story she was described to be “pretty and charming woman” (Maupassant, 1) also a simple person. In the end of the story her appearance changed dramatically. The description of her was ,”her hair unkept, with uneven skirts and rough, red hands.” (Maupassant, 8). It was also stated that her manicured fingernails were worn away, and she looked old. Her apartment was described in the beginning of the story. “grim apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, ugly curtains.” (Maupassant, 1).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at January 19, 2014 01:12 PM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 January 2013

QUESTION #10:
How did an evening at a ball offer Mathilde a chance to present
herself in a new guise (if you don’t know the word “guise,” look it up)?

ANSWER:
The evening at the ball was a high class event that everyone wanted to attend but not many people got the chance to be invited to. As Mr.Loisel stated, "I had a lot of trouble getting the invitation. Everyone wants one. The demand is high and not many clerks get invited. Everyone important will be there" (Maupassant 12).

Mrs.Loisel was used to staying inside the house and never going out. This was a chance to finally experience she had always imagined and dreamed. So after explaining to her husband that she had nothing to properly wear for the high class dinner, she went out to buy a new dress and borrowed a friends diamond necklace that gave her the "rich" appeal.

It worked just the way she wanted. The day the party came Mrs.Loisel was a success. She was prettier than anyone else, stylish, graceful, smiling and wild with joy. (Maupassant 52).

She had captured everyone's attention with her presence. A presence and guise that she normally did not present because of the class rank she was in, but for the one night at the dinner she was in the environment she had always dreamed. The high class environment.

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at January 21, 2014 11:38 AM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
21 January 2013

Question #5:
Why was Mathilde unhappy with her life at the opening of the story?

Answer:
Mathilde was unhappy at the opening of the story because of her family's financial problems. Mathilde was not your average women. "She was a simple person without the money to dress well, but she was as unhappy as if she had gone through bankruptcy, for women have neither rank nor race" (Roberts 53).
Mathilde never felt like she fit in with society. The women that surrounded her had money. They had the money to dress well and decorate their homes how they wanted too. Mathilde did not have any of that.
"She finally settled for a marriage with a minor clerk in the Ministry of Education" (Roberts 53).
Mathilde was always settling. She settled and made sacrifices throughout the entire story. Mathilde was always daydreaming about what her life would be like if her family had more of an income. No matter what her husband did for Mathilde she was never happy.

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at January 21, 2014 04:44 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA12
21 January 2014

Question: Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that "women have neither rank nor race." Sometimes translations read "caste or class". Do you agree with this? Why or why not? Do men have class or caste?
Answer: I think this question depends on the time period. During Maupassant's time you could argue that women didn't have caste or class. Women didn't have the same rights, opportunities, or power as men did at those times. Women's success at that time had more to do with the man they married then personal accomplishments.
If you were to answer this same question in regards to today’s time period it would be different. I would disagree with Maupassant's claim that women don't have rank nor race. Today, in America, women have all the same rights, opportunities, and power as men do. There are plenty of women that are far superior to their male counterparts. This may not be the case in all societies, but in the United States it certainly is.
For men there has always been some kind of social ranking. Today, in America there might not be a caste system or anything like that, but people who are more successful than others are definitely treated differently. So, to answer the question, I would say both men and women have caste and class today.

Posted by: sawyer hand at January 21, 2014 05:09 PM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA12
21 January 2014

Question #6:
Describe the economic status of Mathilde Loisel. How would you categorize her economic class?

Answer:
Mathilde Loisel comes from a poor family of clerks and copyists. Likewise she married a minor clerk in the Ministry of Education. They had little to no money and Mathilde often found herself dreaming of a life of luxury "She was a simple person, without the money to dress well..." (Roberts 53). The couple who had hardly any money in the first place had to spend any savings on Mathilde's need for the finer things. "She imagined a gourmet-prepared main course..." (Roberts 53). Seeing other women with their high class jewelry and costly furs made her depressed when she thought about her own life of low class income and poverty. She and her husband lived most of their life together working just to pay off their debts "She had become the strong, hard, and rude woman of poor households." (Roberts 59).

Posted by: Berlin Waters at January 21, 2014 05:42 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA12 Academic Writing II
20 January 2014
1. Mathilde Loisel is the protagonist.
2. Monsieur Loisel is the protagonists’ husband.
3. Madame Forestier is a wealthy friend of the protagonist.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at January 21, 2014 07:25 PM

9) Do you think Mathilda recognized good quality jewlery?

Yes, I think Mathilda recognized good quality jewlery because when the clasp broke, it was difficult at first to find another one exactly like the necklace they had. They found one and it was priced forty thousand francs and they could buy it for thirty six thousand (de maupassant Guy pg 91).

Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at January 21, 2014 10:19 PM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
22 January 2014
The Necklace
Question # 7:
Describe Mathilde’s reaction after reading the invitation.
Answer:
Mathilde was upset when she read the invitation because of the lack of proper formal attire for the event. Mathilde does not own any fine dresses nor jewelry that she could wear to the dinner. Mathilde stated that she could not go since she does not possess any of those items. Thinking of how Mathilde could not go to the dinner, she felt depressed when she realized that she could never attend any kind of special event.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at January 21, 2014 11:43 PM


Sergio Velazquez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng122 - ACADEMIC WRITING II

Question # 16 What kind of occupation do you think Mister Loisel (Mathilde’s
husband) has? Why are they not able to easily repay the cost of the
replacement necklace? Why is this important to the story?

ANSWER:

Mathilde's husband is a teacher we find this out because in the story he is called “a little clerk in the Ministry of Education,” in addition to that throughout the story it is made evident that they are a lower middle class family, because she does not need to work and they still can lie comfortably.

Mathilde and her husband are not easily able to repay the cost of the necklace because it cost 36,000 francs. Mathilde's husband has to go into his saving and pick up multiple jobs to pay of the store. The cost of the necklace was so outrageous, that Mathilde had to get rid of her maid.Then in an ironic turn of events engage in lowly work for a servant to help pay off the debt.

IN the end we find out that the true necklace that was lost in the first place, was only 500 francs, this is important because if Mathilde explain the truth, then ten years of her life would not have been wasted.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at January 22, 2014 09:44 AM

Shelby Marrero
Dr B Lee Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
22 January 2013

Question #13:
What efforts were made to find Ms. Jeanne Forrestier's necklace?

Answer:
Loisel"s husband retraced all their steps to see if they were able to find the necklace. After he came back he went to the Police Headquarters, announces a reward in the newspaper, and went to small cad companies. After losing all hope they decided to try and replace the necklace.

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at January 22, 2014 10:15 AM

James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
21 Jan 2014


Question #8
What did Mathilde’s husband surrender in order to provide money for a dress? Was is a big sacrifice?


Answer:
Unbeknown to Mathilde, her husband in fact surrendered a lot for her. Okay, he may not have been the fantastically rich, upper class husband that she had dreamed of, but it’s clear to me from this story that he loved her. He tried his hardest to give her the lifestyle that she wished to live.

Hearing throughout that she was “utterly miserable” seemed to have a big effect on Mathilde’s husband. What man would enjoy hearing that coming from their wife’s mouth? I can’t imagine any. He sacrificed what many would not, his own personal happiness for that of his wife’s. The dress happened to be “exactly the same amount he had been saving for a gun” (de Maupassant 4) which in a way was fortunate, but at the same time was still a big sacrifice. Right there, the husband made the split second decision to give up the distant dream of which he had about going shooting with his friends, simply to please the woman he loved.

Sadly for the husband, Mathilde was not aware of the shear amount of sacrifices her husband made for her on a day to day basis.

Posted by: James Jessop at January 22, 2014 10:17 AM

Question #11:
Do you think Mr. Loisel enjoyed the ball?

Answer:
Yes, I think that Mr. Loisel enjoyed seeing his wife happy and dressed nice for the occasion. Why else would he give her 400 francs of his own money(28) other than to make her happy?

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at January 22, 2014 10:23 AM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23 January 2014

Question #17:
Describe in your own words how the Loisels' lives changed after they had paid for the new necklace.

Answer:
After having spent ten, long, hard years living in debt and repaying dozens of people, the Loisels' lives had changed drastically- namely Mrs. Loisel. Debt to Mr. Loisel, a man of middle-class decent, was nothing new at all. In fact, cutting corners in order to meet ends meet seems to be all he's ever known. However, as for Mrs. Loisel, her aspirations of fame and glory seemed to of consume her entire life. Therefore, too fixated on fine dining and elegant attire, she has never stopped and appreciated how much her husband, Mr. Loisel, has sacrificed for her happiness, rather than his.
After the loss of the diamond necklace, Mrs. Loisel finally realized just how hard it is to work whilst receiving nothing in return- much like her husband had done. Over the years, she had aged at a higher rate due to stress, grown muscle from endless hours of scrubbing floors day in and day out, and had learned to pinch every penny earned. It is thus my belief that the Loisels lives had changed in that Mr. Loisel had a wife who finally appreciated the hardships he had faced for her, and Mrs. Loisel finally got a sense of just how much her husband had done for her whilst receiving nothing in return.

-----------------


*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at January 23, 2014 06:24 PM

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
9 September 2014

QUESTION #10:
Is there any evidence to suggest that Mr. Loisel enjoyed the ball? Why, or why not?

ANSWER:
There is no evidence to suggest that Mr. Loisel enjoyed the ball, yet there is evidence to prove that he did not have a very good time, especially not as much as Mrs. Loisel. He was only excited about the ball because it meant he was climbing the social ladder at work. He also knew that Mrs. Loisel, with her expensive taste and dreams, would love to attend something with the higher class in attendance. He did not realize that going to the ball would involve him buying her a brand new dress and trying to find the most extravagant jewelry to match. Mrs. Loisel had an amazing time and, “all the men saw her, asked her name, sought to be introduced” (Maupassant 56). It would have been a natural reaction for Mr. Loisel to become angry or annoyed with the constant attention from other men for his wife. Mr. Loisel also “had been sleeping in a little empty room with three other men whose wives had also been enjoying themselves” (Maupassant 57). He would not have slept during a party if he were having a good time. He may not have been miserable, yet there were no clues to indicate that he had a great time or that he would look forward to attending again.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at September 9, 2014 12:26 PM

Alyssa Davis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
9 September 2014

Question #13:
What kind of financial arrangements did the Loisels make with the jeweler for the replacement necklace? How is this significant, if at all, to the story, as a whole? Explain in your response.

Answer:
When Mrs. Forrestier’s diamond necklace came up missing, Loisel’s decided they were going to try their hardest to look for the missing necklace. Once they realized that the necklace was unable to be found, they decided to visit every jewelry shop they knew in hopes of finding a necklace that would replace the misplaced diamond necklace. They stumbled upon a shop that had a similar necklace and Mr. Loisel “made an agreement that he would buy it back for thirty-four thousand francs if the original was recovered before the end of February,” as stated in paragraph 92 (Maupassant 58). The arrangement made by the Loisels to the jeweler is significant to the story because the Loisels ended up having to pay for the necklace for the next ten years. Replacing the necklace put the Loisels in debt because they borrowed money from multiple resources, “he borrowed, asking a thousand francs from one, five hundred from another, five louis here, three louis there,” (Maupassant 58). They spent the next ten years of their lives repaying everyone they received money from to help pay for the diamond necklace.

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at September 9, 2014 04:09 PM

Elizabeth Brown
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA07
9 September 2014

Question #20: Compare and contrast the lives of Mathilde and her friend Mrs. Forrestier. How are they alike? How are they different? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The characters in this short story are alike in some ways and different in others. Mathilde and Mrs. Forrestier are similar because they both enjoy the finer things in life. They both possess a passion for fine jewelry, and neither would enjoy seeing the other look plain. (Maupassant pg. 55-56) They are both good friends as well, Mrs. Forrestier allowed Mathilde to borrow her “diamond necklace” and trusted her to return it, and Mathilde lost the necklace and went into debt for ten years over returning the necklace to her friend. (Maupassant pg. 60) They are different because Mrs. Forrestier had jewelry and Mathilde never did. They are different now because Mathilde has grown hardened by her work over the years, and Mrs. Forrestier has been able to enjoy her life and remain younger and softer looking because she had had a privileged lifestyle for the past ten years (Maupassant pg. 60).

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at September 9, 2014 05:31 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 4, 2014
The Necklace
By: Guy de Maupassant
Question 17:
How did Ms. Forrestier react to meeting Mathilde, years later, when they crossed paths on the Champs-Elysees? How is this significant, if at all, to the story, as a whole? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
Ms. Forrestier is confused when approaches by Mathilde many years later. To begin with, she does not recognize Mathilde and is startled at the fact that a working class woman knows her by name. After, Mathilde introduces herself; Ms. Forrestier gives her pity for her appearance. A short conversation between the two women, Ms. Forrestier quotes, “But... Madam! ... I don’t know… You must have made a mistake. No, I’m Mathilde Loisel. Oh! My poor Mathilde, you’ve changed so much.” This conversation between the women is significant to the story because it goes to show how much Mathilde was willing to work herself to enjoy one night with the wealthy.

Posted by: Stephanie at September 9, 2014 10:27 PM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
9 September 2014

Question #11:
Why was Mathilde anxious to hurry away from the ball (Are there any similarities to the Cinderella fairytale?)? Explain your response. Use quote passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
Mathlide was anxious because when she got the invitation she felt as if she didn’t belong or fit in. Meaning that she wasn’t like everyone else, she didn’t have nice clothes and she didn’t know what time wear. (Roberts 54) Also she didn’t want to find out that she was different. She felt as if she couldn’t live her fantasy forever (being dressed up nice and being the prettiest at the party.) It was like she got her perfect night and then in the morning, she realized it was over and then lost the necklace. (Roberts 57) This is relevance to Cinderella because Cinderella asks her fairy god mother to go to the ball in this amazing dress. She has to leave at 12 o’clock because that’s when the spell is over. As she is running out she loses her glass slipper and the king pick it ups. He has everyone try it on and no one fit it. Only Cinderella could fit it. The relevance is that they are both not meant to go to the party, this magical moment happens, they both get to go, and they both lose an object to come back and get.
“She quickly tore open the envelope and took out a card engraved with these words: Instead of being delighted, as her husband had hoped, she threw the invitation spitefully on the table.”
“’How much would a new dress cost, something you could use at other times, but not anything fancy?”
“It’s awful, but I don’t have any jewels to wear, not a single gem, nothing to dress up my outfit.”
“The necklace was no longer around her neck!”

Posted by: Zachary Gary at September 10, 2014 12:15 PM

Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
9 September 2014

Question #16: Using evidence from the text, describe, in your own words, how the Loisel’s lives changed after they had paid for the new necklace. How is it significant, if at all, to the story, as a whole? Explain your response.

Answer:
Because they couple did not have much money, she borrowed a necklace from Madame Jeanne Forestier. She was very unhappy in life because they did not have a lot of money and they were not able to afford the things that she wanted. When Mr. and Mrs. Loisel got home from the ball Mrs. Loisel realized that she had lost the diamond necklace that she had borrows. They looked everywhere for it but found no trace of it and had to go out and try to find a similar one if not the same to replace it and return to Mrs. Forestier without her noticing. The problem was the necklace that they found to replace it was thirty-six thousand francs. “Loisel had saved eighteen thousand francs that his father had left him. He had to borrow the rest.” (De Maupassant 7). After they spent literally all of their money they “dismissed the maid, they changed their address, they rented an attic flat.” (De Maupassant 8). She now had to do all of the housework and laundry. She also had no choice but to dress on cheap housedresses. Her husband had to work uncountable hours a day just to make some money back. After ten years of living like this, they had finally paid everything back. Losing the necklace made the whole story. If she would not have lost it, there would have been no story at all.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at September 10, 2014 01:09 PM

Trejon Baynham
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 04
9 September 2014

QUESTION:
How did an evening at a ball offer Mathilde a chance to present herself in a new guise? How was this relevant to the entire story, as a whole?

ANSWER:
The evening at the ball gave Mathilde the opportunity to temporarily live the extravagant life she internally feels entitled to. As Maupassant indicated early in the text, Mathilde “suffered constantly” as she felt herself belonging to a social class in which luxury was the norm. (Maupassant 3) However, having attended and putting herself in the position of having lost the necklace given to her by Mrs. Forrestier, it introduced her to a lifestyle that instilled in her an appreciation for a life in contrast to her desires. After having worked hard for 10 years to pay off the debt of replacing the lost necklace, Mathilde “had become the strong, hard, and rude woman of poor households.” (Maupassant 104)

Posted by: Trejon Baynham at September 10, 2014 01:37 PM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA07
9 September 201

Question
what do readers learn from the story about the structure of French society at the time "The Necklace" was written? How is it significant, if at all, to the story, as a whole? Explain your response.

Answer
In my opinion, readers gather a conclusion that the French society during the time "The Necklace" was written that they were very proud people no matter what their background was. It also showed that there were basically two sets of people; people that were wealthy and people that were simply poor or just getting by.

This is significant to the story because Mrs. Forristier was portrayed as wealthy in the story, but in the end we later on found out that the necklace that was seemed to be expensive (36,000 lbs) was worth merely 500 franks Mrs. Forrestier says on page 60 lines 126 - 127 , "Oh my poor Mathilda. But mine was only costume Jewelry, at most it was worth only five hundred franks."

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at September 10, 2014 02:01 PM

Mickael Dodard
Dr.Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
10 september 2014

Question: What was Ms. Forestier’s reaction when “her necklace was finally returned? How is this significant, if at all to the story, as a whole? Explain your response.

Answer:
She said, "You ought to have brought it back sooner; I might have needed it." Ms forestier meant that the person could have returned it sooner but she was happy to find it.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at September 11, 2014 01:06 PM

John Crane
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
10 September 2014

QUESTION #12: What efforts were made to find Ms. Jeanne Forrestier’s necklace? How is this significant, if at all, to the story, as a whole? Explain your response.

ANSWER: Mathilde husband searched everywhere he could think of to find the necklace. He said, “I’m going out to retrace all our steps” (de Maupassant 6) and did not come home until seven in the morning. Mathilde did not go looking for the necklace at all, instead, she laid down and fell asleep (de Maupassant 6). The searching has no significance to the story though, because in the end, Jeanne tells her it was costume jewelry (de Maupassant 9).

Posted by: John Crane at September 11, 2014 08:01 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at September 15, 2014 04:17 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing CA012
21 January 2015

Question:#10 How did an evening at a ball offer Mathilde a chance to present herself in a new guise (if you don't know the word "guise," look it up)?
Answer: The ball offered Mathilde a chance to present herself in a new guise by allowing her to become the high classed woman she dreamed herself to be. Mathilde is married to a Clerk, living in an ordinary lifestyle by her standards. "She suffered because of her grim apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, ugly curtains. All such things, which most other women in her situation would not even have noticed, tortured her and filled her with despair"(de Maupassant 53). She wanted to be desired, envied, attractive and sought after. Mathilde is able to shed her simple woman persona for someone who had "inborn finesse…elegant taste… and engaging personalities"(de Maupassant 53). At the party, she was able to become the belle of the ball. All of the men wanted to dance with her and she was sought after to be introduced(de Maupassant 56). She danced the entire time joyfully while she found herself on cloud nine. Mathilde was able to fit in with all the other women, dressed in the best clothes and finest jewels. She was no longer the Clerk's wife. She was a woman of high class, the woman who held "expensive banquets with shining place settings and wall hangings portraying ancient heroes and exotic birds in an enchanted forest"(de Maupassant 53).

Posted by: Mallory Delay at January 21, 2015 01:44 PM

#13: What efforts were made to find Ms. Jeanne Forrestier’s necklace?
To find Mrs. Forrestier’s necklace Mr. Loisel went out to retrace their steps that same night to see if he can find the necklace that way, but ended up turning up with nothing. Next, “he went to the Police Headquarters and to the newspaper to announce a reward. He went to the small cab companies, and finally he followed up even the slightest lead.”(line 80) He continued by going from jeweler to jeweler searching for the necklace. Finally, he came across this shop in Palais- Royal and found a necklace that looked similar to the one they were looking for. Mr. Loisel got the jeweler to promise he wouldn’t sell it for three days so he could come up with the thirty-six thousand francs the jeweler let him buy it for. They came up with the money and was able to give Mrs. Forrestier her necklace back without her even noticing it was a substitute.

Posted by: Selena Hammie at January 21, 2015 06:37 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA12
21 January 2015

“The Necklace” Discussion Questions

Question: Identify all the characters in this story.

Answer: In this short story titled The Necklace, there are many characters described in the tale. Mrs. Loisel, a simple women whose beauty is remarkable, is dissatisfied with her life as it currently is. The story says, “she was one of those pretty and charming women” (Paragraph 1). Mrs. Loisel seems as if she yearns to be rich, like her friend Madame Forrestier and is dissatisfied by everything. Her husband, Mr. Loisel, who appears to be truly in love with his wife, can’t seem to comprehend her personality. A sentence in the story speaks in regard to his wife and states, “loved, married by a rich and distinguished man” (Paragraph 1). The third character, Madame Forrestier, is a wealthy, generous friend of Mrs. Loisel who kindly gives Mrs. Loisel a necklace as a favor.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at January 21, 2015 10:26 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA01
23 January 2015

Question: What did Mathilde’s husband surrender in order to provide the money for a dress? Was this a big sacrifice for him?

Answer: Mathilde’s husband gave up the money that he had put aside for a shotgun. This was not a significant sacrifice because he was purchasing the shotgun for use in the following summer, he would still have time to put aside another four hundred francs before lark-hunting season began (26).

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at January 22, 2015 02:44 PM

5) Why was Mathilde unhappy with her life at the opening of the story?

Mathilde was unhappy since the day she was born, well that's how the story made it seem. Mathilde was poor and soon married someone below her, this is what she was ashamed of. She felt as though her life was not good enough, well not as good as the people she was around who were all rich. She was very selfish and didn't appreciate the little things she did have. This is why her life was very unhappy throughout the opening of the story.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at January 22, 2015 04:05 PM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
22 January 2015

Question: What kind of financial arrangements did the Loisels make with the jeweler for the replacement necklace?

Answer: The financial arrangement the Loisels made with jeweler for the replacement necklace was to buy the necklace for thirty six thousand francs and if they found the first necklace before the end of February they could get thirty four thousand francs back. Loisel used eighteen thousand francs he inherited from his father and borrowed the rest from other men. Madam Loisel had to work to help pay off the replacement necklace for ten years.

Posted by: Rachel addington at January 22, 2015 05:30 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA12
January 22, 2015
The Necklace
Question 12: Why was Mathilde anxious to hurry away from the ball?
Answer: Mathilde was ashamed of the shawl her husband had purchased for their trip home. She rushed away before the wealthy women could notice the shabby article of clothing in contrast to how luxuriously she had presented herself at the ball. (line 55)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 22, 2015 09:31 PM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
23 January 2015


Question: Describe what kind of life Mathilde dreamed about. Provide some specifics. Can you see any patterns to her desires?

Answer: Mathilde Loisel dreamed of a life she wished she had. She would daydream of a large room filled with elegant furniture and lighting. She dreamed of expensive gourmet meals served on decorated dishes. When Mr. Loisel surprised her with an invitation to a dinner party, Mathilde threw it. She insisted that she could not attend the dinner because she did not have the proper attire. Her husband gave her money to get a dress that could be used on multiple occasions. As the dinner party approached, Mathilde “seemed sad, uneasy, and anxious” (55). Mr. Loisel questioned her, and she claimed she had no jewelry to wear with the dress. He gave her the idea to borrow a piece of jewelry from a friend. Returning from the party, Mathilde looked at herself in the mirror one last time, realizing the necklace was gone. After replacing the necklace and paying off all the debt to do so, Mathilde “dreamed of that evening where she had been so beautiful and so admired” (59).

Mathilde wanted to live such an elegant life. When she finally had a chance to experience the night like she had dreamed of, her and her husband spent ten years paying for it.

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at January 22, 2015 10:08 PM

Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 CA12
January 22nd 2015

Question: 3. Describe the economic status of Mathilde Loisel. How would you categorize her economic status?
Answer: She was rather poor women, without a lot of money. She didn’t have enough money for good clothes and all comforts. She was born in the family of clerks and copyists, so it wasn’t a good start into life for her. I would place her as a regular townswoman from poor neighborhood.

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak at January 22, 2015 10:09 PM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II ENG-122-CA12
22 January 2015

Question: What was Ms. Forrestier's reaction when "her" necklace was finally returned?

Answer: In the reading "The Diamond Necklace," when Mrs. Loisel finally returned the necklace she had borrowed from Ms. Forrestier, her friends reaction to getting the necklace back was a little rude as she said to Mrs. Loisel, "You should have brought it back sooner, I might have needed it" (Maupassant 59).

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at January 22, 2015 10:16 PM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 “The Necklace”
22 January 2015

Question: 9. Do you think Mathilde recognized good quality jewelry?
Answer: No, because she thought that the necklace she borrowed and then lost was real.

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at January 22, 2015 10:55 PM

Emma Riemer
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 academic writing
22 January 2015

The Necklace
Question four: How would you describe the appearance of Mathilde and her apartment?

Answer:
Mathilde’s apartment was that of an ordinary woman. Mathilde lived an ordinary life but she longed for more. Her apartment is simple as is she. The author describes Mathilde’s apartment by saying, “…her grim apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, ugly curtains” (de Maupassant 53). He also says “She was a simple woman…” (de Maupassant 53).

Posted by: Emma Riemer at January 23, 2015 12:04 AM

On page 5 after the ball, Mr. Loisel and his Madame exit after a long night of dancing.In the text, which mentioned that "Since midnight her husband had been dozing in a deserted little room, in company with three other men whose wives were having a good time." It is clear that Mr.Loisel's night was tiring, and from the effort beforehand to be ready for the ball it's possible to take that he did not have time to enjoy the ball.

Posted by: Rously Paul at January 23, 2015 08:00 AM

Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA 12
23 January 2015

“She suffered endlessly, feeling herself born for every delicacy and luxury. She suffered from the poorness of her house, from its mean walls, worn chairs, and ugly curtains. All these things, of which other women of her class would not even have been aware, tormented and insulted her.” (The Necklace, page 54, par. 5, Edgar Roberts translation)
“She learned to do the heavy housework, dirty kitchen jobs… And, dressed in cheap house dresses, she went to the fruit dealer, to the grocer, the butchers, with a basket under her arms, haggling, insulted, defending her measly cash penny by penny.” (The Necklace, page 59, par. 4, Edgar Roberts translation)
Question: Describe in your own words how the Loisels’ lives changed after they had paid for the new necklace.
Answer: The Loisels’ lives changed tremendously after purchasing the replacement necklace. Mrs. Loisel was depressed because she could not have more luxurious possessions, and is now forced to live the life of a real poor woman. She seemed to perform her newly acquired house duties well. They are forced to downgrade in living conditions, and Mr. Loisel had to work strenuously to pay off the debt. “Mrs. Loisel soon discovered the horrible life of the needy. She did her share, however, completely heroically. They dismissed the maid; they changed their address; they rented an attic flat.” (Roberts 59) Mrs. Loisel has a complete transformation of her looks and character. “Mrs. Loisel looked old now. She had become the strong, hard, and rude women of poor households.” (Roberts 59)

Posted by: Victoria Markou at January 23, 2015 10:30 AM

Diego Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
21 January 2014

Discussion Question for “The Necklace”

Quotation: “She walked closer. ‘Hello, Jeanne.’ The other gave no sign of recognition and was astonished to be addressed so familiarly by this working-class woman. She stammered: ‘But… madam!...I don’t know…you must have made a mistake.’ ‘No. I’m Mathilde Loisel.’ Her friend cried out …”

Question 18: How did Ms. Forrestier react to meeting Mathilde, years later, when
they crossed paths on the Champs-Elysées?

Answer: At first Mrs. Forrestier did not recognize Mathilde and thought that she was a poor confused lady from the working-class. Mrs. Forrestier was even astonished that a woman in such a low class addressed her so familiarly. Then, when she realized who Mathilde was, she was shocked at what Mathilde had to go through for some fake jewelry.

Posted by: Diego Garcia at January 23, 2015 11:05 AM

Alison Colon
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing 2
21 January 2015

3. Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that women have neither rank nor race”. Some translations read “caste or class.” Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

I do not agree with that statement .I feel that women do have rank and race just as men do. I do not believe women should have to live off their good looks and charm. Now I do believe that women should have to work for things equally and not just be born into it or classified in ranks due to their beauty but as for having no ranking or race in society I feel that is not the case. Ancestry should be taken into account but should not be the basis of a woman’s social class and capabilities. No women is better then the next because of her wealth, ancestry, or appearance. A great example of how women should be in society is when Mathilde lost the necklace and had to replace it with a new one. She was forced to work and do as the men did and her ranking in society was based upon her doing so. I feel that men should be equal to women and should have rank and race in society. I agree with being born in a certain social class or having a good birth can also make you the man you are, but I also feel that the man’s work habits should also be taken into consideration more often then none. I do not agree with people being ranked, judged, or living off their good looks and charm or rather their wealth or good birth.

Posted by: Alison Colon at January 23, 2015 11:19 AM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122-CA09
31 August 2015

Question: How did Ms. Forrestier react to meeting Mathilde, years later, when they crossed paths on the Champs-Elysées?

Answer: Through her entire life, Mathilde Loisel desired a life of luxury and opulence, she truly believed that it was what she had been destined for from birth. An opportunity to, at the least, pretend she was an upper-class belle had presented itself through her husband’s position in the Ministry of Education, a gala held by the Chancellor of Education. Mathilde, however, in her selfishness refused to go due to her lack of expensive apparel. Her husband lent her money for a dress, and when she discovered her lack of jewelry, was prompted to visit her friend, Ms. Forrestier. Ms. Forrestier, in contrast to Mathilde, had items of luxury, most notably the jewels that Mathilde had sought, “Mrs. Forrestier went to her mirrored wardrobe, took out a large jewel box, opened it, and said to Mrs. Loisel: ‘Choose my dear.’ She saw bracelets, then a pearl necklace, then a Venetian cross of finely worked gold and gems” (De Maupassant, lines 42-44). After choosing the titular necklace, a fine diamond necklace, Mathilde and her husband attended the ball. At the ball, Mathilde was the Belle she always dreamed to be as “She was prettier than anyone else, stylish, graceful, smiling and wild with joy. All the men saw her, asked her name, sought to be introduced. All the important administrators stood in line to waltz with her. The chancellor himself eyed her” (De Maupassant, line 52). She was youthful, beautiful, and a veritable “Belle of the Ball”. However, after losing the necklace, she and her Husband were forced to put themselves in deep debt to replace it. For the next decade both Mr. and Mrs. Loisel took up many different jobs to pay back their debt. As the years went by, Mathilde lost her good looks and youth, sacrificing them to pull her family out of debt. As put by De Maupassant, “She had become the strong, hard, and rude woman of poor households. Her hair unkempt, with uneven skirts and rough, red hands…” (De Maupassant, line 104). When Mathilde encounter her old friend Mrs. Forrestier, the latter did not even recognize her. The beautiful, charming woman that Mrs. Forrestier knew a decade prior was gone, and replaced with the haggard woman that startled her on her walk along the Champs-Elysées. Mrs. Forrestier was taken aback by her appearance, and offended that such a run-down woman would dare address her, as put by the author “The other gave no sign of recognition and was astonished to be addressed so familiarly by this working class woman” (De Maupassant, line 108). When Mathilde finally identified herself, Mrs. Forrestier was shocked to see how far her old friend had fallen in the ten years since they had last seen each other. When revealed that Mrs. Forrestier was the source of the Loisel’s hardships, she was shocked. After hearing Mathilde’s tale of hardship, she was moved, and utterly surprised at what she had gone through over what turned out to be a piece of Costume Jewelry, that “At most…was worth only five hundred francs!” (De Maupassant, line 126).

Posted by: Michael Mooney at August 31, 2015 06:20 PM

Shania Bienaime
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
31 August 2015

The Necklace by Edgar V. Roberts

Question: Identify all of the characters in this story.
Answer:
Mathilde- A simple working woman with big dreams of being noticed and having luxurious things. She is always unhappy about her unluxurious life and how she wants to have elegant things. She lives in a shabby apartment with her working husband.
Mr.Loisel (Mathilde Husband)- a minor clerk in the ministry of education. He seems like he has a kind heart and will do anything for his wife. In the story, he gave up his money for his rifle gun he has been saving up for to help buy the necklace. He works even harder to pay off his debt because of his wife misplacement of the necklace.
Mrs. Forestier– The wealthy friend of Mathilde. She gave Mathilde the beautiful necklace to wear to the event.
The Jeweler– The jewelry box had his name inside it. They thought that the necklace was originally bought from him, but it was not.

Posted by: Shania bieniame at September 1, 2015 02:12 AM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
1 September 2015

Question: What kind of occupation do you think Mister Loisel (Mathilde’s husband) has? Why are they not able to easily repay the cost of the replacement necklace? Why is this important to the story?

Answer: I think that Mister Loisel had a job that was not the best of the best, but it was not the worst of the worst. In today’s terms, I would compare the Loisel couple to a lower middle-class group that made ends meet but not by much. Mister Loisel could have worked either for a school or maybe a teacher. Something that involves education because of the invitation the couple got says they were invited by The Chancellor of Education. Those types of jobs show why they are not easily able to pay off the necklace. They have to work to survive and work more to help pay for the necklace and all the loans they took out to get the necklace so that Mrs. Forrestier would not know that Mrs. Loisel lost it. All of this is important to the story because if Mathilde, Mrs. Loisel, would have went to Mrs. Forrestier and told her that she lost the necklace then she would have told Mathilde that it was costume jewelry. Then the past ten years would not have been so hard they could have paid off the necklace easier.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 1, 2015 05:56 PM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing ENG 122 CA09
1 September 2015

Question: Describe the economic status of Mathilde Loisel. How would you categorize her economic class?
Answer: Mathilde comes from a very poor family and usually when you come from a poor family your goal was to find a wealthy husband. She had settled for a mediocre clerk and didn’t have the nicest things. She was poor. She had no jewelry, no dresses or any accessories "She had a rich friend, a comrade from the convent days, whom she did not want to see anymore because she suffered so much when she returned home." (Maupassant 54) she felt jealous every time she was there. Everything Mrs. Forrestier had Mathilde wanted to have and it actually hurt her feelings.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at September 1, 2015 08:52 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
1 September 2015


Question #3: Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that “women have neither rank nor race.” Some translations read “caste or class.” Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

Answer: In this time period, women had no status of their own. They were assigned whatever rank/class the main man in their life had whether it was their father, eldest brother, distant cousin, or husband. In the text, it talks about Mrs. Loisel being unable to find a rich man and was then forced to marry a poorer man which ultimately decided the kind of income she’d have for the rest of her life. A woman could do little on her own in this world. Unable to have a job of their own, they were unable to make a living or support themselves. Mrs. Loisel was always a housewife. Even when he and her husband were in dire debt, she didn’t/couldn’t get a job to help with the bills. They were looked down on as a whole in a, you don’t know what you’re talking about because you’re a woman, kind of way. Women were necessary, but they also had to know their place. Women were replicable. In the case of divorce (if you were even able to get a divorce), a man had a much better change at remarrying than a woman would if at all. I do agree with the statement because it is accurate for the time. Do I personally agree? Of course not. Men had class in most cases. According to the job they got, they would be able to “move up the food chain” so to speak. In a caste, you’re pretty set in stone. What you are born with is usually what you died with.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 1, 2015 09:55 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
Tuesday, 1, September, 2015


" Suddenly she found a superb diamond necklace in a black satin box, and her heart throbbed with desire for it. Her hands shook as she picked it up. She fastened it around her neck, watched it gleam at her throat, and looked at herself ecstatically."((The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant, page 56, par. 47)

Question: Do you think Mathilde recognized good quality jewelry?

Answer: I do not think she recognizes good quality jewelry because she did not understand that the jewelry, she borrowed from Mrs. Forrestier, was a custom. If she could know what jewelry is, even she did not need to know good or bad quality, she would not spend her entire life to pay for jewelry. However, we should think that she desired expensive items, and wanted to be rich, so when she saw jewelries, her eyes were closed by jewelry.

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 1, 2015 10:53 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing II CA09
2 September 2015

Question: Describe Mathilde’s reaction after receiving the invitation.

Answer: Mathilde’s initial reaction to the invitation was excitement as she quickly tore the envelope open. Her mood changed in an instant when she read its contents and became enraged. Mathilde shows her anger in line 10 of the conversation with her and her husband, where it says “she threw the invitation spitefully on the table”. Mathilde was filled with sorrow when she had nothing to wear to the party. The passage shows her sadness by the line “large tears fell slowly from the corners of her eyes to her mouth” (Maupassant 55)

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at September 1, 2015 11:29 PM

Peyton Farrier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09
02 September 2015

"He threw, over her shoulders, the shawl that he had brought for the trip home-- a modest everyday wrap, the poverty of which contrasted sharply with the elegance of her evening gown. She felt it and hurried away to avoid being noticed by the other women who luxuriated in rich furs." (The Necklace, page 56, par. 55, Edgar V. Roberts translation)


Question: Why was Mathilde anxious to hurry away from the ball?

Answer: In the short story, "The Necklace" Mathilde was ashamed by how she looked and by the clothes that she owned she asked her husband for four hundred francs so she didn't stand out from everyone and she could fit in with the richer women. "... there's nothing more humiliating than looking shabby in the company of rich women." (De Maupassant 55). So she went out bought a elegant dress and a nice necklace to match, and enjoyed her time at the ball. At the end of the night her husband brought a shawl to keep her warm on the way home and it clashed with her outfit she had on. She was humiliated and didn't want to be seen wearing it while all the other women wore their rich furs.

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at September 2, 2015 12:17 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
2 September 2015

Question: What kind of occupation do you think Mister Loisel (Mathilde’s husband) has? Why are they not able to easily repay the cost of the replacement necklace? Why is this important to the story?

Answer: Mister Loisel's occupation is a position as a minor clerk in the Ministry of Education. While this kind of occupation is a fair and modest job, it is not the most prestigious and highest-paying job that exists, which leads to the issue of Mister Loisel struggling to pay for the lost neckless. In the story it talks about how Mathilde had wanted a new dress for the party that she was about to attend with her husband and that her husband had saved up four hundred francs in order to buy a shotgun for a hunting trip but was willing to give it to Mathilde for a new dress that would be appropriate for the fancy party(de Maupassant, 55). Here sufficient evidence is provided to show that the couple did not have a lot of money to throw around and had to be quite conservative and responsible about their finances. Also when trying to figure out how to come up with the money for a new neckless Mister Loisel explains how he was planning to liquidate money that he had accumulated from a combination of savings and leftover money from his father in order to help pay for the necklace. These life savings had added up to roughly eighteen thousand francs which to an upper class wealthy, aristocrat was not all that much, considering the price of the necklace on its own was originally forty thousand francs. Mister Loisel was forced to take numerous loans from numerous amounts of individuals to match the price of the replacement neckless(de Maupassant, 58-59). Here sufficient evidence is provided that shows how the Loisel's were not able to replace the old necklace. In the reality of it all, given their socioeconomic status and the job that Mister Loisel had they simply didn't have enough money and wouldn't accumulate enough money in the given time to afford the new neckless without accepting outside loans. This whole predicament is so important to the story because the entire story is centered around Mathilde's desire to be elegant and wealthy. It is through this desire to be something that she isn't that puts herself in a very troubling position. If she had originally been accepting of her lifestyle, maybe her life would not have turned for the worst, and the story would have been completely different. Maybe she would have never borrowed the neckless and therefore never lost it which would mean that she would still be living her comfortable but not elegant life of an average housewife. Since they were originally unable to pay for the necklace and had to take out loans to pay for it, they became poor in the process but if they never had to take out any loans because of a lost necklace they would still be living their average lifestyle. If Mathilde had not had aspirations to become something she was not her and her husband would not have to have worried about paying for a replacement neckless which would have drastically changed the plot of the whole entire story.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at September 2, 2015 01:16 PM

Daniel Wright
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA09
02 September 2015
"He borrowed, asking a thousand francs from one, five hundred from another, five louis here, three louis there. He wrote promissory notes, undertook ruinous obligations, did buisness with finance companies..." (Page 7 Paragraph 94 "La Parure")
Question: Describe in your own words how the Loisels’ lives changed after they had paid for the new necklace.
Answer: The Loisels' lives changed dramatically after they bought the replacement necklace. They took many risks and made many bad decisions. They were edepted incredibly deeply to many different entities and were forced to work many extra hours to keep up with the promises made, forcing the couple into a destitute lifestyle.

Posted by: Daniel at September 2, 2015 02:35 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
1 September 2015

Question: Why was Mathilde unhappy with her life at the opening of the story?


Answer: In the short fiction story "The Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant, translated by Edgar V. Roberts, Mathilde is "one of those pretty charming women, born, as if by an error of destiny, into a family of clerks and copyists" (Maupassant, pg. 53, par. 1). Mathilde believed she was to be of more importance to others, respected, treated with pure love and riches. She had mistaken her destiny in the place of her dreams. Just like any other woman, Mathilde wanted it all. Jewelry, wealthy dresses, and having a beautiful house were always on her mind. In Reality, Mathilde was a woman living in poverty with an average life hoping for the occurrence of a miracle. Mathilde is one of those women who would trace happiness to nothing other than wealth and a comfortable lifestyle. By the end of the story, Mathilde was the exact opposite of what she sought to be. She had to come to the realization that there are many other women out there that are in the same situation. An example for this understanding is the last words Mrs. Forrestier had said "Oh my poor Mathilde! But mine was only costume jewelry. At most, it was worth only five hundred francs!..." (Maupassant, pg. 60, par. 125).

Posted by: zekeriya kayaselcuk at September 2, 2015 04:21 PM

Do Over
Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
1 September 2015


Question: Do you think Mr. Loisel enjoyed the ball?

Answer: For the first few hours Mr. Loisel enjoyed the ball because of how excited and happy his wife was; she “was a success” (Maupassant 56). Men, of all different ranks, were coming up to her introducing themselves and even wanted a dance (Maupassant 56). Around midnight, however, Mr. Loisel stopped enjoying the ball. He was “sleeping in a little empty room with three other men whose wives had also been enjoying themselves” until four o’clock in the morning (Maupassant 56).

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at September 2, 2015 07:15 PM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
3 September 2015

Question: What did Mathilde's husband surrender in order to provide the money for a dress? Was this a big sacrifice for him?

Answer: In the short story, "The Diamond Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant, Mathilde Loisel was a wife of a minor clerk in the lower class in France. She "burned with a desire to please, be envied, be attractive, and sought after" but had no wealth to do so (de Maupassant 54). One day, Mr. Loisel, her husband, brought an invitation to a grand dinner of the Chancellor of Education. Instead of becoming gleeful, Mathilde shed tears and became frustrated over not having an elegant dress to wear. When asked how much money she needed for a new dress, "but not anything fancy," she replied that 400 francs would suffice (de Maupassant 55). To which Mr. Loisel "blanched slightly, because he had set just that amount to buy a shotgun for Sunday lark-hunts" (de Maupassant 55). However, he accepted, and Mathilde would later go purchase the dress. His surrender of the new hunting weapon was a big sacrifice for him as he was a "frugal clerk" and had set the money aside for him to enjoy during the summer. His frugality also showed when he replied to Mathilde's statement of not having jewelry to accompany the dress, "God, but you're silly! Go to your friend Mrs. Forrestier and ask her to lend you some jewelry" (de Maupassant 55).

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 3, 2015 04:07 PM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA09
31 August 2015

Question: Describe what kind of life Mathilde dreamed about. Provide some specifics. Can you see any patterns to her desires?

Answer: Guy de Maupassant created Mathilde as a character who craved riches. She dreamed of materialistic items such as, "large, silent anterooms, decorated with oriental tapestries and lighted by high bronze floor lamps..." (de Maupassant 53). She felt that these expensive things would make her happier and more accepted among those who did have these. Mathilde felt "'...shabby in the company of rich women'" (de Maupassant 55). Her desires were all physical treasures that held high cost. She sought these to create her imaginary wealthy lifestyle.

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at September 3, 2015 05:24 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09 Academic Writing II
31 August 2015

"She was one of those pretty and charming women, born, as if by an error of destiny, into a family of clerks and copyists."
"She suffered because of her grim apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, and ugly curtains."

Question: How would you describe the appearance of Mathilde and her apartment?

Answer: I would describe Mathilde as a pretty and charming woman like any other. However, she was not born into wealthy families. As for how her apartment looks, it is nothing but drab walls, threadbare apartment, ugly curtains and much more in her grim apartment.

Posted by: Hana Lee at September 3, 2015 07:05 PM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
20 January 2016

Question: Describe what kind of life Mathilde dreamed about. Provide some specifics. Can you see any patterns to her desires?

Answer: Mathilde dreamed of many beautiful items that women of higher importance have. She dreamed of many things that she did not get to have growing up or when she got married. Mathilde imagined rooms with beautiful items compared to where she is living. Mathilde would be dreaming of a life of luxury while looking around her dingy apartment as stated here. “She daydreamed of large, silent anterooms, decorated with oriental tapestries and lighted by high bronze floor lamps…” (de Maupassant 53).

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 19, 2016 08:25 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
19 January 2016
Question: What was Mrs. Forrestier’s reaction when her necklace was finally returned?.
Answer: In the text, ‘Roman Fever’, Mrs. Forrestier was somewhat angry and disappointed because Mrs. Loisel took a while to return her diamond necklace. After Mrs. Loisel had given Mrs. Forrestier the necklace, Mrs. Forrestier states, “you should have brought it back sooner; I might have needed it” (De Maupassant 59). It should be highlighted that Mrs. Forestiers choice of word also indicate to the reader that she was angry with Mrs. Loisel. The use of the word should indicate that Mrs. Loisel had a duty to complete within a particular time framed and that duty was to return the necklace. The fact that Mrs. Loisel failed to carry out her mission actually disturbed Mrs. Forrestier, which causes her to make the statement mentioned above in an offended tone.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at January 19, 2016 08:46 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 06
19 January 2016

Question: 7. Describe Mathilde's reaction after reading the invitation?

Answer: Mathilde's was furious after reading the invitation; in fact, immediately, she tossed the invitation on the table spitefully (de Maupassant 54). She resembled a toddler when she threw her tantrum after reading that letter. She was furious because she had nothing to wear to this fancy ball held by Ministry of Education. Then, out of sadness, she cried because she had no fancy clothes, advising to her husband that he give the invitation to someone whose " wife has nicer clothes than mine" (de Maupassant 55).

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at January 19, 2016 09:03 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210
19 January 2016

Question: What kind of financial arrangements did the Loisels make with the jeweler for the replacement necklace?

Answer: The Loisels, firstly 'begged' the jeweler not to sell it for three days so that they could arrange their finances. Loisel had an inheritance of 18 thousand franks, left to him by his father which would contribute to the 36 thousand franks. For the remaining 18 thousand he would borrow it.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at January 19, 2016 09:17 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 122 CAO6
19 January 2016

“The Necklace”

Q: Identify all the characters in this story.
A: This short story opens with a description of Mathilde Loisel. She longs for a glamourous lifestyle, but instead lives one feeling as though she was a beggar. “She had no decent dresses, no jewels, nothing. And she loved nothing but these; she believed herself born for only these” (de Maupassant 54). As the quote depicts, Mrs. Loisel lives for material things, and this eventually leads to her downfall.
Mr. Loisel, the husband of Mathilde, is a passive but hardworking character who is very devoted to his wife. He is always trying to lighten the situation, whether it be praising the simple dinner of “…good old boiled beef” (de Maupassant 53) or reassuring Mathilde that she looks good in her plain theatre dress (de Maupassant 54).
Mrs. Jeanne Forrestier is Mathilde Loisel’s good friend who allows her to borrow the necklace. At the end of the story, Mrs. Forrestier feels remorse for Mathilde, as she tells her that her necklace is only worth five hundred franc’s, not thirty-six thousand franc’s (de Maupassant 60).

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at January 19, 2016 11:22 PM

Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
20 January 2016

Question: Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that “women have neither rank nor race.” Some translations read “caste or class.” Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

Answer: During the Colonial period, women had no rights and were considered insignificant, as in Guy de Maupassant’s story, “The Necklace,” “women have neither rank nor race” (Maupassant 53). I agree, “caste or class” is right and acceptable for translation because both are referring to social classes and traits. Maupassant writes, “In place of high birth or important family connections, they can rely only on their beauty . . . which are their only power, make working-class women the equals of the grandest ladies” (Maupassant 53). These two quotes specifically highlight the terminology of rank and race. I also believe there are castes and classes for men, although, obviously they are the head of the family and represent according to their caste/class.

Posted by: Heather Hauck at January 20, 2016 12:25 AM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
20 January 2016

The Necklace

Question #1: Identify all of the characters in this story?

Answer: The three characters in this story are Mathilde Loisel, who is the main protagonist and wife, her husband, Monsieur Loisel, and, lastly, Mathilde’s wealthy friend, Madame Forestier. Mathilde is a beautiful woman who is married but cannot afford the lifestyle that she wants. Mathilde “suffered constantly, feeling herself destined for all delicacies and luxuries” (Maupassant 53). Monsieur Loisel’s frugalness makes him to be a man who does not need much to be happy (55). He is content other than that he wants his wife to be happy and does everything in his power to make her happy. His devotion can be seen when he gets her the invitation to the party (54) and uses the money for his shotgun to buy his wife a dress (55). The wealthy friend of Mathilde, Madame Forestier, is very kind to them and lends Mathilde one of her necklaces for the party she wants to attend (56). The result of this is Mathilde loses the necklace at the party and cannot find it. So she tells her husband, and they work together to replace the necklace (57). As a result, they go into massive debt and work for years to pay it off just to find the wealthy friend one day and told that the necklace was only costume jewelry (60).

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at January 20, 2016 01:46 AM

Phillip Moss
English 122
Dr. Hobbs
19 January 2016


Question: How do you think Mathilde recognized good quality jewelry?

Answer: Normally one would assume that Mathilde could recognize quality jewelry because of how much she dreams about being wealthy. The description she gave of the fancy anteroom and private room on page one suggest that she is educated in the sense of what is elegant. However obviously, she can’t recognize actual jewelry because Mrs. Forrestier admits that the piece is fake on page 9 “Oh my poor Mathilde! But mine was only costume jewelry".

Posted by: Phillip Moss at January 20, 2016 08:23 AM

Travis Farmer
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CA06
20 January 2016

Question: 2.) Describe the economic status of Mathilde Loisel. How would you categorize her economic class?

Answer: Mathilde Loisel is relatively poor. Her husband is a lowly-paid clerk, and cannot provide many material things. Even though they won’t go hungry, she is still unhappy. I would categorize her economic class as under middle class. Despite her economic standing, she still dreamed of fame and grandeur. Despite her dreams, she still had nothing. [Page 2, sentence 1]

Posted by: Travis Farmer at January 20, 2016 01:47 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
20 January 2016

Question: 8.) What did Mathilde’s husband surrender in order to provide the money
for a dress? Was this a big sacrifice for him?

Answer: 8.) Mathilde’s husband surrendered the money that he set aside to buy a new shotgun for Sunday lark-hunts for the next summer. This was a big sacrifice for him because this is something that he had saved up for to buy for himself to have fun with his friends. But he knew how important going to this party and wearing a nice dress meant to her, so he was willing to give up something he wanted for the women he loved.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at January 20, 2016 01:52 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
18 January 2016

Question: Why was Mathilde anxious to hurry away from the ball?

Answer: Mathilde wanted to leave the ball so quickly because she did not want the other “wealthier” women to see that she was not one of them. Mathilde refused her shawl because it could not compare to the luxurious fur outerwear of the other women. The narrator explains that Mathilde, “felt it and hurried away to avoid being noticed by the other women who luxuriated in rich furs” (de Maupassant 56). Even after her husband called out to her, she seemed un-phased and rushed to leave so that no one would see her.

Posted by: Revised - Nastassja Sielchan at January 20, 2016 03:14 PM

Revised Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
19 January 2016

“The Necklace”

Q: Identify all the characters in this story.

A: This short story opens with a description of Mathilde Loisel. She longs for a glamourous lifestyle, but instead lives one feeling as though she was a beggar. “She had no decent dresses, no jewels, nothing. And she loved nothing but these; she believed herself born for only these” (de Maupassant 54). As the quote depicts, Mrs. Loisel lives for material things, and this eventually leads to her downfall.
Mr. Loisel, the husband of Mathilde, is a passive but hardworking character who is very devoted to his wife. He is always trying to lighten the situation, whether it be praising the simple dinner of “good old boiled beef” (53) or reassuring Mathilde that she looks good in her plain theatre dress (54).
Mrs. Jeanne Forrestier is Mathilde Loisel’s good friend who allows her to borrow the necklace. At the end of the story, Mrs. Forrestier feels remorse for Mathilde, as she tells her that her necklace is only worth five hundred franc’s, not thirty-six thousand francs (60).

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at January 20, 2016 03:23 PM

Revision Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 06
19 January 2016

Question: 7. Describe Mathilde's reaction after reading the invitation?

Answer: Mathilde's was furious after reading the invitation; in fact, immediately, she tossed the invitation on the table spitefully (de Maupassant 54). She resembled a toddler when she threw her tantrum after reading that letter. She was furious because she had nothing to wear to this fancy ball held by Ministry of Education. Then, out of sadness, she cried because she had no fancy clothes, advising to her husband that he give the invitation to someone whose "wife has nicer clothes than mine" (55). Basically, after reading the invitation, Mathilde was furious and sad because they were invited to a fancy ball and they didn’t have any fancy clothes.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at January 20, 2016 08:28 PM

Revised – Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
21 January 2016

Question #3: Maupassant, the author, writes in the first paragraph that “women have neither rank nor race.” Some translations read “caste or class.” Do you agree with this? Why or why not? What about men: do they have caste or class?

Answer: During the Colonial period, women had no rights and were considered insignificant, as in Guy de Maupassant’s story, “The Necklace,” “women have neither rank nor race” (de Maupassant 53). I agree, “caste or class” is right and acceptable for translation because both are referring to social classes and traits. Maupassant writes, “In place of high birth or important family connections, they can rely only on their beauty [ . . . ] which are their only power, make working-class women the equals of the grandest ladies” (de Maupassant 53). These two quotes specifically highlight the terminology of rank and race. I also believe there are castes and classes for men, although, obviously they are the head of the family and represent according to their caste/class.

Posted by: Heather Hauck at January 21, 2016 08:19 AM

Revision-Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
20 January 2016

Question: Describe what kind of life Mathilde dreamed about. Provide some specifics. Can you see any patterns to her desires?

Answer: Mathilde dreamed of many beautiful items that women of higher importance have. She dreamed of many things that she did not get to have growing up or when she got married. Mathilde imagined rooms with beautiful items compared to where she is living. Mathilde would be dreaming of a life of luxury while looking around her dingy apartment. As stated here, “She daydreamed of large, silent anterooms, decorated with oriental tapestries and lighted by high bronze floor lamps…” (de Maupassant 53). Most women would not notice such things in their home while Mathilde did.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 21, 2016 11:12 AM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
19 January 2016

Question: What was Mrs. Forrestier’s reaction when her necklace was finally returned?.

Answer: In the text, “La Parure”, Mrs. Forrestier was somewhat angry and disappointed because Mrs. Loisel took a while to return her diamond necklace. After Mrs. Loisel had given Mrs. Forrestier the necklace, Mrs. Forrestier states, “you should have brought it back sooner; I might have needed it” (De Maupassant 59). Concerning Mrs. Forestier’s choice of word, the use of the word should indicate to the reader that Mrs. Loisel had a duty (to return the diamond necklace) to complete within a specific time framed, and it was Mrs. Loisel’s responsibility to get the job done on time. However, Mrs. Loisel had failed to do so and as a result; Mrs. Forrestier was disturbed by the matter, which caused her to make the statement mentioned above in an offended tone.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell (revised) at January 21, 2016 02:36 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122CA06 Academic Writing II
20 January 2016

Question: Why was Mathilde unhappy with her life at the beginning of the story?

Answer:
In the opening of the story we see that Mathilde is visibly unhappy with her life and is feeling depressed. One reason that she feels so down is that she recognizes that women like her only marry into money and that is based on their charm and beauty. She was born into a family of clerks and copyists that were skilled in their respective professions. However, Mathilde didn’t have these attributes, she was a very pretty lady and had to rely on that for her to find a husband who would support her. She felt destined for a life of luxury but saw herself in a low income apartment with ugly curtains and furniture. The dreams and aspirations that she had yet to achieve was what really had her feeling terrible and depressed.

Posted by: (Fixed) Matt Scharr at January 21, 2016 10:57 PM

Allison Cobb

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06

20 January 2016



Question: How would you describe the appearance of Mathilde and her apartment?




Answer: I would describe the appearance of Mathilde herself as longing. Her material possessions aside, I assume she appears hard-working but also reaching. Mathilde is beaten down by the poverty she and her husband are stuck in, but she has a light in her that shows she wants to work for more. This can be seen in a passage that says, “She had no decent dresses, no jewels, nothing. And she loved nothing but these; she believed herself born only for these” (Maupassant 54). These words show that while she looks run down, she yearns for more.

Mathilde's apartment mirrors her poverty. She doesn’t have nice things, exemplified by the passage that says “she suffered because of her grim apartment with its drab walls, threadbare furniture, ugly curtains” (Maupassant 53). Her apartment isn’t a reflection of herself, but a reflection of her clothing and her monetary value.

Posted by: Revision - Allison Cobb at January 22, 2016 09:51 AM

Nastassja Sielchan and Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: Who is the roundest character? Why? Dynamic? Who are the flattest? Why? What exactly is the point-of-view? Is there more than one?

Answer: The roundest character is Mathilde because the author describes her economic situation, her desires, and her life. The flattest character is Mrs. Forrestier is the flattest character and at the end of the story, she was unchanged. De Maupassant describes, “Mrs. Forrestier, still youthful, still beautiful, still attractive” (de Maupassant 60). The story is told in limited-omniscient third-person.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at January 29, 2016 03:12 PM

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