« Conflict on the Road with Langston Hughes | Main | What's Beneath Roald Dahl's "Skin"? »

January 21, 2013

Into the Woods with Nathaniel Hawthorne's "Young Goodman Brown"

Goodman Brown.jpg
Image Source: http://images.barnesandnoble.com/images/7790000/7792930.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 21, 2013 09:43 AM

Readers' Comments:

13 November 2008

ENG 122 Students,

As directed in today's class meeting, please discuss Hawthorne's "Young Goodman Brown" below according to YOUR assigned question. Re-type your question.

Discussion Questions for Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown”

 

1.     What is the significance of Brown’s full name?  Explain.

2.     What is the significance of Brown’s wife’s name? Explain.  What is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him?

3.     Who was the old man walking with Brown? Did he have other guises? Most importantly, did Brown know he was going to meet this man or not? Give examples that support both sides.

4.     Well, after reading the story, do you now know if Brown was really a “good” man or not? Explain with examples from the text.

5.     Brown was called “silly” in the story by the old woman.  Why? Did the townspeople not like him?  Explain with examples from the text.

6.     We have discussed the concept of “foreshadowing” many times in this course. Was there evidence of a foreshadowing of what was to come in the story’s beginning? Explain with examples from the text.

7.     When Brown screams, “my Faith is gone!” what does he mean? Is there only one meaning to this passage or many? Explain.

8.     Think about all the “goodly” people Brown saw going “astray” in the story. What were their names? Any symbolism or irony? Also, f this was a dream, why do you think Brown was dreaming about or imagining these people living a life of sin?

9.     What do you think the old expression to dance or “walk with the devil” means/implies?  Is this notion something people can apply to their lives today? How so? Give examples.

10.  So, how do we answer Hawthorne’s question?  Was Brown only dreaming or  did he actually walk with the devil? Explain your answer.

11.  Why did the devil have such a “considerable resemblance” to Goodman Brown? Can you think of any other stories that have similarities to this “literary device” (technique)? What is significant about it?

12.  Are there any examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell us where and why.

13.  What is the significance of Brown’s staff? Anything symbolic? Explain your answer.

*Don't forget to the second part of this assignment for Guy de Maupassant HERE: ">http://www.english-blog.com/archives/2008/11/maupassants_the_necklace_an_illuminating_class_discussion.php

If you are going to the Southern Journeys event for extra credit, I'll see you there Friday.

ALSO!

Just a little reminder of how papers 1 and 2 will factor in to your final overall score for the course (in case you missed a class meeting where I discussed it):

In short, per our syllabus breakdown, the sum of all the small formal papers for this class (including the annotated biblio.) count for 50% of the total final grade for the course. This is on the syllabus

As stated clearly on the syllabus, for this to “add up” correctly, each paper must count for 10 points.

With that in mind, what might seem “odd” to you (at first) is that on papers #1 and #2, you were scored on a “20 point scale” (instead of a 10-point scale). I did this on purpose to help you learn your way around a research paper. It was always my intention to convert these back to a 10-point scale to make theme fit the model.

So, now I’m doing it. To make Papers 1 and 2 compatible with everything else that is scored on a 10-point scale, they must be now be “converted.” That means that an A (20-19 on the 20-point scale) now becomes a 10 in the 10-point scale. A “B” (18-17 on the 20 point scale) becomes a 9 in the 10-point scale, and so. Just so you know, this benefits you. If you made the low end of a "C" on the 20-point scale (16-15) points, you now have a solid C (8 points) in the 10-point scale. Zeros still covert to Zeros (only received for incomplete submissions). Just so you know, on the 10-point scale, a 10=A, 9=B, 8=C, 7=D, and 6 & Below=F.

Conversion Table

 

New Numerical Score

Letter Grade

Old Numerical Score

10

A

20-19

9

B

18-17

8

C

16-15

7

D

14-13

6 & below

F

12 & below

 

After today, when you look at turnitin.com, you will that I converted papers #1 and #2 to the proper 10 point scale. If you are doing the OPTIONAL (not required) extra credit for me at the Southern Journeys, I will raise them up a grade after I get all of the pieces you are required to submit (response on the blog and the photo evaluation form).

Note that the annotated biblio. and paper #3 will be evaluated on a 10-point scale right from the start—no conversion involved. Remember that the final longer research paper has its own category (see the syllabus for details).

If you are confused, see me in my office. Don’t worry—all this works out to your advantage, not your loss.

With kind regards,

Dr. Hobbs

-------------------------------
Jenny Troutman
ENGL 121 – Humanities Literature
1/26/07

Dear Prof. Hobbs,

I was a Student Assistance today in class.

Sincerely,

Jenny T.

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at January 26, 2007 03:13 PM

Professor Hobbs,

I mean to address at least one question about Goodman Brown: how old he was and how this is supposed to be significant? It would be hard to accurately determine his age (since it is not actually mentioned in the text) but one clue from the story is that he IS, at least, of a marriageable age since he is married to Faith. With farms and a need for labor (not to mention the shorter life span) didn't people normally get married earlier back in the days of American colonialism/puritanism? With his overly expressed concern about his wife (and hers for him) I'm guessing that he is still young, maybe in his twenties. Does this matter?

Possibly, I think, since, like a lot of college students today at this age (early 20s), it seems like a time of self-discovery, exploration, experimentation, and generally just trying to figure out (make sense of) the world in which we live. You know, as children, living at home, we are usually just "told" how to think, what to do, etc. There are really very few things we can do for ourselves and decisions we are allowed to make until we are independent from our parents. Some young adults don't really experience this kind of independence until they first move away from home. And, as the old saying goes, "Idle hands are the devil's workshop!"

All kidding aside, in our case (as students), one way to get a sense of independence is to go to university and stay in dormitories. In Brown's case, it was to get married and get his own place. On his own, as a young man, for the first time in his life he ponders such esoteric things as good, evil and how we "ought" to live. On one's own, one needs/ has to decide these things for oneself.

Until next time when we get to discuss "Luck,"

I remain,

Dudley D.
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature MWF 11:45-12:45

Posted by: D. Dooright at January 26, 2007 03:50 PM

I'm in Group 2 and here was our question:
What is the significance of Brown's staff? Anything symbolic? Explain.

He get's the staff from the man who is suppose to be "the devil". He makes it from a maple tree and when he touches it the branches kind of burn off. Everything in this story has a symbolic meaning to me. Just like his wifes name, Faith. The maple staff Brown gets from "the devil" I think relates to maybe a more biblical meaning like Mosses' staff.

Posted by: Kristin Dudra at January 27, 2007 02:49 PM

For some reason I think that his name is Young “Goodman” Brown. On the last page young is not capitalized and Goodman Brown is. I think Goodman describes him as a good man. This may be what he is most refereed to as. I am not sure how they communicated back then so I am not going to act like I do.

Posted by: Donnetta Allen at January 27, 2007 04:24 PM

Lyndsay Krall
Group 7

Group 6 question:

Think about all the “goodly” people Brown saw going “astray” in the story. What were their names? Any symbolism or irony? Also, if this was a dream, why do you think Brown was dreaming about or imagining these people living a life of sin?


Answer:

• Goody Cloyse- Goody was Brown’s spiritual advisor at one point in time and also her name was “Goody” but ironically she was evil
• Brown’s father and grandfather- All along Brown had no idea that both his father and grandfather were followers of evil
• Martha Carrier
• Faith
• Deacon Gookin
• Minister
• Others from his town

I feel that if this were a dream, Young Goodman Brown imagined these people living a life of sin because all along he thought of them as being true and faithful non-sinning people, but ironically they were the exact opposite.

Posted by: Lyndsay Krall at January 28, 2007 11:13 AM

Group 6, Question 5

Q: Are there any examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell us where and why.

A: Intolerance seems to be the base of the story. Goodman Brown goes into the forest to complete his own wicked deed, praises himself for not doing it, but then becomes alarmed when he sees the members of his community committing sins just as he had been about to do. It is as though Goodman Brown can tolerate his own ill-deeds, but cannot accept that others in his village could also have wicked thoughts like his own. In this, he seems hypocritical. He comes to feel that he is above them in some way because he was ‘pious’ in not committing his act, but that they, because they complete theirs, are impious and thus inferior. Due to this ‘superiority complex’, Goodman Brown begins to view all others as terribly wicked people and that he is the only true good one. However, for condemning the bad in others to the extent that he does, Goodman Brown does not think once to condemn himself for the same actions. Thus, he condemns his own family, friends, community to suffer for his lack of forgiveness and tolerance.


Erin K.
Humanities Literature ENGL 121.003 MWF 11:45-12:45

Posted by: Erin K at January 28, 2007 01:16 PM

28 January 2007
Professor Hobbs,

I am in Group 4 and am addressing the question: What do you think the old expression to dance or “walk with the devil” means/implies? Is this notion something people can apply to their lives today? How so? Give examples.

I think that the expression to “walk with the devil” implies that one is doing work of the devil or in other words sinning. For one to “walk with the devil” they might fall into the temptations of doing something morally wrong or frowned upon. People in societies of all times and places are subject to such a situation. Everyday there are decisions to be made on whether to abide by the rules or laws, or to break them. There are many examples of situations in which someone may fall into the dark side and choose to do evil over good. A person may “walk with the devil” by being unfaithful to a spouse and participating in an affair. Someone may choose to cheat on a test by copying off of a neighboring classmate’s paper. More seriously, a person may decide to commit homicide and kill another human being to receive benefit for themselves. There is an infinite list of actions that could be classified into this category depending on the culture and class.
Sinning is a term to be open to interpretation. However, a general understanding of the word is to be doing an action that is wrong for the benefit of oneself. Since not everyone believes in the devil, the term “walking with the devil” may not be used by all to describe such behavior. Still, there is a general understanding in each society of what is accepted as good behavior and bad. Those who choose to stray from the good and give into the bad will usually be punished or found out in the end for their choices.


Bettina H.
ENG 121.003 MWF 1145-1245.

Posted by: Bettina Herold at January 28, 2007 02:19 PM

Mr Hobbs,

The question I am to address to you about Goodman Brown is When Brown screams, “My Faith is gone!” What does he mean? Is there more than one meaning to this passage or is there many? Explain.

I feel there is definitely more than one meaning for Brown screaming, “My Faith is gone!” Brown may be saying this in a literal way that his wife Faith, is really gone. He thinks the devil has taken her or she may have turned into a witch. Another meaning for his phrase is his faith is gone in a religious perspective because he feels that he has lost everything including his wife and he has devils around him in a haunted forest. He thought his faith could possibly hole himself together, but he has too much evil and devil around him that he has lost his faith religiously.

Thank You,

Deidra K.

Posted by: Deidra K. at January 28, 2007 03:30 PM

Professor Hobbs,

Question 12.) What is the significance of Brown’s wife’s name? Explain. What is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him?

In the story “Young Goodman Brown”, by Nathaniel Hawthorn, Mr. Goodman Brown’s newly found wife’s name is Faith. The word faith means ones confidence, reliance, or dedication without evidence to anything ranging from a friend to a higher power. At the beginning of the story, Goodman Brown leaves his wife, Faith, to attend a journey through the woods. During this journey, Brown is accompanied by a fellow traveler who is believed to either be the devil or to symbolize evil. This shows that Brown, being curious enough to join a journey with such evil representation, is questioning his own beliefs and leaving his “faith” behind. After seeing what he believes to be his wife leaving the woods with the devil himself, Brown cries out, “My faith is gone! There is no good on earth, and sin is but a name.” (Hawthorne, p. 227). Hawthorne wrote this line to show that Brown lost his wife and his own faith. In the beginning of this tale Brown indirectly questions if his wife still has faith in him. This is unusual because he ends up doubting his beliefs, becomes dark, depressed, and cannot trust much of anything in the end of the story.

Sincerely,
Stephanie Vrabel

Posted by: Stephanie Vrabel at January 28, 2007 04:52 PM

I had question number 9. This was a very hard question to answer because the language in the story is difficult to understand. I believe the old woman said Brown was silly because he was blinded and didn't believe or want to believe that the people in the town followed evil. Later in the story it was proven to him that it was true.

Posted by: Erin Rock at January 28, 2007 04:58 PM

Q: Are there any examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell where and why.

The story of young Goodman Brown begins with him setting off to do an errand. It was somewhat contradicting though in the sense that he set out to do this errand, but accused everyone else of being devilish for doing the same thing. He seems as though he is intolerant of people doing devilish things, but is doing them himself.

Andy H.

Posted by: Andy Hood at January 28, 2007 05:37 PM

Professor Hobbs,

6. Think about all the "goodly" people Brown saw going "astray" in the story. What were their names? Any symbolism or irony? Also, if this was a dream, why do you think Brown was dreaming about or imagining these people living a life of sin?

- The first character we encounter is Faith, Goodman's wife. Her name in the story symbolizes faith and good will, especially the faith of Goodman Brown himself. It is ironic that she is seen going astray considering her name and its meaning. It would be obvious to one that she would not be a character to go astray in this story.

- The second character we encounter is Goody Cloyse, Goodman's spiritual advisor when he was younger. In the story she is seen speaking and making contact with the devil himself. It is ironic that her name is Goody and that really she isn't good considering she follows the devil. It is also ironic that her job is to advise people to follow the path of the Bible and that she is truly following the path of the devil.

- The next character we see encountering the devil is the minister himself. It is very ironic that the village minister, one who follows and preaches the Bible, following the path of the devil.

- The final character Goodman encounters is Deacon Gookin, the minister's assistant. Since he assists the minister it would be most apparent that he too would follow the path of the Bible. Therefore it makes it ironic that he too follows the path of the devil.

- Goodman may have imagined these people living a life of sin because everyday they are seen following or symbolizing the path of the Bible. Most would never imagine them following the path of the devil in reality, but in dreams anything can happen. And in Goodman's case he believed his dream that they all lived a life of sin causing him to trust no one in reality once waking up.

Katie Kovac
Group 7
English 121 003

Posted by: Katie Kovac at January 28, 2007 05:38 PM

I was the S.A.

-Nicole Novak

Posted by: Nicole Novak at January 28, 2007 06:50 PM


What is the significance of Browns full name? Explain.

The name Young Goodman Brown gives great significance and details for readers before they begin the short story. Just by the name one can decipher that “Brown” represents common man. Under the social standing of gentlemen was Goodman, which was the middle class in Puritan society. This can give us insight on morals and qualities this character may posses before ever reading this story.

Posted by: Sheryll Daugherty at January 28, 2007 07:13 PM

In Goodman Brown, the devil had a considerable resemblance to Goodman. He had many similar physical features as Goodman, but looked a considerable amount older. The devil appeared as though he could be Goodman’s father. The story describes that the devil had the temperament of an older person as well. He was confident in himself and very knowledgeable about many things. I think this is a very important part of the story. Because the devil looked and acted older and wiser than Goodman, it made him more believable. It was easy for Goodman to eventually believe what the devil was saying, because the devil reminded Goodman of his father. The role of a father is typically a knowledgeable person, whom is also very trustworthy.

Chicken Little is a story which reminds me somewhat of this relationship. Although it is not a father son relationship, it is similar in some ways. Because Chicken Little is young and naïve, it makes her more susceptible to a character such as a fox. If Chicken Little had been an old chicken, she may not have fallen into the trap. Eventually Chicken Little believed what the fox was telling her, because he seemed older and more knowledgeable. Those two traits often make a person seem more believable as they did in both “Goodman Brown” and “Chicken Little.”

Posted by: Jaime Hersh at January 28, 2007 07:25 PM

Shayne Schmidt

Question 10:

I feel Brown was a really good man because at the beginning he was like his fathers be for him a good Christian. At the beginning his life was pure and had no evil in front of him. To me Brown was just like any another man temped by evil or the devil himself when you come face to face.

Posted by: Shayne Schmidt at January 28, 2007 07:30 PM

Question 12
What is the significance of Brown’s wife’s name? Explain what is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him.

The word faith is defined as reliance, trust; belief in religious doctrine: loyalty, sincerity. This has significance in the story because Young Goodman Brown’s wife’s name is Faith. Throughout the story she wears a pink ribbon, but ends up losing it by the end. Does that signify Young Goodman Brown losing his wife faith, as well as his religious faith because of the devil tempting him in the woods? To have faith you believe in a higher power without question or proof. That’s why it’s ironic that he could be questioning the “faith” of either one.

Posted by: Tina W at January 28, 2007 07:40 PM

Professor Hobbs,

To the question of whether or not Goodman Brown was dreaming or actually walking with the devil I say this: Goodman Brown, caught up in the news and happenings of the time, had a fitful and wholly unpleasant nightmare. I have never been to a witch’s coven, or the mass of an infernal church. However, of the dreams I can remember, I have had some very detailed and strange ones, the subjects of which were not unlike that of what Goodman brown experienced.

In many dreams, I have tended to incorporate people I have met and interacted with in grand or strange events: alien landings/abductions, attacks of the living dead, and other plots of popular movies, video games, and fiction. In the story, Goodman Brown seems to do something similar: he mixes the familiar people from his life with the popular folklore and happenings of the day: Good Cloyse, Deacon Gookin, and his wife Faith are all part in a gathering of evil folk or a witch’s coven.

At the same time, just because I have not been on the receiving end (to my knowledge) of a dark blessing, or stood at the altar of a satanic cult does not mean that it didn’t happen in Mr. Brown’s time or that it doesn’t happen now. Whether it was a dream, a drug induced trip, or something that actually happened, Goodman Brown believed it was true and lived the rest of his days in distrust of the people that he once loved. Any way you look at what happened the result is the same: Goodman Brown died a grumpy old man.

Justin Bleggi

Posted by: Justin Bleggi at January 28, 2007 07:43 PM

Dr. Lee Hobbs

(question 1)So, how do we answer Hawthorne’s question? Was Brown only dreaming or did he actually walk with the devil? Explain your answer.

In the story Young Goodman Brown, I believe that he was in fact dreaming about actually walking with the devil. I developed my conclusion from the last paragraph of the story on page 230 in the book. After reading that part of the story I established that it was a dream Young Goodman Brown was having, it states in the book “it was a dream of evil omen for Young Goodman Brown,” (Writing about literature, Edgar V. Roberts.) He turned completely pale when the minister began to speak, because a sin came over him and he couldn’t focus on what was being said. When he died, his friends and family didn’t even write anything on his tombstone, and his death was dark and sudden. Like I previously stated I believe that Young Goodman Brown was dreaming the entire time about walking with the devil, because of how I interpreted the last paragraph of the story.


B. Decker

Posted by: Brooke at January 28, 2007 08:07 PM

What is the significance of Brown's full name?
Well, back in those days, alot of people's first names started with Goodman or Goodwoman so maybe it just went with his well being. Brown, maybe dealing with his surrondings and how he was fine when he wasn't in the woods and the colors and atmosphere and how they deel with "Brown".

Posted by: Lorin Gdula at January 28, 2007 08:18 PM

1.28.2007


Question 8: Look up the work “foreshadowing” in your dictionary if you don’t know it. Was there evidence of a foreshadowing of what was to come in the story’s beginning? Explain with examples from the text.

To foreshadow is to give notice or indication of in advanced. I believe there was foreshadowing in “Young Goodman Brown” in the very beginning of the story. Goodman Brown’s wife, Faith, begged him not to go on his journey that night, because she was having dreams that were troubling to her. When Goodman Brown decided to leave, he felt badly for leaving Faith, and he said, “Methought, as she spoke, there was trouble in her face, as if a dream had warned her what works is do be done tonight.” Faith developed apprehension about Goodman Brown’s journey through her dreams. This is an example of foreshadowing because not only did mysterious things happen during his journey, but the reader finds out at the end that it may have been just a bad dream, like the ones Faith discussed having earlier.
Jen N.

Posted by: Jen Naugle at January 28, 2007 08:33 PM

Q: Think about all the "goodly" people Brown saw going "astray" in the story. What were their names? Any symbolism or irony? Also, if this was a dream, why do you think Brown was dreaming about or imagining these people living a life of sin?

The first name that appears right off the bat in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown,” is his young wife Faith. There is obviously symbolism involved with her name, as Goodman Brown leaves his Faith as he is tempted to pursue the devil himself. A character which remained nameless throughout the story, the man that Brown met when he entered the forest, can also be seen as either the devil or someone associated with it. This thought was aroused because he leads the way almost as if to be tempting Brown more and more towards the devil. As Goodman Brown ventures farther and farther into the forest, he comes across many of the religious figures from his town of Salem such as Deacon Gookin, his reverend pastor, and multiple Indian priests. With the exception of the Indian priests, these are the people to which Brown went for religious advice throughout his life. A thought I had about Goodman Brown’s witnessing their attendance at the forest gathering was that the town in which they all lived was Salem, MA, known for its witch trials and executions. If this actually was a dream, although these people were strongly religious, they still felt it not to be sinful to kill some of the women of their own town. Thus, providing evidence that even seemingly religious people commit evil deeds.

Posted by: Colin Hough at January 28, 2007 09:06 PM

Dear Mr Hobbs,

Group 05: Are there any examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell us where and why.

In Nathanial Hawthorn’s Young Goodman Brown, Goodman is feeling very guilty about leaving his wife, and committing some sort of shady deed in the dead of night, and he believes that his family lived the lives of good honest Christians. When he brings this up to his mysterious (and likely evil) travel companion, the companion states that his family is not as righteous as Goodman believes, and that together the traveler and Goodman’s ancestors created acts of great intolerance and hate. He speaks of “smartly” lashing a Quaker woman as a spectacle, and the apparent demise of an Indian Village. Groups of people (i.e. the Quakers and the Indians) are specifically mentioned, which alludes to the fact that their race or religion is a factor of importance. In acts of intolerance, minority groups which hold different views than that of the majority are often chastised and mistreated.

--Erika Knox

Posted by: Erika Knox at January 28, 2007 09:34 PM

English 121
Professor Hobbs
11:45-12:45

8) Foreshadow means to give notice or indication of in advance. I think that there was a pretty clear example of foreshadowing at the start of Young Goodman Brown. The foreshadowing is when he thinks to himself “Me thought, as she spoke, there was trouble in her face, as if a dream had warned her what work is to be done tonight.” This thought makes it pretty apparent that something bad is going down tonight and his wife is very troubled about it, so right at the start you know that this is probably not going to be a story with a happy ending.

Jeff Hoover

Posted by: Jeff Hoover at January 28, 2007 09:42 PM

Prof. Hobbs,

QUESTION: What do you think the old expression to dance or “walk with the devil” means/implies? Is this notion something people can apply to their lives today? How so? Give examples.

The old expression to “dance or walk with the devil” means that a person is doing something that maybe considered sinful or wrong. The devil is said to be a cruel evil spirit or demon and if a person is to be dancing or walking with him they must be par taking in actions that are cruel or evil. An example of this could be if a person goes against the norm. People see the devil as something not normal because they may worship God. This maybe being a homosexual in the religious eye this is not a normal thing and they can say that a homosexual is walking with the devil.

Carlos R. Gonzalez

Posted by: Carlos R. Gonzalez at January 28, 2007 09:46 PM

Brown’s staff was very significant in this story. I believe it represented the apple in the story of Adam and Eve. Brown’s fellow-traveler was trying to tempt him to take his staff, just as the serpent tempted Eve to eat the apple and she then gave the apple to Adam. They both ate the apple knowing it was wrong, just as Goodman Brown took the staff, knowing it was wrong. I also believe Brown’s fellow-traveler was a representation of the devil. He was like the serpent in the story of Adam and Eve.

Posted by: Amber Dunmire at January 28, 2007 10:19 PM

Professor Hobbs,

2. What is the significance of Brown’s staff? Anything symbolic? Explain.

The staff symbolizes the snake. The appearance of the staff represents that Brown’s companion is not trustworthy and sly. Brown refuses to hold the staff, because he thinks the staff represents evil in the world.

L. Wozniak

Posted by: L. Wozniak at January 28, 2007 10:45 PM

Group 09: Brown was called silly in the story by the old woman. Why? Did the townspeople not like him? Explain with examples from the text.

In the end of the story, I don’t think the townspeople liked Goodman Brown. I know this because on page 230 it says, “…a goodly procession, besides neighbors not a few, they carved no hopeful verse upon his tombstone, for his dying hour was gloom.” To me this shows that the townspeople didn’t like him much because there was hardly anyone at the funeral and there was nothing carved on his tombstone. It is hard to say whether the townspeople liked Goodman in the beginning of the story because I couldn’t find much evidence on that.
I think that the old woman called Goodman silly because he changed from the beginning of the story to the end of the story. I also think he was called this because he was tempted by Satan and gave in.

Posted by: Rebecca Shenkle at January 29, 2007 09:50 AM

Brown uses his wife as he states “his love and his faith.” He portrays her as his strength uses her for support. The unusual part is she admits to him that she almost doesn’t trust her self, or at least doesn’t feel safe staying at home over night alone. Her name is the center point of the entire story.

Posted by: Thomas at January 29, 2007 10:31 AM

The staff that the traveler was carrying and the staff that was made from the tree limb where both significant and symbolic. The traveler’s staff, which was crafted as if a live snake was wrapped around, was symbolic because of how it seemed to move back and forth in the hands of the “devil”. It represented the evil of the carrier and the witch craft that he practiced. When the traveler touched Goody Cloyse with the “serpent’s tail” she screamed “The Devil”. The snake has always been a historical and biblical representation of evil and Satan.

Posted by: Greg Crossland at January 29, 2007 11:39 AM

Professor Hobbs,

Question: Why did the devil have such a “considerable resemblance” to Goodman Brown? Can you think of any stories that have similarities to this “literary device?” What is significant about it?

Goodman Brown is like any other adolescent man in the world trying to find their way in life. During his journey through the woods or hell you can consider it as, Goodman Brown is faced with pressure from the devil. Browns faith is tested continuously with different obstacles that he faces in the woods. The devil is a man who abides by his own morals and his own beliefs, which is to turn people like Goodman Brown against themselves. However, you could say that they have a “considerable resemblance,” to one another because they both have principles that they are set out for. A similar story that I have read earlier that relates to this short story would be The Ministers Black Veil by Nathaniel Hawthorne. The significance of this story relates to one another in which that both men are faced with struggles from sinning. They both try and live the life they are set out for and they are faced with pressure from society. Overall these two short stories go hand and hand due to the simple fact that they are naïve young men who are trying to live their lives as best they can.

April H.

Posted by: April H. at January 29, 2007 03:40 PM

Students,

Friday, we read and analyzed Nathaniel Hawthorne's "Young Goodman Brown" from the appendix of our Edgar Roberts text. A hearty "good job!" to everyone who actively participated in the day's activities!

Here are some of the questions we had time to discuss below *:

Group 13: What is the significance of Brown’s full name? Explain.
Group 12: What is the significance of Brown’s wife’s name? Explain. What is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him?
Group 11: Who was the old man walking with Brown? Did he have other guises? Most importantly, did Brown know he was going to meet this man or not? Give examples that support both sides.
Group 10: Well, was Brown really a “good” man or not? Explain with examples from the text.
Group 09: Brown was called silly in the story by the old woman. Why? Did the townspeople not like him? Explain with examples from the text.
Group 08: Look up the work “foreshadowing” in your dictionary if you don’t know it. Was there evidence of a foreshadowing of what was to come in the story’s beginning? Explain with examples from the text.
Group 07: When Brown screams, “my Faith is gone!” what does he mean? Is there one meaning to this passage or many? Explain.
Group 06: Think about all the “goodly” people Brown saw going “astray” in the story. What were their names? Any symbolism or irony? Also, f this was a dream, why do you think Brown was dreaming about or imagining these people living a life of sin?
Group 05: Are there any examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell us where and why.
Group 04: Why did the devil have such a “considerable resemblance” to Goodman Brown? Can you think of any other stories that have similarities to this “literary device” (technique)? What is significant about it?
Group 03: What do you think the old expression to dance or “walk with the devil” means/implies? Is this notion something people can apply to their lives today? How so? Give examples.
Group 02: What is the significance of Brown’s staff? Anything symbolic? Explain your answer.
Group 01: So, how do we answer Hawthorne’s question? Was Brown only dreaming or did he actually walk with the devil? Explain your answer.

In class, your group discussed the question connected to your group's number (group 8 did question 8, and so forth). Before the discussions began, I asked you to write down the question of the group AFTER yours in your journal, for example group 13 had to write down the question for group 12 in their journal (exception: group 1, write down group 13’s). Here is where you'll need that information!

Type up your answer to the question you wrote down in your journal. Remember, this ISN’T the same question your group discussed in class. First, submit your "polished" answer (at least a good paragraph) to Turnitin.com. There will be a folder for the assignment called “Young Goodman Brown.” Upload it there. Second, after you upload your article to Turnitin.com, copy-and-paste it here as a comment (you may have to scroll down a bit to find the comment box). Be sure to follow a formal format, like Dudley D. did HERE on "The Necklace" article. I ask this so that I can be sure who you are, etc. for my grade book. You only need put your first name and last initial to preserve, at least, some degree of anonymity.

So, the answer you prepare for your question needs to show up in TWO places this time: in both the www.turnitin.com site AND here on the English-blog. You don’t need to e-mail me a confirmation.

NOTE: SAs don’t have to do the question assignment. They should just leave a comment that says “I was an SA today” on both places.

Now, just a few points I'd like to make about "Where We Are (thus far) In This Course"

1. Last Friday concluded the module “Introduction to Literature.” If you read the articles, came to class and participated in the class discussions and activities, you should have gotten a good idea of what literature is and what will be expected in this course.

2. Today (Friday) concludes the second module of our course, “How to Survive this Course.” With various assignments, you have now had practice using MS-Word, uploading files to the internet, using the Turnitin.com service, leaving comments on the English-Blog, receiving and sending email to and from me, participating in cooperative groupwork, how to address your instructor by introducing yourself each time, how to use your dictionary to clear an unknown or misunderstood word, how present an oral summary of a fragment from the text, and, finally, how to read a work of literature closely and analyze two short stories (by answering critical questions in written and oral form). So, you’ve really done a lot already!

3. Monday, we begin our first novel reading module with Watership Down. We’ll begin to discuss it in class by Wednesday, the 31st. I’ve deliberately picked an easy novel to get started since some of you may have never read a real novel before. But, it’s not as easy as it seems. I’ll want you to read it as carefully as you would any other text for this class and your other classes. Take notes in the margins, underline words you don’t know and look them up, write your thoughts in your journal after you do your readings. This will PAY OFF later when it is time to write about the novel. Better to have some notes already done than none!

Homework: In addition to the assignment outlined above (and given to you in today's class) don't forget to:

1. Read the readings on the itinerary WAL pages 181 – 185.5 and 242 – 245 “Luck”
2. Read/study/comment/take notes/pay special attention to "YOUR" chosen chapters of the Watership Down novel (from the list you signed in class).
3. The presenters for Wednesday are (chapter you need to cover is in parentheses): Tatiata (1), Deidra (2), Erin (3), Jeff (4), Justin (5), Melisa (6), Shayne (7), Lorin (8), Jennifer N. (9), Steph (10), Amber (11), Joe (12), Erin (13), Lyndsay (14)

For those of you who were absent today, you didn't' get to sign the list! I'll assign you to a day and a chapter and sent the whole list out as a group e-mail message later.


*Sources: Some awesome questions ideas by Mrs. Jane M. C. Buono and user "goneaway" at the Everything2 site HERE.

--------------------------------------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this assignment has now passed. Comments are no longer being accepted for this exercise

~Lee

Posted by: Lee Hobbs at April 4, 2007 06:05 PM

5. Brown was called “silly” in the story by the old woman. Why? Did the towns people not like him? Explain with examples from the text.
Brown was called silly by the old woman because he had the held the belief that so many people that he held in such high regard could do no wrong. The towns people did like him. An example of this is the fact that Goody Cloyse had taught Brown catechism in his youth and she was one of his spiritual advisers. Another example of this was the fact that the towns people were prepared to welcome him into their wicket circle.

Posted by: Dominique Smith at November 16, 2008 01:27 PM

Question #7

I think it refers to the fact that he was confronted with shady devilish dealings and when he is screaming "my Faith is gone" refers not so much to his wife but his own faith in good things.

Posted by: Martin M. Mune at November 18, 2008 07:28 AM

#2. I do believe that the fact that his wife's name is Faith does effect the story. He asks her if she has lost faith in him and whether or not that is true is not the point, the point is that he has lost faith in himself and he is going to lose Faith his wife. He has no faith because if he did he would not be walking with the Devil.

Posted by: Danielle Dunlevy at November 18, 2008 11:41 AM

Discussion question number 10
It seems as though Goodman Browns journy into the woods is real, but his meeting with the devil is not. it seems as though his encounter with the devil is some what of a vision quest for him he needs to find answers to questions that have been bothering him.

Posted by: John Baron at November 18, 2008 12:10 PM

1.) What is the significance of Brown’s full name? Explain.

The significance of Goodman Brown’s full name is that he’s not really a Goodman. He appears to be the ideal man on the surface but underneath he’s not. It says in the book that he walks with the devil. A Goodman does not walk with the devil. Many people in today’s society walk around pretending to be someone they’re not. Men especially, they could have a beautiful wife and family at home but it won’t be enough. The man would get “tired” of the boring routine and find themselves a mistress. The pretend to be “Goodmen” but in all reality they are quite the opposite.

Posted by: Mary Chuhinko at November 18, 2008 12:21 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at November 19, 2008 12:08 PM

2009-01-04

Today (Friday) concludes the second module of our course, “How to Survive this Course.” With various assignments, you have now had practice using MS-Word, uploading files to the internet, using the Turnitin.com service, leaving comments on the English-Blog, receiving and sending email to and from me, participating in cooperative groupwork, how to address your instructor by introducing yourself each time, how to use your dictionary to clear an unknown or misunderstood word and, finally, how to read a work of literature closely and analyze two short stories (by answering critical questions). So, you’ve really done a lot already.

---------------------------------

Michelle Youngblood
Professor Hobbs
English 122 CA 16
January 20, 2009
Young Goodman Brown: Author’s Main Point
Often time’s people who have known each other for years assume they know a person completely. Although someone may act a certain way in front of a group of people, he or she is not always letting that audience view them as who they truly are. Another subject of the author’s main point is listening to somebody else’s advice or opinion. Hawthorne illustrates these points in his short story Young Goodman Brown.
A person never knows who a person really is, is one of the author’s main points. For instance, when Young Goodman Brown was in the forest and he said he thought he heard two voices that sounded like the minister and Deacon Gookin while they were riding horses quietly in the forest (Hawthorne, 72); he thought it was not likely for them to be there because the forest was known as a place where people came to meet with the devil. What astounded him the most was when he learned of how many people from the village he recognized in the forest. Earlier in the short story, Young Goodman Brown was walking with a man with a staff. The man showed Goodman Brown a figure of a lady in the path whom he recognized as a lady from his church who was his moral and spiritual adviser (Hawthorne, 70). Of all people, Young Goodman Brown never thought in a million years he would find people from his church in the forest. These examples from the book aids in letting people know that even though we think we may know the people we interact with, we really do not.
Listening to someone else’s opinion can sometimes come in handy in particular situations. Previously in the short story, Young Goodman Brown’s wife was telling him he should not go into the forest because she had a bad feeling about it (Hawthorne, 67.) After experiencing his dream of being in the forest or his night in the forest, Goodman Brown was not the same. He became more strict, sad, distrustful and desperate (Hawthorne, 78.) It seems as though Goodman Brown was not into the church as he may have been before his walk in the forest. For example, on page 78 in the short story of Young Goodman Brown while he was in church he could not hear the people in the church singing due to an over-powering anthem of sin. Taking advice from other people pays off in the end from time to time; people just have to know when and when not to adhere to that information.
In conclusion, the author’s two main points were: Taking someone’s advice and a person never knows the other completely. Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story Young Goodman Brown became vital in supporting details of the main points of the story. When a person shows concern by telling someone what he or she should or should not do, they should stop and think and take their opinion into consideration. When some people think they know it all, especially about people, he or she has another thing coming because they are going to be in shock to find out facts about the person they thought they knew so well.

Works Cited
Balkun, Mary McAleer. Young Goodman Brown. Upper Saddle River: New Jersey, 2005.

Posted by: Michelle Youngblood at January 19, 2009 11:12 PM

John Winans
Eng 122
Dr. Hobbs
21January2009
Young Goodman Brown
“Young Goodman Brown” is the title of a work by Nathaniel Hawthorne that reveals the main character, a man both young and good. The setting is Salem village in about the year of eighteen hundred and thirty five.
This young man is a general God fearing citizen with a wife whom carries the unforgettable name of Faith, one which is needed to continue throughout the life of Mr. Brown. The good young man is taken on a journey accompanied by a ghastly figure that is just out of the light of revelation throughout the story. This journey takes all who join into the darkest, deepest despairs of the human conscience both mind and body reaching the utmost realm of the soul.
The witching hour seems to be the starting point of this journey, as the bell tolls twelve and the darkness closes in, a somewhat familiar figure appears only within the cover of the shadows and heard only by the soul’s ear. The figure accompanies our Goodman on his travels winding along the beaten path that takes him through the wooded terrain which encircles the travelers, blocking out all attempt of light that may allow the inquisitive eye to pierce in or out. Both characters are described as relatively close in appearance to the point of even being father and son with the elder possessing a certain staff familiar to the priests and prophets of scripture mysteriously resembling a serpent known by some including Goodman’s father and father’s father all whom were decent Christian men.
As the men travel side by side they encounter other characters that appear and disappear in the shadows in and out of sight and sound throughout the cover of night. An elderly woman is one such proof, known by the young man as a religious teacher of his and very aware of him and his companion to the surprise of Brown. The woman is eager to attend to the task at hand and continues as well as the two. Coming upon the path a little further is the trotting of horses two of which bring forth two more characters known to Brown as a deacon and minister both who lend their support of the task. These familiar and even unfamiliar men and women from all walks of life both sinner and saint making way along the same path to the final destination adding singing, wailing and prayer heard from afar while the glow off in the distance becomes brighter as the travelers continue along the winding path to an apparent ending where the glow reveals it’s purpose.
Young Goodman Brown reaches the finale with much contemplation and support of the outside presence of those he’d had the pleasure to know through the years both of the dead and undead. Young Goodman Brown has seen his end and it has finally found him as the living witness his travel from this life to the afterlife where he is greeted by the past for it is in the present that Young Goodman Brown was on the path from life to death and he has seen it through from start to finish.

Posted by: John Winans at January 26, 2009 10:11 PM

I am home schooling my 8th grader and this is the story we are studying! This is excellent! We have to chuckle though at the comments made about the grading system because we don't have one like that! But it will prepare my child for college courses!!!!

-----------------

Note from Dr. Hobbs:

Thank you for your comments LC! Please feel free to have your 8th grader leave remarks on the blog as well. This is a public-forum (this is done intentionally for the college students) so both they and I enjoy seeing what the world outside OUR classroom thinks and feels about this work and their observations of it.

Posted by: LC at February 2, 2009 09:23 PM

Sarah Hatcher
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
February 6, 2013

Question 2: What is the significance of Brown's wife's name? Explain. What is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him?

Answer: What is unusual is that his wife's name is Faith, yet she seems to have none in him. They are young and have only been married 3 months, and it is as if he already senses that something is wrong. In the end, it turns out that there were problems and Brown ends up being the one that changed.

Posted by: Sarah Hatcher at February 7, 2013 02:48 AM

Christopher Burke
Dr. Hobbs

Question: What is the significance of Browns staff? Does it symbolize anything? Explain.

Answer:
The "Young Goodman Brown" is allegorical, which means that the characters and events are to be understood as representing other things and symbolically expressing a deeper spiritual, moral, or political meaning. This rings true in the story. Hawthorne has a meaning for everything in the story including the pink ribbon in Brown's wife's, Faith, hair. (Heavenly Purity)

Brown being pure himslef has come to realize there is evil in his world and is plundged into the middle of it. His staff had the head of serpent which symbolized the owner as being sly, and due to the bible, treacherous. (Snake) at one point this staff is given to Brown but he deies it showing his rightious path.

Posted by: Christopher Burke at February 7, 2013 06:00 PM

On the other hand, a lot of priceless art work has been
discovered from the trash plus in garden sales, that's not saying your corporate stamped pocket watches could be the next Patek Philippe that marketed for $11 million bucks at Sotheby's
in Dec 1999. There are those that know what it takes to have a
successful garage sale and others that wouldn't have a clue if it were pinned on to their lapel. 1 with the best ways in which you are able to get all of the information present on-line is to consider obtaining hold of a forum where such a topic is being discussed.

Posted by: Darlene at February 7, 2013 09:43 PM

Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
8 February 2013

Question:1. What is the significance of Brown’s full name? Explain.

Answer: The author uses the name Goodman Brown as an example of irony. Brown's name suggests that he is good and pure, but in the story he walks with the devil. The devil is an archetype that is used to represent evil. Hawthorne used this quote, at the beginning to hint that Mr. Brown was not a "good man", "... Goodman Brown felt himself justified in making more haste on his present evil purpose(Hawthore70)". The quote shows Browns evil intentions from the start.

Posted by: Octavia Robinson at February 7, 2013 10:02 PM

Terrance Browne
Dr.Hobbs
ENG122
8 February 2013

Question :Are there any examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell us where and
why.

Answer : In my opion yes I believe that there were some example of intolerance in this short story. Mainly because of the fact that this took place during the "Puritan Time Period" He also sets up and drops hints that they are living in the times of the salem witch trails and that he also mentions that "intolerance is evil" in which he says (Hawthorne 72).

Posted by: Terrance Browne at February 8, 2013 09:30 AM

Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
8 February 2013

Question: What is the significance of Brown’s staff? Anything symbolic? Explain your answer.

Answer: The staffs is a demonic staff that has forbidden powers(Travel faster). It is temptation and curiosity that the staff bewildered on Brown. The significance is how the devil fools him into taking the the staff because of his temptation which has similar ties to the forbidden fruit with the famous tale of Adam and Eve. Like Adam and Eve the serpent also appears in Young Goodman Brown, which symbolizes evil, temptation, and demons.

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at February 8, 2013 09:47 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA05
8 February 2013

Question: We have discussed the concept of "foreshadowing" many times in this course. Was there evidence of a foreshadowing of what was to come in the story's beginning? Explain with examples from the text.

Answer: Yes, there is an evident example of foreshadowing on the first page of the story. Faith is afraid to have Young Goodman Brown leave her alone for the night, so he says to her, "Say thy prayers, dear Faith, and go to bed at dusk, and no harm will be done to thee." (Hawthorne, 69.) Later on in the story, essentially, in Young Goodman Brown's eyes, Faith is turned to the devil. So, after Young Goodman Brown tells her to pray, she turns to the devil later on in the story.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 8, 2013 09:57 AM

Colby Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05 Academic Writing 2
8 February 2013

Question: After reading the story, do you now know if Brown was really a “good” man or not?
Explain with examples from the text.

Answer: Saying someone is good is more a matter of opinion, according to the text, Goodman believed himself to be a good person. I only say this because he refused to join anything that he deemed as "evil" or "bad" which in his own mind made him a "good" man. I argue this because the story says, on the bottom of page 83 and top of page 84," when the congregation were singing a holy psalm, he could not listen, because an anthem of sin rushed upon his ear." This proves that he believes himself to be a good man because he tuned out and saw through what he believed to be a facade to cover up evil.

Posted by: Colby Johnson at February 8, 2013 04:54 PM

Analisa Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA 08
10 Feb 2013

Question: Are there examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell us where and why?

Answer: A example of intolerance is when Goodman Brown tries to stay true to his faith. Goodman says "and I shall be the first of the name of Brown that ever took this path and kept.." (Brown, 71). Brown was saying that he was going to stay true to his faith and not fall of like everybody else that has.

Posted by: Analisa Johnson at February 10, 2013 01:18 PM

Octavio Herrera
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA04
7 February 2013

Question: Are there any examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell us where and why.

Answers: There were several examples of intolerance in Young Goodman Brown, including ones that were aimed towards the Indians. “There may be a devilish Indian behind every tree” (Hawthorne 70) throughout the entire text many references were made towards the Indians being a devilish people. Women and other people who may be minorities were not treated with the same respect as the while males were in Young Goodman Brown.

Posted by: Octavio Herrera at February 10, 2013 08:34 PM

Jade Lowe
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122 CA08
10 February 2013

Question: So, How do we answer Hawthorne's question? Was Brown only dreaming or did he actually walk with the devil? Explain your answer.

Answer: I think that it was a dream because on page 83 in the last paragraph Hawthorne says, "But atlas! It was a dream of evil omen for young Goodman Brown."

Posted by: Jade Lowe at February 10, 2013 08:37 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
10 February 2013

Question: 9. What do you think the old expression to dance or “walk with the devil” means/implies? Is this notion something people can apply to their lives today? How so? Give examples.

Answer: In Young Goodman Brown, the main character realizes on his walk that there is evil in the world. To me, “walk with the devil” means to walk with an evil purpose, or to sin. This is something people can apply in their lives today because people sin and do bad things every day. For example, I believe that the man who killed the children in Sandy Hook, Connecticut was walking with the devil.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at February 10, 2013 09:20 PM

Jennifer Evans
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA 08 Young Goodman Brown
10 February 2013

Question: 7.) When Brown screams, “my Faith is gone!” what does he mean? Is there only one
meaning to this passage or many? Explain.

Answer: Faith Is Mr. Browns wife. Also his spiritual faith is gone.
"My Faith is gone!" cried he, after one stupefied moment. "There is no good on earth; and sin is but a name. Come, devil; for to thee is this world given." (Hawthorne 77)

Posted by: Jennifer Evans at February 11, 2013 12:15 AM

Jasmine Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-122-CA08
February 11, 2013
Question: What is the significance of Brown’s staff? Anything symbolic? Explain your answer.
Answer: Browns staff symbolizes him accepting evil into his life because in the story it says “His staff bore the likeness of great black snake, so curiously wrought, that it might almost be seen to twist and wiggle itself like a living serpent.” This means that his “friend” is sneaky and not very trustworthy. So, when Brown accepts his friends staff he is accepting evil into his life.

Posted by: Jasmine Lowe at February 11, 2013 12:29 AM

By the end of the story i got the impression that young Goodman brown was little bit crazy and did not trust anybody. When he returns to his village he calls the deacon a wizard and doesn't even greet his wife because he thinks they are evil.

Posted by: Ryan Nowotny at February 11, 2013 08:06 AM

Angie Fortunak
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
11 February 2013

Question 6: We have discussed the concept of "foreshadowing" many times in this course. Was there evidence of a foreshadowing of what was to come in the story's beginning? Explain with examples from the text.

Answer:
Young Goodman Brown, was religious as he says "My love and my Faith", he went through the catechism program (69). We see him praying, and continuing to be true to his God. However, something turns, "poor little Faith!" (70). As the story continues we see him get more and more pulled away from his faith and starts to claim that there is no God, and everything is evil. GOodman Brown continues to say how he was the only one in his family that took the road that they did. As he keeps believing that his faith is disappearing, "My faith is gone!" "There is no good on earth; and sin is but a name" (77). We saw in the beginnning that Goodman Brown was starting to loose faith and now we see him going insane. The forshadow of him starting to take a turn in the path, although religious took us to now when he has trouble believing that there is a religion somewhere for him.

Posted by: Angie Fortunak at February 11, 2013 09:05 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA02 Academic Writing II
15th of February 2013

Question: “Identify as many conflicts as you can in this short story. What is the chief conflict? In the denouement part of the structure, how is it resolved (or, is it resolved)?”

Answer: The chief conflict of the story would be between Goodman Brown and his own faith, especially considering that Goodman’s journey through the woods is essentially an allegory to his struggle with his faith. Other conflicts within the story include the conflict between Goodman and Faith, his wife. The conflict between himself and the stranger he meets in the woods is itself a conflict, but also, because the stranger is described as resembling Goodman, it represents the conflict between Goodman’s pure Christian nature and the side of him that represents temptation (hence the serpentine staff the stranger is carrying. One of the greatest conflicts, that Goodman Brown himself recognizes, is the conflict between Man and Sin and whether or not the root of sin is found in the world or within himself. In the denouement of the story, the conflict is ended when Goodman finally succumbs to doubt and rejects his faith, granted, the conflict is not ended happily, but it is resolved nevertheless.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at February 15, 2013 03:52 AM

Ryan MacCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
2 October 2013


Question: So, how do we answer Hawthorne’s question? Was Brown only dreaming or did he actually walk with the devil? Explain your answer.


Answer: Brown was dreaming, as he did not actually walk with the devil. It was merely a dream that Hawthorne made it seem like this event actually happened in the forest that day. When Brown tells his wife that “look up to heaven, and resist the wicked one” (Hawthorne 14), he soon would find himself in the middle of the woods as if he just had woken up from a dream. After he wakes up, his life changes as he is suspicious of everyone around him, and makes it seem like as if he does not even know if it was dream or reality.

Posted by: Ryan MacCarthy at October 2, 2013 12:10 PM

Ryan MacCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
2 October 2013


Question: So, how do we answer Hawthorne’s question? Was Brown only dreaming or did he actually walk with the devil? Explain your answer.


Answer: Brown was dreaming, as he did not actually walk with the devil. It was merely a dream that Hawthorne made it seem like this event actually happened in the forest that day. When Brown tells his wife that “look up to heaven, and resist the wicked one” (Hawthorne 14), he soon would find himself in the middle of the woods as if he just had woken up from a dream. After he wakes up, his life changes as he is suspicious of everyone around him, and makes it seem like as if he does not even know if it was dream or reality.

Posted by: Ryan MacCarthy at October 2, 2013 12:10 PM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
2 October 2013

Question: We have discussed the concept of “foreshadowing” many times in this course. Was there evidence of a foreshadowing of what was to come in the story’s beginning? Explain with examples from the text.

Answer: There is evidence of foreshadowing in the story when at the beginning, Young Goodman Brown and his wife have to part ways for some event that is going to be revealed later in the story. Young Goodman Brown is going on some kind of journey, yet his wife is trying to stop him from leaving her. This gives the reader the idea that what he is going to do, scares his wife. This leaves her emotional, and begging her husband not to leave her alone and she will hardly be able to sleep, but her husband is fearless and trying to tell her he must leave. She is feeling very upset, and lonely, when she says, “Dearest heart, whispered she, softly and rather sadly, when her lips were close to his ear, pr’ythee, put off your journey until sunrise and sleep in your own bed tonight.” (Hawthorne 2) As well as this, Young Goodman Brown explains he gave a “parting kiss with his young wife” (Hawthorne 2) that makes the reader think that a big event and journey for this man, as well as his sad wife, is going to unfold in the story.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at October 2, 2013 03:25 PM

Sade Loiseau
Dr.Hobbs
English 122
2 October 2013
Question #11 : Why did the devil have such a “considerable resemblance” to Goodman Brown? Can you think of any other stories that have similarities to this “literary device” (technique)? What is significant about it?
Answer: The devil had a considerable resemblance due to the fact that Goodman Brown discovered that his father, grandfather, Goody Cloyse, the minister, Deacon Gookin is all in the faith with the devil. So Goodman does as well.

Posted by: Sade Loiseau at October 2, 2013 03:33 PM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr.Hobbs
Academic writing II CA08
3 October 2013

Question: What is the significance of Brown's staff? Anything symbolic? Explain your answer.

Answer: the significance is moral support; there is a symbolism of unity because his staff members are supporting him to go further and helping him overcome any obstacles that stand in front of them

(p.4, paragraph 2, lines 1-3)

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at October 3, 2013 01:38 PM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng. 122 Academic Writing CA 08
2 October 2013

Question: What is the significance of Brown’s wife’s name? Explain. What is unusual about
Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him?

Answer:
Brown’s wife’s name is Faith. This is ironic because at the beginning of the story Brown has a lot of faith and trust in the community and his faith, but not at the end of the story. What is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him is that she has turned evil. Because of this, he should be the one who has lost faith in her.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at October 3, 2013 11:27 PM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
4 October 2013

Question: Who was the old man walking with Brown? Did he have other guises? Most importantly, did Brown know he was going to meet this man or not? Give examples that support both sides.

Answer: In the story from Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown”, the old man that was walking with Brown I consider it was the devil himself. At the begging it was just an old man, a second traveler, “As nearly as could be discerned, the second traveler was about fifty years old, apparently in the same rank of life as Goodman Brown, and bearing a considerable resemblance to him, though perhaps more in expressions than features” (Hawthorne 71); but throughout history this old man evolves and gives clues to Young Good Brown is not so innocent. Something was not right or does not fit with this character, example of that is his staff “But the only thing about him, that could be fixed upon as remarkable, was his staff, which bore the likeness of a great black snake, so curiously wrought, that it might almost be seen to twist and wriggle itself like a living serpent” (Hawthorne 71). I resume that the may be the evil himself disguising like an old man because he try to tempt Goodman Brown “this is a dull pace for the beginning of a journey. Take my staff, if you are so soon weary.” (Hawthorne 71).It can be said that Brown it was going to meet this man because he says, “. . . having kept covenant by meeting thee here, it is my purpose now to return whence I came” (Hawthorne 71) and vice versa seems that the old man was expecting him as well “You are late, Goodman Brown,” said he” (Hawthorne 70).

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at October 4, 2013 11:20 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
4 October 2013

Question: After reading the story, do you know if brown was really a “good” man or not? Explain with examples from the text.

Answer: After reading the story, the reader finds out that Goodman Brown is not a “good” man even though he may appear to be in the beginning of the story “Young Goodman Brown.” Goodman Brown says, when he and the other main character have reached the forest, that he should be going home, but the other man convinces Brown to continue on(Hawthorne 71). Because Brown ends up wanting to not fulfill his “evil purpose,” one may believe he is a good man(Hawthorne 70). However, later in the story Goodman Brown ends up calling upon the devil; he says, “Come devil! for to thee is this world given”(Hawthorne 77). Also, before he says this, he says his Faith is no longer with him. Even though literally, he means his wife Faith, this name is symbolic of his own religious Faith(Hawthorne 77). Goodman Brown’s losing faith and calling upon the devil can definitely support the fact that Goodman Brown is a bad man. Also, the fact that Hawthorne kept going on this trip even though he knew it was a bad one expresses the fact that Brown makes bad decisions. Though Goodman Brown is tempted by the devil, he still keeps going, and the situations in the story become more horrible and darker as time goes on(Hawthorne 71, 75). Brown attends a meeting which is apparently run by witches(Hawthorne 83). In the end of the story, the reader learns that this event took place only in a dream(Hawthorne 83). Hawthorne, throughout the story, gives the reader details which point to Goodman Brown being tempted by the man he is walking with and Brown becoming more and more of a bad person as the events in the story unfold.

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at October 4, 2013 01:15 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
13 February 2014

QUESTION #4:
After reading the story, do you now know if Brown was really a "good" man or not? Explain with examples from the text.

ANSWER:
After reading the story, it can be clearly seen that Brown is in fact, not a "good" man. I feel this to be so because in the end Goodman did not resist the temptation of the devil and allowed himself to go further and further into the forest (Hawthorne 72), eventually even taking hold of the serpent-like staff to attend the ceremony at the slightest thought that his Faith may be in harm's way (Hawthorne 78).

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at February 13, 2014 04:56 PM

Bianca T. Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA12
16 Feb. 2014

Question #6- We have discussed the concept of "foreshadowing" many times in this course. Was there evidence of a foreshadowing of what was to come in the story's beginning? Explain with examples from the text.

Answer- There was evidence in the story of foreshadowing. Goodman Brown saw fear in his wife's face as he left when he took one last look at her. "Methought, as she spoke,there was trouble in her face, as if a dream warned her what work was to be done to-night. But, no, no! 't would kill her to think it"(Hawthorne 3). This would mean that there would be something going on later in the story or towards the end of the story. At the end of the story, something bad happens to Goodman Brown. "And when he had lived long, and was borne to his grave...they carved no hopeful verse upon his tombstone, for his dying hour was gloom" (Hawthorne 17). Goodman Brown loses faith in his wife and in humanity and he dies. Foreshadowing is present in the beginning of the story and it shows that something does happen in the future of the story.


Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at February 16, 2014 05:22 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
14 February 2014

Question #5: Brown was called silly by the old woman because he claimed to have seen the devil in the woods and called it a "witch". The towns people however still tried to treat him the same, but knew he was different. Maybe the townspeople were not as Christian as they made themselves out to be? For example, in the text, the author describes the scene the morning after Goodman Brown travels into the woods. "The good old minister was taking a walk along the graveyard, to get an appetite for breakfast and meditate his sermon and bestowed a blessing, as he passed, on Goodman Brown. He shrank from the vulnerable Saint, as if to avoid an anathema" (Hawthrorne 83). This shows that even though the townspeople greet him with good intentions, they are changed.

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at February 16, 2014 08:22 PM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
17 February 2014

Question #2:
What is the significance of Brown’s wife’s name? Explain. What is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him?

Answer:
The Brown's are a religious couple and her name is only fitting to be "Faith". When Goodman Brown leaves his wife to run an errand she becomes worried and does not want him to go so he asked if she has lost faith in him which is unusual since the two had only been married three months (Hawthorne 69).

Posted by: Berlin Waters at February 17, 2014 12:42 AM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
17 February 2014

Question: Who was the old man walking with Brown? Did he have other guises? Most importantly, did Brown know he was going to meet this man or not? Give examples to support both sides.

Answer: The man walking with Goodman Brown in the story seems to be the devil. He appears as an old men and sometimes takes on the role of other characters in the story. There are examples to support both sides if Goodman Brown knew he was going to meet the man. An example that would say Goodman Brown didn't know is in the following line, "What if the devil himself should be at my very elbow!". In this quote it doesn't seem like Goodman Brown has any intention on meeting up with anyone that night. An example that would argue that Goodman Brown did know he was meeting with the Devil is in the following lines, "'You are late, Goodman Brown,' said he. 'The clock of the Old South was striking, as I came through Boston; and that is full fifteen minutes agone.' 'Faith kept me back awhile,' replied the young man". This suggests that Goodman Brown obviously planned on meeting with the man since he is saying that he is late.

Posted by: sawyer hand at February 17, 2014 12:54 AM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
14 February 2014

Question 12:
Are there any examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell us where and why.

Answer:
When the old lady was telling Goodman Brown that her broom, shows intolerance towards the elders (Hawthrone 74). There is no respect the for the elders, so people think that they can get anyway with any crime and any other form of disrespect because an old person can be known as easy marks and are easy to take avenge of. At the end of the story, Goodman Brown was trying to tell Faith to refuse them and to look the Heaven instead of witchery (Hawthrone 83). This could be intolerance by disrespecting the Deacon Gookin’s form of worship as witchcraft and a form of Satanism.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at February 17, 2014 01:24 AM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
16 February 2014

Question:
What is the significance of Brown’s full name?

Answer:
The significance of Brown’s full name is that it shows innocence and corruptibility throughout the story by believing of the goodness of people that surround him and believing that the devil has taken over the minds of the people he loves. For example, he believes in the goodness of his father and grandfather until the old man, who was most likely the devil, tells him that he knows them both. This is shown in this quote, “Well said, Goodman Brown! I have been was well acquainted with your family as with ever a one among the Puritans; and that’s no trifle to say.” (Hawthorn 5).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero (corrected) at February 17, 2014 09:57 AM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
17 February 2014

QUESTION #11:
Why did the devil have such a "considerable resemblance" to Goodman Brown? Can you think of any other stories that have similarities to this "literary device" (technique)? What is significant about it?

ANSWER:
The devil had such a "considerable resemblance" to Goodman Brown by expression more than features because they were in the same rank of life (Hawthorne 71). Another story that have similarities to this "literary device" is the short story "On the Road".

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at February 18, 2014 09:35 PM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
14 February 2014

Question:
So, how do we answer Hawthorne’s question? Was Brown only dreaming or did he
actually walk with the devil? Explain your answer.

Answer:
Brown's experience was very real to him. No matter if it was a dream or not it was a real experience to him. He sees his wife talking to the strange man he encountered, which he believes is the devil. He starts to question his wife when is cries “My Faith is gone!” (Hawthorn 10). This suggests that his wife was never a human being, but a lady that was helping the devil.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at February 21, 2014 01:00 PM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 12, 2014 07:19 AM

Shyra Bryant, Trejon Baynham
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
Eng. 122 Academic Writing CA 07
3 October 2014

QUESTION:
What do you think the old expression to dance or “walk with the devil”
means/implies? Is this notion something people can apply to their lives today? How
so? Give examples.

ANSWER:
In our opinion, the saying “walk with the devil” implies that one is walking in sight of the devil. On page 70, Goodman Brown states, “There may be a devilish Indian behind every tree,” he continues, “what if the devil himself were at my very elbow.” (Hawthorne 70) In this example, Goodman Brown is questioning his level of temptation and influenced from the devil. To that regard, it is something that people can apply to their everyday lives especially if one is of a religious background.

Posted by: Shyra. B and Trejon. B at October 3, 2014 02:04 PM

Danielle Kluender and Gianna Anderson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
3 October 2014

Question #4:
After reading the story, do you now know if Brown was really a “good” man or not? Explain with examples from the text.

Answer:
Yes, Brown is a good man but his mind is playing tricks on him. He wants to believe that his family members are good people but the devil has taken over his mind and made him believe that they are evil. If you live your life by the bible, you believe that there is good in everyone and to forgive the bad in people. For example, he says, “With Heaven above, and Faith below, I will yet stand firm against the devil!” (Hawthorne 76).

Posted by: Danielle Kluender, Gianna Anderson at October 3, 2014 02:05 PM

Elizabeth Brown, Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
3 October 2014

Question #3:
Who was the old man walking with Brown? Did he have other guises? Most importantly, did Brown know he was going to meet this man or not? Give examples that support both sides.
Answer:
The old man walking with Brown was a traveler with a twisted staff. He is a man who has been with Brown’s family for generations, and he is almost like a conscience of Brown’s family. This man could be God or the Devil. He did not know he was going to meet this man, but he knew who he was when he saw him. The man told him he was a friend of the families.

Posted by: Elizabeth brown, Stephanie Vera at October 3, 2014 02:06 PM

Zach Gary and Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
October 3, 2014


QUESTION #11:
Why did the devil have such a considerable resemblance to Goodman Brown? Can you think of any other stories that have similarities to this literary device? What is significant about it?

ANSWER:
He had such a large resemblance to Goodman Brown because he was all in his head. He was essentially his conscience and Goodman Brown was fighting with his religious beliefs that previously guided him through life. At some points throughout his journey with the man “Goodman Brown sat himself down on the stump of a tree, and refused to go any further” (Hawthorne 75). He was fighting a battle within of good against evil and right against wrong. Another tale would be in “Juliette,” when the main character strongly personifies his car, making it seem like his wife. The significance about personification is that it illustrates the internal struggles of the character, as he travels along his “present evil purpose” (Hawthorne 70). It is a different strategy to give insight to the protagonist.

Posted by: Samantha Witte, Zach Gary at October 3, 2014 08:53 PM

Mickael Dodard & John Crane
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
3 September 2014

Question #6
We have discussed the concept of “foreshadowing” many times in this course. Was
there evidence of a foreshadowing of what was to come in the story’s beginning?
Explain with examples from the text.

Answer: The foreshadowing at the beginning is that the wife was telling her husband to not go away. When thee author provided that detail, he tried to give a clue of what is going to happen in the story.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at October 6, 2014 11:12 AM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
18 February 15

Young Goodman Brown Discussion Question

Question 4: After reading the story, do you know if Brown was really a “good” man or not? Explain with examples from the text.

Answer: After reading the story, readers cannot adequately determine if Brown is really a "good" man or not. Readers know that during Brown’s adventure in the forest, he states, “not another move will I budge on this errand” (Hawthorne 8). He was determined to stay faithful to God. There are no facts to prove that he was truly a “good” man or not. However, at the end of the story, the only reason he used the staff and accepted to go to the evil was that he heard Faith’s voice. Brown shows he is a “good” man by proving he is brave and compassionate for going to find Faith, and for not accepting the evil that was presented in front of him.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 18, 2015 12:01 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 February 2015

Question: Brown was called “silly” in the story by the old woman. Why? Did the townspeople
not like him? Explain with examples from the text.

Answer: Brown was an honorable man from a righteous family. “My father never went into the woods on such an errand, nor his father before him. We have been a race of honest men and good Christians, since the days of the martyrs.” (Hawthorne 73) Readers find out in the story that the townspeople are evil and devil worshipers. The corrupt townspeople think that a good man is foolish for being righteous.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 18, 2015 12:12 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
19 February 2015

Question 12: Are there any examples if intolerance mentioned in the story? Tell us where and why?

Answer: There are a few historical examples of intolerance in the story. Hawthorne mentions "Young Goodman Brown came forth at the sunset, into the street of Salem village," (Hawthorne 69); this represents the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. The Puritans of the village killed twenty-five innocent people because they were accused of doing witchcraft. Hawthorne also mentions King Philip; a war amongst the villages and Indians. The traveler that walks with Young Goodman makes mention of this when he states he helped Brown's father, "set fire to an Indian village in king Philip's war." (Hawthorne 72) The Puritans did not tolerate anyone who did not follow what they believed.

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 19, 2015 01:11 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Question 8: Think about all the “goodly” people Brown saw going “astray” in the story. What were their names? Any symbolism or irony? Also, if this was a dream, why do you think Brown was dreaming about or imagining these people living a life of sin?
Answer: Goodman Brown encountered Goody Cloyse, Deacon Gookin, and the minister on his journey in the forest. When he first entered, an older man whom he called Friend accompanied him. These names resembled the type of people that they appeared to be, although none of them were who they were said to be. After Goodman had returned home the following day, he questioned whether it was a dream that he had, but he had a constant suspicion of all citizens including his wife. He had this dream because not everyone is who they claim to be, one must always be cautious.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 19, 2015 04:16 PM

Aderias N Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
19 February 2015
Question 4: After reading the story, do you now know if Brown was really a “good” man or not? Explain with examples from the text.
I think Brown was a really good man because at the beginning he was like his fathers be for him a good Christian. At the beginning his life was pure and had no evil in front of him. To me Brown was just like any another man temped by evil or the devil himself when you come face to face. In pg70- Goodman Brown shows both innocence and corruptibility as he vacillates between believing in the inherent goodness of the people around him and believing that the devil has taken over the minds of all the people he loves. At the beginning of the story, Goodman Brown believes in the goodness of his father and grandfather, until the old man, likely the devil, tells him that he knew them both.

Posted by: aderias ewing at February 19, 2015 07:45 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
19 February 2015

“Young Goodman Brown”

Question #3: Who was the old man walking with Brown? Did he have other guises? Most importantly did Brown know he was going to meet this man or not? Give examples that support both sides.

The old man that was walking with Goodman brown was an elderly man who knew his father and grandfather. The elderly man explains how he knew his family when he interrupted Goodman Brown during his pause by saying, “I have been as well acquainted with your family as with a ever one among the Puritans. “I helped your grandfather, the constable when he lashed tne Quaker woman so smartly through the streets of Salem… They were my good friends, both.” (Hawthorne page 72 paragraph 1) His other guise was that he is the devil and he offers Goodman brown his stick which is a snake. I think Brown had no knowledge of meeting this man because nowhere in the story it states that he will have an encounter with this man. Though, it was good that he met this man because it taught him that not everybody is good and that he should not have been the first of his family to walk the path.

Posted by: Selena Hammie at February 19, 2015 08:51 PM

Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing CA 12
20 February 2015

Question 3:
What is the significance of Browns wife’s name? What is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him?
Answer:
Faith is Goodman Browns wife and her name is symbolic of Goodman Brown's faith in society and humankind. ““My love and my faith” said Goodman Brown.” (Hawthorne 2)

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 20, 2015 01:27 AM

Emma Riemer and Rachel Addington
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Young Goodman Brown


Question 7: When Brown screams, “my Faith is gone!” what does he mean? Is there only one meaning to this passage or many? Explain.

Answer:
When Brown Screams, “my faith is gone!” there are two meanings. The first is that his wife faith is dead. The beginning of the story, it is talked about his wife’s pink ribbons and just before he screams, he hears a scream and catches a pink ribbon. “There was a scream…something fluttered lightly down through the air, and caught on the branch of a tree. The young man seized it, and beheld a pink ribbon” (Hawthorne 77). The second meaning is that he lost his faith/his faith in the church and the church people that he knew had died. He lost his trust and confidence in the people and church.

Posted by: Emma Riemer at February 20, 2015 02:05 AM

Emma Riemer
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Young Goodman Brown


Question 7: When Brown screams, “my Faith is gone!” what does he mean? Is there only one meaning to this passage or many? Explain.

Answer:
When Brown Screams, “my faith is gone!” there are two meanings. The first is that his wife faith is dead. The beginning of the story, it is talked about his wife’s pink ribbons and just before he screams, he hears a scream and catches a pink ribbon. “There was a scream…something fluttered lightly down through the air, and caught on the branch of a tree. The young man seized it, and beheld a pink ribbon” (Hawthorne 77). The second meaning is that he lost his faith/his faith in the church and the church people that he knew had died. He lost his trust and confidence in the people and church.

Posted by: Emma Riemer at February 20, 2015 02:06 AM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
19 February 2015

Question: What do you think the old expression to dance or “walk with the devil” means? Is this notion something people can apply to their selves today? How so? Give examples.

Answer: To walk or dance with the devil means to bring trouble or misfortune upon yourself. Yes, this can be used today, for example going out to a club or party on a Thursday night knowing you have a test in your morning class the next day. This is an example of “dancing with the devil,” because you are aware of your class, but you choose to go out and party, neglecting sleep, and study time. Another example would be trying drugs for the first time, knowing the negative effects and using the substances anyway. This is an example of “dancing with the devil” because you are exposing yourself to drugs that can harm you for a long period just for a few minutes of enjoyment.

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at February 20, 2015 02:20 AM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
19 February 2015

Question: So, how do we answer Hawthorne’s question? Was Brown only dreaming or did he actually walk with the devil? Explain your answer.

Answer: I think that Young Goodman Brown was sleeping during his experience with the devil. They’re a few reasons for this assumption. The first reason is that he says he's known Goody Cloyse since he was a child, "Goodman Brown recognized a very pious and exemplary dame, who had taught him his catechism in youth," but when he sees her in the woods she completely ignores him and doesn't even nod towards him. If it was reality she would have atlas acknowledged his existence. Also in the woods he sees all of the townspeople his wife and friends at this evil ceremony and when they're back in town they act like nothing happened. Because of this I believe it was also a dream because for a lifetime after this he never trusts them again. If it were reality someone would've had to have said something about it to him at some point.

Posted by: Rachel Addington at February 20, 2015 02:41 AM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Question: When Brown screams, “My Faith is gone!” what does he mean? Is there only one meaning to this passage or many? Explain.

Answer: When Goodman Brown screams in the forest, “My Faith is gone!” (Hawthorne 77) He means that the devil took his sweet wife, Faith. I believe there are two meanings to this passage, one is literally saying that his wife had been taken by the devil and the other meaning is that Goodman Browns faith in Heaven is gone now because the devil took his wife. “With Heaven above and Faith below, I will yet stand firm against the devil!” (Hawthorne 76). As you can see here this is when Goodman Brown believed there was Heaven, and with his faith he would be able to stand against the devil, but once the devil took his wife his faith in heaven vanished.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at February 20, 2015 08:46 AM

Rously Paul
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Question: What is the significance of Brown’s full name? Explain

Answer: Brown’s name is a title in the eyes of the author to show how pious and well liked he is in the community this also holds true for his wife Faith, whom Goodman Brown is married. The formatting is to give power to the reluctance Brown has to participate in the dark ritual. The effects of the ritual has dark effects on the good man as he becomes a stoic and dreary man to his death “…for his dying hour was gloom” (page 17 paragraph 1)

Posted by: Rously Paul at February 20, 2015 09:08 AM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Young Goodman Brown
Question #6: We have discussed the concept of “foreshadowing” many times in this course. Was there evidence of a foreshadowing of what was to come in the story’s beginning? Explain with examples from the text.

Answer: At the beginning of the story, Faith tried to convince her husband to stay home and not go on his journey. She had been “troubled with such dreams and such thoughts, that she’s afeard” (Hawthorne 69). Faith was worried about her husband’s trip. As Goodman Brown was approaching his destination, he stopped to rest in the woods. He had fallen asleep, “and only dreamed a wild dream of a witch-meeting” (Hawthorne 83). Perhaps Goodman Brown’s dreams were caused because Faith told him she afraid.

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at February 20, 2015 09:43 AM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing CA12
19 February 2015

Young Goodman Brown
Question:
What is the significance of Brown’s full name? Explain?

Answer:
There is a lot of significance in young Goodman brown. His name means many thing, I would say that they put young in the beginning because he is naive immature not really knowing what exactly is going on. Brown, I would be considered as someone being common the reason I say that is because he believed that he was better than everybody in the forest.

Posted by: jorge braham at February 20, 2015 10:05 AM

Rously Paul and Kaitlin Murphy
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
23 February 15

Question: List all Major and Minor themes in Young Goodman Brown use excerpts from the story to support your theme.

Answer: Themes in Young Goodman Brown :
Loss of innocence- When Brown stumbled upon his loved ones and is facing evil, his mind warps him into a bitter man. whether it be real and those close are monsters in human clothing or his dreams has shown him his dark side he chooses to live his life as a broken man.
Fear of wilderness- Brown mentions his fear of the wild for Indians hiding behind trees or the devil and when wandering the wilderness he finds the devil himself.
The weakness of public morality – Hawthorne throughout his story shows how corrupt the community Brown lives in is and how he too becomes a product of his environment and joins those close to him in their dark habits.

Posted by: Rously Paul and Kaitlin Murphy at February 23, 2015 09:46 AM

Shania Bienaime
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question: Who was the old man walking with Brown? Did he have other guises? Most importantly, did Brown know he was going to meet this man or not? Give examples that support both sides. Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: The old man he was walking with is the devil. When he meets with brown in the forest he dresses decent and normal. No one really knows what the devil may look like but according to the story he has many guises and can fit in into any crowd. He also takes a resemblance to the main character Brown “…apparently in the same rank of life as Goodman Brown, and bearing a considerable resemblance to him, though perhaps more in expression than features. Still they might have been taken for father and son” (Haw 5).

Posted by: Shania Bienaime at September 28, 2015 02:23 PM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question: After reading the story, do you now know if Brown was a really "good" man or not?? Explain. Quote, any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.
Answer: Goodman Brown isn't a good person. Whether it was reality or a dream he still went to the devil and left his wife and God for the devil and now thinks everyone is evil when it is him, and he is the devil. "...when the family knelt down for prayer, he scowled and muttered to his wife as he gazed sternly at her and turned away"(Hawthorne 84).

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 28, 2015 05:12 PM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question #2: What is the significance of Brown’s wife’s name, and what is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: In “Young Goodman Brown” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Goodman Brown has a wife of three months named Faith. Hawthorne explains that Brown’s wife’s name as apt for her, as she represented Brown’s literal godly faith (69). It is unusual and ironic that Brown asks her if she has lost faith in him because he loses his godly faith after his night walk. “’My Faith is gone!’ cried [Brown]. There is no good on earth; and sin is but a name” Brown cries out as he openly admits he lost his godly state when he sees Faith is with the devil, too (Hawthorne 77).

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 28, 2015 09:47 PM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
29 September 2015

Question: What is Hawthorne’s “question,” and how do we answer it? Was Brown only dreaming or did he actually walk with the devil? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: Hawthorne's question was, "Had Goodman Brown fallen asleep in the forest, and only dreamed a wild dream of a witch-meeting" (Hawthorn 83)? I believe Brown was dreaming and did not walk with the devil. He gains a new filter on life following the dream in which he became "a stern, a sad, a darkly meditative, a distrustful, if not desperate man..." (Hawthorne 83).

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at September 29, 2015 01:34 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question #13: What is the significance of Brown’s staff? Anything symbolic? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: The significance of Brown’s staff or also called the devil’s staff was handed to him by a traveler who might have been the devil in disguise. It symbolizes the biblical symbol of the serpent as an evil demon. The old man was telling Goodman Brown to use the staff to travel faster, and he took up the offer yet just like Eve, it was ultimately condemned for his weakness by losing his innocence. Goodman Brown’s decision was motivated by curiosity and the staff made it clear that the old man is more demon than a human and thus when Goodman Brown took up that staff, he was also on the path towards evil. (Hawthorne 74-78)

Posted by: Hana Lee at September 29, 2015 06:19 PM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
29 September 2015

Question: Think about all the “goodly” people Brown saw going “astray” in the story. What were their names? Is there any symbolism or irony and, if so, what? Also, if this WAS a dream, why do you think Brown was dreaming about or imagining these people living a life of sin? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support your claim.
Answer: Goodman Brown appears to be a devout Puritan in the beginning of the story. Innocent and devoid of any sin, so it would seem. However, he is drawn into the forest to join the leagues of the Devil. As he proceeds into the forest, he speaks out against joining the devil, and stops several times to turn back (which he never does). Brown sees many people from Salem, many devout Puritans like himself, entering the forest. First is Goody Cloyse, a kindly old woman that taught Brown the basic principles of Christianity (catechism) and acted as his spiritual advisor. Cloyse recognizes the Devil (the old man travelling with brown) and carries on a casual conversation with him in their encounter “’The devil!’ screamed the pious old lady. ‘Then Goody Cloyse knows her old friend?’ observed the traveller, confronting her, and leaning on his writhing stick. ‘Ah, forsooth, and is it your worship, indeed?’ cried the good dame.” (Hawthorne 6). Brown also encounters Deacon Gookin and the old Minister, the spiritual leaders for Salem, as they make their way to the satanic ceremony. When Brown actually arrives at the ceremony he finds many of the townsfolk, whom he believed to be devout puritans, in attendance. The presence of all these “good Christians” at the satanic ceremony is a classic example of literary irony. They are all model Christians, but have all made a pact with Satan. Additionally, they serve to cement the loss of innocence in Goodman Brown, and his realization that he isn’t actually as devout as he would think (in fact, his devotion to god is almost entirely based on the devotion of the other townspeople). Brown accepts the loss of innocence, “At the word, Goodman Brown stepped forth from the shadow of the trees, and approached the congregation, with whom he felt a loathful brotherhood, by the sympathy of all that was wicked in his heart.” (Hawthorne 13). In the end, Brown cannot determine if the event was a dream or not. Even if it had been a figment of his imagination, the fact of the matter is that Brown has lost his innocence. He finally realizes that despite their outward appearances and good behavior, there is sin within everyone, including himself. “it was a dream of evil omen for young Goodman Brown. A stern, a sad, a darkly meditative, a distrustful, if not a desperate man, did he become, from the night of that fearful dream” (Hawthorne 16)

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 29, 2015 07:28 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09

September 29, 2015


Question: Why would Satan look so much like Brown himself? Why is that creepier than a demon with horns and pitchfork and cloven hooves? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: Satan perhaps used Brown’s father and grandfather’s figure to trick the young man into believing he was on the right path. “The second traveler was about fifty years old, apparently in the same rank of life as Goodman Brown, and bearing a considerable resemblance to him, though perhaps more in expression than features. Still, they might have been taken for father and son.” (Hawthorne pg. 71). Satan would not want Brown to know he is the devil. To gain the trust of Goodman Brown, Satan took the shape of a human figure. “The fiend in his own shape is less hideous, than when he rages in the breast of man.” (Hawthorne pg. 78). This human form of Satan is creepier than his true form because people would not realize he is evil. So Satan will be able to trick others into believing he is heavenly and good.

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk at September 29, 2015 09:12 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015

Question: When describing the events in the woods, count how many times Hawthorne uses ambiguous language in diction like seems, must, appears, perhaps, and maybe. Why does Hawthorne want to leave all this so ambiguous? Why not tell readers clearly whether something is happening or not happening? Explain. Quote relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: Hawthorne purposely creates ambiguity in the forest scene to leave many questions open to the reader. The reader will have to decipher for themselves whether or not the events that take place in the forest are real or simply a dream. “Had Goodman Brown fallen asleep in the forest, and only dreamed a wild dream of witch-meeting?” (Hawthorne 83). Whether Brown dreamed of the occurrence in the forest or not, it seemed real to him and had an effect on him.

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at September 30, 2015 12:46 AM

Peyton Farrier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
30 September 2015

Question: When Brown screams, “my Faith is gone!” what does he mean? Is there only one meaning to this passage or many? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: When he yells "my Faith is gone" he is talking about his wife missing. There is two meaning behind this message because right after he states that Faith was gone he says "There is no good on earth; and sin is but a name. Come, devil! for to thee is this world given" (Hawthorne 77). Meaning that there is nothing left for him if he doesn't have Faith being his wife and faith itself in the world

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at September 30, 2015 09:45 AM

"My journey, as thou callest it, forth and back again, must needs be done 'twixt now and sunrise. What, my sweet, pretty wife, dost thou doubt me already, and we but three months married?" (Hawthorne 2) This is foreshadowing that the husband is concerned and cautious to the wife. Why would the husband act like this? Possibly he is sneaking something behind the wife's back. Another foreshadow is when Faith wishes for him to come back with something good "And may you find all well when you come back." (Hawthorne 2) But, you find out later in the story that this is not the case at all.

Posted by: Brad McAvoy at September 30, 2015 11:32 AM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015

Question: Brown declares that he has “lost his faith.” Faith in what, exactly? God? Or something else? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: When Brown said he “lost his Faith”, he was talking about his wife and his faith with God. Brown in the beginning and throughout the story repeatedly said how Faith is his wife, but when she ‘disappears’, he lost his wife, and his Faith with God. “There is no good on earth; and sin is but a name” (Hawthornr 77). Faith was the Godliest person in the story that kept him intact with his faith; when she disappeared, he lost his faith.

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at September 30, 2015 11:46 AM

Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobbs
English Academic Writing CA09
September 28, 2015

Question: What is the significance of Brown’s full name? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: Young Goodman Brown’s name tells us of his nature. Brown seemed to stick fast to the beliefs he had in others holding their faith and being fairly innocent. Brown said, “A marvel, truly, that Good Cloyse should be so far in the wilderness, at night-fall! But, with your leave, friend, I shall take a cut through the woods, until we have left this Christian woman behind. Being a stranger to you, she might ask whom I was consorting with, and whither I was going” (Young Goodman Brown page 73). This quote shows the goodness he thought he saw in Good Cloyse until he saw he talking to the devil on friendly terms. Goodman Brown was shocked. This resulted in Brown becoming a bitter man and not trusting the church community anymore. This was shown when he asked Deacon Gookin, “What God doth the wizard pray to” (Young Goodman Brown page 83)?

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at September 30, 2015 01:06 PM

The Old Man is the devil. The guises he had with him was his staff which had the shape of a serpent that some people believed to move if you paid attention to it. MR.Goodman did know that he was meeting this man because "You are late, Goodman Brown"..."Faith kept me back awhile"pg70. Then again the Mr.Goodman was surprised to see him as if it was unexpected to see him this early, as in maybe he had planned to see him later in the day just not this soon. "tremor in his voice, caused by the sudden appearance of his companion, though not wholly unexpected."pg70 I believe that quote explains Mr. Goodman perfectly because he knew the old man and was planning to see him, but just wasn't planning on seeing him so soon.

Posted by: Freddie Williams at September 30, 2015 02:01 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015


Question #5


Question: Brown was called “silly” in the story by the old woman. Why? Did the townspeople not like him? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.


Answer: Goody Cloyse says “Yea, truly is it, and in the very image of my old gossip, Goodman Borwn, the grandfather of that silly fellow that now it” (Hawthorne 74). The devil is taking on the form of Brown’s grandfather, someone the old lady knew well as she referenced him as her “old gossip” (Hawthorne 74). When calling Brown silly, she was comparing him to his grandfather. The fact that she would call him silly would imply foolishness. Goody Cloyse and Goodman Brown’s grandfather were both in league with the devil (Hawthorne 74). At this point in the story Brown hasn’t given in to the devil’s cult yet. Because he has lived his life piously up to this point, the other townspeople are aware that Goodman Brown is not one of them. To say that he is silly is to say he doesn’t fit in or not following the status quo. It could also imply his ignorance, in that he didn’t realize these people were evil and just took them on their word (Hawthorne 72).

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 30, 2015 02:54 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015

Answer:” But, irreverently consorting with these grave, reputable, and pious people, these elders of the church, these chaste dames and dewy virgins, there were men of dissolute lives and women of spotted fame, wretches given over to all mean and filthy vice, and suspected even of horrid crimes. It was strange to see that the good shrank not from the wicked, nor were the sinners abashed by the saints.”
Goodman Brown sees the ceremony and the dark side of Salem Village. The transgression of social boundaries is one of the most confusing and upsetting aspects of the ceremony. The Puritans had made a society that was very much based on morality and religion, in which status came from having a high standing in the church and a high moral reputation among other townspeople. When Goodman Brown tells the devil at the beginning of the story that he is proud of his father and grandfather’s high morals and religious convictions, he is describing how the society in which he lives values these traits above all others. When Goodman Brown sees the mingling of these two different types of people at the ceremony, he is horrified: the ceremony reveals the breakdown of the social order, which he believed was ironclad. Hawthorne is pointing out the hypocrisy of a society that prides itself on its moral standing and makes outcasts of people who do not live up to its standards.

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 30, 2015 03:17 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015

Question: Are there any examples of intolerance mentioned in the story? Identify where and why. Explain and quote any relevant text from the passage to support your answer.

Answer: There are a few instances of intolerance within the story. The most prominent instance of intolerance in the story is when Goodman Brown refused to give in to the Devil’s will. Even after he saw some of the most prominent figures from his village like Goody Cloyse, Deacon Gookin, and even his wife Faith at the Devil’s meeting in the woods he still refuses to give in to the Devil’s ways. At first he claims he is just wants to go back to the village and denies the Devil for his wife’s sake as he says “Well, then, to end the matter at once there is my wife, Faith.It would break her dear little heart, and I’d rather break my own” (Hawthorne 73). Here Goodman justifies the reason for his intolerance claiming he is doing it just for his wife’s sake. Then when he sees his wife at the Devil’s meeting everything changes. He loses complete trust in her and everyone else in the village that he saw there. His intolerance to the Devil’s commands keeps him loyal to his religion but also differentiates him from the whole village. After this event, his life is altered forever.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at September 30, 2015 03:26 PM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing CA09
28 September 2015

Question:
Why is nothing carved on Brown’s tombstone? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.
Answer:
The reason why Goodman Brown didn’t get anything carved on his tombstone is because they believed he was going crazy. They say it all began when his wife was around the witches and began changing which caused he to change and the puritans believed that a behavior like that was never going to be saved in the faith of Christianity. So they left his tombstone blank because they believed that he was not worth saving.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at September 30, 2015 10:18 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA 06
11 February 2016

Question: When Brown screams, “my Faith is gone!” what does he mean? Is there only one meaning to this passage or many? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: In this short story, titled, "Young Goodman Brown", the audience is revealed to the titular character Young Goodman Brown, who is a Christian and seems to be holding on faith in God because of his wife, Faith. Therefore, after he witnesses his wife, and her pink ribbon fluttered through the air, when he screams, "my Faith is gone (Hawthorne 77)," he is means that his trust in people, who should not give into the evil of the devil -like the minister, his father, grandfather, and his wife, in particular- is broken. His wife and others who had trusted, in his eyes, have lost innocence. He had faith in the people around him to have faith, especially his wife, his faith is based on others faith. This is revealed when he thinks to himself while leaving his wife that, "she's a blessed angel on earth; and after this one night, I'll cling to her skirts and follow her to Heaven (70)." This thought shows that his wife has strong faith, whereas he does not have such a strong faith, so he has to hold tightly to her faith to make it to Heaven. This suggests that Young Goodman Brown perceives his faith is not as strong as his wife's faith. This concept, in which Young Goodman Brown trusts those people around him to have faith, is shown again when he is talking to the devil and Young Goodman Brown reveals that his family's faith: "My father never went into the woods on such an errand, nor his father before him. We have been a race of honest men and good Christians, since the days of the martyrs (71)." This suggests that Young Goodman Brown is not worried about his faith but worried about the faith of his family and those around him. Therefore, when they give into evil, he proclaims his faith is gone. His proclamation of his faith being gone can also mean that his wife, who he trusted to have strong faith, and her innocence and her faith has disappeared.  

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 13, 2016 07:24 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
12 February 2016

Question: Brown declares that he has “lost his faith.” Faith in what, exactly? God? Or something else? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: In the story “Young Goodman Brown”, Goodman Brown declared that his faith is gone after a series of event that happened in the forest (Hawthorne 77). However, the faith that Goodman Brown is referring to is his dearest wife, whose name is Faith. Goodman Brown confirmed that his faith is gone after he heard a cry of grief, rage, and terror who he believes is Faith; followed by the pink ribbon (Faith was wearing a pink ribbon earlier) he snatched from a branch in a tree (77).

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 14, 2016 01:40 PM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
14 February 2016

Question: What is the significance of Brown’s wife’s name, and what is unusual about Brown asking his wife if she has lost faith in him?

Answer: Brown’s wife’s name is Faith, she was gone. He thinks the devil took her, his faith is gone in a religious perspective because he says that he lost everything. “”But, where is Faith?” thought Goodman Brown; and, as home came into his heart, he trembled (Hawthrone 80).” He couldn’t believe his wife was gone.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at February 15, 2016 01:11 AM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
15 February 2016

“Young Goodman Brown”

Q: What is the significance of Brown’s full name?

A: The significance of Young Goodman Brown’s name is that he is, firstly, young and unknowledgeable to the corruption evil can cause. “Goodman” symbolizes the goodhearted nature of Brown, and his want to believe that all his friends and wife are loving and unable of evil (Hawthorne 77).

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at February 15, 2016 11:14 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing 122 CA06
15 February 2016

Question: Why did Satan look so much like Brown himself? Why is that creepier than a demon with horns and pitchfork and cloven hooves?

Answer: Satan looked like Brown himself because was trying to deceive him. The narrator states, “bearing a considerable resemblance to him though perhaps more in expression than features” (Hawthorne 71). When someone who looks like you is trying to convince you to do something unmoral, it can allow your mind to change and agree with the other person. If Satan had the horns, pitchfork, and hooves, it might have been easier for Brown to ignore him. Since he had the same resemblance, he fell into his plan.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 15, 2016 12:09 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
13 February 2016

Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown

Question #14: .How does the nighttime wilderness serve as a foil for the daytime village in this story? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: The nighttime wilderness is almost an opposite representation of the daytime village. How Goodman Brown perceived the people is challenged when he enters the wilderness. What he thought were good and wholesome people are really unholy, villainous characters. He finds out his own family participated in heinous acts when the traveler says, “I helped your grandfather, the constable, when he lashed the Quaker woman so smartly through the streets of Salem. And it was I that brought your father…to set fire to an Indian village” (Hawthorne 72). Whether or not what Goodman Brown sees is a hallucination or real events, he is unable to trust anyone afterwards (84).

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 15, 2016 01:19 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 06 Academic Writing II
15 February 2016


Question 6.) Was there evidence of foreshadowing in the beginning of the story?
Answer: The Foreshadowing that took place in the beginning of the story was when Faith is worried that something bad will happen if she is left alone. Goodwin Brown begs to differ and tells her she will be fine and that he will be back in time to protect her. However, in the end we see that Faith is also being converted with the devil, leaving Brown basically the only faithful person to God.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at February 15, 2016 02:12 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 06 Academic Writing II
15 February 2016


Question 6.) Was there evidence of foreshadowing in the beginning of the story?
Answer: The Foreshadowing that took place in the beginning of the story was when Faith is worried that something bad will happen if she is left alone. Goodwin Brown begs to differ and tells her she will be fine and that he will be back in time to protect her. However, in the end we see that Faith is also being converted with the devil, leaving Brown basically the only faithful person to God.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at February 15, 2016 02:12 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
15 February 2016

Question: 15.) Why is nothing carved on Brown’s tombstone? Explain. Quote any relevant passages from the text to support your claim.

Answer: 15.) The reason that nothing was carved onto Browns tombstone because “for his dying hour was gloom.”(Hawthorne, 6) It was gloom because he died in the forest and his dying day was a sabbath day, as his grave was followed by his wife Faith.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at February 15, 2016 02:29 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
February 16 2016

Question 11) Why did the devil have such a "considerable resembelence" to goodman brown? Can you think of any other stories that have similarities to this "literary device" (technique)? What is significant about it? Explain.

Answer 11) I think that the devil has such a significant resemblance to Goodman to help him have a realization of the person he is. If he sees this devil and all the bad things he is doing, it may open his eyes. In the narrative, it tells us that the next day, he has no idea if his experience in the forest was real or a dream but it changed him forever, maybe that was the significance of it.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 16, 2016 08:37 PM

Google
My Blog

Creative Commons License
This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Some rights reserved. 2006.