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January 04, 2013

Hermann Hesse's Allegorical Novel _Siddhartha_


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Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: Modern Library, 2006. ISBN: 0679643362.

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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Posted by lhobbs at January 4, 2013 12:22 AM

Readers' Comments:

Find some study questions (as first seen on your reading-checks) below:

·       What is the social rank of Siddhartha’s father? (3) Please give the title’s proper name.

 

·       What is the name of Siddhartha’s best friend? (3-4)

 

·       Part of your instructions for this course is to read with a dictionary. In addition to the author’s explanations within the text, if you have paid attention in class and examined your text, you will know that there is a glossary of terms in the back of the book (127-29). One word that is used repeatedly in chapter 1 is “Brahmin.” What does it mean?

 

·       See the comments for question 3. The word “Samana” is used repeatedly at the end of chapter 1 and throughout chapter 2. What is a “Samana”?

 

·       To whom did Siddhartha go to in the forest (84)?

 

·      Govinda’s “wish was to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, splendid one” (4). Why?

 

·       “Siddhartha had begun to harbor discontent” (5). Why?

 

·       “The father realized then that Siddhartha was no longer with him in the place of his birth. His son had already left him behind” (10). What does this mean and why?

 

·       “Siddhartha saw a single goal: to become empty . . .” (11) What does this mean and why?

 

·       “Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might have learned more quickly and simply. In some bar in a street full of whores, my friend, among the cart drivers and dice players, I might have learned these things” (15). What does this mean and why?

 

·       “I do not wish to walk upon water” (22). What does this mean and why?

 

·       The first chapter of your last assigned reading was titled “Gautama.” Who or what is “Gautama”?

 

·       What does Siddhartha do to Govinda after his friend decides to listen to “the perfect one”?

 

·       Why does Siddhartha feel that the Buddha has robbed him? What did he receive from him in return?

 

·       What ultimately happened to Govinda?

 

·       In the chapter called “Awakening, “ whom does Siddhartha finally decide that he will study from?

Jessica McLean
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA17 Academic Writing II
March 30, 2009
Abandonment of Family in Siddhartha and An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge
In both Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha and Ambrose Bierce’s An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, the main characters leave their families to go on a personal journey. Peyton Farquhar from An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge goes on his journey for a completely different reason than Siddhartha. They both have good intentions, but the outcome for each character is not the same.
In An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, Peyton Farquhar leaves his wife and young children to go sabotage the Federal Bridge. Farquhar, however, gets caught and his punishment is to be hanged. At this point in the story, he is regretting his decision to abandon his family in an attempt to be a Southern patriot. While waiting on the plank for his punishment to be carried out, “he closed his eyes in order to fix his thoughts upon his wife and children” (Bierce 200). The whole time all he can do is think about how selfish he was for leaving his family and what a poor decision he made.
Siddhartha’s journey was one of a spiritual nature through which he wanted to find enlightenment. He leaves his parents at a young age to go live with Samanas in a forest and takes his best friend with him. Then he decides to continue his journey and leaves his friend behind as well. Siddhartha does not regret his decision to leave and throughout the story he doesn’t reminisce about the past or even think about returning home. Siddhartha was selfish and didn’t think about the people he affected by leaving his home.
In conclusion, Peyton Farquhar and Siddhartha were both selfish in their reasons for leaving their families. In contrast however, Farquhar’s journey was one of loyalty to the South and Siddhartha’s was a personal journey of enlightenment. Farquhar also regretted his decision of leaving, and Siddhartha did not. In the end, it is easy to see how these characters are both like and unlike each other.

Works Cited
Bierce, Ambrose. “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.” Edgar V. Roberts. Writing About Literature. Brief
11th ed. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2006. 199-204.
Hesse, Hermann. “Siddhartha.” New York: Modern Library, 2006.

Posted by: Jessica McLean at March 30, 2009 09:14 PM

Josh Green
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA17
3/30/09
Siddhartha vs. The Chrysanthemums
The Journey of Men
John Steinbeck and Hermann Hesse have very contrasting writing styles and portray different traits and values in their characters. I chose to compare and contrast the lives of the old wandering man in “The Chrysanthemums” and the soul searching monk in “Siddhartha”. The two men journey their whole lives in search of aspirations and lifestyles they wish to lead. In a way the two men are both solitary creatures and with no real interest in others. The men are driven by their own personal goals and their need for fulfillment. The characters may have the traveling spirit but the two men embody very different values.
Siddhartha goes from one lifestyle to the next in search of deeper meaning in his life. He travels the world with hopes of one day achieving inner peace and the holiest of enlightenment. Along the way Siddhartha adapts to all his surroundings and masters them with the help of friends. The old man on the other hand travels to make a living cleaning “Pots, pans, knives, scissors, lawn mores, Fixed.” (Steinbeck 26) He takes the same route every six months from Seattle to San Diego every year and like Siddhartha, he does this alone, but Siddhartha’s path is always a mystery while the old man’s has no deviations. “Takes all my time, about six months each way.” (Steinbeck 27) The old man lives out of his wagon with all his belongings but the monk Siddhartha cares not for material possessions and his only shelter comes from those he meets in his travels.
Siddhartha once had a home and a life filled with everything he needed but he refused to settle with such a life. “Siddhartha had begun to harbor discontent.” (Hesse 5) Thus he began to travel in search of something greater in his life, not for money or possessions, but for value in life. The old man had no choice for his life. He was possibly left all by himself and was forced to journey for a living. Either way the two men have very little in common but they do share the need to travel and although Siddhartha finds what he’s been searching for in his life, the old man remains the mystery.

Works Cited
Steinbeck, John. “The Chrysanthemums.” Writing about Literature by Edgar V. Roberts. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006. 242- 245.
Roberts, Edgar V. “Writing about Literature” Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006.

Posted by: Josh Green at March 30, 2009 11:04 PM

Sasha-ann Jarrett
Dr. Hobbs
English 122-CA17
March 24, 2009
Trapped Within a Clique
The novel “Siddhartha” written by Herman Hesse and the short story entitled “The Story of an Hour” are based on characters whose lives are trapped as they live the lives of others. There are other comparisons within the story, such as the tone, and the setting, but the most significant is that of the characters experiencing a feeling of being trapped.
The novel Siddhartha is set in India in the B.C. era, and the description allows the reader to immediately identify with the setting. Siddhartha is a member of a religious sect called the “Brahmins”, and was always told what to do. He became frustrated with being constantly led so he went on a journey, a physical journey as well as a journey into his inner being. He had hoped that this journey would provide some incite into helping him to position himself in life and some self-direction. Unfortunately, this did not happen as fast as he thought it would and thus he remained a follower.
According to research, Indians “just can’t say no”, whether it is verbal or non-verbal. Rather than disappoint, they will give the response that they know you wish to hear. Siddhartha, being an “Indian”, follows this custom, as he tries to please everyone who he comes in contact with. The reason Siddhartha gives everyone the answer they want could be attributed to his culture, and it is exactly this that he is trying to free himself from. His dilemma is his eagerness to continuously please everyone that surrounds him, while he fails to please himself. However, one has to be cautious in characterizing Siddhartha as this behavior is really not to be considered dishonest, but as an integral part of the Indian tradition. Within the story, Siddhartha goes against his beliefs when he tells his father that he is leaving, which is in contrast to what his father wants to hear, yet in return, Siddhartha’s father agrees with Siddhartha’s departure, as the father knows that this is the answer that his son wishes to hear, and remains true to his custom.
Similarly, the same cultural belief theme could be applied to the short story “The Story of an Hour”. Although this piece of literature is written several years later, it is also in a similar setting in the earlier period. “The Story of an Hour” is very similar and several other comparisons with the novel, Siddhartha can be drawn. The main character of “The Story of an Hour” is Louise, who is trapped within the stereotypical role of women in her society and is “ruled” by her husband. She is just as obedient as Siddhartha because she goes along with everything that her husband says. Also, as a consequence, of how women are treated during that era, Louise is unable to do the things she dreams about and her actions are limited to societal norms. The depth to this short story is a woman not being able to make her own choices due to the demands of society. She continues to hope that one day she will be rid of it all; similarly Siddhartha hopes to find his place in life, and end his journey as a follower.
The characters are in the same position in each of the stories, as they both try to please the people they care about. One is more like a prisoner trapped in her own home and society while the other is a victim of his culture and tradition. They both try to please those who are close to them, yet they remain unfulfilled. A void that can only be blamed on their passion to conform and their zest to find something better before it is too late.


Works Cited
• Chopin, Kate. “The Story of an Hour” A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader. Pearson Education Inc., 2005
• “Siddhartha” by Herman Hesse
http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/india-country-profile.html


Posted by: Sasha-Ann Jarrett at March 31, 2009 07:54 AM

Katie Ganning
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 CA 17: Academic Writing II
31 March 2009
Compare/Contrast Between Siddhartha and Ms. Brill: The Unattached World
To be in love with the world is a difficult affair. You cannot see the feelings only the reaction of the people living in the world with you. In the comparison of Katherine Mansfield’s, Ms. Brill and Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha, two main characters one who enjoys her Sunday routine spending it in the park while Siddhartha has already lived 2 different lives and has chosen to live amongst the child people. In Hesse’s Siddhartha, he has become consumed by the world possessions and observing people which is a life he as never wanted and in comparison to Ms. Brill, who loves the townspeople and what the world has to offer.
While Siddhartha has aged and has lived with the child people for quite sometime, he starts to learn and enjoy the luxuries of possessing nice things and gambling. In his previous life, one would never think to live like this, consuming all the food possible and continue to learn to art of samara. However, once he almost finally realized that this was the true way to find happiness in the world, he realized “The people of the world, the ordinary people, were still alien to him, just as he was apart from them” (Hesse 75). After living this life for so long, it really didn’t give a meaning to finding truth. All the people surrounding him were living a complete life of “pleasure and follies (78) and really didn’t have an understanding of who Siddhartha really was. As much as he lived his life with the child people, he was still all alone and that “he could play no longer (84). Realizing his un-attachment to the town, he leaves to continue his journey that he started many years ago.
During Ms. Brill’s typical Sunday afternoon walk in the park, she believes her life is so perfect just like in a play performance. She amusingly watched the action surrounding her, “How she loved sitting here, watching it all” (Mansfield 232). While the band continued to play, a younger couple sat near Ms Brill to listen to the performance. Ms. Brill, being the gleeful observer that she was, watched the couple and heard to her surprise what they had to say. Thinking she was having a wonderful afternoon, the couple acknowledged her awkwardness and of the townspeople disliking of her presence, “Why does she come here at all- who wants her? Why doesn’t she keep her silly old mug at home?” (233). This moment brought pain to Ms. Brill, as much as she loved this town and the people in it so much, she realized they did not feel the same about her. She was involved as much as she was uninvolved. Even though this came to realization for Ms. Brill, she did not leave the town she loved so much but continued to live there and stay unattached.
As much as both Ms. Brill and Siddhartha lived in their towns amongst the people, in reality they both were really uninvolved at all. For years, they both lived life thinking they had complete happiness, that these towns are what made them truly happy. The people that lived in each town were friends and acquaintances to their knowledge, but really meant nothing to them both all along. Although Ms. Brill and Siddhartha lived in two different cultures and different times, the socialization of people is similar in all different cultures.

Works Cited
Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle Brook: Prentice Hall, 2006. 144-154.
Mansfield, Katherine. “Ms. Brill”. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle Brook: Prentice Hall, 2006.
Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York, NY: New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1951.

Posted by: Katie Ganning at March 31, 2009 09:04 AM

Kasey McDearis, Shaina McSweeney, Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
Eng311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
27 August 2012
Chapter One: The Brahman’s Son Pg. 7
Passage: “Siddhartha”, he said, “why are you waiting?”
“You know why.”
“Will you go on standing and waiting until it is day, noon, evening?”
“I will stand and wait.”
“You will grow tired, Siddhartha.”
“I will grow tired.”
“You will fall asleep, Siddhartha.”
“I will not fall asleep.”
“You will die, Siddhartha.”
“I will die.”

Answers:
Page 7
1. Who is speaking? Siddhartha’s father initiates the conversation.
2. Who is being addressed? Siddhartha answers his father and a dialogue ensues.
3. What is the context of this passage? Siddhartha has asked his father if he could become a Samanas, and his father is telling him that he cannot. Siddhartha then rejects his fathers disapproval, which shows Siddhartha’s intense want to join the Samanas.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at August 27, 2012 03:18 PM

A- Siddhartha is speaking
B- Siddhartha is speaking to himself in this passage
C- He was not content with the elder’s wisdom anymore and wanted to learn more. He felt that there was more to be learned, and the elders could not teach him because they felt too content. (Page 3)

Posted by: Joseph / Summer at August 27, 2012 03:19 PM

Jason Anderson Group 2
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
August 27,2012
Passage:
"But where, where was this self, this innermost part, this ultimate part? It was not flesh and bone, it was neither thought nor consciousness, thus the wisest ones taught. So, where, was it?"

Answers:
Who is speaking? Siddhartha
Who is being addressed? Self, inner thoughts
What is the context? Siddhartha is questioning his life, particularly the teachings and knowledge he has now. He feels a thirst for greater knowledge, that cannot be quenched in his current life.

Posted by: Jason Anderson Group 2 at August 27, 2012 03:20 PM

Delia Mulvihill and Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311
In-Class Discussion of Part 1 of Siddhartha

Group 5

Passage: “Siddhartha learned a great deal form the Samanas; he learned many ways of losing the Self. He traveled along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue. He traveled the way of self-denial through meditation, through the emptying of the mind through all images. Along these and other paths did he learn to travel. He lost his Self a thousand times and for days on end he dwelt in non-being. But although the paths took him away from Self, in the end they always led back to it.”

a. The narrator is speaking

b. The reader is being addressed about the kind of person Siddhartha is becoming.

c. The context of the passage is that it is explaining what Siddhartha is learning from the Samanas and how he is growing from the experiences. He learned how to kill his sense so he could not feel any pain, hunger, thirst, etc. He’s still unhappy because regardless he always comes back to his Self, which is the point of learning all of these skills of being able to get away from his Self.

d. Page 11/12

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill and Sarah Winans at August 27, 2012 03:20 PM

Shyenne Price & Joe May
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
August 27, 2012

“A goal stood before Siddhartha, a single goal: to become empty, empty of
thirst, empty of wishing, empty of dreams, empty of joy and sorrow.”

A. Who is speaking?
The Narrator.
B. Who is being addressed?
Siddhartha. Siddhartha’s goal of wanting to become a Samana is what is being addressed.
C. What is the context of this passage?
This passage explains explicitly that Siddhartha is seeking to become a more spiritual person and what he is needing to do in order to be that way. In one aspect he wishes to practice what he preaches and experience the things he has been taught.

Posted by: Shyenne Price & Joe May at August 27, 2012 03:21 PM

Question 7 : "We are not going around in circles, we are moving up, the circle is a spiral, we have already ascended many a level."

(Answers are found on page 12 of the PDF version on libguides)
Who is speaking: Govinda
Who is being addressed: Siddhartha
What is the context of this passage, what is going on, exactly, here: Siddhartha was questioning if being with the Samanas was helping them get closer to reaching enlightenment or if they were continuing the cycle set for them by other Brahmins. Govinda was stating that they are continuously learning and gaining a new level of spiritual enlightenment with each step. Siddhartha seeks more whereas Govinda is decently content.

Posted by: Madison at August 27, 2012 03:49 PM

Given that Govinda was Siddhartha’s “lance bearer,” speculate about the conditions under which Govinda left home.

The text states that Govinda loved Siddhartha more than anyone else. “He loved Siddhartha's eye and sweet voice, he loved his walk and the perfect decency of his movements, he loved everything Siddhartha did and said and what he loved most was his spirit, his transcendent, fiery thoughts, his ardent will, his high calling” (2). Govinda also had faith in Siddhartha’s potential. Govinda wanted to be special like Siddhartha and felt that if he followed Siddhartha at least he could share in that distinctiveness. “…Govinda, as well did not want to become one of those, not one of those tens of thousands of Brahmans” (5). When Govinda hears that Siddhartha is leaving home he believes that his own life is really going to begin. Although he is afraid, it is his loyalty to Siddhartha and his own desire to stand out that motivates him to leave home.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at August 27, 2012 10:19 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
August 27, 2012

Question: “Why does he feel an “icy chill”? He compares himself to a star. How is that so?”

Answer: Siddhartha feels suddenly cold because he realizes that he is alone in his awakening. “Now, he was nothing but Siddhartha, the awoken one. Nothing else was left.” (Hesse, 36). He had always held a title to his name, his father’s son, a Brahman and a Samana, but now in this moment of awakening he is simply Siddhartha and nothing more. By being like a star, Siddhartha is standing out from others. He understands that he is alone on the path he has awoken to and will no longer have to answer to anyone but himself.

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 36. Kindle.

Posted by: Shyenne Price at August 28, 2012 12:10 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
28 August 2012
Chapter One: The Brahman’s Son
Number 3
Question: How are the Semanas described? From his description, how does the author feel about them?
Answer: The Semanas are described as people who are trying to find Nirvana by finding complete peace within their minds, bodies, and souls. They dedicate their time and lives to meditation in order to reach Nirvana. They also fast in the process. I think that the author feels at first inspired by the Semanas, almost the same way that Siddhartha feels, but having known as much as he did about them, he compares them to drunkards with no teaching abilities for Siddhartha.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at August 28, 2012 04:54 PM

Sherman and De'Nisha
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 CA12 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
27 August 2012

Passage:
"What is meditation? What is leaving one's body?.....It is fleeing from the self...The same escape, the same short numbing is what the driver of an ox-cart finds in the inn, drinking a few bowls of rice-wine..."

Answers: Found on pages 11-12

Who is speaking? Siddhartha
Who is being addressed? Himself (Siddhartha)
What is the context of the passage? Siddhartha and Govinda (Siddhartha’s bestfriend/sidekick) are both escaping from life and the realities life brings, in the midst of trying to understand life through spirituality.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at August 28, 2012 05:15 PM

7. What would Siddhartha have done if his father would have said “No” to his request?

In The Son of the Brahman, Siddhartha has asked his father if he could leave the Brahman’s and join the Samanas. He feels strongly about leaving and joining the Samanas to further increase his knowledge. In the passage, Siddhartha says that he will “do what his father will tell him to do.”(8) This would mean that if his father would continue saying no, then Siddhartha would obey his father and keep living among the Brahmans. He would keep standing at the doorway waiting for his father’s approval until his death.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at August 28, 2012 07:16 PM

Joseph Lontrato
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-311 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
August 28, 2012

Question: Why did Govinda break with his friend, Siddhartha?

Answer: In Chapter three of Siddhartha (Gotama) Govinda and Siddhartha travel to Jetavana, in the garden of Anathapindika in search of Buddha. After they locate the exalted one, Govinda asks to be accepted into the community of his disciples. After he is accepted he then tells Siddhartha that he is going to leave him and walk the path of salvation. Siddhartha later says to Govinda, “Govinda, my friend, now you have taken this step, now you have chosen this path. Always, oh Govinda, you've been my friend, you've always walked one step behind me. Often I have thought: Won't Govinda for once also take a step by himself, without me, out of his own soul? Behold, now you've turned into a man and are choosing your path for yourself. I wish that you would go it up to its end, oh my friend, that you shall find salvation!”(Page 21)

Posted by: Joseph Lontrato at August 28, 2012 08:46 PM

HW #24

Q: Why does Govinda choose to join Gotama? Why won't Siddhartha join him?

A: Gotama, the Illustrious One, had spoken of his beliefs and explained his ideas of salvation. Govinda willingly stepped forward to be accepted into the community because of what Gotama had said. Gotama had spoken of suffering and how to release oneself from suffering. Govinda felt some kind of reassurance in Gotama's teachings whereas Siddhartha had not felt the same. Siddhartha did not agree with Gotama's teachings that "through a small gap there streams something strange, something new, something that was not there before and that cannot be demonstrated and proved: that is {his} doctrine of rising above the world, of salvation." (32). Siddhartha truly believes that "nobody finds salvation through teachings." (34). All that Gotama has to offer is teachings. That is enough for Govinda, but not nearly enough for Siddhartha.

Posted by: Madison at August 28, 2012 08:51 PM

Question: What did Siddhartha do to the oldest Samana and what feat did this prove?
Answer: Siddhartha took over the elder’s soul and rendered him powerless. He also took over his free will with just one of his glances. This proved that Siddhartha had already gained all the knowledge that there was to gain from the Samana’s and yet he was still unsatisfied and not “full” yet. This also showed that he would not reach nirvana this way and needed to try something else to fulfill him.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at August 28, 2012 09:18 PM

Homework Question #4
4. How did Siddhartha convince his father? Why didn’t he just go?

Siddhartha wanted to leave home and venture out to join the Samanas. His father was an extremely wise and respected Brahman among their people. It was tremendously important for Siddhartha to receive his father’s permission in order to leave. Siddhartha respected his father for who he was and all that he had taught and given him so he was reluctant to just leave and journey out without his father’s acceptance. After asking his father if he could leave and getting crush when receiving his father’s response of no Siddhartha just stood still as a statue. He crossed his arms and continued to stand after his father had left and gone to bed. His father awoke after a few hours and had seen that Siddhartha remained in the same spot and continued to do this. When he finally returned his father spoke and asked many question finally concluding that Siddhartha “no longer dwelt with him in his home, that he had already left him” (Hesse, 8). Once Siddhartha stands his ground and his father realizes he is determined to venture and join the Samanas in order to further his knowledge; he permits him to leave and journey forward.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at August 29, 2012 12:14 AM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
29 August 2012

Question: Why is Govinda willing to follow Siddhartha?

Answer: In chapter one, we learn that both Govinda and Siddhartha both were friends and sons of Brahmans. Govinda is willing to follow Siddhartha because he looks up to him. The text states that Govinda, “loved everything Siddhartha did and said.” Govinda knew that one day Siddhartha was going to stand out from all the others and eventually become a God. (2).

Posted by: Sherman Milton at August 29, 2012 10:34 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Question: According to Siddhartha, how will he find enlightenment?

Answer: According to Siddhartha, enlightenment cannot be found in teachings. In speaking to Gotama, he states that even he, the Buddha, cannot share enlightenment by teachings. Thus Siddhartha has decided to abandon all teachings because even the best cannot share the experience of enlightenment.(24)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at August 29, 2012 11:35 AM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
29 August 2012

Question 1: Why is Siddhartha unhappy? Why is his spirit like a “waiting vessel”?

Answer: In Part One, Siddhartha is unhappy because he felt that he had learned everything from his father and the Brahmans that he could and he was still not satisfied with everything. He was still eager to learn new things and be able to get to nirvana. His spirit is like a “waiting vessel” because he is still trying to learn new things with the Brahmans but knows that he will have to leave in order to find what he is really looking for. “He had started to suspect that his venerable father and his other teachers, that the wise Brahmans had already revealed to him the most and best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied.” (Page 4)

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at August 29, 2012 12:57 PM

"Be Aware of too much wisdom!"
A. The Buddha is speaking
B. Siddhartha is being addressed
C. Siddhartha is leaving the Buddha and his followers. He tells the Buddha that he is leaving because he thinks his self will continue to exist due to his attachment to the community. The Buddha then replies with the quote above.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at August 29, 2012 01:17 PM

38. When Siddhartha “awakes” from his dream,what
does he see for the first time? When Siddhartha awoke he said "Govinda, my friend, now you have taken this step, now you have chosen this path. Always, oh Govinda, you've been my friend, you've always walked one step behind me. Often I have thought: Won't Govinda for once also take a step by himself, without me, out of his own soul? Behold, now you've turned into a man and are choosing your path for yourself. I wish that you would go it up to its end, oh my friend, that you shall find salvation!" (Siddhartha Ebook)In my opinion Siddhartha saw that his friend had taken the first step twoard independence.Govinda said "Siddhartha, it is not my place to scold you. We have both heard the exalted one, we have both perceived the teachings. Govinda has heard the teachings, he has taken refuge in it. But you, my honoured friend, don't you also want to walk the path of salvation? Would you want to hesitate, do you want to wait any longer?" (Siddhartha Ebook)Govinda had become a "man" in his eyes and was looking for his own path. For the first time since they became friends, and Govinda became Siddhartha's follower he questioned his leader. He questioned what his motives where for doing the things he does. With this Govinda was looking for some rationale behind Siddhartha's radical thoughts and questions. He wondered if Siddhartha was looking for Nirvana or he was just seeking to have questions answered on how to get there. They both saw the elders of the Samana growing old and realized they may never acheive their "salvation" or find Nirvana.

Posted by: Joseph May at August 29, 2012 01:18 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
29 August 2012

Question: Who is Gotama? What does the narrator think of him?
Answer: Gotama is the Buddha. The narrator admires Gotama, and wants to reach the state Gotama has reached. “This man was holy. Never before, Siddharta had venerated a person so much, never before he had loved a person as much as this one” (20).

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at August 29, 2012 01:29 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
29 August 2012
Homework Question #10
How does Siddhartha act when he is with the Samanas?
Siddhartha joins the Samanas in hopes that he will find his life’s purpose and achieves to quench his thirst for wanting more out of life. He doesn’t believe that his current surroundings can quench this “thirst”; therefore, he joins the Samanas with Govinda. Upon first joining the Samanas, Siddhartha does exactly what he is told and begins to adapt to the ways of the Samanas. Siddhartha gives away his garments and wore nothing more than a loincloth and an earth-colored unsown cloak (9). He ate only one uncooked meal a day and fasted for twenty-eight days, as the Semanas did. Siddhartha learned a lot when he was with the Semanas, many ways leading away from the self he learned to go (10). However, Siddhartha eventually begins to feel as if he could have learned these ways in a quicker, simpler fashion. He decides that, the way of the Semana isn’t for him.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at August 29, 2012 02:11 PM

Jeff Champlain
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Twentieth Century writers
Homework question #12
Page 10-11 pdf file
How Does Siddhartha meditate?

Siddahartha meditates by slowing his heartbeat, and reaching a state where he can hold his breath and even stop his heart beat. This takes him to a place where there is no suffering from normal struggles. Once he is out of this meditation state he becomes subject to the world around him again.

Posted by: Jeff Champlain at August 29, 2012 02:27 PM

Sarah Winans
8-28-2012
ENG 311
Dr. Hobbs
Magic
Siddhartha was not impressed by the magic because he thinks that everyone can do it. On pages 42-43 of the text, he states, “Everyone can perform magic, everyone can reach his goals, if he is able to think, if he is able to wait, if he is able to fast.” I think what he is trying to say is that by simply accomplishing your own goals you are making magic, and he has learned that goals can be feasible with determination.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at August 29, 2012 02:32 PM

Jason & Marcus Group 2
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
August 27,2012
Page 3
Passage:
"But where, where was this self, this innermost part, this ultimate part? It was not flesh and bone, it was neither thought nor consciousness, thus the wisest ones taught. So, where, was it?"

Answers:
Who is speaking? Siddhartha
Who is being addressed? Self, inner thoughts
What is the context? Siddhartha is questioning his life, particularly the teachings and knowledge he has now. He feels a thirst for greater knowledge, that cannot be quenched in his current life.(3)

Posted by: Jason/ Marcus at August 29, 2012 02:45 PM

Kasey McDearis, Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
29 August 2012
Chapter 10: The Sun
Passage: “But even if you would die ten times for him, you would not be able to take the slightest part of his destiny upon yourself.”

Answers:
1. Who is speaking? Vasudeva the Ferryman is speaking
2. Who is being addressed? Siddhartha is being spoken to.
3. What is the context of this passage? Vasudeva is telling Siddharta about his son. He is saying this to him because, he wants his son to learn from Siddhartha’s journey. He wants him to understand that he cannot do things for him for his entire life.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at August 29, 2012 02:51 PM

Madison and Matt L
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
28 August 2012

Passage Question 7 :
"We are not going around in circles, we are moving up, the circle is a spiral, we have already ascended many a level."

Answers:
Who is speaking? Govinda
Who is being addressed? Siddhartha
What is the context of this passage, what is going on, exactly, here? Siddhartha was questioning if being with the Samanas was helping them get closer to reaching enlightenment or if they were continuing the cycle set for them by other Brahmins. Govinda was stating that they are continuously learning and gaining a new level of spiritual enlightenment with each step. Siddhartha seeks more whereas Govinda is decently content.
(Answers are found on page 12 of the PDF version on libguides)

Posted by: madison and matt at August 29, 2012 02:52 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA12 Survery of Major Twentieth Centure Writers
29 August 2012
Question: What would Siddhartha have done if his father would have said “No” to his request?
Answer: In The Son of the Brahman, Siddhartha has asked his father if he could leave the Brahman’s and join the Samanas. He feels strongly about leaving and joining the Samanas to further increase his knowledge. In the passage, Siddhartha says that he will “do what his father will tell him to do.”(8) This would mean that if his father would continue saying no, then Siddhartha would obey his father and keep living among the Brahmans. He would keep standing at the doorway waiting for his father’s approval until his death.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at August 29, 2012 02:54 PM

Marcus C/Madison G
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
29 August 12

"...did you too learn that secret from the river: that there is no time?"

A) Siddhartha
B) Vasudeva
C) After Siddhartha realizes that Vasudeva listens to the river, he also wants to know if he learned from the river that there is no time. Vasdueva tells Siddhartha, Yes, he learned from the river that there is no time, only the present, not the shadow of the past or future (74).

Posted by: Marcus C/Madison G at August 29, 2012 02:56 PM

Joseph Lontrato & Summer Taylor
ENG-311 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
Dr. Hobbs
August 27, 2012

Passage: “He had started to suspect that his venerable father and his other teachers, that the wise Brahmans had already revealed to him the most and best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied”

Who is speaking? Siddhartha is speaking

Who is being addressed? Siddhartha is speaking to himself in this passage

What is the context/situation? He was not content with the elder’s wisdom anymore and wanted to learn more. He felt that there was more to be learned, and the elders could not teach him because they felt too content.(Page 3)

Posted by: Joseph Lontrato/ Summer Taylor at August 29, 2012 03:02 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
28 September 2012

HW Question 24: Why does Govinda choose to join Gotama? Why won't Siddhartha join him?

Answer: Gotama, the Illustrious One, had spoken of his beliefs and explained his ideas of salvation. Govinda willingly stepped forward to be accepted into the community because of what Gotama had said. Gotama had spoken of suffering and how to release oneself from suffering. Govinda felt some kind of reassurance in Gotama's teachings whereas Siddhartha had not felt the same. Siddhartha did not agree with Gotama's teachings that "through a small gap there streams something strange, something new, something that was not there before and that cannot be demonstrated and proved: that is {his} doctrine of rising above the world, of salvation." (32). Siddhartha truly believes that "nobody finds salvation through teachings." (34). All that Gotama has to offer is teachings. That is enough for Govinda, but not nearly enough for Siddhartha

Posted by: Madison at August 29, 2012 03:03 PM

Timothy Delay
Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA12 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
29 August 2012

Passage:
[T]here is one thing that this clear, worthy instruction does not contain; it does not contain the secret of what the Illustrious One himself experience – he alone among hundreds of thousands. That is what I thought and realized when I heard your teachings. That is why I am going on my way – not to seek another doctrine, for I know there is none, but to leave all doctrines and all teachers and to reach my goal along – or die.”

Answer:

Who is spreaking? Siddhartha
Who is being addressed? The Buddha, Gotama
What is the context/ situation? This is when Siddhartha pulls Gotama to the side and tries to explain why he is not staying to study under him. He feels that he is not being fulfilled. He wants to go into the world and get his own experience to further his enlightenment. He is determined to reach the perfection that Gotama has without another teacher or religion. Gotama tells more about being enlightened than how to reach enlightenment which is not what Siddhartha wants.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at August 29, 2012 03:09 PM

Jason Anderson/ Sherman Milton Group 3
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
8/29/12

Passage: "Siddhartha does nothing... he passes through the things of the world like a rock through water, without doing anything, without stirring; he is drawn, he lets himself fall."(42)

Answers:
A) Siddhartha is the speaker.
B) His audience is Kamala.
C) He is speaking about how he pursues his goals in life. He does not allow anything to distract him. He is unrelenting like a stone falling through water. (42)

Posted by: Jason/ Sherman at August 29, 2012 03:13 PM

Joe May/ Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-311 CA06
29 August 2012

Group 5
Question 5

Quote-
"Never before, it had become so strangely clear to Siddhartha, how closely lust was akin to death."

Questions-
Q.a)Who is speaking?
A.a)Siddhartha is speaking to himself. This is spoken in the 3rd person.

Q.b)Who is being addressed?
A.b)Siddhartha is adressing himself as well as Kamala.What is being addressed is his goal and how his feelings of human emotions are inhibiting him from achieving Nirvana.

Q.c)What is the context of this passage?
A.c)During this sexual, deviant and lustful interaction with Kamala, Siddhartha realizes that he is starting to feel human emotions. He is no longer a "rock falling through water" not absorbing any of the outside energy, but rather a human feeling emotions. I say this because he "comes to this realization" after his first sexual encounter. He realizes that he is not immortal, and that humans make love and feel lust. Humans cry tears and die. He has always been about achieving his one goal and this may inhibit him from finding Nirvana.

Posted by: Joe May and Summer Taylor at August 29, 2012 03:18 PM

Jeff Champlain and De’Nisha Butler (Group 2)
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
August 29,2012

Number 2

Passage:
“It was the self, I wanted to free myself from, which I sought to overcome.”

Answers: Found on page 27

(A) Who is speaking? Siddhartha
(B) Who is being addressed? Siddhartha is addressing himself
(C)What is the context of the passage? Siddhartha realized that he wasn’t a youth anymore, but a man. He wanted to be free from teachings and teacher, even Buddha, the wisest teacher. Siddhartha doesn’t want to conform to anyone’s teaching. He was only deceiving himself, it was a mystery for him to be alive. He knows the least about himself. Siddhartha sought to overcome the self he built. He was not happy with himself, the self he constructed

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at August 29, 2012 05:08 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
29 August 2012

Question:
11. What do people say about Siddhartha and the Ferryman?

Answer:
People began to believe that these two ferrymen were similar enough to be brothers. Word spread that these men held answers that noone else would surrender; that these men had solved life's mysteries. People who traveled across the river would constantly tell the ferrymen of their lives and some were even bold enough to ask questions about life to merely get a facial expression as an answer. "The curious people laughed and were discussing how foolishly and gullibly the common people were spreading such empty rumors." (76). Siddhartha and the Ferryman were ridiculed without compensation.

Posted by: Madison at August 29, 2012 06:59 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
29 August 29, 2012
Question: What does the river do when Siddhartha goes to see his son? Whose reflection does he see?

Answers: The River laughs at Siddhartha when he goes to find his son. Siddhartha sees his own reflection which merges in changes into his father's image. Siddhartha has a revelation that he liked his son also left on his own. The image then finally merges the changes into Siddhartha son further reflecting that the cycle will continue and that he needs to let go.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at August 29, 2012 08:56 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05
29 August, 2012

Question: How is Gotama different from the Samanas?

Answer: The Gotama are different from the Samana in that they are monks and not wisemen who forgo material item in order to reach spiritual enlightenment. Buddha teaches that you need to detach from the world and forgo things like love in order to reach enlightenment. The Gotama also have one holy person that they seek guidance from unlike the Samanas that have many(9-26).

Posted by: Timothy Delay at August 29, 2012 09:05 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
August 29, 2012

Question: “Why doesn’t Siddhartha punish the boy?”

Answer: Siddhartha does not punish his son because he loves him too much. He feels as if it is unfortunate for him to have fallen out of the life he used to have of servants and fine foods and clothing and only wishes to make him comfortable now living by the river. He says to Vasudeva, “I’m fighting for him, I’m seeking to win his heart, with love and with friendly patience I intent to capture it.” (Hesse, 99). Siddhartha “knows that ‘soft’ is stronger than ‘hard’” (Hesse, 100) and wants this to be the only way that his son truly loves him.

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 99-100. Kindle.

Posted by: Shyenne Price at August 29, 2012 11:29 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
August 28,2012

Question 41:
Siddhartha promised his father that he would return home. Why did Siddhartha decide not to return?

Answer: Because he realized he was no longer the same person. He said “But I am no longer the one I was…Whatever should I do at home and at my father’s place?...But all this is over, all of this is no longer alongside my path”. He felt nothing else was left. Siddhartha wanted to start fresh, start a clean slate in his life.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at August 30, 2012 06:10 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
August 30,2012


Question 3:
Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. How is this so?
Siddhartha compared himself to a stone as he realized he had lost sight of his goal. He had allowed the city to consume him, suck him in. “…drifted through the flow of the streets, stood still on the squares, rested on the stairs of stone by the river”. The analogy of a stone, gives the idea to the readers that he was easily persuaded and lost sight of what he set out to do in the beginning of his journey. I also feel as if Siddhartha is saying he was trampled upon and his dream or his goal was shun by everything else that was going on around him.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at August 30, 2012 06:11 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
30 August 2012

Chapter 10: The Son
Question number 5

Question: Why does the son hate the father?

Answer: He feels that he was taken away from his life of luxury to live in the conditions that Siddhartha does. His father does not want him to be pampered for the rest of his life, so he wants him to learn to be independent. His son does not like this situation at all. He remains very defiant for most of the time.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at August 30, 2012 08:22 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
30 August 2012

Question: “Given that Govinda was Siddhartha’s “lance bearer,” speculate about the conditions under which Govinda left home.”

Answer: The text states that Govinda loved Siddhartha more than anyone else. “He loved Siddhartha's eye and sweet voice, he loved his walk and the perfect decency of his movements, he loved everything Siddhartha did and said and what he loved most was his spirit, his transcendent, fiery thoughts, his ardent will, his high calling” (2). Govinda also had faith in Siddhartha’s potential. Govinda wanted to be special like Siddhartha and felt that if he followed Siddhartha at least he could share in that distinctiveness. “…Govinda, as well did not want to become one of those, not one of those tens of thousands of Brahmans” (5). When Govinda hears that Siddhartha is leaving home he believes that his own life is really going to begin. Although he is afraid, it is his loyalty to Siddhartha and his own desire to stand out that motivates him to leave home. (Quotes were taken from chapter 1: The Brahmin’s Son.)

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at August 30, 2012 08:58 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
30 August 2012

Question: “Be aware of too much wisdom!”

Answer: A. The Buddha is speaking. B. Siddhartha is being addressed. C. The Buddha makes this comment to Siddhartha after Siddhartha tells the Buddha that he is leaving him and his followers. Siddhartha has explained that he will not be able to lose his self if he stays because he will become attached to the Buddha and his followers. “…In truth the Self would continue to live and grow, for it would have been transformed into your teachings, into my allegiance and love for you and for the community of the monks” (35). Page numbers were taken from the printed novel.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at August 30, 2012 09:07 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
30 August 2012

Homework Question 8: “Why does Siddhartha wish to kill himself?”
Answer: Siddhartha wanted to kill himself because he was feeling hopeless and lacking in purpose. He had just sickened from his life of consumerism and was consumed by the idea of suicide. “There was nothing more for him but to efface himself, to destroy the unsuccessful structure of his life, to throw it away, mocked at by the gods. That was the deed which he longed to commit, to destroy the form which he hated!” (88-89) Quotes taken from chapter 8: By the River

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at August 30, 2012 10:15 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
30 August 2012

In-class Question 10: “The world, my friend Govinda, is not imperfect, or on a slow path towards perfection: no, it is perfect in every moment”
Answer: A. Siddhartha is speaking. B. Govinda is being addressed. C. Govinda has asked “have you not discovered certain knowledge yourself that has helped you to live?”(142) And Siddhartha in response, has provided Govinda with all he has discovered during his life. Siddhartha tried to explain to Govinda that “time is not real…” (143). In the quote above he used the state of the world to animate this idea. Page numbers were taken from the printed version of the text.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at August 30, 2012 10:39 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Matt Lynch
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 311
August 30, 2012

Question #9:
"Siddhartha felt more and more that this was no longer Vasudeva, no longer a human being, who was listening to him, that this motionless listener was absorbing his confession into himself like a tree the rain, that this motionless man was the river itself, that he was God himself, that he was the eternal itself."
1)Who is speaking?
Siddhartha is speaking to himself, self reflection
2)Who is being addressed?
Siddhartha is not addressing anyone specific because he is having a self reflection about what he believes is happening and who Vasudeva really is.
3)What is the context of the passage?
Siddhartha realizes that Vasudeva was just like the Buddha. Vesudeva shows how to listen and its effects. Siddhartha realizes Vesudeva is able to help him to further reach his goal of enlightenment.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at August 30, 2012 11:24 PM

Matt Lynch
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 311
Siddhartha Homework Question #16

Question: What “wound” does Siddhartha have? What is the different light that he sees people in?

The “wound” that Siddhartha has is that he is not satisfied or happy. He has an urge and desire for more knowledge and to reach enlightenment. Siddhartha sees other people as people who settle or are satisfied with where they are and their accomplishments. Siddhartha does not have much in common with other people since he has deeper thoughts and always desiring more.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at August 30, 2012 11:39 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Siddhartha Part 2

Question:How does Siddhartha's dice playing echo his real life?

Answer: Siddhartha has become discontent with his life. He goes through the motions of happiness, and of his business; but has never learned to love himself or others. He deems this the foolishness and joys of a child that he is unable to learn.(53-54)The dice playing much like his life leaves him unhappy, and so he fakes it. (54)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at August 31, 2012 10:23 AM

Joseph Lontrato
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-311 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
August 31, 2012

Chapter 9 – The Ferryman

Question: What did Siddhartha learn from the ferryman?

Answer: Siddhartha learned many things from the ferryman. “He learned to build an oar, and learned to mend the boat, and to weave baskets, and was joyful because of everything he learned, and the days and months passed quickly. But more than Vasudeva could teach him, he was taught by the river. Incessantly, he learned from it. Most of all, he learned from it to listen, to pay close attention with a quiet heart, with a waiting, opened soul, without passion, without a wish, without judgment, without an opinion.” (Page 74). Furthermore Siddhartha learned to live and dwell in the present and not to worry about the things in the past or the things that could occur in the future, because the present was the only thing that mattered at the time. On page 74 Siddhartha realizes the secret of the river and states, "It is this what you mean, isn't it: that the river is everywhere at once, at the source and at the mouth, at the waterfall, at the ferry, at the rapids, in the sea, in the mountains, everywhere at once, and that there is only the present time for it, not the shadow of the past, not the shadow of the future?

Posted by: Joseph Lontrato at August 31, 2012 11:08 AM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
31 August 2012

Question: What does Siddhartha think of the Ferryman and of the river?

Answer: Siddhartha thinks very highly of the Ferryman of the river. One thing that really stood out about the Ferryman is that he learns from the river. Siddhartha really respected him for the way he treated him when he departed and did not have anything to give him in return.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at August 31, 2012 11:09 AM

Sarah Winans and Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
Chapter Two: With the Childlike People Pages 46-47
Passage:“Here with Kamala was the worth and purpose of his present life, not with the business of Kamaswami.”
Answers:
Page 46-47
a. Who is speaking? The narrator is speaking.
b. Who is being addressed? Siddhartha.
c. What is the context of this passage? Siddhartha seems to be loving spending time with Kamala, and finds his true purpose with Kamala and not dealing with business in Kamaswami. I think he is loving that he is learning from her, and he is learning that once you are in love with someone you should not abandon them.

Posted by: Sarah Winans and Bryan Baldwin at August 31, 2012 11:45 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
August 27, 2012

Siddhartha,Chapter Two- With the Samanas; pg 17

Question:
What did Siddhartha do to the oldest Samana and what feat did this prove?

Answer:
Siddhartha took over the elder’s soul and rendered him powerless. He also took over his free will with just one of his glances. This proved that Siddhartha had already gained all the knowledge that there was to gain from the Samana’s and yet he was still unsatisfied and not “full” yet. This also showed that he would not reach nirvana this way and needed to try something else to fulfill him.


Posted by: Summer Taylor at August 31, 2012 11:56 AM

(re-submission of first homework assignment)
Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
Eng311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
31 August 2012
Question: Why was Siddhartha unimpressed by magic?
Answer: Siddhartha was not impressed by the magic because he thinks that everyone can do it. On pages 42-43 of the text, he states, “Everyone can perform magic, everyone can reach his goals, if he is able to think, if he is able to wait, if he is able to fast.” I think what he is trying to say is that by simply accomplishing your own goals you are making magic, and he has learned that goals can be feasible with determination.
Pages 42-43

Posted by: Sarah Winans at August 31, 2012 12:05 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
Eng311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
31 August 2012
Part 2: The Son
Question: How does Siddhartha take advantage of father?
Answer: I found Siddhartha to take advantage of his dad through pages 84-86. The young boy was very rich and used his grieving and his attitude to avoid Siddhartha and make him feel like he did not have any control over him.
Pages: 84-86

Posted by: Sarah Winans at August 31, 2012 12:27 PM

Delia Mulvihill and Joseph Lontrato
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05
In-Class Discussion of Siddhartha Part Two

Group 6

Passage: “…when the Om entered his consciousness: he became aware of him0self in his misery and in his error.”

a.The Narrator

b.The Reader

c.The context of this passage is when Siddhartha is at the end of his rope and feels that he has nothing left to do in his life and wants to drown himself in the river. When he is about to let go of the tree, the word “Om” which is what the Brahmans say at the end of their prayers comes to his mind and it “awakens his dormant spirit” and he comes back to reality of his actions and what he has been doing to himself.

d.Page 62

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at August 31, 2012 12:30 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
August 27, 2012

Chapter Chapter 5 Kamala; page 34

Question:
What does Siddhartha think of the ferryman and the river?

Answer:
The first thing that Siddhartha says to the ferryman is that the river is beautiful. The ferryman then explains to Siddhartha that there is much to be learned from the river. Siddhartha tells the ferryman that he is unable to give the ferryman a gift for ferrying him across the river, but the ferryman tells him that it is ok because Siddhartha will pay him that gift later on. Another teaching the ferryman teaches Siddhartha is that like the river, everything comes back. Siddhartha compares the ferryman to his friend Govinda because he is thankful, submissive, like to obey, and are like children-thinking little.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at August 31, 2012 12:43 PM

Joe May
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311 CA06 M/W/F 2:30pm
31 August 2012

Siddhartha Part II HW Questions #12.

12. Describe the events surrounding Kamala’s meeting Siddhartha again.

Kamala and her son (Siddharthas Son) attended a pilgrimage to see the buddha, because he was dying and this pilgrimage was attended by many. They needed a ferry driver to take the pilgrims accross water to see the holy Gatama in his last human days. Siddhartha was also a pilgrim going to hear the last teachings of Buddha. During their pilgrimage, during a rest Kamala was bitten by a poisenous snake. Siddhartha heard the screams and when he went to help he saw it was his beautiful "courtesan" from many years ago. Upon her being taken to a hut where her bite could be cleaned and healing potion administered, Siddhartha saw the face of his son and instantly knew it was his kin.

Posted by: Joseph May at August 31, 2012 01:28 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
31 August 2012

Question: How is Siddhartha different when he wakes up? Who is sitting with him?
Answer: When Siddhartha wakes up from his nap under the coconut tree he feels relieved and feels that he has awaken. He feels like he is reborn a new and can remember another life. He is able to feel like his old self. He feel relief because he says, “Never before by sleep, he had been thus refreshed, thus renewed, thus rejuvenated! Perhaps, he had really died, had
drowned and was reborn in a new body?” (63) The word Om has helped him find himself again and started the process of going back to his old self. When Siddhartha awakes, he is found starring at someone very familiar in a yellow robe. He finds himself looking at Govinda. Govinda was watching Siddhartha and protecting him from the creatures of the forest before he himself drifted off to sleep.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at August 31, 2012 01:45 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
31 August 2012
Homework Question # 7

What was the bird dream about? What does it mean?
Siddhartha had a dream about a small, rare singing bird that Kamala owned. Siddhartha dreamt that the bird had become mute. The bird used to always sing in the morning, and since it became mute it arose his attention. He stepped in front of the cage and looked inside, where he saw the small bird dead and laid on the ground. He took it out, weighed it and then threw it into the street. After this action he felt bad because, he had thrown away all the value of everything good by throwing out the dead bird. This dream made him feel worthless and empty. Siddhartha felt as if everything died in him. There wasn’t anything else valuable to him. Siddhartha compared the dream to his life. Similar to the bird that died, Siddhartha felt as if everything in his life died and had no meaning.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at August 31, 2012 02:22 PM

Leah Hollingsworth (Researcher) , Timothy Delay (Spokesperson), Joe May (Scribe)
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311 CA05
5 September 2012

QEP Activity: Group 3

3. Saint Leo University Core Value of Respect- Animated in the spirit of Jesus Christ, we value all individuals' unique talents, respect their dignity and strive to foster their commitment to excellence in our work. Our community's strength depends on the unity and diversity of our people, on the free exchange of ideas and on learning, living, and working harmoniously.

A. The Saint Leo core value of respect is seen many times throughout the short book of Siddhartha. The core value of respect is best represented in the final chapter of Govinda on page 148 and lies in paragraphs 2 and 3. In these passages Govinda shows respect to Siddhartha for his friendship and his insight. He respects his clear and straightfoward thoughts as well as his honesty. With those qualities Siddhartha has helped Govinda find peace and his own way.

Posted by: Joe May at September 5, 2012 03:21 PM

Sarah Winans
Wollinsky Mendez
Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05

Question: How is the core value of Community connected to the text?

In this text, the core value of Community is best exemplified by the son of the Brahman. "Siddhartha was thus loved by everyone. He was a source of joy for everybody, he was a delight for them all."

Works Cited:
Hesse, Herman "Siddhartha"
3

Posted by: Sarah Winans, Wollinsky Mendez, and Bryan Baldwin at September 5, 2012 07:06 PM

Jeff Champlain, Kasey Mcdearis, Sherman and De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
September 5, 2012

Group One: Excellence
In this text, the core value of excellence is best exemplified in the chapter entitled Gotama (beginning on page 18).
Abstract: “I wish that they shall all stay with the teachings, that they shall reach their goal: It is not my place to judge another person’s life. Only for myself, for myself alone, I must decide, I must choose, I must refuse. …….but that in truth it would live on and grow, for then I had replaced myself with the teachings, my duty to follow you, my love for you, and the community of monks!”
Found on page 25.
Here Siddhartha reconstructs and refines the principles that guide his journey, a journey to spirituality but also excellence. Siddhartha through Gotama’s teaching shaped his own quest for enlightenment into a self-directed form of excellence. Yes, Siddhartha receives teachings from Kamala on how enjoy worldly love, and other teachings from Vasudeva. Siddhartha’s journey remains self-directed as he strives to attain and contain the core values of excellence.
Siddhartha learned a great deal from the Samanas; he learned how to deny the self. Through self-denial, hunger, pain, thirst etc. he became a non-being. Although, to readers it may not make sense, in the long run it led to the development of his character, he learned skills, he learned responsibility, and in the end he achieved excellence.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at September 5, 2012 11:11 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Shyenne Price
Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
5 September 2012
QEP Activity: Question #5
5. Responsible Stewardship- Our creator blesses us with an abundance of resources. We foster a spirit of service to employ our resources to university and community development. We must be resourceful. As a Catholic university, we optimize and apply all of the resources of our Florida and global communities to fulfill Saint Leo University’s mission and goals.
Towards the end of the novel, Siddhartha begins to show his own sense of responsible stewardship. Siddhartha helps his dear friend, Govinda, to see a vision that gave him happiness. He began to see everything that was valuable and holy to him in his life. Govinda’s prolonged search finally ended. He found the happiness he longed for.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm/Shyenne Price/Summer Taylor at September 6, 2012 12:14 AM

Shaina McSweeney, Delia Mulvihill and Matt Lynch
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05
05 September 2012

6. Integrity-The commitment of Saint Leo University to excellence demands that its members live its mission and deliver on its promise. The faculty, staff, and students pledge to be honest, just, and consistent in word and deed.

Core value working definition: To be consistently honest and moral, with both other people and yourself.

In this text, the core value of integrity is best exemplified in The Son of the Brahman/chapter 1, page six, With the Samanas/chapter 2, page 16, and Gotama/chapter 3, page 23.

In all three of the examples given above, Siddhartha is departing from certain places and leaving certain people, such as his family, the samanas, and the Gotama. Each time Siddhartha leaves, he does not make an excuse, but instead is completely honest with each individual, even if it’s not what the person wants to hear. This is shown when Siddhartha gives his opinion to Gotama about his teachings. “I have not spoken to you like this to argue with you” (24).

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at September 7, 2012 12:24 AM

Jason Anderson
Madison Grabow
Joseph Lontrato
ENG311 CA05
Dr. Hobbs
September 7,2012

QEP Number 4: Personal Development
Answer: In this text, the core value of personal development is best exemplified on page 104, where Siddhartha has finished his journey, through trials and tribulations, having reached a peaceful and balanced life. This is preceded by his realization (page 70) that he must learn from the river in order to develop himself. On page 74 he finally learns from the river that he must live in the present, not the past or the future. Throughout the text he tries to better himself to reach that pure balance he saw in Gotama, hoping that he may teach others how to reach it as well.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Jason/Madison/Joseph at September 7, 2012 12:47 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 28, 2012 08:41 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr Hobbs
ENG 311

Homework Question #4
4. How did Siddhartha convince his father? Why didn’t he just go?

Answer: Siddhartha wanted to leave home and venture out to join the Samanas. His father was an extremely wise and respected Brahman among their people. It was tremendously important for Siddhartha to receive his father’s permission in order to leave. Siddhartha respected his father for who he was and all that he had taught and given him so he was reluctant to just leave and journey out without his father’s acceptance. After asking his father if he could leave and getting crush when receiving his father’s response of no Siddhartha just stood still as a statue. He crossed his arms and continued to stand after his father had left and gone to bed. His father awoke after a few hours and had seen that Siddhartha remained in the same spot and continued to do this. When he finally returned his father spoke and asked many question finally concluding that Siddhartha “no longer dwelt with him in his home, that he had already left him” (Hesse, 8). Once Siddhartha stands his ground and his father realizes he is determined to venture and join the Samanas in order to further his knowledge; he permits him to leave and journey forward.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at December 5, 2012 10:45 AM

Matt Lynch
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers 20th Century
Dr. Hobbs
November 25, 2012
Final Essay #3 Personal Development within Siddhartha by Herman Hesse and The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
Personal development is something all people experience throughout life. Personal development is what shapes us into the people who we ultimately become. It takes real life experiences and hard times in order to learn and develop for the future. Through hard times and learning experiences people can develop and learn from decision they have made over time, so they will not receive the same outcomes in the future. Personal development is the process of individual self-development, through experiences, developing talents, and enhancement of life. In Siddhartha and the Old Man and the Sea both main characters Siddhartha and Santiago both experience personal development through making tough decisions and experiencing new things, the development of talents, and experience self-sacrifice, ultimately having a self-realization of transforming for the better.
Siddhartha and Santiago the old fisherman both go through a journey where they are confronted with many decisions in different experiences. They are called to make decisions and to learn from these experiences and the decisions they have made in order to further themselves along their journey. “Siddhartha, he said, why are you waiting? You know why. Will you go on standing and waiting until it is day, noon, evening? I will stand and wait. You will grow tired, Siddhartha. I will grow tired. You will fall asleep, Siddhartha. I will not fall asleep. You will die, Siddhartha. I will die.” (Hesse 8 PDF). This is the first hard experience that Siddhartha has encountered, making the decision whether or not to listen to his father and stay home or to go with what he wants to do and follow the Semanas. In The Old Man and the Sea Santiago comes across a similar experience in deciding whether to leave the shallow water or explore the deep water to fish. “Today I’ll work out where the schools of bonito and albacore are and maybe there will be a big one with them. Before it was really light he had his baits out and was drifting with the current. One bait was down forty fathoms. The second was at seventy-five and the third and fourth were down in the blue water at one hundred and one hundred and twenty-five fathoms.” (Hemingway 11, PDF). These were unfamiliar depths to the old fisherman, Santiago. He had to make adjustments to his fishing style and how he would manage the skiff. Both Siddhartha and Santiago had to make tough personal decisions in certain situations, these experiences enable them to further their personal development. If they had not made these decisions then their personal development would have been limited.
Siddhartha and Santiago both had to learn and develop new skills and tasks throughout their journeys, positively building their personal development. Along each of their paths they improve their personal development, Siddhartha by learning the skills to live on his own and live off the land like a Samana and Santiago by adjusting and learning to fish the deeper waters. “Instructed by the oldest if the Samanas, Siddhartha practiced self-denial, practiced meditation, according to a new Samana rules.” (Hesse 11, PDF). Siddhartha once joining the Samanas had to learn their ways and their practices. New talents to help him control himself and his feelings making him develop as a person. Santiago when he went to the deep water had to simply adjust to a new surrounding. “Now the man watched the dip of the three sticks over the side of the skiff and rowed gently to keep the [31] lines straight up and down and at their proper depths… He kept them straighter than anyone did, so that at each level in the darkness of the stream there would be a bait waiting exactly where he wished it to be for any fish that swam there.” (Hemingway 12, PDF). Santiago had to drop lines; He also made the adjustment to keep them straighter than anyone else’s for disguise. Siddhartha and Santiago both had to learn or make adjustment s along their journeys enabling them to positively personally develop.
Siddhartha and Santiago also had to experience sacrifice in order to personally develop on their journey. Siddhartha when he had to battle his hunger so he did not starve and Santiago when he battles the marlin. “Siddhartha learned a lot when he was with the Samanas … He went the way of self-denial by means of pain, through voluntarily suffering and overcoming pain, hunger, thirst, tiredness.” (Hesse 11, PDF). Siddhartha experiences sacrifice while suffering in pain and hunger to learn the Samana’s ways. Santiago experiences sacrifice when trying to bring the marlin to the boat after hooking it. “Settled comfortably against the wood and took his suffering as it came and the fish swam steadily and the boat moved slowly through the dark water.” (Hemingway 25, PDF). Santiago’s hand becomes bruised and he is completely drained yet his sacrifice paid off and he caught the marlin. Siddhartha and Santiago both personally develop through the sacrifices they made throughout their journeys.
In the novels “The Old Man and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway and “Siddhartha” by Hermann Hesse, the main characters Siddhartha and Santiago experience personal development. Siddhartha and Santiago personally develop through making difficult decisions, learning new skills, and personal sacrifice. With the decisions, they each made, the skills they developed, and the sacrifices Siddhartha and Santiago made them both had a positive improvement in personal development which they both eventually realize in the end.

Work Cited
Hemingway, Ernest. The Old Man and the Sea. Scribner's, 1952. PDF.
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Bantam, 1922. PDF.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at December 5, 2012 03:12 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311
1 December 2012
Excellence or Average: A Comparative Analysis of The Great Gatsby and Siddhartha
Every person strives for something in his or her life at least once. It can be money, love, power, or even a job. With all of these things to choose from, people have the option of choosing multiple goals to accomplish throughout their life. One goal that all people can identify with, however, is the pursuit of excellence. Excellence can mean many different things to different people, and can be applied to just about anything. These can include excellence in family matters, excellence in personal development, and excellence in religion. Since excellence is an immense topic with a myriad of meanings, there will be a working definition of the “type” of excellence that will be discussed in this paper. In this paper, the definition of excellence is a character or characters striving for perfection in some aspect of their life, and also having a natural “knack” for their particular goal. This paper will show that Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha is a better, more identifiable example of the pursuit of excellence than Scott F. Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby by comparing and contrasting three aspects of excellence: excellence in love, excellence in society, and excellence in self-improvement.
In The Great Gatsby, Gatsby's entire life was driven by his love for Daisy Buchanan, but in the end, she did not choose him. Through Gatsbys attempts to woo Daisy, the reader can obviously see that Gatsby has no natural “knack” for his goal. Even though he spent many years trying to impress Daisy, it was never enough. One example of this is, “She was appalled by West Egg, this unprecedented ‘place’ that Broadway had begotten upon a Long Island fishing village—appalled by its raw vigor that chafed under the old euphemisms and by the too obtrusive fate that herded its inhabitants along a short cut from nothing to nothing” (Fitzgerald 115). In Hesse’s story, the main character Sidhartha has no problem getting the girl he wants. His love, Kamala, is all too impressed by Siddhartha’s natural inclination for love even though he has no experience in the art. "You are the best lover," she said thoughtfully, "I ever saw” (Hesse 52). Though Gatsby tried harder than Siddhartha to excel in his pursuit, Siddhartha had a natural knack for love that Gatsby seemed not to possess.
Excellence in society is a key part in life; it can increase popularity and standing, and if exceptionally excellent, wealth. This was such the case that Gatsby encountered. Gatsby befriended a wealthy man named Dan Cody and worked on his yacht for five years, which gave Gatsby a taste of what money could be like. Gatsby worked for years on this goal, and certainly succeeded in getting rich, but in the end it was all for nothing. Gatsby’s tale is an extreme example of a person who seems to show an obvious natural inclination for excellence in society, but Gatsby forgot the most important part- it is not always about the money. Being sociably also means to make and keep friends. Nobody even cares enough about Gatsby besides Gatsbys father and Nick to come to his funeral. “The minister glanced several times at his watch so I took him aside and asked him to wait for half an hour. But it wasn’t any use. Nobody came” (Fitzgerald 186). Gatsbys story of rags to riches is not a very realistic and relatable example of excellence like Siddhartha. Siddhartha shows excellence in society, but his examples are a bit more understated than Gatsbys are. Siddhartha displays this excellence by simply making and keeping friends easily. Siddhartha’s friends have willingness to follow him no matter what happened, or where Siddhartha went. “He [Govinda] wanted to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, the splendid. And in days to come, when Siddhartha would become a god, when he would join the glorious, then Govinda wanted to follow him as his friend, his companion, his servant, his spear carrier, his shadow” (Hesse 3). This is an example of how Siddhartha’s excellent in society influenced the people around him and what loyalty his friends felt towards him. Siddhartha may not have gained a huge house and a mass of money, but he was by far the wealthiest man in the end.
Both The Great Gatsby and Siddhartha have main themes centered around self-improvement. Gatsby wanted self-improvement in a material sense. He wanted to improve his social status and wealth in order to impress his love Daisy, so she would leave her husband and be with Gatsby instead. Gatsby did succeed in the money part of his venture, but had to turn to the underworld to do so. Because of this, Gatsby did not truly improve himself as he thought he did. Gatsby’s social status may have improved, but his “self” became corrupt. Unlike Gatsby, Siddhartha succeeded in his self-improvement, because his self-improvement was about his spirit and not his material things. Since childhood, Siddhartha showed a knack for improving himself as shown in this example, “[ his father]….saw him growing up to become great wise man and priest, a prince among the Brahmans” (Hesse 1). By the end of Hesse’s novel Siddhartha has found nirvana and completed what he started- a transformation from ignorance to understanding.
The Great Gatsby and Siddhartha both show strong central characters that will do almost anything to achieve their goals, but only one of these books displays true excellence- Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha. Siddhartha shows an innate natural knack in his goals that Gatsby just does not seem to possess. This natural inclination and actual success in his goals is what rises Siddhartha about the “just average” to excellent.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at December 5, 2012 06:41 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
4 September 2013
QUESTION #13
#13 QUESTION
He had started to suspect that his venerable father and his other teachers, that the wise Brahmans had already revealed to him the most and best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied
Question:
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above (a) who is speaking, (b) who is being addressed? (c) what is the context of the passage , i.e., what is going, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations).
Answer:
The person speaking in this passage would be Govinda, the person being addressed is Siddhartha and his father, the context of the passage is that Siddhartha feels that he is that his father is not achieving the proper way of enlightenment, and he also suspects that his father and the Brahmins have been taught everything from the holy books in which Siddhartha has a belief that they have not reached enlightenment.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at September 4, 2013 06:09 PM

Stephanie
Professor Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4 September 2013

Question: Govinda’s “wish was to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, splendid one.” Why is Govinda willing to follow Siddhartha?

Answer: Because Govinda thought, Siddhartha would become a god. Nevertheless, as Govinda says he wanted “to follow him as his friend, his companion, his servant, his spear-carrier, his shadow (Hesse, page 6).” So, therefore, Govinda wanted to follow his example by walking the same path as Siddhartha did. For Govinda, Siddhartha was his role model and more than his friend he was like an extended part of Govinda’s life; you could say, Siddhartha was almost like a brother for Govinda.

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at September 4, 2013 06:12 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in literature
9th September 2013

Question: "Why, do you suppose Siddhartha's mother does not have more of a role in the decision?"

This novel is set in India, the introduction mentions that it was 1911. This was a time in which women were seen as inferior and could not voice their opinions, let alone have a say in such an important decision. It was the cultural norm for women to serve their husbands as if they were their owners. "Now go kiss your mother, tell her where you are going. (Pg7)" This quote shows that if, Siddhartha's mother did have an input it would have been futile anyway since the father's decision is final. "...and went to his mother to do as his father had said. (Pg7)" Similarly to the first quote, this reinforces the father's authority and how the mother is more of a symbol of the family and not an authoritative figure.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 4, 2013 09:29 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210 CA02 Discussion question
4 September 2013

“Be Aware of too much wisdom”
Question: A) Who is speaking? Who is being addressed? What is the content of this passage?


Answer: Siddhartha and Govinda traveled a long Samana’s journey through the forest to seek out the spiritual and holy Buddha, to listen to his teachings. After listening to Buddha’s teachings with his own ears, Siddhartha was in awe by Buddha’s wise words about his spiritual journey, in which he overcame earthly pain. He approached Buddha to share his thoughts about his teachings. Siddhartha strongly questioned Buddha’s teachings and questioned his goals. He says to Buddha he wants to “depart from all teachings and all teachers and to reach my goal by myself or to die” (Siddhartha, 28). The Gotama tells Siddhartha “beware of too much wisdom” because he is searching for answers, and a self-righteous path he has no idea how to attain(Buddha,29).

Posted by: Erica Bodden at September 5, 2013 07:49 PM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013
Question: “Truly, only a person who has succeeded in reaching the innermost part of his self would
Glance and walk this way.”
46. Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation my differ from the version of the text you are using ( there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
This passage follows a conversation that Siddhartha has with the Illustrious One. During this conversation, he is critiquing the O Illustrious One’s teachings. Siddhartha says, “Nobody finds salvation through teachings” (34). The entire novel focuses on Siddhartha’s journey to self-discovery and it is ironic that the Illustrious One preaches that once you join him and his teachings you will find your way to salvation. Siddhartha points out that it is impossible for someone to find salvation through someone else’s teachings. One has to discover it on his own. For this reason, Siddhartha feels that he cannot follow the Illustrious One; he needs to continue his journey. However, in the quote mentioned above Siddhartha is praising him but at the same time being a bit satirical. Right before this he says how he wishes that he could “look and smile, sit and walk like that, so free, so worthy, so restrained, so candid, so childlike and mysterious” (35). On the surface, these seem like compliments but he is really criticizing him. He does not understand how a person preaching false hope and information can sit so calm as if it does not affect him. He feels like the Illustrious One is putting up a front just to gain blind followers.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at September 5, 2013 08:00 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013

Questions: “Why did Siddhartha remain standing? Why didn’t he just leave? Did Siddhartha’s father allow him to leave because in a sense, Siddhartha had “already left”?”

Answer: Siddhartha remained standing after his father’s initial refusal because of his determination to obtain his father’s consent to joining the Samanas. His determination was evident from his earlier conservation with Govinda during which he explained “…let’s not waste words…” in response to Govinda’s doubt about receiving his father’s permission (Hesse 9). Siddhartha knew that if he remained vertical long enough, he would not only display his dedication to joining the Samanas, but also his father would grant him permission to leave out of concern for his well-being. When Siddhartha’s father entered the room after hours of observing Siddhartha’s unfaltering vigil, he realized that he did not recognize Siddhartha, but rather saw him “…standing there…like a stranger to him…” (Hesse 10). He then understood that Siddhartha had already departed from his chosen path for him and despite his disapproval, needed to let him go.

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at September 5, 2013 08:01 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
5 September 2013

Question: “A goal stood before Siddartha, a single goal: to become empty, empty of thirst, empty of wishing, empty of dreams, empty of joy and sorrow.”

"Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b). Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This Translation may differ from the version of the test you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version."

In Siddhartha, the speaker is a voice that follows Siddhartha’s life. In the quote, the narrator is addressing the reader about what Siddhartha’s goals are while being a part of the Samanas. The context of the passage is what Siddhartha’s goals are in life. He wants to join the Samanas to learn qualities that he would not have learned while living home. After the narrator list Siddhartha’s goal, the story turns towards Siddhartha’s actions. His actions consist of staying in one location until he stopped functioning. He learns to function in other ways. Overall, this quote describes what Siddhartha hopes to achieve while being with the Samanas.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 5, 2013 08:50 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013

Question:""...Nobody will obtain salvation by means of teachings!" (Hesse, 28). A.) Who is speaking? B.) Who is being addressed?. C.)What is the context of the passage, i.e. what is going on, exactly, here?"

Answer: In this particular part of the text, Gotama is speaking to Siddhartha, who has decided that he was going to leave and continue his journey. He then gives a parting speech about all the things he had learned while in Gotama's presence. He also expressed what he felt to be faults in Gotama's teachings of salvation. Gotama responds by saying, "You should think about this further. But, be warned, oh seeker of knowledge, of the thicket of opinions and of arguing about words." (Hesse, 27). Gotama wanted to portray to Siddartha that his teachings of salvation were more guidelines than actual teachings. You can not be taught salvation, you can only experience it.

Posted by: Regina Green at September 5, 2013 09:04 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire
5 September 2013

Question: How does Siddhartha meditate?

Answer: While living among the shramanas Siddhartha practiced the meditative absorption. He stood under the openness of the sky and became one with everything he encountered, experiencing the life cycle of every living and nonliving element he came into contact with. As he walked aimlessly through the wilderness he encountered “a dead jackal lying on the sandy bank, and Siddhartha’s mind slipped into the carcass, became a dead jackal, lay on the shore, swelled up, stank, rotted, was torn to pieces by hyenas, flayed by vultures, became a skeleton, became dust” and then finally returned back to his self (Hesse, 12). This meditation forced him out of his mind, to experience other lives, and intended for him to release craving and selfish feeling in efforts to reach nirvana.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at September 5, 2013 09:06 PM

24. Siddhartha followed the Samanas’, and through his journey the thing that he talks about most is “He learned many ways of losing the self” (Hesse, 15). However, unlike other people accepted into the Samanas, he saw these ways of losing one’s self as just putting of the inevitability of finding one’s self again. He also thinks there are ways of losing the self in a quicker way than the Samanas way. He points this out when he says “The driver of the oxen makes this same flight, takes this temporary drug when he drinks” (Hesse, 17). He is explaining that he thinks everyone is trying to lose “the self” in different forms, and all these methods let you forget whom you are for a short while, but after this temporary respite, you return to the world and everything is as it was. In this chapter the author is pointing out that it is possible to lose “the self”, but it is impossible to stop it returning, which results in Siddhartha believing that they are all tricks. Therefore, he starts to look elsewhere for his inspiration, which he finds from the Buddha.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at September 5, 2013 09:20 PM

Jordan Dadez
Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013
Question: How did Siddhartha convince his father? Why didn’t he just go?
Answer: Siddhartha convinces his father to let him go and become a Samana by showing unwavering resolution. He waits patiently after his father refuses to consider his request until his father returns to the chamber. His father notices how determined Siddhartha is because “in Siddhartha’s face he saw no trembling, [and] his eyes were fixed on a distant spot” (Hesse 11). By acquiring his father’s blessing, Siddhartha is able to leave in good conscience.

Posted by: Jordan at September 5, 2013 09:30 PM

Question: "I do not wish to walk upon water." What does this mean and why?

Siddhartha wants to be like everyone else, and is not interested in having powers like the Samanas. Siddhartha wants to gain knowledge and wants to learn everything he can. He is not interested in what the Samanas can do, he wants to go on his own path. This becomes apparent when he says "Let old Samanas be content with such feats" speaking of walking on water.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at September 5, 2013 09:48 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013
Question: What has the Buddha robbed from him? What has he given? Why doesn’t it bother these holy men to beg for a living? Explain the difference in cultural values.

Answer: Growing up as a young Brahman, Siddhartha gained knowledge and wisdom from his father. Each day Siddhartha would practice the skill of reflection, and meditation in the hope of becoming prince. Brahmans had many beliefs they believed Prajapati was the creator of the world, and that sacrifices brought great fortune. Siddhartha began to doubt these teachings. He stated, “The sacrifices and the invocation of the gods were excellent-but was that all? Did the sacrifices give happy fortune? And what about the gods? Was it really Prajapati who had created the world?” (Hesse 6). Soon Siddhartha and Govinda became fascinated with the Buddha. The Buddha believed the world was full of suffering and everyone needed saving. The Buddha was like a healer to the people and helped anyone in need. After arriving to the land of the Buddha, Siddhartha and Govinda went on a search. They eventually asked where they could find the Buddha. Being such holy men, these two were never ashamed to ask for anything because asking questions is a part of gaining knowledge.
After meeting the Buddha, Govinda, Siddhartha’s best friend decided to stay with the Buddha. Govinda was force to leave behind his family, friends, and possessions. Upset with Govinda’s decision Siddhartha went to speak with the Buddha. When Siddhartha was finish talking with the Buddha, he felt as if he had found himself. Siddhartha stated, “He has deprived me of my friend, the one who had believed in me and now believes in him, who had been my shadow and is now Gotama’s shadow. But he has given me Siddhartha, myself” (Hesse 29).

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 5, 2013 10:08 PM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013

Question #11: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage? i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: I used the pdf version of Siddhartha by EBD books and it is the public domain prose translation of the book. In the dialogue, Siddhartha and his father are talking to each other. Siddhartha told his father that he wanted to join the Samanas. His father, however, did not wish for Siddhartha to be with the Samanas. In chapter 1, the father said, "Not proper it is for a Brahman to speak harsh and angry words. But indignation is in my heart. I wish not to hear this request for a second time from your mouth" (Hesse 8). Since his father denied the request, Siddhartha made the choice to stay in one place until he received his father's approval. Siddhartha knew what could happen to himself if he didn't move, but he was determined to join the Samanas.

Posted by: Rache Robinson at September 5, 2013 10:15 PM

Salvatore Christlieb
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
5th September 2013


15. “Siddhartha saw a single goal: to become empty…” What does this mean and why? What happens when he reaches that goal?

Answer:
Siddhartha’s single’s goal is a challenging goal for anyone to master. His goal of emptiness is to deprive the body of physical needs. Physical demands that humans in general would despise denying. On page eleven of Hermen Hesse’s book Siddhartha states, “Siddhartha had one single goal—to become empty, to become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure and sorrow—to let the Self die”. Siddhartha views ordinary lives of human beings around him except he sees them as disgusting. When Siddhartha was traveling his thoughts were “all were not worth a passing glance, everything lied, stank of lies; they were all illusions of sense, happiness and beauty. All were doomed to decay” (Hesse 11). He sees these people as disgusting because they are living through their senses and illusions created by such senses. They are unable to see the truth about the Self and the selfish desires created by the Self. When the Self conquers the way people live life is a lie. “To let the Self die [would allow for the ability] to experience pure thought” (Hesse 11). Pure thought is a form of contemplation which is the result of a spiritual life or as the title of this paper states order of emptiness.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 5, 2013 10:34 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL - LOVE AND DESIRE IN LITERATURE
5 August 2013

Question # 22: Siddhartha’s goal is to conquer the Self. Explain what it means.

For everyone Siddhartha was perfect. He learned a lot from learned men, could engage in debates, and pronounce Om silently. His father saw him as a future prince among Brahmins, intelligent man thirsty for knowledge, but inside Siddhartha was unsatisfied. He was seeking for the answer. Where was the Self, the innermost? Young Siddhartha wanted to know more than he was thought. Something no one showed him the way to, and nobody knew it.

Siddhartha was wondering why other people teach him and wash away his sins everyday? He thought that “One must find the source within one’s own Self, one must possess it. Everything else was seeking- a detour, error.” It was his goal- to possess his Self.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 5, 2013 10:42 PM

According to Siddhartha, what one learn? Explain.

According to Siddhartha, one cannot learn anything. Siddhartha believes, “There is, oh my friend, just one knowledge, this is everywhere…” (Hesse, 17). Siddhartha says this because he thinks there is knowledge in everything and everyone. He thinks knowing something goes far beyond the teachings of the Samanas or even the Brahman people.

Posted by: Jennifer Schubin at September 5, 2013 10:59 PM

Allison Knipe

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210CL

5 September 2013

Question #42: Evaluate Buddha's pragmatic and implied response that his disciples are better off with him than in the world of desires even though they will not find salvation through his teachings. Is Buddha intentionally deceiving his disciples "for their own good"?

I believe that Buddha is trying to teach that even while he would like his disciples to follow him, they may not find what they are looking for. On page 27, Buddha explains, "But the teachings, you've heard from me, are no opinion, and their goal is not to explain the world to those who seek knowledge. They have a different goal; their goal is salvation from suffering" He explains that his teachings are not to explain the world. The problem is that he is teaching to people who are knowledge seekers. This is protecting them for their own good so that they can learn for themselves. Buddha asks if Siddhartha thinks his disciples should abandon the teachings (28). This is a rhetorical question because he knows that he would like them to continue to follow him. However he wants them to have their own opinion.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 5, 2013 11:05 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210 CA02 Love and desire in literature
5 September 2013
18. “Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might has learned more quickly and simply. In some bar in a street full of whores, my friend, among the cart drivers and dice players, I might have learned these things.” What does this mean and why?
I believe Siddhartha is frustrated with the teachings of the Brahmans that he finds their ways too complicated when there is a more simple way to do things.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 5, 2013 11:15 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
September 5th, 2013

“We are not going around in circles, we are moving up, the circle is a spiral, we have already ascended many a level.”

Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here?

Answer:
The quote is Govinda’s response to Siddhartha’s weary faith regarding their spiritual journey. Siddhartha asks “What now, oh Govinda, might we be on the right path? Might we get closer to enlightenment? Might we get closer to salvation? Or do we perhaps live in a circle – we, who have thought we were escaping the cycle?”. He then goes on to say, “Oh, Govinda, I believe out of all the Samanas out there, perhaps not a single one, not a single one, will reach the nirvana. We find comfort, we find numbness, we learn feats, to deceive others. But the most important thing, the path of paths, we will not find.”. (Hesse.16). Siddarthas harsh words eat away his hope in search for Nirvana, thus truly startling Govinda.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at September 5, 2013 11:17 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013


“Siddhartha learned a great deal from the Samanas; he learned many ways of losing the Self. He traveled along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue. He traveled the way of self-denial through meditation, through the emptying of the mind through all images. Along these and other paths did he learn to travel. He lost his Self a thousand times and for days on end he dwelt in non-being. But although the paths took him away from Self, in the end they always led back to it.”

Question: Answer the following questions about the passage above: Who is speaking? Who is being addressed? What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly here?

Answer: In the passage, the Narrator addresses how Siddartha is progressing alongside the Samanas. As described in the 2012 Simon & Brown edition, by resisting all his senses, Siddartha is learning through "Voluntarily suffering and overcoming pain, hunger, thirst, tiredness" (Hesse 14). The Samanas believe if one can eliminate the Self or any personal feelings all that remains will be transdecent. Siddartha is growing more spiritual under the training of the oldest of the Samanas, soon conquering these techniques for days on end; he is not capable of escaping his Self permanently. As the passage continues, He is becoming impatient with the new teachings, Siddartha describes his feelings of "agony of the cycle which had been forced upon him" (Hesse 15), when he continuously finds his Self after hours or days of being in the non-self.

Posted by: Camila at September 5, 2013 11:37 PM

Maria Benkirane
Dr. Hobbs
Love and desire in literature
September 5, 2013

Question: How is Gotama different from the Samanas?

Answer: Gotama and the Samanas are two different characters in the book of Siddhartha. Gotama does not suffer or destroy his body in order to find peace. He is the enlightened one and people all over the world travel to hear about his teaching. Hess describes Gotama saying: "The Buddha went his way modestly and lost in thought; his calm face was neither merry nor sad, but seemed to be gently smiling inwardly....Indeed every finger of his calmly held hands, spoke of peace, spoke of perfection, sought nothing, imitated nothing, but breathed softly in unfading repose, in unfading light in unassailable peace" (15). However; The Samanas believe that true enlightenment is achieved if their whole body is destroyed. Hess describes the way of the Samanas that Siddhartha is following saying: "He traveled along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue" (8). They dress in rags and starve until they keep eliminating themselves as a way to achieve enlightenment.

Posted by: Benkirane Maria at September 5, 2013 11:50 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

“He had started to suspect that his venerable father and his other teachers, that the wise Brahmans had already revealed to him the most and best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied.” (Hesse 6)

Question: Who is speaking? Who is being addressed? What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly here?

Answer: Siddhartha speaks the quote to himself. He is trying to find out what he wants to accomplish next in his life long journey to find fulfillment with his spirit, soul, and heart. Siddhartha felt as if the people he had in his life had thought him all the knowledge they had already known and wisdom they had learned. His goal was to go out and find more people that could show him even more of the world.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at September 5, 2013 11:53 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
September 5, 2013

Question: Why did Siddhartha knowingly relate to Govinda the false statement, “Very good are the teachings of the exalted one, how I find fault in them.”

Answer: After Govinda had said this, he went on asking Siddhartha why he did not want to walk the path of salvation with him. Siddhartha explained how he wished Govinda would find his own journey, and not just the footsteps of Siddhartha. Siddhartha also explained he did not want to go with Govinda, and they should go separate ways to find their own destinies. When Govinda expressed his desire of the path of salvation Siddhartha realized his passion he did not want the path of salvation.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 6, 2013 12:13 AM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
6 August 2013

Question: What needs to be renounced in order to follow Buddha? From a psychological point of view, why would these sacrifices be required?

Answer: In order to follow Buddha all material goods to be renounced in order for Siddhartha to find his Zen. Siddhartha tries to escape from and while that he tries to create a space that only the universe will be able to fill. All he wants to do is escape reality.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at September 6, 2013 02:25 AM

Julia Della Penna
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
6 September 2013


Question: “Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might have learned more quickly and simply. In some bar in a street full of whores, my friend, among the cart drivers and dice players, I might have learned these things.” What does this mean and why?

Answer: Siddhartha expresses to Govinda, his shadow, that he is sadden with what he accomplished even after the difficult and extensive journey he took learning the ways of the Samanas. “Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might have learned more quickly and simply…” (Hesse, 12) Siddhartha states that he would have learned the way of “self” easier by being in the streets where the whorehouses, carters and gamblers roam instead of the harsh conditions he went through with the Samanas. He feels that he would have received the same information and seems almost as if he is regretting all he had done; he could have been in any other place and experienced the same.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at September 6, 2013 02:40 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210: Love and Desire in Literature
September 6, 2013

Question 11: “Siddhartha,” he said, “why are you waiting?” “You know why.” “Will you go on standing and waiting until it is day, noon, evening?” “I will stand and wait.” “You will grow tired, Siddhartha.” “I will grow tired.” “ You will fall asleep, Siddhartha.” “I will not fall asleep.” “You will die, Siddhartha.” I will die.”
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using. Let us know what page to find this in your version.

Answer: In this quote, on pages 10-11, Siddhartha’s father is speaking; Siddhartha’s father is addressing Siddhartha. Earlier in the passage, Siddhartha tells his good friend Govinda that he is going to become a Samana (Hesse 9). So when Siddhartha tells his father of his desire, his father is not too happy about his son’s choice. When his father asks him what he is waiting for, Siddhartha is waiting for his father to give his blessing to become a Samana. His father is trying to discourage Siddhartha from going, but Siddhartha knows this is what he wants.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at September 6, 2013 04:02 AM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
Eng. 210 CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
September 6, 2013

Question: “The father realized then that Siddhartha was no longer with him in the place of his birth. His son had already left him behind” (10). What does this mean and why?

Answer : I am using the version of the book that the bookstore had sold. The quote was written differently and helped me to understand it more. “Then his father realized that even now Siddhartha no longer dwelt with him in his home, that he had already left him” (11). This meant that the Brahman knew that Siddhartha was not giving up on what he believed in and wanted to do. So much so that Siddhartha no longer was there mentally, only physically. He felt he then had no choice but to let him go on to be a Samana.

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at September 6, 2013 08:10 AM

Cheyenne DeMaggio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA05 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

Question: "Siddhartha had begun to harbor discontent. 'Why is Siddhartha unhappy?' Why is his spirit like a 'waiting vessel'?"

Answer: Siddhartha is unhappy because he feels like there is more to life then what he has already learned, or what he believes that he is predestined to do for the rest of his life. "He had begun to sense that his vulnerable father and his other teachers, the wise brahmans had already shared with him the better part of their wisdom; they had already poured their all into his waiting vessel, and the vessel was not full, his mind was not satisfied, his soul was not at peace, his heart was not content" (Hesse, 5). Siddhartha had anticipated the moment when he knew everything that all of his loved ones could teach him, however, this understanding of knowledge did not also give him the sense of self-awareness and fulfillment for which he was seeking. This was a huge let down for him and caused much discontent. Now Siddhartha realizes that with this information he can go out into the world and utilize it to discover his own self contentment.

Posted by: Cheyenne DeMaggio at September 6, 2013 08:44 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 210 CA02 Love and Desire
6 September 2013
Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differe from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer: Siddhartha is speaking. He is thinking about his life and the stuff surrounding it. He is addressing his thoughts about behavior and Gods. Siddhartha is doing some self-reflection about himself. I believe that he is trying to find some sort of balance in his life he wants to achieve enlightenment. “Was no longer senseless”. (Hesse .37).

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at September 6, 2013 08:59 AM

Question #9: Given that Govinda was Siddhartha’s “lance bearer,” speculate about the conditions under which Govinda left home.
Answer: Govinda left home because he felt it was his duty to follow and be like Siddhartha. Govinda seems to be very similar to Siddhartha because he does not want to do the boring rituals every day for the rest of his life. Hesse wrote, “Govinda knew Siddhartha would never become an ordinary Brahmin, a lazy purveyor of rituals… and Govinda, too, would not become any of those things.” Govinda could be in a similar situation at home with his father, like Siddhartha, and this is his only opportunity to leave home.

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at September 6, 2013 09:15 AM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desires in Literature
6 September 2013

Question: Answer the following questions: (a.) Who is speaking, (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here?

Answer: (a.)Siddhartha is the person who is speaking and is obvious that this is so, because two pages previous of the quote (in the Gotama chapter) he states, "Siddhartha wandered through the grove deep in thought. There he met Gotama, the Illustrious One, and as he greeted him respectfully and the Buddha's expression was so full of goodness and peace, the young man plucked up the courage and asked the Illustrious One's permission to speak to him."(Hess, 31) (b.) The person who is being addressed would be the Illustrious one as I have listed previously, “Siddhartha wandered through the grove deep in thought. There he met Gotama, the Illustrious One, and as he greeted him respectfully and the Buddha's expression was so full of goodness and peace, the young man plucked up the courage and asked the Illustrious One's permission to speak to him,”’ declared Siddhartha in the Gotama chapter. (31) (c.) Basically what is taking place here is that Siddhartha and his friend Govinda are separating, because they are both looking for different teachings to fulfill their different goals. Govinda is satisfied with the Illustrious Ones teachings as he states in Gotama chapter, "I wish to pay my allegiance to the Illustrious One and his teachings." (Hess, 29) While on the other hand Siddhartha enjoys the teachings from the Illustrious One, but is searching for something more and he knows that he may never be satisfied. This is clearly shown when Govinda is being addressed by Siddhartha (in the Gotama chapter). Siddhartha utters, “Be at peace, Govinda. The Illustrious One's teachings are very good. How could I find a flaw in them?" (Hess, 31) Then Siddhartha finds the Illustrious One and retorts (Gotama chapter), "Yesterday, O Illustrious One, I had the pleasure of hearing your wonderful teachings. I came from afar with my friend to hear you, and now my friend will remain with you; he has sworn allegiance to you. I, however, am continuing my pilgrimage anew."' (Hess, 31) Siddhartha then continues by stating, “The teachings of the enlightened Buddha embrace much, they teach much – how to live righteously, how to avoid evil. But there is one thing that this clear, worthy instruction does not contain the secret of what the Illustrious One himself experienced – he alone among hundreds of thousands. That is what I thought and realized when I heard your teachings. That is why I am going on my way – not to seek another doctrine, for I know there is none, but to leave all doctrines and all teachers and to reach my goal alone – or die.”’ (Hess, 34)

Posted by: Lydia Santana at September 6, 2013 10:02 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 – Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013
#33
Q: Why does Govinda choose to join him? Why won't Siddhartha join him?

A: Govinda chooses to follow the Buddha after listening to his teachings in person deciding that joining Gotama's community is the path toward salvation. Although, Govinda usually follows Siddhartha's lead on most decisions, he is first to step forward after listening to the Buddha. Siddhartha does not choose to join Gotama because he is not satisfied with his teachings. Siddhartha talks to the Buddha regarding his dissatisfaction when he talks about a flaw in the Buddha's teachings. When talking with Gotama, Siddhartha says, “According to your teachings, this unity and logical consequence of all things is broken in one place . . . that is your doctrine of rising above the world, of salvation. With this small gap . . . the eternal and single world law breaks down again” (33). Therefore, because Siddhartha cannot reconcile these two contradicting teachings, he is unable to sincerely join Gotama.

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. 1922. New York: Bantam, 1971. Print.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at September 6, 2013 10:10 AM

Gotama is also known as Gautama which was the Buddha. Based on the reading, when Siddhartha has left the town, he headed for the forest where most people were exiled and stop at a place where most of the people that left the town has gathered. The narrator had explained Gotama (Buddha) as a very silence man, a one that doesn't have a smile nor a sad face, one that is quite and looks peaceful. Gotama was just like any other monk he sat the same way and looked very calm. As the narrator says, "and from that calmly downward-hanging hand every single finger expressed peace, expressed perfection" (Siddartha pg.25).

Posted by: Abdulaziz alsaif at September 6, 2013 10:30 AM

Questions for Chapter 1-3 of Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210
5 September 2013

Question: Who is speaking, who is being addressed, what is the context of this passage, what is going on, & what page did you find this on?

Answer: I believe that Siddhartha is speaking and is addressing where and who Atman is. Siddhartha is a strong and handsome man who ponders of who Atman really is. He feels as though Atman has the knowledge and acts of God. (Page 12). “To reach this place, the self, myself, the Atman, there was another way.” –Siddhartha. Samaveda spoke to Siddhartha with his wonderful verse “ Your soul is the whole world.” This quote too led Siddhartha to want to learn more about him and others.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at September 6, 2013 10:30 AM

Q20: who is Gotama? What does the narrator think of him?

Gotama is also known as Gautama which was the Buddha. Based on the reading, when Siddhartha has left the town, he headed for the forest where most people were exiled and stop at a place where most of the people that left the town has gathered. The narrator had explained Gotama (Buddha) as a very silence man, a one that doesn't have a smile nor a sad face, one that is quite and looks peaceful. Gotama was just like any other monk he sat the same way and looked very calm. As the narrator says, "and from that calmly downward-hanging hand every single finger expressed peace, expressed perfection" (Siddartha pg.25).

Posted by: Abdulaziz alsaif at September 6, 2013 10:32 AM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4th September 2013

Question: “Truly, only a person who has succeeded in reaching the innermost part of his self would glance and walk this way.”

Answer: On the 29th page of the W. K. Marriott translation, Siddhartha said the quote-stated prior after his meeting with the well-known and loved Buddha, Gotama whom he was also referring. The meeting occurred right after Siddhartha and his friend Govinda traveled to the grove of Jetavana where they had a chance to hear the teachings of the well-recognized Buddha. Govinda along with other members of the community was inspired by Gotama’s teachings and cried out for acceptance into their community. However, Siddhartha found problems with the teachings, which he humbly and professionally addressed, to Gotama, which led to Gotama commending him on his wisdom, and opinions; but also challenged his mindsets.

Posted by: Jasmine Charlton at September 6, 2013 10:40 AM

Andrew Milljour
Professor Hobbs
English 210 CL, CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 6, 2013

Question: # 43. After Siddhartha met with the Guatama, he declared that he would only learn from himself from that point on. After this week’s reading do you think Siddhartha has stayed true to his self-promise? Why or why not?

Answer: I believe that Siddhartha has stayed true to his self-promise after declaring to learn on his own. He has already made a few steps in doing so. First, he leaves his oldest friend Govinda with the Buddha so he can learn on his own. Second, Siddhartha had come to the realization that by listening and taking part in other teachings that his self will grow. He knows that the only way to reach his goal of enlightenment that he will have to reach it by himself.

Posted by: Andrew Milljour at September 6, 2013 10:55 AM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
6 September 2013

Question: How did Siddhartha convince his father? Why didn’t he just go?

Answer: Siddhartha convinces his father to let him go and become a Samana by showing unwavering resolution. He waits patiently after his father refuses to consider his request until his father returns to the chamber. His father notices how determined Siddhartha is because “in Siddhartha’s face he saw no trembling, [and] his eyes were fixed on a distant spot” (Hesse 11). By acquiring his father’s blessing, Siddhartha is able to leave in good conscience.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at September 6, 2013 10:56 AM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013

Question: “Truly, only a person who has succeeded in reaching the innermost part of his self would
Glance and walk this way.”

46. Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation my differ from the version of the text you are using ( there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

The quote is located on page 35 in the blue book.
This passage follows a conversation that Siddhartha has with the Illustrious One. During this conversation, he is critiquing the Illustrious One’s teachings. Siddhartha says, “Nobody finds salvation through teachings” (34). The entire novel focuses on Siddhartha’s journey to self-discovery and it is ironic that the Illustrious One preaches that once you join him and his teachings you will find your way to salvation. Siddhartha points out that it is impossible for someone to find salvation through someone else’s teachings. One has to discover it on his own. For this reason, Siddhartha feels that he cannot follow the Illustrious One; he needs to continue his journey. However, in the quote mentioned above Siddhartha is praising him but at the same time being a bit satirical. Right before this he says how he wishes that he could “look and smile, sit and walk like that, so free, so worthy, so restrained, so candid, so childlike and mysterious” (35). On the surface, these seem like compliments but he is really criticizing him. He does not understand how a person preaching false hope and information can sit so calm as if it does not affect him. He feels like the Illustrious One is putting up a front just to gain blind followers.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at September 6, 2013 10:56 AM

Andrew Milljour
Professor Hobbs
English 210 CL, CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 6, 2013

Question: # 43. After Siddhartha met with the Guatama, he declared that he would only learn from himself from that point on. After this week’s reading do you think Siddhartha has stayed true to his self-promise? Why or why not?

Answer: I believe that Siddhartha has stayed true to his self-promise after declaring to learn on his own. He has already made a few steps in doing so. First, he leaves his oldest friend Govinda with the Buddha so he can learn on his own. Second, Siddhartha had come to the realization that by listening and taking part in other teachings that his self will grow. He knows that the only way to reach his goal of enlightenment that he will have to reach it by himself.

Posted by: Andrew Milljour at September 6, 2013 11:05 AM

Question 25: Why is Siddhartha unimpressed with the magic arts?


Siddhartha has the strong belief that each person has the potential to find themselves by having their own personal beliefs, and not just automatically following what others may preach about. As stated in the book, Siddhartha mentions to Gotama "...I admired your teachings. Everything is completely clear and proved" (Hesse 32). However, he decides that although he did understand Gotama's teachings, he thinks that there is more to learn from other places. He feels the need to go and find things on his own, rather than have to follow Gotama's ways, because it does not fully fulfill his own personal quest.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 6, 2013 11:14 AM

Question: What frustrates Siddhartha?

Answer: Siddhartha becomes frustrated because he does not feel he is close to reaching his goal or may not be on the right path towards reaching his goal. According to the book “He killed his senses, he killed his memory, he slipped out of his self into thousands of other forms..” (Hesse). He was not near his ultimate goal of salvation. He realized that he needed to go back to being himself instead of different forms of himself that were not true being true to himself.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 6, 2013 11:24 AM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL – Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 September 2013
Published By: New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books

Question: What do you think is the reason for the attempt to capture the archetypes of life itself in meditation?

Answer: Siddhartha’s goal in life was to understand one’s true self. He felt that the life he was living in the custom of the Brahmin was not fulfilling that goal. When Siddhartha left his community to live the Samana lifestyle, he strived for enlightenment through meditation and other new traditions. In chapter two, it is stated, “He travelled the way of self-denial through meditation, through the emptying of the mind of all images” (Hesse, 15). Siddhartha meditated in order to lose his self. He believed that by clearing his mind and tuning out his past full of discontent, he could reach clarification in the world and in his life itself.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at September 6, 2013 11:30 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

Question #17: What frustrates Siddhartha?

Answer: Siddhartha becomes frustrated because he does not feel he is close to reaching his goal or may not be on the right path towards reaching his goal. According to the book “He killed his senses, he killed his memory, he slipped out of his self into thousands of other forms..” (Hesse 14). He was not near his ultimate goal of salvation. He realized that he needed to go back to being himself instead of different forms of himself that were not true being true to himself.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 6, 2013 11:42 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

Question #17: What frustrates Siddhartha?

Answer: Siddhartha becomes frustrated because he does not feel he is close to reaching his goal or may not be on the right path towards reaching his goal. According to the book “He killed his senses, he killed his memory, he slipped out of his self into thousands of other forms” (Hesse 14). He was not near his ultimate goal of salvation. He realized that he needed to go back to being himself instead of different forms of himself that were not true being true to himself.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 6, 2013 11:56 AM

Andrew Milljour
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL, Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 September 2013
Question: #43. After Siddhartha met with the Guatama, he declared that he would only learn from himself from that point on. After this week’s reading do you think Siddhartha has stayed true to his self-promise? Why or why not?
Answer: Using the Kindle Edition, pages are replaced by location numbers, translated by Hilda Rosner. I believe that Siddhartha has stayed true to his self-promise after declaring to learn on his own. He has already made a few steps in doing so. First, he leaves his oldest friend Govinda with the Buddha so he can learn on his own. Siddhartha tells Govinda “That is what the teachings preach, that is the will of the Illustrious One. That is what you wished yourself. Tomorrow, Govinda, I will leave you” (Hesse 286). Second, Siddhartha had come to the realization that by listening and taking part in other teachings that his self will grow. He knows that the only way to reach his goal of enlightenment is to learn on his own. Siddhartha begins to think at the end of the chapter “The Buddha has robbed me, thought Siddhartha [ . . . ] But he has given to me Siddhartha, myself” (Hesse 339).

Posted by: Andrew Milljour at September 6, 2013 11:57 AM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 September 2013

Question: What has the Buddha robbed from him? What has he given? Why doesn’t it bother these holy men to beg for a living? Explain the difference in cultural values.

Answer: Growing up as a young Brahman, Siddhartha gained knowledge and wisdom from his father. Each day Siddhartha would practice the skill of reflection, and meditation in the hope of becoming prince. Brahmans had many beliefs they believed Prajapati was the creator of the world, and that sacrifices brought great fortune. Siddhartha began to doubt these teachings. He stated, “The sacrifices and the invocation of the gods were excellent-but was that all? Did the sacrifices give happy fortune? And what about the gods? Was it really Prajapati who had created the world?” (Hesse 6). Soon Siddhartha and Govinda became fascinated with the Buddha. The Buddha believed the world was full of suffering and everyone needed saving. The Buddha was like a healer to the people and helped anyone in need. After arriving to the land of the Buddha, Siddhartha and Govinda went on a search. They eventually asked where they could find the Buddha. Being such holy men, these two were never ashamed to ask for anything because asking questions is a part of gaining knowledge.
After meeting the Buddha, Govinda, Siddhartha’s best friend decided to stay with the Buddha. Govinda was force to leave behind his family, friends, and possessions. Upset with Govinda’s decision Siddhartha went to speak with the Buddha. When Siddhartha was finish talking with the Buddha, he felt as if he had found himself. Siddhartha stated, “He has deprived me of my friend, the one who had believed in me and now believes in him, who had been my shadow and is now Gotama’s shadow. But he has given me Siddhartha, myself” (Hesse 29).

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 6, 2013 11:57 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
6 September 2013

Question #32. “How do they recognize him?”


Answer:
Siddhartha and Govinda recognizes Buddha instantly because of Gotama yellow robe. On page 23 in the Marriott translations it reads, “Siddhartha saw him, and he instantly recognised him, as if a god had pointed him out to him. He saw him, a simple man in a yellow robe, bearing the alms-dish in his hand, walking silently.” As you keep reading, Gotama is described as calm, his walk expressed perfection and a peaceful (Hesse 23).

Posted by: Paula Pion at September 6, 2013 12:15 PM

Joe Rulli
Professor Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

Question: "I do not wish to walk upon water." What does this mean and why?

Siddhartha wants to be like everyone else, and is not interested in having powers like the Samanas. Siddhartha wants to gain knowledge and wants to learn everything he can. He is not interested in what the Samanas can do, he wants to go on his own path. This becomes apparent when he says, "Let old Samanas be content with such feats" (Hesse 22) speaking of walking on water.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at September 6, 2013 01:02 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

Question 35: Gotama asks him if his, Gotama’s, followers will also find enlightenment. Siddhartha dodges this question. How?

Answer: When Gotama asks Siddhartha if his (Gotama's) followers will also find enlightenment, Siddhartha does not give him an answer. Siddhartha states, "May they all follow the teachings! May they all reach their goal! It is not for me to judge another life I must judge for myself (pages 34-35)." This explanation is not able to be summarized as yes or no; Siddhartha says that Gotama's followers should keep their vows, and he can only speak for himself.

*This is a Repost. The edition that I am using is the 1951 Bantam Books translation by Hilda Rosner (the cover for it is the picture that you have posted on this site).

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 6, 2013 01:16 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2013

Question: “Truly, only a person who has succeeded in reaching the innermost part of his self would glance and walk this way.” Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: On page twenty-nine of the W. K. Marriott translation, Siddhartha said the quote-stated prior after his meeting with the well-known and loved Buddha, Gotama whom he was also referring. The meeting occurred after Siddhartha and his friend Govinda traveled to the grove of Jetavana where they had a chance to hear the teachings of the well-recognized Buddha. Govinda along with other members of the community inspired by Gotama’s teachings cried out for acceptance into their community. However, Siddhartha found problems with the teachings when Gotama preached,” Suffering was life, full of suffering was the world, but salvation from suffering had been found: salvation was obtained by him who would walk the path of the Buddha” [Hessa, 24]. Siddhartha then humbly and professionally addressed his queries to Gotama, which led to Gotama commending him on his wisdom, and opinions; but also challenged his mindsets when he responded by saying, “You’ve heard the teachings, oh son of a Brahman, and good for you that you've thought about it thus deeply. You’ve found a gap in it, an error. You should think about this further. But be warned, oh seeker of knowledge, of the thicket of opinions and of arguing about words” [Hesse, 27].

Posted by: Jasmine Charlton at September 6, 2013 02:50 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 September 2013

Question: What do you think is the reason for the attempt to capture the archetypes of life itself in meditation?

Answer: New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books publish the edition of Siddhartha that was used for this response. Siddhartha’s goal in life was to understand one’s true self. He felt that the life he was living in the custom of the Brahmin was not fulfilling that goal. When Siddhartha left his community to live the Samana lifestyle, he strived for enlightenment through meditation and other new traditions. In chapter two, it is stated, “He travelled the way of self-denial through meditation, through the emptying of the mind of all images” (Hesse, 15). Siddhartha meditated in order to lose his self. He believed that by clearing his mind and tuning out his past full of discontent, he could reach clarification in the world and in his life itself.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at September 6, 2013 03:42 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng -210CL - Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
4 September 2013

Question # 2: Govinda’s “wish was to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, splendid one.” Why is Govinda willing to follow Siddhartha?

Answer to # 2: Because Govinda thought, Siddhartha would become a god. Nevertheless, as Govinda says he wanted “to follow him as his friend, his companion, his servant, his spear-carrier, his shadow.(Hesse 6)” So, therefore, Govinda wanted to follow his example by walking the same path as Siddhartha did. For Govinda, Siddhartha was his role model and more than his friend he was like an extended part of Govinda’s life; you could say, Siddhartha was almost like a brother for Govinda.

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at September 6, 2013 05:17 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

Question:""...Nobody will obtain salvation by means of teachings!" (Hesse 28). A.) Who is speaking? B.) Who is being addressed?. C.)What is the context of the passage, i.e. what is going on, exactly, here?"

Answer: In this particular part of the text, Gotama is speaking to Siddhartha, who has decided that he was going to leave and continue his journey. He then gives a parting speech about all the things he had learned while in Gotama's presence. He also expressed what he felt to be faults in Gotama's teachings of salvation. Gotama responds by saying, "You should think about this further. But, be warned, oh seeker of knowledge, of the thicket of opinions and of arguing about words" (Hesse 27). Gotama wanted to portray to Siddartha that his teachings of salvation were more guidelines than actual teachings. You can not be taught salvation, you can only experience it.

Posted by: Regina Green at September 6, 2013 08:25 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

Questions: “Why did Siddhartha remain standing? Why didn’t he just leave? Did Siddhartha’s father allow him to leave because in a sense, Siddhartha had “already left”?”

Revised Answer: Siddhartha remained standing after his father’s initial refusal because of his determination to obtain his father’s consent to joining the Samanas. His determination was evident from his earlier conservation with Govinda during which he explained, “let’s not waste words” in response to Govinda’s doubt about receiving his father’s permission (Hesse 9). Siddhartha knew that if he remained vertical long enough, he would not only display his dedication to joining the Samanas, but also his father would grant him permission to leave out of concern for his well-being. When Siddhartha’s father entered the room after hours of observing Siddhartha’s unfaltering vigil, he realized that he did not recognize Siddhartha, but rather saw him “standing there like a stranger to him” (Hesse 10). He then understood that Siddhartha had already departed from his chosen path for him and despite his disapproval, needed to let him go.

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at September 7, 2013 01:12 AM

Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
6 September 2013

I am using the Hilda Rosner translation.

Question 37. How was it that Siddhartha could instantly recognize the Buddha and Govinda could not?


Answer. "Siddhartha saw him and recognized him immediately, as if pointed out to him by a God" (Hesse 22). Since Siddhartha is blessed by all of these different gifts, that he was able to recognize the Illustrious One. Govinda was not able to recognize him because he is not gifted as Siddhartha in those areas. Because Siddhartha is basically a "God" himself, that he is able to notice specific things that other people cannot.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at September 7, 2013 01:26 AM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng - 210CL - Love and Desire in Literature - CA01
6 September 2013


Question # 19: After Siddhartha decides not to join the Buddha’s community, from whom does he choose to learn, instead?

Answer to # 19: He chooses to learn from himself. Siddhartha says, “I want to begin my thoughts with Atman and with the suffering of the world. I do not want to kill and dissect myself and longer, to find a secret behind the ruins. Neither Yoga-Veda shall teach me anymore, nor Atharva-Veda nor the ascetics, nor any kind of teaching. I want to learn from myself, want to be my student, want to get to know myself, the secret of Siddhartha. (Hesse 31)”

Posted by: Stephanie gilbert at September 7, 2013 09:21 AM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

8. Question In this chapter, Siddhartha experiences a “profound feeling of awakening from long dreams" Compare this to his time as a Samana; by contrast, how is Siddhartha now "awakened"? Explain.
Siddhartha was walking along a path the day after he spoke with Buddha, when he realized that he tried learning from so many teachers, and had not learned anything. He is awakened by the thought that he, Siddhartha, can only learn from himself and his experiences. It becomes apparent that he realizes this when he says, "But what is this, what you have sought to learn from teachings and from teachers, and what they, who have taught you much, were still unable to teach you? It was the self, the purpose and essence of which I sought to leaern." (Hesse 30)

Posted by: Joe Rulli at September 7, 2013 01:37 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

Question: What epithet does Hesse use for Siddhartha in this chapter? What part of himself does Siddhartha leave behind with his youth?

Answer: Hesse says that Siddhartha has realized that he needs to be himself and enjoy the world that is around him instead of putting himself through suffering to try and change the unchangeable. “It was the self, the purpose and essence of which I sought to learn. It was the self; I wanted to free myself from, which I sought to overcome. But was not able to overcome it, could only deceive it, could only flee from it, only hide from it. Truly, no thing in this world has kept my thoughts thus busy, as this my very own self this mystery of me being alive, of being one and being separated and isolated from all others, of me being Siddhartha!” (Hesse 30) Siddhartha had spent his entire life concerned about learning from others and making sacrifices that he failed to learn from himself and find out his true identity.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at September 7, 2013 05:40 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

“He had started to suspect that his venerable father and his other teachers, that the wise Brahmans had already revealed to him the most and best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied.” (Hesse 6)

Question: Who is speaking? Who is being addressed? What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly here?

Answer: Siddhartha speaks the quote to himself. “Siddhartha has started to nurse discontent in himself, he had started to feel that the love of his father and the love of his mother, and also the love of his friend, Govinda, would not bring him joy for ever and ever, would not nurse him, feed him, satisfy him.” (Hesse 6) He is trying to find out what he wants to accomplish next in his life long journey to find fulfillment with his spirit, soul, and heart. Siddhartha felt as if the people he had in his life had thought him all the knowledge they had already known and wisdom they had learned. His goal was to go out and find more people that could show him even more of the world.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at September 7, 2013 05:43 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2013

Question: Why did Siddhartha knowingly relate to Govinda the false statement, “Very good are the teachings of the exalted one, how I find fault in them.”

Answer: After Govinda had said this, he went on asking Siddhartha why he did not want to walk the path of salvation with him. Siddhartha explained how he wished Govinda would find his own journey, “Often have I thought: Won’t Govinda for once also take a step by himself, without me, out of his own soul” (Hesse 25)? Siddhartha also explained he did not want to go with Govinda, and they should go separate ways to find their own destinies. When Govinda expressed his desire of the path of salvation Siddhartha realized his passion he did not want the path of salvation.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 7, 2013 07:24 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 September 2013

Question: After Siddhartha decides not to join the Buddha’s community, from whom does he choose to learn, instead?

Answer: Siddhartha started thinking as he walked alone searching for his purpose. He did not have a teacher or a leader to follow. He did not have Govinda following him around anymore. He did not have his father’s high expectations resting on his shoulders. At that moment, he had his epiphany and discovered what he wanted. Siddhartha thought, “I want to learn from myself, want to be my student, want to get to know myself, the secret of Siddhartha” (Hesse 31).

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 7, 2013 07:47 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
7 September 2013

Question: What does Siddhartha decide to study? How is that the one field he has been ignorant in?

Answer: Siddhartha decides to study the art of himself so to speak. He realizes that he knows nothing about himself due to the many teaching methods he has studied. In his desperate attempt to find the divine part or Atman, he lost sight of who he is. After he arrives at this realization, Siddhartha states, “I want to learn from myself, want to be my student, want to get to know myself, the secret of Siddhartha” (Hesse 31). He then sees the world in a new light for he is born again.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at September 7, 2013 10:26 PM

Answer: The purpose of an education is to learn about a subject that would not usually be available in everyday life. The advantage of an education is that the teacher is the main source of information, and the student would not have to meander to find the answer. "The Brahmins and their holy books knew everything, everything; they had gone into everything (page 6)."

The disadvantage to an education is that while the teacher may be able to tell the student about the topic, such as ice cream, the student has to learn firsthand how ice cream tastes. The student has to have some experience in order for the teachings to be complete.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 7, 2013 10:57 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 September 2013

Question 22:Chapter Four marks the end of Part One of the novel. What does Part One seem to suggest about the purpose, advantages, and disadvantages of education?

Answer: The purpose of an education is to learn about a subject that would not usually be available in everyday life. The advantage of an education is that the teacher is the main source of information, and the student would not have to meander to find the answer."The Brahmins and their holy books knew everything, everything; they had gone into everything (page 6)."

The disadvantage to an education is that while the teacher may be able to tell the student about the topic, such as ice cream, the student has to learn firsthand how ice cream tastes. The student has to have some experience in order for the teachings to be complete.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 7, 2013 11:01 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

“Be Aware of too much wisdom”
Question: A) Who is speaking? Who is being addressed? What is the content of this passage?

Answer: Siddhartha and Govinda traveled a long Samana’s journey through the forest to seek out the spiritual and holy Buddha, to listen to his teachings. After listening to his teachings with his own ears, Siddhartha was enlightened by Buddha’s wise words about his spiritual journey, in which he overcame earthly pain. He approached Buddha to share his thoughts about his teachings. Siddhartha strongly questioned Buddha’s teachings and questioned his goals. He says to Buddha he wants to “depart from all teachings and all teachers and to reach my goal by myself or to die” (Hesse, 28). The Gotama tells Siddhartha “beware of too much wisdom” because he is searching for answers, and a self-righteous path he has no idea how to attain (Hesse, 29).

Posted by: Erica Bodden at September 8, 2013 10:34 AM

Cheyenne DeMaggio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

Question: "Siddhartha had begun to harbor discontent. 'Why is Siddhartha unhappy?' Why is his spirit like a 'waiting vessel'?"

Answer: Siddhartha is unhappy because he feels like there is more to life then what he has already learned, or what he believes that he is predestined to do for the rest of his life. Hesse proclaims that Siddhartha "had begun to sense that his vulnerable father and his other teachers, the wise brahmans had already shared with him the better part of their wisdom; they had already poured their all into his waiting vessel, and the vessel was not full, his mind was not satisfied, his soul was not at peace, his heart was not content" (Hesse5). Siddhartha had anticipated the moment when he knew everything that all of his loved ones could teach him, however, this understanding of knowledge did not also give him the sense of self-awareness and fulfillment for which he was seeking. This was a huge let down for him and caused much discontent. Now Siddhartha realizes that with this information he can go out into the world and utilize it to discover his own self contentment.

Posted by: Cheyenne DeMaggio at September 8, 2013 12:11 PM

This is a re-post.

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013


Question: “A goal stood before Siddartha, a single goal: to become empty, empty of thirst, empty of wishing, empty of dreams, empty of joy and sorrow.”


"Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b). Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This Translation may differ from the version of the test you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version."


Answer: In Siddhartha, the speaker is a voice that follows Siddhartha’s life. In the quote, the narrator is addressing the reader about what Siddhartha’s goals are while being a part of the Samanas. The context of the passage is what Siddhartha’s goals are in life. He wants to join the Samanas to learn qualities that he would not have learned while living home. Siddhartha had to receive his father’s permission to leave to become a Samanas. His father even said, “You will die, Siddhartha” (Hesse 11). Even though Siddhartha knew his father was right, he still felt the need to join the Samanas. After the narrator list Siddhartha’s goal, the story turns towards Siddhartha’s actions. His actions consist of staying in one location until he stopped functioning. He learns to function in other ways. Overall, this quote describes what Siddhartha hopes to achieve while being with the Samanas.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 8, 2013 12:13 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 September 2013

“We are not going around in circles, we are moving up, the circle is a spiral, we have already ascended many a level.”

Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: The quote is Govinda’s response to Siddhartha’s weary faith regarding their spiritual journey. Siddhartha asks “What now, oh Govinda, might we be on the right path? Might we get closer to enlightenment? Might we get closer to salvation? Or do we perhaps live in a circle – we, who have thought we were escaping the cycle?”. He then goes on to say, “Oh, Govinda, I believe out of all the Samanas out there, perhaps not a single one, not a single one, will reach the nirvana. We find comfort, we find numbness, we learn feats, to deceive others. But the most important thing, the path of paths, we will not find.” (Hesse 16). Siddarthas harsh words eat away his hope in search for Nirvana thus truly startling Govinda.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at September 8, 2013 01:04 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
5 September 2013

Question:
18. “Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might has learned more quickly and simply. In some bar in a street full of whores, my friend, among the cart drivers and dice players, I might have learned these things.” What does this mean and why?

Answer:
I am using The Literature Network online version of the book. This quote is phrased differently in that version but the meaning is the same. I believe Siddhartha is frustrated with the teachings of the Brahmans that he finds their ways too complicated when there is a more simple way to do things. When Siddhartha says, “I could have learned more quickly and by simpler means. In every tavern of that part of a town where the whorehouses are, my friend, among carters and gamblers I could have learned it." Meaning if these people can achieve the same kind of goals as Siddhartha without having to do any hard work why can’t he?

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 8, 2013 03:06 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
5 September 2013

Question:
18. “Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might has learned more quickly and simply. In some bar in a street full of whores, my friend, among the cart drivers and dice players, I might have learned these things.” What does this mean and why?

Answer:
I am using The Literature Network online version of the book. This quote is phrased differently in that version but the meaning is the same. I believe Siddhartha is frustrated with the teachings of the Brahmans that he finds their ways too complicated when there is a more simple way to do things. When Siddhartha says, “I could have learned more quickly and by simpler means. In every tavern of that part of a town where the whorehouses are, my friend, among carters and gamblers I could have learned it." Meaning if these people can achieve the same kind of goals as Siddhartha without having to do any hard work why can’t he?

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 8, 2013 03:06 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
5 September 2013

Question #24: Explain Siddharta’s discovery that there are many ways to lose the self. Why are they all tricks?

Siddhartha followed the Samanas’, and through his journey the thing that he talks about most is “He learned many ways of losing the self” (Hesse, 15). However, unlike other people accepted into the Samanas, he saw these ways of losing one’s self as just putting of the inevitability of finding one’s self again. He also thinks there are ways of losing the self in a quicker way than the Samanas way. He points this out when he says “The driver of the oxen makes this same flight, takes this temporary drug when he drinks” (Hesse, 17). He is explaining that he thinks everyone is trying to lose “the self” in different forms, and all these methods let you forget whom you are for a short while, but after this temporary respite, you return to the world and everything is as it was. In this chapter the author is pointing out that it is possible to lose “the self”, but it is impossible to stop it returning, which results in Siddhartha believing that they are all tricks. Therefore, he starts to look elsewhere for his inspiration, which he finds from the Buddha.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at September 8, 2013 03:31 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
5 September 2013

Question #24: Explain Siddharta’s discovery that there are many ways to lose the self. Why are they all tricks?

Siddhartha followed the Samanas’, and through his journey the thing that he talks about most is “He learned many ways of losing the self” (Hesse 15). However, unlike other people accepted into the Samanas, he saw these ways of losing one’s self as just putting of the inevitability of finding one’s self again. He also thinks there are ways of losing the self in a quicker way than the Samanas way. He points this out when he says “The driver of the oxen makes this same flight, takes this temporary drug when he drinks” (Hesse 17). He is explaining that he thinks everyone is trying to lose “the self” in different forms, and all these methods let you forget whom you are for a short while, but after this temporary respite, you return to the world and everything is as it was. In this chapter the author is pointing out that it is possible to lose “the self”, but it is impossible to stop it returning, which results in Siddhartha believing that they are all tricks. Therefore, he starts to look elsewhere for his inspiration, which he finds from the Buddha.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at September 8, 2013 03:32 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: In this chapter, Siddhartha experiences a “profound feeling of awakening from long dreams.” Compare this to his time as a Samana; by contrast, how is Siddhartha now “awakened”? Explain.

Answer: At the time when Siddhartha was a Samana he had set a goal “to become empty, empty of thirst, empty of wishing, empty of dreams, empty of joy and sorrow” (Hesse 13). He had to lose himself in-order to find himself, the real Siddhartha. He no longer wanted to live by others rules or teachings. Wanting to explore the world himself, Siddhartha stated, “No longer, I want to begin my thoughts and my life with Atman and with the suffering of the world” (Hesse 31).
After living with the Samana’s for some time, Siddhartha went through intense tests, which at times caused him to lose himself. At times “for hours and days he remained in the non-self” (Hesse 14). Eventually, he would “awaken” and return to his usually self. After reminiscing on everything he had been through, Siddhartha “opened his eyes and looked around, a smile filled his face” (Hesse 31). Siddhartha had finally freed himself from everyone’s shadow.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 8, 2013 03:46 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013


Question: As a Samana, Siddhartha says that as he sought Atman in mediation, he lost his self. Is this different from conquering his self? Is it different from freeing his self?


Answer: Siddhartha lost his self while he sought Atman in mediation. Even though Siddhartha lost himself, he is still conquering his self at the same time. When you conquer something, it means you have control. Siddhartha has control over his mind. He says, “I searched Atman, I searched Brahman, I was willing to to dissect my self and peel off all of its layers, to find the core of all peels in its unknown interior, the atman, life, the divine part, the ultimate part” (Hesse 31). Siddhartha makes the statement that he is willing to search to find parts of his self that he still has not discovered. He is choosing to find new parts of his interior. He has control over himself because he is making the decision to flee from himself. Even though he has lost himself, he is fleeing from the Siddhartha he knows to find a new Siddhartha. The only thing Siddhartha is freeing himself from is himself. Being lost from his self is not different because he is freeing himself from the old Siddhartha to find new knowledge about his self. Conquering and freeing his self are the same thing when compared to how Siddhartha lost himself.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 8, 2013 04:13 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2013


“Siddhartha learned a great deal from the Samanas; he learned many ways of losing the Self. He traveled along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue. He traveled the way of self-denial through meditation, through the emptying of the mind through all images. Along these and other paths did he learn to travel. He lost his Self a thousand times and for days on end he dwelt in non-being. But although the paths took him away from Self, in the end they always led back to it.”
Question: Answer the following questions about the passage above: Who is speaking? Who is being addressed? What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly here?

Answer: In the passage, the Narrator addresses how Siddartha is progressing alongside the Samanas. As described in the 2012 Simon & Brown edition, by resisting all his senses, Siddartha is learning through "Voluntarily suffering and overcoming pain, hunger, thirst, tiredness" (Hesse 14). The Samanas believe if one can eliminate the Self or any personal feelings all that remains will be transdecent. Siddartha is growing more spiritual under the training of the oldest of the Samanas, soon conquering these techniques for days on end; he is not capable of escaping his Self permanently. As the passage continues, He is becoming impatient with the new teachings, Siddartha describes his feelings of "agony of the cycle which had been forced upon him" (Hesse 15), when he continuously finds his Self after hours or days of being in the non-self.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at September 8, 2013 05:32 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
8 September 2013

Question:
23. Track Siddhartha’s progress through Part One. Paths lead to “somewhere,” and Siddhartha has taken many paths, thus far, in this story. Identify the different paths has Siddhartha been traveling on in Part One. On what path, if any, do readers find him at the end of Part One?

Answer:
I am using The Literature Network online version of the book. Siddhartha starts his path learning the ways of the Brahmans when he feels like he has learned everything there is to know. When he decided he wanted to join the Samanas he takes a path of endurance and pain while walking in the forest and through the town while hungry and thirsty. Siddhartha talks to Gotama and he realizes his final path is not to reach his goal but to discover himself. At the end of part one while Siddhartha is thinking, “Out of this moment, when the world melted away all around him, when he stood alone like a star in the sky, out of this moment of a cold and despair, Siddhartha emerged, more a self than before, more firmly concentrated.” He then says he no longer has to struggle to find out what he is supposed to do.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 8, 2013 06:05 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desires in Literature
6 September 2013
Revised

Question: Answer the following questions: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here?

Answer: (a.) It is made apparent that Siddhartha is the person who is speaking, because in the Gotama chapter he states, "Siddhartha wandered through the grove deep in thought. There he met Gotama, the Illustrious One, and as he greeted him respectfully and the Buddha's expression was so full of goodness and peace, the young man plucked up the courage and asked the Illustrious One's permission to speak to him” (Hess 31).
(b.) The person who is being addressed would be the Illustrious One as I have listed previously, “Siddhartha wandered through the grove deep in thought. There he met Gotama, the Illustrious One, and as he greeted him respectfully and the Buddha's expression was so full of goodness and peace, the young man plucked up the courage and asked the Illustrious One's permission to speak to him,”’ declared Siddhartha in the Gotama chapter (31).
(c.) Basically, what is taking place here is Siddhartha and his friend Govinda are separating, because they are both looking for different teachings to fulfill their different goals. Govinda is satisfied with the Illustrious Ones teachings as he states in Gotama chapter, "I wish to pay my allegiance to the Illustrious One and his teachings” (Hess 29). While on the other hand Siddhartha enjoys the teachings from the Illustrious One, but is searching for something more and he knows that he may never be satisfied. This is clearly shown when Govinda is being addressed by Siddhartha (in the Gotama chapter). Siddhartha utters, “Be at peace, Govinda. The Illustrious One's teachings are very good. How could I find a flaw in them"? (Hess 31) Then Siddhartha finds the Illustrious One and retorts (Gotama chapter), "Yesterday, O Illustrious One, I had the pleasure of hearing your wonderful teachings. I came from afar with my friend to hear you, and now my friend will remain with you; he has sworn allegiance to you. I, however, am continuing my pilgrimage anew"' (Hess 31). Siddhartha then continues by stating, “The teachings of the enlightened Buddha embrace much, they teach much – how to live righteously, how to avoid evil. But there is one thing that this clear, worthy instruction does not contain the secret of what the Illustrious One himself experienced – he alone among hundreds of thousands. That is what I thought and realized when I heard your teachings. That is why I am going on my way – not to seek another doctrine, for I know there is none, but to leave all doctrines and all teachers and to reach my goal alone – or die”’ (Hess 34).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at September 8, 2013 06:30 PM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CAO2 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question 7: When Siddhartha “awakes” from his dream, what does he see for the first time?

When Siddhartha awakes, for the first time he sees the world in a clearer perspective. In chapter 4, Siddhartha, “…looked around, as if he was seeing the world for the first time. Beautiful was the world, colourful was the world, strange and mysterious was the world” (Hesse 28).
He's started to appreciate the world around him.

Posted by: Rache Robinson at September 8, 2013 06:46 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 September 2013

Question: What is the cause of Siddhartha’s smile? Has Siddhartha changed? If so, how. Explain.

Answer: In the beginning of the Awakening, Siddhartha walks lost in thought when an epiphany washes over him. All this time he has been trying to find the upmost knowledgeable and divine teacher only to find him and be incapable to receive his teachings. Siddartha quickly realized that his journey to learn about the self had derailed, “[. . .] I know nothing about myself, [. . .] I was afraid of myself, I was fleeing from myself! I searched Atman, I searched Brahman, I was willing to to dissect my self and peel off all of its layers, [. . .] But I have lost myself in the process” (Hesse 31).
This realization caused Siddartha to smile he felt awakened from a long dream, and with that he continued to walk, but faster and with more pride, a walk of a man with determination. He chose to change, and rather than be someone else’s student he was going to be his own student, finalized with his decision he spoke to himself, “now I would not let Siddartha escape from me again! [. . . ] I do not want to kill and dissect myself any longer, to find a secret behind the ruins. [. . . ] I want to learn from myself, want to be my own student, want to get to know myself, the secret of Siddartha” (Hesse 31). Siddartha has chosen to create his own path to find himself because no other person, no matter how wise could teach him more about his self rather than Siddartha himself.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at September 8, 2013 06:48 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question: What desire does Siddhartha no longer have?

Siddhartha no longer has the desire to learn from other people. Siddhartha says, "I want to learn from myself, want to be my student, want to get to know myself, the secret of Siddhartha" (Hesse 31). He realized that he is a stranger to himself. He is going to start spending his time looking into himself to find out who he is.

Posted by: Regina Green at September 8, 2013 06:53 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire
5 September 2013

Question: How does Siddhartha meditate?

Answer: While living among the shramanas Siddhartha practiced the meditative absorption. He stood under the openness of the sky and became one with everything he encountered, experiencing the life cycle of every living and nonliving element he came into contact with. As he walked aimlessly through the wilderness he encountered “a dead jackal lying on the sandy bank, and Siddhartha’s mind slipped into the carcass, became a dead jackal, lay on the shore, swelled up, stank, rotted, was torn to pieces by hyenas, flayed by vultures, became a skeleton, became dust” and then finally returned back to his self (Hesse, 12). This meditation forced him out of his mind, to experience other lives, and intended for him to release craving and selfish feeling in efforts to reach nirvana.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at September 8, 2013 07:14 PM

Jennifer Schubin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question: What does Siddhartha decide to study? How is that the one field he has been ignorant in?
Answer: While leaving the teaching of the Samanas, Siddhartha begins to realize that he knows very little about himself. He thinks to himself, “Truly no thing in this world has kept my thoughts thus busy , and this my very own self, this mystery of me being alive, of me being one and being separated and isolated from all the others, of me being Siddhartha!”(Heese, 30) In thinking this, Siddhartha concludes that he is going to study the self.

Posted by: Jennifer Schubin at September 8, 2013 07:20 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire
9 September 2013

Question: “It was the self, I wanted to free myself from, which I sought to overcome.” Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer: In this quoted passage, Siddhartha is speaking to himself, thinking silently addressing his inner thoughts and feelings. Siddhartha is walking through the grove after leaving the Buddha contemplating his next course of action, his next step in reaching enlightenment. He wonders why it is that he is unable to feel free after practicing the teachings of his mentors. He comes to the conclusion that, “I was looking for atman, I was looking for Brahman; I was determined to tear my ego apart, to peel it layer by layer in order to find in its unknown innards the pith behind all the husks, atman, life, the divine, the ultimate. But in the process I myself got lost” (Hesse 31). In this reflection, he comes to the realization that in order to completely release from himself and achieve nirvana, he must first come to know himself.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at September 8, 2013 08:18 PM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question #47
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer:
The person speaking in this passage was Siddhartha, the person being addressed is Gotama, the context of this passage is that Siddhartha is responding to what Gotama has told him stating he knew that Gotama was the enlightened one from the moment he set eyes on him. That he has reached the highest point Brahmins can reach but Gotama obtain this position, not by teachings but by experience. That the teachings don’t contain how each individual experienced enlightenment, so that is why Siddhartha decides he’s going to find his own way, not through doctrines or teachings but by creating his own path to reach his goal.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at September 8, 2013 08:41 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013
Resubmission

Question #42: Evaluate Buddha's pragmatic and implied response that his disciples are better off with him than in the world of desires even though they will not find salvation through his teachings. Is Buddha intentionally deceiving his disciples "for their own good"?

I believe that Buddha is trying to teach that even while he would like his disciples to follow him, they may not find what they are looking for. Buddha explains, "But the teachings, you've heard from me, are no opinion, and their goal is not to explain the world to those who seek knowledge. They have a different goal; their goal is salvation from suffering"(Hesse 27). He explains that his teachings are not to explain the world. The problem is that he is teaching to people who are knowledge seekers. This is protecting them for their own good so that they can learn for themselves. Buddha asks if Siddhartha thinks his disciples should abandon the teachings (28). This is a rhetorical question because he knows that he would like them to continue to follow him. However he wants them to have their own opinion.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 8, 2013 09:00 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 September 2013

Question: “What epithet does Hesse use for Siddhartha in this chapter? What part of himself does Siddhartha leave behind with his youth?”

Answer: In the W. K. Marriott translation, Hesse used a number of ways to explain Siddhartha. One of these explanations could be when he called Siddhartha, “the awoken one”[Hesse, 31]. He also used descriptive words to describe what Siddhartha was. Words like, “ascetic, priest, and Brahman” [Hesse, 32] Hesse also uses wide vocabulary when he called Siddhartha a, "cleric”, which is another way to say priest or someone with religious affiliation. Whiles Siddhartha was continuing his journey of finding himself he came to the realization that, “he was no youth anymore, but he turned into a man” [Hesse, 30]. During his self-reflective state, he realized that he had left behind his desire to have teachers and hear teachings, but instead he wanted to learn life on his own through experiences.

Posted by: jasmine charlton at September 8, 2013 09:11 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question #26: What single reason does Siddhartha give for why he has remained alien and unknown to himself?

The single cause that Siddhartha gives for why he has remained alien and unknown to himself is one that only he can fix. Siddartha explains that, "I was afraid of myself, I was fleeing from myself!" (Hesse 31). This realization was fueled by the dissection of himself. Siddhartha states that he had "lost himself in the process" (31).

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 8, 2013 09:12 PM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013
Question: Why does Siddhartha speak of himself in the third person?
Answer: I believe he talks about himself in third person to become more aware of himself and his actions, so he can view his self like others. Sometimes being ourselves our judgment can become cloudy of how we really see our self, but if you talk about yourself like someone else, you can become more self-aware like Siddhartha.

Posted by: Aye'Kendria George at September 8, 2013 09:27 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013
Question #17: What does Siddhartha realize has left him “like the old skin that a snake sheds”?

Answer: At the beginning of the path to enlightenment Siddhartha was thirsty for knowledge. He was willing to leave his life to learn how to conquer the Self from Samanas, but he was not satisfied with what he had learned from them. In his conversation with Govinda Siddhartha critiqued Samanas. He said, “What I have so far learned from Samanas, I could learned more quickly and easily in every inn in a prostitute’s quarter, amongst the carriers and dice players” (Hesse 13). The news about Gotama who conquered the Self and became a Buddah brought a new hope to Siddhartha. Young son of Brahmin recognized him as he saw The Prefect One. Never Siddhartha had loved a man so much, but the teachings of Buddha did not bring a satisfaction to him. He started to realize that never will other teachings attract him, since man’s teachings didn’t. After he left the Perfect One, he felt like a new man. His former life was left behind. From that moment he understood that alone feelings become knowledge. According to Siddhartha “he realized that he was no longer a youth; he was now a man. He realized that something had left him, like the old skin that a snake sheds” (Hesse 30).

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 8, 2013 09:42 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013
Question #17: What does Siddhartha realize has left him “like the old skin that a snake sheds”?

Answer: At the beginning of the path to enlightenment Siddhartha was thirsty for knowledge. He was willing to leave his life to learn how to conquer the Self from Samanas, but he was not satisfied with what he had learned from them. In his conversation with Govinda Siddhartha critiqued Samanas. He said, “What I have so far learned from Samanas, I could learned more quickly and easily in every inn in a prostitute’s quarter, amongst the carriers and dice players” (Hesse 13). The news about Gotama who conquered the Self and became a Buddah brought a new hope to Siddhartha. Young son of Brahmin recognized him as he saw The Prefect One. Never Siddhartha had loved a man so much, but the teachings of Buddha did not bring a satisfaction to him. He started to realize that never will other teachings attract him, since man’s teachings didn’t. After he left the Perfect One, he felt like a new man. His former life was left behind. From that moment he understood that alone feelings become knowledge. According to Siddhartha “he realized that he was no longer a youth; he was now a man. He realized that something had left him, like the old skin that a snake sheds” (Hesse 30).

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 8, 2013 09:44 PM

Maria Benkirane 
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literatur
5 September 2013
Question: How is Gotama different from the Samanas?
Answer: Gotama and the Samanas are two different characters in the book of Siddhartha. Gotama does not suffer or destroy his body in order to find peace. He is the enlightened one and people all over the world travel to hear about his teaching. Hess describes Gotama saying, "The Buddha went his way modestly and lost in thought; his calm face was neither merry nor sad, but seemed to be gently smiling inwardly”[ . . . ]Indeed every finger of his calmly held hands, spoke of peace, spoke of perfection, sought nothing, imitated nothing, but breathed softly in unfading repose, in unfading light in unassailable peace" (15). However; The Samanas believe that true enlightenment is achieved if their whole body is destroyed. Hess describes the way of the Samanas that Siddhartha is following saying, "He traveled along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue" (8). They dress in rags and starve until they keep eliminating themselves as a way to achieve enlightenment.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 8, 2013 09:45 PM

Maria Benkirane 

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

5 September 2013

Question: How is Gotama different from the Samanas? (REDO)

Answer: Gotama and the Samanas are two different characters in the book of Siddhartha. Gotama does not suffer or destroy his body in order to find peace. He is the enlightened one and people all over the world travel to hear about his teaching. Hess describes Gotama saying, "The Buddha went his way modestly and lost in thought; his calm face was neither merry nor sad, but seemed to be gently smiling inwardly”[ . . . ]Indeed every finger of his calmly held hands, spoke of peace, spoke of perfection, sought nothing, imitated nothing, but breathed softly in unfading repose, in unfading light in unassailable peace" (15). However; The Samanas believe that true enlightenment is achieved if their whole body is destroyed. Hess describes the way of the Samanas that Siddhartha is following saying, "He traveled along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue" (8). They dress in rags and starve until they keep eliminating themselves as a way to achieve enlightenment.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 8, 2013 09:59 PM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
8 September 2013

Question: “How are the Samanas described? From his description, how does the author feel about them?”
Answer: The Samanas are described as skinny, withered, sunburnt men who are surrounded by loneliness (Hesse 6). From the description, it seems that the author pity’s the Samanas because he also says “…strangers and enemies to the world, strangers and lank jackals in the realm of humans.”

Posted by: Paula Pion at September 8, 2013 10:14 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
6 September 2013

Question #17: What frustrates Siddhartha?

Answer: Siddhartha becomes frustrated because he does not feel he is close to reaching his goal or may not be on the right path towards reaching his goal. According to the book “He killed his senses, he killed his memory, he slipped out of his self into thousands of other forms” (Hesse 14). He was not near his ultimate goal of salvation. He realized that he needed to go back to being himself instead of different forms of himself that were not true being true to himself.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 8, 2013 10:44 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question #25: Identify the proverbial “snake in his path”. What change did this discussion lead to for Siddhartha? Trace Siddhartha’s changes in feelings as he goes through this process of thinking.

Siddhartha begins to question himself about what he really wanted to know from the teachings he had been following. This is shown when he says, “What is it that you wanted to learn from the teachings and teachers” (Hesse 38). After thinking this he has a euphoria moment, when he realizes why he has not been satisfied with his life thus far, “He looked around him as if seeing the world for the first time” (Hesse 39) this is in relation to the fact that he is seeking a way to properly lose “the self”, and the teachings he has been listening to only allow you to lose yourself for a moment. However, soon after this he realizes that this new ideology has some serious consequences, and that he was now effectively alone, as shown when he claims, “But he, Siddhartha, where did he belong?” (Hesse 41). His state of excitement before now changes to, “icy despair” (Hesse 41), as he realizes that if he follows this path he will be totally alone.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at September 8, 2013 10:48 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2012

Question: What would Siddhartha have done if his father would have said “No” to his request?

The first time Siddhartha asked his father for permission to become a Samana, he father replies with "There is displeasure in my heart. I should not like to hear you make this request a second time."(Hesse 10)
However, Siddhartha remains in the same position: standing with his arms folded, unmoving. Siddhartha continues this way until his father comes in to talk to him in the last hour of the night.
Siddhartha explains to his father how he would rather stand and wait for his father’s approval instead of disobeying him, even if it means dying. "You will die, Siddhartha." "I will die."(Hesse 11)

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at September 8, 2013 10:54 PM

Salvatore Christlieb
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 September 2013

Question: 1. What does Siddhartha leave in the grove with the Buddha (Guattama/Gotama) and Govinda?

Answer:
Siddhartha left his “former life behind him in the grove … he realized that he was no longer a youth; he was now a man” (Hesse 30). This is not the typical manly man; this is the sophisticated gentleman who can think before he speaks. The man who came out of the grove was the brilliant thinker who became independent of “teachers and . . . teachings” (Hesse 31). He just began his journey to become an enlightened thinker, the one that we know as Siddhartha. His old self was the insignificant self; he embarked on that journey from the grove once he rid himself of his former life and began to think on how to control the Self

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 8, 2013 11:00 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013


Question: What'does'Siddhartha'realize'has'left'him'“like'the'old'skin'that'a'snake'sheds”?

Answer: Slowly and surely after leaving the Buddha Siddhartha came to himself. After careful mediation and self-indulging, he finally found the answer to the question he has spent his life trying to find. Siddhartha realized his childhood was over “ He realized that he was not a youth anymore, but had turned into a man”(Hesse,30). Siddhartha spent a majority of his life following the teachings of wise leaders. At the same moment when he realized that he was no longer a boy, but a man he also realized that he needed to shed dead weight from his life such as “ the wish to have teachers and to listen to teachings”(Hesse,30). Siddhartha spent his life trying to free himself through separation rather than just accept who he was and just become one with his own mind.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at September 8, 2013 11:04 PM

Christopher Holtzhower
ENG 210 CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
06 September 2013
Question #9: Given that Govinda was Siddhartha’s “lance bearer,” speculate about the conditions under which Govinda left home.
Answer: Govinda left home because he felt it was his duty to follow and be like Siddhartha. Govinda seems to be very similar to Siddhartha because he does not want to do the boring rituals every day for the rest of his life. Hesse wrote, “Govinda knew Siddhartha would never become an ordinary Brahmin, a lazy purveyor of rituals… and Govinda, too, would not become any of those things (Hesse 4).” Govinda could be in a similar situation at home with his father, like Siddhartha, and this is his only way he can leave home.

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at September 8, 2013 11:05 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

"No longer, I want to begin my thoughts and my life with Atman and with the suffering of the world. I do not want to kill and dissect myself any longer, to find a secret behind the ruins."

Question:
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage i.e. what is going on exactly here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: In the American translated paperback version of “Siddhartha”, there are many significant passages that should be looked at closely for its context. In one of the passages Siddhartha says to himself, “No longer, I want to begin my thoughts and my life with Atman and with the suffering of the world. I do not want to kill and dissect myself any longer, to find a secret behind the ruins” (Hesse 31). In this passage, Siddhartha is in a transition from being religious and trying new religions to a more materialistic life. He does not want to think about why the world can be corrupt. Siddhartha no longer wants to focus on the pain and suffering that occurs in the world, but rather something that he feels would make him feel happier. Siddhartha also states “I want to learn from myself, want to be my student, want to get to know myself” (Hesse 31). Siddhartha is expressing that he wants to be done with trying to learn from others. Siddhartha wants to learn things from his own experiences, rather than from teachings. He also wants to grow more as an individual.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 8, 2013 11:37 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: What separates Govinda and Siddhartha at the beginning of this chapter?

Answer: Govinda decides to stay with the Buddha, and become a Monk while Siddhartha continues with his journey. Siddhartha explains to the Buddha, “ This is why I am continuing my travels – not to seek other, better teachings, for I know there are none, but to depart from all teachings and all teachers and to reach my goal by myself or to die” (Hesse 28). Siddhartha comes to the realization that he cannot progress any further on this path. He learns that what he needs to experience for himself can only come from himself. He goes on to say, “I want to learn from myself, want to be my student, want to get to know myself, the secret of Siddhartha” (31). By taking this step, Siddhartha, experiences an intense awakening.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at September 8, 2013 11:44 PM

Flavia Vazqiez
END 210CL CA01
Question #29

"What is meditation? What is leaving one's body... It is fleeing from the self... The same escape, the same short numbing is what the driver of an ox-cart finds in the inn, drinking a few bowls of rice-wine..."

Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: a.) Who is speaking?, b.) Who is being addressed?, c.) What is the context of this passage?

Answer: In this passage the speaker is Siddhartha and he said this quietly, like to himself. The context of this passage is that Siddhartha wanted to become a Samana, so he answers this to Govinda when he asks how could Siddhartha have learned from the Samanas.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at September 9, 2013 12:04 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

I used the literature network (onlineliterature.com) to read Siddhartha.

Question # 9
In the context of this chapter, what is the difference between “my self” and “myself”? Does Siddhartha make sense when he says he tried to “free my self” from “myself”?

Answer:
The self (my self) is what Siddhartha used to be before he took the path of self-teaching through experiences. The “myself” he is referring to is his inner self. After years of learning about the world around him, he never took the time to learn about himself. Siddhartha states “And there is nothing in this world I know less about than about me, about Siddhartha. (Hesse Ch. 4 paragraph 3)” No, what Siddhartha is trying to do is run away from his self. In which he states “That I know nothing about myself...I was afraid of myself, I was fleeing from myself! (Hesse Ch. 4 paragraph 4)” He can’t free “my self” from “myself” because they are one and the same.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at September 9, 2013 12:12 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question: “What made Siddhartha shiver inwardly like a small animal? Why?”

Answer: After realizing that learning from Gotama and other sources was not the way, he approached a snake on his path; the snake forced Siddhartha into a deep meditation and reflection on the current state of his path to enlightenment. He realized, “I am no longer the one I was” and his past way of life “is no longer alongside my path” (Hesse 32). This revelation resulted in “a cold in his chest, as a small animal, a bird or rabbit, would when seeing how alone he was” (Hesse 32). Companionless for the first time in his journey, Siddhartha briefly feels lost now that he is no longer a Brahman of high caste; further, in comparison to his formally omnipresent friend Govinda, who now belongs to a fellowship of monks, he has no one (Hesse 33).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at September 9, 2013 12:35 AM

Julia Della Penna
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
6 September 2013

[REDO:]
Question: “Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might have learned more quickly and simply. In some bar in a street full of whores, my friend, among the cart drivers and dice players, I might have learned these things.” What does this mean and why?

Answer: Siddhartha expresses to Govinda, his shadow, that he is sadden with what he accomplished even after the difficult and extensive journey he took learning the ways of the Samanas. Siddhartha says, “Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might have learned more quickly and simply.” (Hesse, 12). Siddhartha states that he would have learned the way of “self” easier by being in the streets “where the whorehouses are, carters and gamblers” (Hesse, 12) roam instead of the harsh conditions he went through with the Samanas. He feels that he would have received the same information and seems almost as if he is regretting all he had done; he could have been in any other place and experienced the same.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at September 9, 2013 01:07 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
6 September 2013
RE-DO
Question 11: “Siddhartha,” he said, “why are you waiting?” “You know why.” “Will you go on standing and waiting until it is day, noon, evening?” “I will stand and wait.” “You will grow tired, Siddhartha.” “I will grow tired.” “ You will fall asleep, Siddhartha.” “I will not fall asleep.” “You will die, Siddhartha.” I will die.”
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using. Let us know what page to find this in your version.

Answer: In this quotation, Siddhartha’s father is speaking; Siddhartha’s father is addressing Siddhartha. Earlier in the passage, Siddhartha tells his good friend Govinda that he is going to become a Samana (Hesse 9). Govinda responds with, “will your father permit you to do that” (Hesse 9). Therefore, when Siddhartha tells his father of his desire, his father is not too happy about his son’s choice. When his father asks him what he is waiting for, Siddhartha is waiting for his father to give his blessing to become a Samana. His father is trying to discourage Siddhartha from going, but Siddhartha knows this is what he wants.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at September 9, 2013 01:19 AM

Cheyenne DeMaggio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

Question: "What does Siddhartha want to learn from the teachers that he has been unable to learn? Why hasn’t he been able to learn this?"

Answer: After separating himself from his family, and even speaking to the most enlightened being he's ever encountered, Siddhartha realizes that he still has not fulfilled his life. While walking in the forest, he came to the conclusion "it was the ego whose meaning and essence he wanted to learn" (Hesse 40). As explained in the Kohn translation, Siddhartha had always tried to overcome his ego, but he was only able to hide from it for moments at a time (40). While Siddhartha spent so much time trying to separate from himself in an effort to find atman, he actually lost his own self.

Posted by: Cheyenne DeMaggio at September 9, 2013 01:23 AM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013

Question: “Truly, only a person who has succeeded in reaching the innermost part of his self would
Glance and walk this way.”

46. Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation my differ from the version of the text you are using ( there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

The quote is located on page 35 in the blue book.
This passage follows a conversation that Siddhartha has with the Illustrious One. During this conversation, he is critiquing the Illustrious One’s teachings. Siddhartha says, “Nobody finds salvation through teachings” (34). The entire novel focuses on Siddhartha’s journey to self-discovery and it is ironic that the Illustrious One preaches that once you join him and his teachings you will find your way to salvation. Siddhartha points out that it is impossible for someone to find salvation through someone else’s teachings. One has to discover it on his own. For this reason, Siddhartha feels that he cannot follow the Illustrious One; he needs to continue his journey. However, in the quote mentioned above Siddhartha is praising him but at the same time being a bit satirical. Right before this he says how he wishes that he could “look and smile, sit and walk like that, so free, so worthy, so restrained, so candid, so childlike and mysterious” (35). On the surface, these seem like compliments but he is really criticizing him. He does not understand how a person preaching false hope and information can sit so calm as if it does not affect him. He feels like the Illustrious One is putting up a front just to gain blind followers.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at September 9, 2013 02:06 AM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA05 Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

18. What realization gives Siddhartha the feeling of awakening from a long dream?

In this part of the novel, Siddhartha has just continued his journey without Govinda: a man who was loyal and stood by his side. As he continued alone, he began to reflect on what this journey really meant and how he was going to find his “self.” Siddhartha has always had someone to guide him and stand by his side and in this particular moment, his revelation is when he realizes that only he can show him the way to self-discovery. He says, “I will learn from myself, be my own pupil; I will learn from myself the secret of Siddhartha” (39). This means that only he can lead himself to salvation. No other person could do this because only he truly understands himself. Ironically, he believed that he needed someone else to help him to do this by seeking the teachings of thinkers. In reality he “lost [himself] on the way” (38). Once he realizes these things, his revelation has unfolded and he is now able to continue his journey.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at September 9, 2013 02:30 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
9 September 2013
Question 6: What is the “Self”? Why has it occupied Siddhartha so?
Answer: The definition of self, explained in Siddhartha is “the purpose and essence of which I sought to learn” (Hesse 30). “Self” is what you are looking for in your life and what makes you, you. Siddhartha is a little lost, and wanted his self to be clearer. That is why he left for this journey; to find his self. By the end of Awakening, Siddhartha is a new person. Siddhartha states, “there is nothing in this world I know less about than about me, about Siddhartha” (Hesse 30). He has found his self.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at September 9, 2013 02:44 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL-CA01 Siddhartha-PART 1 Chapter 4 “The Awakening”

Question: After awakening, Siddhartha thinks he is like a newborn child and should return to his father, however, he doesn’t. Why does he not go home?


Answer: “But I am no longer the one I was, I am no ascetic any more, I am not a priest any more, I am no Brahman any more. Whatever should I do at home and at my father’s place? Study? Make offerings? Practise meditation? But all this is over, all of this is no longer alongside my path.
This quote starts to explain how Siddhartha has been his father’s son Brahman, but now he is nothing but Siddhartha. Siddhartha does not go home to his father because he feels as though he was so alone. He has struggled at birth and still is struggling years later as he continues to figure out who he is becoming and where he stands in life.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at September 9, 2013 08:32 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL-CA01 Siddhartha-PART 1 Chapter 4 “The Awakening”

Question 16: After awakening, Siddhartha thinks he is like a newborn child and should return to his father, however, he doesn’t. Why does he not go home?


Answer: “But I am no longer the one I was, I am no ascetic any more, I am not a priest any more, I am no Brahman any more. Whatever should I do at home and at my father’s place? Study? Make offerings? Practise meditation? But all this is over, all of this is no longer alongside my path.
This quote starts to explain how Siddhartha has been his father’s son Brahman, but now he is nothing but Siddhartha. Siddhartha does not go home to his father because he feels as though he was so alone. He has struggled at birth and still is struggling years later as he continues to figure out who he is becoming and where he stands in life.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at September 9, 2013 08:33 AM

Christopher Holtzhower
ENG 210 CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
09 September 2013
“No longer, I want to begin my thoughts and my life with Atman and with the suffering of the world. I do not want to kill and dissect myself any longer, to find a secret behind the ruins.”
#15: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer: Siddhartha is speaking during this passage. Siddhartha is addressing himself. Siddhartha does no longer want to be like every other person in his culture. Siddhartha says, “And there is nothing in the world I know less about than me, than Siddhartha (Hesse 31)!” This means that Siddhartha was lost his whole life and does not know whom he is. He then declares that he will be his own teacher in order to learn more about himself.

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at September 9, 2013 08:53 AM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: As a Samana, Siddhartha says that as he sought Atman in mediation, he lost his self. Is this different from conquering his self? Is it different from freeing his self?

Answer: When Siddhartha mentions how he was losing his self in the process of the searching of Atman, he also mentions how he was “afraid of myself, I was fleeing from myself” (Pg. 31). This is the same as conquering himself because the word “conquering”, in itself, gives off the connotation of victory, and in a way, the searching caused him to become afraid of the person he was. This happens to be different from freeing his self because if Siddhartha were to free himself, it would be of his own will and he would not be getting the sense of being defeated.


Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at September 9, 2013 09:08 AM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: What single reason does Siddhartha give for why he has remained alien and unknown to
himself?

Answer: New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books publish the edition of Siddhartha that was used for this response. Siddhartha’s goal in life was to find his true self. He searched for himself through the Brahman originally. When he realized that was not where he truly belonged, he put his goal in the hands of the Samanas and sought out Atman. He wanted to rid himself of his old ways and move on to find what he thought defined life and “the Absolute” or “Divine.” It was in chapter four that Siddhartha realized what had happened, “The reason why I do not know anything about myself, the reason Siddhartha has remained alien and unknown to myself is due to one thing, to one single thing – I was afraid of myself, I was fleeing from myself” (Hesse, 38). Siddhartha was too busy trying to change his original self that he lost himself entirely. He was completely unfamiliar with his own being, which was frightening to Siddhartha. Not only was he lost in terms of what he wanted for the future, he was lost in terms of the present as well.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at September 9, 2013 09:08 AM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 210 CL Love and Desires in Literature
9 September 2013

Question 21: To what realization does Siddhartha “awaken”? Why is his sense of isolation called “the last shudder of his awakening”?

Answer: Siddhartha “awakens” when he contemplates to himself what the teachers cannot teach him, and he came to the realization that his teachers could not teach him about Self. Then he came to recognition that he does not know himself, because he was afraid of himself and he had spent so many years trying to destroy himself. He wanted to get rid of himself in order to find the unknown innermost, the nucleus of all things. After comprehending his thoughts, he had awakened. This is made apparent when reading the following text from the Awakening chapter, “Slowly the thinker went on his way and asked himself: What is it that you wanted to learn from teachings and teachers, although they have taught you much, what was it they could not teach you? [. . .] It was Self, the character and nature of which I wish to learn. [. . .] The reason why I do not know myself, the reason why Siddhartha has remained alien and unknown to myself is due to one thing, [. . .] I was fleeing from myself. I wished to destroy myself, [. . .] in order to find in the unknown innermost[.] But by doing so, I have last myself on the way. Siddhartha looked up and around him, a smile crept over his face, and a strong feeling of awakening from a long dream spread right through his being,” Siddhartha thought to himself (Hess 38-39).
The reason why his sense of isolation is called “the last shudder of his awakening,” is that he realizes that everything he had once surrounded himself with was now changed in some way and he did not know how to label himself. He also had a sense of no place, but he is firm about himself. This is shown as he reflects to himself, “Previously, when in deepest meditation, he was a Brahmin of high standing, a religious man, Now he was only Siddhartha, the awakened; otherwise nothing else. [. . . ] Nobody was so alone as he. He was a nobleman, belonging to any guild and finding refuge in it, sharing its life and language. [. . .] Govinda had become a monk and thousands of monks were his brothers, wore the same gown, shared his beliefs and spoke his language. But he, Siddhartha, where did he belong? [. . .] At that moment, when the world around him melted away, when he stood alone like a star in the heavens, he was overwhelmed by a feeling of icy despair, but he was more firmly himself than ever. That was the last shudder of his awakening “(Hess 41)[.]

Posted by: Lydia Santana at September 9, 2013 09:39 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 – Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013
#24
Question: What is the cause of Siddhartha's smile? Has Siddhartha changed? If so, how? Explain.

Answer: Siddhartha smiles because he has realized that the path he was on was not the correct path he needed to be on in order to find his Self. In fact, Siddhartha thinks that having been on the path he was, “I lost myself on the way” (Hesse 38). Siddhartha has changed in that he now believes that the religious, monastic-like life he was previously living is no longer the path for him. At this point, Siddhartha believes that he must experience those things that he had believed were burdens.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at September 9, 2013 09:49 AM

Maria Benkirane
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question: Has Siddhartha come to any realizations in this chapter? How is he different now than before?

Answer: Siddhartha comes to the realization that enlightenment cannot be taught or read about; He needs to do it all by himself and to achieve it on his own. Hess described Siddhartha’s words thoroughly saying, "But what is this, what you wanted to learn from teachings and from teachers, and what they- who have taught you a lot- were nevertheless unable to teach you?” And he discovered: "It was the self whose meaning and nature I wanted to learn. It was the self; I wanted to free myself from, which I wanted to overcome" (21). He also starts seeing the world as a magical and beautiful place: "He looked around, as if he were seeing the world for the first time. The world was beautiful, the world was full of variety, the world was strange and puzzling [ . . . ] Siddhartha, awakening, on the path to himself" (Hess 21-22). He needs to discover who he truly is as a person, calling it rebirth. He is different from before because for the first time he finally feels like a real independent man.

Posted by: Maria Benkirane at September 9, 2013 09:58 AM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: "Why did Govinda break with his friend, Siddhartha?"

Answer:In the chapter of Gautama, Siddhartha's friend Govinda finally decides to go out on a limb and chooses to go his own direction in life rather than follow in the footsteps of Siddhartha. Govinda decides to make this move after he and Siddhartha listen to the teachings of the Buddha. I believe that he does this because he loves Siddhartha so much and finally realizes that what he said to him is true and that he needs to become more independent and experience life for himself. The most inspirational quote from Siddhartha that really makes him realize this is taken from page 26 which reads, "Govinda, my friend, now you have taken the step, now you have chosen the path. Always, o Govinda, you have been my friend, always you have walked one step behind me. Often I have thought: Will Govinda never once take a step alone, without me, from his own soul? See, now you have become a man and you yourself are chosing your path. May you walk it to the end, o my friend. May you find release!"(Hesse 26).

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at September 9, 2013 10:01 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2013

Question 21: "What does Siddhartha do with the oldest Samana? What does that feat show?"

Answer: Siddhartha holds a steady, unwavering gaze with the oldest Samana. One could consider this heavy gaze a trance or hypnotism. When Siddhartha hypnotized the old man, he made the oldest Samana completely quiet. Siddhatha controlled the Samana’s words and actions. The oldest Samana became “powerless under Siddhartha’s spell,” (23). This feat shows that Siddhartha is so much closer to enlightenment than he believes. Being able to silence an old and wise Samana proves how superior Siddhartha is spiritually. His gaze is evidence of his will and determination to discover enlightenment.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at September 9, 2013 10:04 AM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: "Why did Govinda break with his friend, Siddhartha?"

Answer:In the chapter of Gautama, Siddhartha's friend Govinda finally decides to go out on a limb and chooses to go his own direction in life rather than follow in the footsteps of Siddhartha. Govinda decides to make this move after he and Siddhartha listen to the teachings of the Buddha. I believe that he does this because he loves Siddhartha so much and finally realizes that what he said to him is true and that he needs to become more independent and experience life for himself. The most inspirational quote from Siddhartha that really makes him realize this is taken from page 26 which reads, "Govinda, my friend, now you have taken the step, now you have chosen the path. Always, o Govinda, you have been my friend, always you have walked one step behind me. Often I have thought: Will Govinda never once take a step alone, without me, from his own soul? See, now you have become a man and you yourself are chosing your path. May you walk it to the end, o my friend. May you find release!"(Hesse 26).

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at September 9, 2013 10:05 AM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

Question: “It was the self, I wanted to free myself from, which I sought to overcome.”
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) who is speaking? (b.)Who is being addressed? ,(c.)What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here?

Answer:
(a.) From the above quote it can be assumed that Siddhartha is speaking to himself, he is referring to himself in the third person. “deep in thought he walked on more slowly asking himself (pg 21”
(b.) Siddhartha is addressing himself, as it is a process of self-realization. “and then he discovered: “it was self whose meaning and nature I wanted to learn… (pg21)”
(c.) The context of this passage is that, he is leaving the grove, where he left Buddha behind. He is conflicted with himself, because he is slowly discovering that he is no longer a “youth” and has become a man.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 9, 2013 10:13 AM

Abdulaziz alsaif
Dr.Hobbs
ENG210CL: Love and Desire in Literature. CA05
6 September 2013

Question: Who if Gotama? What does the narrator think of him?

Answer: Gotama is also known as Gautama which was the Buddha. Based on the reading, when Siddhartha has left the town, he headed for the forest where most people were exiled and stop at a place where most of the people that left the town has gathered. The narrator explained that Gotama (Buddha) was a very silence man, a one that doesn't have a smile nor a sad face, one that is quite and looks peaceful. Gotama was just like any other monk he sat the same way and looked very calm. As the narrator says, "and from that calmly downward-hanging hand every single finger expressed peace, expressed perfection" (Siddartha pg.25)

Posted by: Abdulaziz alsaif at September 9, 2013 10:14 AM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: "After awakening, Siddhartha thinks he is like a newborn child and should return to his father, however, he doesn't. Why does he not go home?"

Answer: The passage shows that Siddhartha does not feel that he should go home because of an insight that he also awakened to. His insight stated, "I am no longer who I was, I am no longer an ascetic, I am no longer a priest, I am no longer a Brahmin. What then should I do back home in my father's house? Study? Perform sacrifices? Practice meditation? All this is past, none of this is on my path any longer" (Hesse 35). His insight shows that he feels he is no longer the person his father wanted him to be, and that is most likely the reason he decided not to go home.

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at September 9, 2013 10:23 AM

Julia Della Penna
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
6 September 2013

Question: 14. What separates Govinda and Siddhartha at the beginning of this chapter?
Answer: The following answer will be deriving from the use of the Olesch et al translation version of Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha.
In Chapter 4, Awakening, what separates Govinda and Siddhartha at the beginning is when Siddhartha leaves the grove and Govinda stays. Quoted from the first paragraph, “When Siddhartha left the grove, where the Buddha, the perfected one, stayed behind, where Govinda stayed behind, then he felt that in this grove, his past life also stayed behind and parted from him.” (Hesse, 33). Siddhartha believes that his previous life has separated from him due to the fact he left Govinda who had been with his whole life. In addition, he feels this certain way just because he decides to teach himself rather than learn from Buddha, the omniscient teacher.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at September 9, 2013 10:29 AM

Abdulaziz alsaif
Dr.Hobbs
ENG210CL: Love and Desire in Literature. CA05
September 2013

Question:

Answer: when Siddhartha was awaken from a long dream his first words were " I will not let Siddhartha slip away from me now! No longer do I want my thinking and my life to begin with atman and the suffering of the world. No longer do I want to slay and dismember myself, to find a secret behind the remains."(Siddhartha 34). When he was awakened he felt like this is the first time he is seeing the world.

Posted by: Abdulaziz alsaif at September 9, 2013 10:39 AM

Abdulaziz alsaif
Dr.Hobbs
ENG210CL: Love and Desire in Literature. CA05
September 2013

Question:

Answer: when Siddhartha was awaken from a long dream his first words were " I will not let Siddhartha slip away from me now! No longer do I want my thinking and my life to begin with atman and the suffering of the world. No longer do I want to slay and dismember myself, to find a secret behind the remains."(Siddhartha 34). When he was awakened he felt like this is the first time he is seeing the world.

Posted by: Abdulaziz alsaif at September 9, 2013 10:40 AM

Abdulaziz alsaif
Dr.Hobbs
ENG210CL: Love and Desire in Literature. CA05
September 2013

Question:

Answer: when Siddhartha was awaken from a long dream his first words were " I will not let Siddhartha slip away from me now! No longer do I want my thinking and my life to begin with atman and the suffering of the world. No longer do I want to slay and dismember myself, to find a secret behind the remains."(Siddhartha 34). When he was awakened he felt like this is the first time he is seeing the world.

Posted by: Abdulaziz alsaif at September 9, 2013 10:41 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 September 2013

Question 25: Why is Siddhartha unimpressed with the magic arts?

Siddhartha has the strong belief that each person has the potential to find themselves by having their own personal beliefs, and not just automatically following what others may preach about. In the book, Siddhartha mentions to Gotama "I admired your teachings. Everything is completely clear and proved" (Hesse 32). However, he decides that although he did understand Gotama's teachings, he thinks that there is more to learn from other places. He feels the need to go and find things on his own, rather than have to follow Gotama's ways, because it does not fully fulfill his own personal quest.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 9, 2013 11:11 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: Siddhartha promised his father that he would return home. Why did Siddhartha decide not to return?
Siddhartha decided not to return home because he realized that he needed to venture out on his own in order to discover his true self. He no longer needed the teachings of others because he did not think that they were helpful or insightful enough to allow him to discover what he truly wanted out of life. He wanted to discover the Self within him. Siddhartha states, “I am no longer what I was…What then shall I do at home with my father” (Hesse 40)? Siddhartha did not think that it was possible to fulfill his quest of finding himself by returning home to his father. He needed to discover himself on his own, and the only way to do that was to not look back and continue his journey alone.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 9, 2013 11:14 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 September 2013

Question 25: Why is Siddhartha unimpressed with the magic arts?

Siddhartha has the strong belief that each person has the potential to find themselves by having their own personal beliefs, and not just automatically following what others may preach about. In the book, Siddhartha mentions to Gotama "I admired your teachings. Everything is completely clear and proved" (Hesse 32). However, he decides that although he did understand Gotama's teachings, he thinks that there is more to learn from other places. He feels the need to go and find things on his own, rather than have to follow Gotama's ways, because it does not fully fulfill his own personal quest.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 9, 2013 11:20 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

Question 2: “What does Siddhartha want to learn from the teachers that he has been unable to learn? Why hasn’t he been able to learn this?”

Answer: Siddhartha has always wanted to reach enlightenment through learning from his teachers. On his walk, and through his pondering, Siddhartha found that his teachers cannot teach him more about himself. Further, Siddhartha cannot enlighten himself while he is running away from himself. He wanted to free himself from himself. However, through his pondering, he comes to the realization that he “was not able to overcome [the self] it, could only deceive it, could only flee from it, only hide from it,” (30). Through further self-examination, Siddhartha came to the realization that he had also lost himself.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at September 9, 2013 11:32 AM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: "After awakening, Siddhartha thinks he is like a newborn child and should return to his father, however, he doesn't. Why does he not go home?"

Answer: The passage shows that Siddhartha does not feel that he should go home because of an insight that he also awakened to. His insight stated, "I am no longer who I was, I am no longer an ascetic, I am no longer a priest, I am no longer a Brahmin. What then should I do back home in my father's house? Study? Perform sacrifices? Practice meditation? All this is past, none of this is on my path any longer" (Hesse 35). His insight shows that he feels he is no longer the person his father wanted him to be, and that is most likely the reason he decided not to go home.

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at September 9, 2013 11:32 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2013

15. Question: “Siddhartha saw a single goal: to become empty…” What does this mean and why? What happens when he reaches that goal?

Answer:
Siddhartha’s single’s goal is a challenging goal for anyone to master. His goal of emptiness is to deprive the body of physical needs. Physical demands that humans in general would despise denying. The goal Siddhartha has is explained during the beginning of his travels, “Siddhartha had one single goal—to become empty, to become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure and sorrow—to let the Self die”(Hesse 11). Siddhartha views ordinary lives of human beings around him except he sees them as disgusting. When Siddhartha was traveling his thoughts were “all were not worth a passing glance, everything lied, stank of lies; they were all illusions of sense, happiness and beauty. All were doomed to decay” (Hesse 11). He sees these people as disgusting because they are living through their senses and illusions created by such senses. They are unable to see the truth about the Self and the selfish desires created by the Self. When the Self conquers the way people live life is a lie. “To let the Self die [would allow for the ability] to experience pure thought” (Hesse 11). Pure thought is a form of contemplation which is the result of a spiritual life or as the title of this paper states order of emptiness.

This is a re-post.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 9, 2013 11:39 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2013

15. Question: “Siddhartha saw a single goal: to become empty…” What does this mean and why? What happens when he reaches that goal?

Answer:
Siddhartha’s single’s goal is a challenging goal for anyone to master. His goal of emptiness is to deprive the body of physical needs. Physical demands that humans in general would despise denying. The goal Siddhartha has is explained during the beginning of his travels, “Siddhartha had one single goal—to become empty, to become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure and sorrow—to let the Self die”(Hesse 11). Siddhartha views ordinary lives of human beings around him except he sees them as disgusting. When Siddhartha was traveling his thoughts were “all were not worth a passing glance, everything lied, stank of lies; they were all illusions of sense, happiness and beauty. All were doomed to decay” (Hesse 11). He sees these people as disgusting because they are living through their senses and illusions created by such senses. They are unable to see the truth about the Self and the selfish desires created by the Self. When the Self conquers the way people live life is a lie. “To let the Self die [would allow for the ability] to experience pure thought” (Hesse 11). Pure thought is a form of contemplation which is the result of a spiritual life or as the title of this paper states order of emptiness.

This is a re-post.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 9, 2013 11:39 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

Question 2: “What does Siddhartha want to learn from the teachers that he has been unable to learn? Why hasn’t he been able to learn this?”

Answer: Siddhartha has always wanted to reach enlightenment through learning from his teachers. On his walk, and through his pondering, Siddhartha found that his teachers cannot teach him more about himself. Further, Siddhartha cannot enlighten himself while he is running away from himself. He wanted to free himself from himself. However, through his pondering, he comes to the realization that he “was not able to overcome [the self] it, could only deceive it, could only flee from it, only hide from it,” (30). Through further self-examination, Siddhartha came to the realization that he had also lost himself.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at September 9, 2013 11:51 AM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

Question: How does Siddhartha prepare for Kamala? What does he want from her?

Answer: To prepare for Kamala, Siddhartha shaved his bread, cut his hair, and put oil in his hair. He wanted to look like someone who would be worthy of her teachings, not a Samana. He even asks her, "But tell me, beautiful Kamala, aren't you at all afraid of the Samana from the forest, who has come to learn how to make love" (Hesse 41)? He wanted to make sure she felt safe. He wanted to learn how to make love. He felt no other person would be worthy of teaching him this.

Posted by: Regina Green at September 9, 2013 02:57 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

Question 17: What three things does Siddhartha say that he can do? Why is this important or irrelevant (or, both)?

Answer:"I can think, I can wait, I can fast (page 56)." These are the three things that Siddhartha says he can do. This is important because this is how he has spent his live up to this point: Meditating on Brahmin scripture, fasting with the Samanas, and waiting to interact with Gotama. Siddhartha is also able to apply these skills to real life situations that are not necessarily religious, such as business affairs.
"Yesterday I told you I knew how to think, to wait and to fast, but you did not consider these useful. But you will see that they are very useful, Kamala [ . . . ] everyone can reach his goal, if he can think, wait, and fast (pages 59-60)."

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 10, 2013 12:00 AM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng -210CL - Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
10 September 2013

Question: # 11. Who does Siddhartha encounter by the water and retreat from because his inner voice says, “No!”


Answer to question: “A young woman,” although “Siddhartha was attracted to her and felt desire towards her he knew it was the wrong thing to do in that moment. (Hesse 38) ” Because she did not feel anything towards him, what she felt was in the heat of the moment. Therefore, he had to stop himself from taking advantage, of her in that situation

Posted by: Stephanie gilbert at September 10, 2013 08:44 AM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question: What is Siddhartha’s opinion of the Ferryman and of the river? What is significant about this?
Answer: “Siddhartha was happy about the friendship and the kindness of the ferryman.” (Hesse 37-38) He compared the ferryman to Govinda because he thought that he was also a person who put others happiness before his own and thanked others when he should be the one getting thanked. Siddhartha had stated, “This is a beautiful river.” (Hesse 37) This was all significant because in his dream Govinda turns into a female and wishes he can have touched a female like that in real life, but as a Samana he is not aloud. By seeing the world from outside the Samanas life it gives him a revelation of what he real wants and what he should do with his future in front of him.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at September 10, 2013 01:36 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
10 September 2013

Question: What is the ferryman’s response when Siddhartha tells him he can’t pay? Why might this be important?

Answer: When Siddhartha tells the ferryman that he cannot offer him payment or a gift, the ferryman responds by saying, “You will give me the gift another time” (Hesse 37). The ferryman speaks of how he has learned many things from the river, but one lesson that has made an impact is that the river brings everything back. Foreshadowing is evident in this statement, yet it also makes the reader wonder what Siddhartha will give back to the ferryman in return.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at September 10, 2013 02:37 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
9 September 2013

Question #6: What is the "Self"? Why has it occupied Siddhartha so?

Answer: The "Self" Hesse is referring to is who the real Siddhartha is. Siddhartha has been wandering places and trying to find certain people, but he realizes that he is not actually trying to find himself, he is afraid of himself and trying to escape. Hesse says "The reason I do not know anything about myself, the reason why Siddhartha has remained alien and unknown to myself is due to one thing, to one single thing-I was afraid of myself" (31). Siddhartha was too busy seeking all of these people that he lost himself on the way. As he left Buddha, Siddhartha noticed that he really knew who he was and what his purpose was. Siddhartha, on the other hand, he had no idea, so once he realized that he knew what his mission was, and that was to find his Self.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at September 10, 2013 06:27 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 September 2013

Question: How are the characters of Siddhartha and Kamala alike? Be specific.

Answer: New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books publish the edition of Siddhartha that was used for this response. Siddhartha and Kamala certainly differ in terms of lifestyle, but they also possess some of the same qualities. First of all, they both seem to be focused on lust and desire. As simple as the way Siddhartha asks, “Will you give me a kiss for a poem?” (Hesse, 56) and Kamala agrees with, “I will do so if your poem pleases me,” (Hesse, 56) proves that they are both lustful people. They had both just met each other, yet they are willing to embark upon each other in such a way. Also, both characters seem eager to learn. Siddhartha has obviously been willing to learn throughout the entire book, but through chapter five, he has expressed his interest in love via Kamala. Kamala seems very interested in the way she expresses herself after she learns that Siddhartha is literate, “Wait, you can read and write” (Hesse, 57)? She explains that she cannot read, and although she does not come out and say that she wants to learn, it seems as though she would be fascinated. Finally, they both seem to be interested in one another. They live their lives in opposite ways, but that almost seems like a reason they want to be together. Kamala lives a rich lifestyle being carted around through the town in fancy clothes. Kamala even states, “For you will need much money if you want to be Kamala’s friend” (Hesse, 57). She seems as though she wants to help Siddhartha achieve this. She explains that the fact that he can read and write could help him to earn money. Of course, Siddhartha is completely open to changing for Kamala. He has changed the way he lives in order to do so. He thinks to himself, “I require clothes and money, that is all. These are easy goals which do not disturb one’s sleep” (Hesse, 58-59). Clearly, he has no fear that he will be able to obtain these assets in order to please Kamala and make a relationship with her work.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at September 10, 2013 07:29 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
11 September 2013

Question: How does Siddhartha prepare for Kamala? What does he want from her?

Answer: While exploring the forest, Siddhartha came across a beautiful woman by the name of Kamala. Growing up as a young Brahman, Siddhartha could not have any contact with women. Therefore, when Siddhartha saw Kamala her beauty mesmerized him. Knowing nothing about love, Siddhartha turned to Kamala; “Kamala I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher for I know nothing yet of that art which you have mastered in the highest degree” (Hesse 41). Laughing at Siddhartha’s proposal, Kamala explains, “Many young men come in beautiful clothes, they come in fine shoes, they have perfume in their hair and money in their pouches” (Hesse 41), Siddhartha had none of these things. Siddhartha pleaded, “Already I am starting to learn from you. Even yesterday I was already learning. I have already taken off my beard, have combed the hair, have oil in my hair” (Hesse 41). Although Siddhartha did not come bearing gifts, fancy clothes, or money, he came to offer his knowledge and wisdom in order to learn how to love, and in that sense, Kamala was willing to help him.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 10, 2013 07:46 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
8 September 2013
Question #20
Question #20
20. After Siddhartha leaves the grove named Jetavana ,where does he initially intend to go?

Answer: The first thing that comes to Siddhartha is to return home to his father, but then he realizes that his home is part of the past, and he can no longer go back to the past. According to page 37 ( Hesse) “Siddhartha reflected deeply as he went on his way, he realized that he was no longer a youth, he was now a man, he realized something had left him, like the old skin that snake sheds”, this shows that Siddhartha was seeing himself as man and no longer who he use to be and he reflects on going home but he can’t because his home was the past and no longer a part of him it almost died within his heart.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at September 10, 2013 07:55 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question #26: What single reason does Siddhartha give for why he has remained alien and unknown to himself?

The single cause that Siddhartha gives for why he has remained alien and unknown to himself is one that only he can fix. Siddartha explains that, "I was afraid of myself, I was fleeing from myself!" (Hesse 31). This realization was fueled by the dissection of himself. Siddhartha states that he had "lost himself in the process" (31).

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 10, 2013 08:19 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
10 September 2013

Question: 13. Who is Kamala and what is her profession? Does Hesse seem to portray this fact in a negative or positive way? Why is this significant to the story?

Kamala is a prostitute that Siddhartha meets in the grove. Hesse portrays this in a positive way. Their meeting is significant because Kamala will teach Siddhartha and help him continue on his journey. Siddhartha explains, " It was my resolution to learn love from this most beautiful woman" (Hesse 45-46) With that said, he convinces Kamala to help him.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 10, 2013 08:33 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
11 September 2013
Question #18
Question #18:

18. When Siddhartha kisses a woman for the first time, there is a style change. How so? Why?

Answer #18:
When Siddhartha kisses a woman for the first time there is a sense of style change change because, Siddhartha’s becomes attached to Kamala and he enters the world of desire. Siddhartha moves himself away from his previous life that he shared with Govinda toward a new life of desire, which he will be able to share with Kamala. When he meets with the washerwoman at the edge of the village makes him think when he will enter the world of desire, and this makes him attached to Kamala. On page 60 “My Dear Kamala, said Siddhartha, “When I came to you in your grove I made the first step, it was my intention to learn about love form the most beautiful woman, from the moment I made that resolution I also knew that would execute it, I knew you would help me, I knew it from the first glance at the entrance of the grove” (Hesse, 60). This shows that Siddhartha had become attached to desire and love he loved her and had just entered the world of desire which changed the style because he is leaving that old life and starting a life full of desire of love.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at September 10, 2013 08:55 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
9 September 2013

Question: How are the characters of Siddhartha and Kamala alike? Be specific.

Answer: In chapter five of the W. K. Marriott translation, Kamala and Siddhartha showed a lot of similarities. One of the similarities can be found in the way Hesse described both characters with having bright red lips. An example of this comparison can be found when he said that Kamala had, “a brightly red mouth, like a freshly cracked fig” [Hesse, 39], and when Siddhartha said,” my mouth is red and fresh as well, it is a suitable match” [Hesse, 41]. Another similarity can be the way they are both observant. When Siddhartha came to the gate and noticed every beautiful detail of Kamala from her hair to her lips, and Kamala noticed every fine detail of Siddhartha. She proved it by asking, “But didn’t you yesterday wear a beard, and long hair, and dust in your hair” [Hesse, 40]. Lastly, they were both fearless to certain extents. They both were not afraid to tell each other what they expected, what they needed to be done, and when they needed it to be done regardless of how each other would respond to the request.

Posted by: Jasmine Charlton at September 10, 2013 09:27 PM

Maria Benkirane
Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

10 September 2013

Question: Complete the passage: “To obey no other eternal command __. Nothing else was necessary.” What does this passage mean?

Answer: "To obey like this, not to an external command, only to the voice, to be ready like this, this was good, this was necessary, and nothing else was necessary" (Hess 36). In this passage, Hess describes Siddhartha's thoughts about what he thought of Gotama's enlightenment and how he wanted to achieve it the same way. He says that it is wonderful to simply follow an inner command, to go under the Bo tree and be ready for enlightenment to take place. Hess describes Siddhartha's feelings saying, "He wanted to strive for nothing, expect for what the voice commanded him to strive for [ . . . ] He heard a voice, a voice in his own heart, which had commanded him to seek rest under the tree" (36). Siddhartha feels that following the inner voice is the only way necessary in order to achieve the enlightenment without being taught by anyone or reading any scriptures.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 10, 2013 10:11 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
10 September 2013


Question: Kamala asks Siddhartha to act a certain way toward Kamaswami. How does she want him to act and why is/will this be important? Does he heed her advice? Was Kamala right?

Answer: Siddhartha finds himself in the midst of a grove owned by a beautiful courtesan. Never before has a woman enticed Siddhartha’s inner being. After seeing this beautiful woman Siddhartha no longer wants to bare the look of a poor beggar. He shaves off his beard and quits the path of a begging Samana so that he can get a chance to be close to Kamala. He is completely enticed by Kamala essence.Although it is clear Kamala enjoys the company of Siddhartha, she gives him a set standard in order to be her friend. She says to him “For you need a lot of money, if you want to be Kamala’s friend” (Hesse, 43). Kamala wants Siddhartha to befriend Kamaswami, “Kamaswami is starting to get old and if he’ll like you, he’ll entrust you with a lot” (Hesse, 45). Kamala knows Siddhartha is a poor man with no access to any riches, she believes this business opportunity can help Siddhartha reach his goal and therefore win her heart.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at September 10, 2013 10:11 PM

Maria Benkirane
Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

10 September 2013

Question: Complete the passage: “To obey no other eternal command __. Nothing else was necessary.” What does this passage mean?

Answer: "To obey like this, not to an external command, only to the voice, to be ready like this, this was good, this was necessary, and nothing else was necessary" (Hess 36). In this passage, Hess describes Siddhartha's thoughts about what he thought of Gotama's enlightenment and how he wanted to achieve it the same way. He says that it is wonderful to simply follow an inner command, to go under the Bo tree and be ready for enlightenment to take place. Hess describes Siddhartha's feelings saying, "He wanted to strive for nothing, expect for what the voice commanded him to strive for [ . . . ] He heard a voice, a voice in his own heart, which had commanded him to seek rest under the tree" (36). Siddhartha feels that following the inner voice is the only way necessary in order to achieve the enlightenment without being taught by anyone or reading any scriptures.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 10, 2013 10:11 PM

Maria Benkirane
Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

10 September 2013

Question: Complete the passage: “To obey no other eternal command __. Nothing else was necessary.” What does this passage mean?

Answer: "To obey like this, not to an external command, only to the voice, to be ready like this, this was good, this was necessary, and nothing else was necessary" (Hess 36). In this passage, Hess describes Siddhartha's thoughts about what he thought of Gotama's enlightenment and how he wanted to achieve it the same way. He says that it is wonderful to simply follow an inner command, to go under the Bo tree and be ready for enlightenment to take place. Hess describes Siddhartha's feelings saying, "He wanted to strive for nothing, expect for what the voice commanded him to strive for [ . . . ] He heard a voice, a voice in his own heart, which had commanded him to seek rest under the tree" (36). Siddhartha feels that following the inner voice is the only way necessary in order to achieve the enlightenment without being taught by anyone or reading any scriptures.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 10, 2013 10:11 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
10 September 2013

Question: What vision does Siddhartha see? Will this woman lead him to enlightenment? Explain.

Answer: Siddhartha’s dream opens his eyes to see his surroundings in a different light, he recollected, which helped him appreciate everything further. The first visual image he familiarizes with is Govinda, “Govinda stood before him…(pg27).” In his dream, Govinda describes experiencing solitude after Siddhartha had left him on his quest to a spiritual life “Why have you deserted me?(pg27)” Siddhartha’s dream takes an unexpected turn when Govinda’s body changes into a woman. Siddhartha experiences an intimate encounter with Govinda’s new form and following this he sees and experiences a new outlook on life. “It tasted of woman and man, of sun and forest, of animal and flower, of every fruit, of every pleasure….(pg27).” I think, the emotions and sensations that overcame Siddhartha will be responsible for him finding enlightenment, since the woman in the dream played a major role.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 10, 2013 10:12 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question: What does Siddhartha ask of Kamala? What does he want her to do?

Answer: Siddhartha wants Kamala to be his teacher. Siddhartha said to Kamala “I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher, for I know nothing yet of that art which you have mastered in the highest degree” (Hesse 41). Siddhartha believes that Kamala would be a great teacher for him because he was already starting to learn from her. Siddhartha wants Kamala to teach him how to dress in nice clothing, shoes and how to get money. Siddhartha had already started to make better changes for himself by learning from Kamala before he even asked her to be his teacher, so he wanted to take full advantage of the opportunity to ask Kamala to teach him how to do everything that would satisfy her.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 10, 2013 10:18 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
10 September 2013

Siddhartha does nothing, he passes through the world the things of the world like a rock through water, without doing anything, without sitting: he is drawn, he lets himself fall.

Question 1: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above. a. Who is speaking? b. Who is being addressed? c. What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly here?

a. Saddhartha is speaking.
b. Kamala is being addressed.
c. Kamala wants Siddhartha to go out and nice clothes, shoes and money by going to talk to one of the richest merchants in the city about a job and Siddhartha wants to please Kamala. He is telling her that when he has a goal such as this one, he waits and thinks and does nothing and is set on achieving his goal. Which in this case is going out and getting nice clothes and money to please Kamala.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at September 10, 2013 10:50 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
8 September 2013

Question: Has Siddhartha come to any realizations in this chapter? How is he different now than before?

After Siddhartha had left his previous life, he had made some realizations. After reflecting deeply, Siddhartha realized "that he was no longer a youth; he was now a man" and "realized that something had left him." (Hesse 37)

Siddhartha claimed that he had awakened. He claimed that he had been afraid of himself and that he was fleeing from himself. Siddhartha explained how now he "will learn from myself, be my own pupil."(Hesse 39)

Siddhartha was now "Siddhartha the awakened; otherwise nothing else."(Hesse 41) He then began his own life, the new Siddhartha, an independent man.

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at September 10, 2013 10:58 PM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
10 September 2013

24. What must Siddhartha have to be “good enough”
for Kamala?

In this part of the novel, Siddhartha seeks out Kamala to ask if she would be his mentor of love. Although flattered, she says that he is “not yet good enough” for her (54). She says that “he must have clothes, fine clothes, and shoes, fine shoes, and plenty of money in his purse and presents for Kamala” (54). All of these superficial things will guide Siddhartha and teach him lessons as the previous tasks he has taken did.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at September 10, 2013 11:22 PM

Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
10 September 2013
Question: What things does the character Siddhartha learn from the character Kamala?
Siddhartha was enjoying the nature and learning from it. He felt like a child around a beauty of nature, but only the beauty of Kamala could changed him. Her red lips and clever face made him wanted to learn about love. He did not know anything about women. He told her he is not a Samana anymore. He shaved his beard and brushed his hair. He became romantic. Siddhartha read her a poem. Later he learned from her that he is charming and attractive. He did not want to live in a forest anymore. He wanted to be amongst the people.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 10, 2013 11:32 PM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 September 2013

Question: What is the ferryman’s response when Siddhartha tells him he can’t pay? Why might this be important?

Answer: When Siddhartha tells the ferryman he can't pay, the ferryman says, "I could see that myself. I did not expect payment or any token from you. You will give me a gift some other time" (Hesse 42). This might be important because it shows that Siddhartha has established a friendship with a good man who seems to see past the materialistic things in life, such as the payment for the ferryboat ride. Meeting the ferryman could have taught Siddhartha a valuable life lesson.

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at September 10, 2013 11:57 PM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 September 2013

Question: What is the ferryman’s response when Siddhartha tells him he can’t pay? Why might this be important?

Answer: When Siddhartha tells the ferryman he can't pay, the ferryman says, "I could see that myself. I did not expect payment or any token from you. You will give me a gift some other time" (Hesse 42). This might be important because it shows that Siddhartha has established a friendship with a good man who seems to see past the materialistic things in life, such as the payment for the ferryboat ride. Meeting the ferryman could have taught Siddhartha a valuable life lesson.

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at September 10, 2013 11:57 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013


Question: How has Siddhartha’s point of view been modified in this chapter of the novel? How does the writing style of Hermann Hesse show this?


Answer: Siddhartha’s point of view does change throughout this chapter. He starts to notice things that were not significant to him before. He notices things about nature and his surroundings. One thing I noticed was that he acted as if he saw Govinda. He then realized it was just a woman, but this shows how he has feelings for Govinda and he misses him. In this chapter, Siddhartha opens his mind to a brand new idea, women. The narrator says, “All of this had always existed, and he had not seen it; he had not been with it. Now he was with it, he was part of it” (Hesse 36). Siddhartha never realized what was around him until now. Hesse changes his style of writing through the dramatic development of desires. He wrote about desiring wisdom to desiring a woman. Those are two completely different things.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 11, 2013 12:05 AM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire
11 September 2013

Question: When Siddhartha kisses a woman for the first time, there is a style change. How so? Why?
Answer: When Siddhartha kisses a woman for the first time there is a change in his attitude and philosophy. After kissing Kamala for the first time, Siddhartha became “like a child bewildered by the abundance of knowledge and things worthy of learning that had been revealed to him” (Hesse 46). He had never experienced a romantic encounter with a woman before and this kiss with her changed his way of thinking. He began to apply his shramana teachings of thinking, waiting, and fasting to his goal of becoming Kamala’s student in a way that he had not previously used his knowledge.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at September 11, 2013 12:24 AM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
10 September 2013

Question: What reason does Siddhartha realize Gotama/Gautama sat under the tree?

Answer: The reason that Siddhartha realize that Gotama/Gautama sat under the tree because enlightenment had just hit him at the time. Siddhartha had heard a voice at the time, a voice from his heart that told him to rest under this tree. Siddhartha did not want to eat, drink, nor offerings, or prayers. All he wanted to do was to obey this voice. In order to obey this voice, he had to be ready but not to the external command because anything else was necessary.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at September 11, 2013 12:30 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

Question: “Why doesn’t Siddhartha ascend the tree” with the woman?”

Answer: Prior to his encounter with the woman of the river, Siddhartha dreamt of engaging in sexual relations with Govinda who turned into a woman; this dream put him on edge and made him especially vulnerable to her charms (Hesse 38). After kissing her breast, Siddhartha pulled away from her and reflected; regardless of his desire, he stopped himself because he was inexperienced and his conscious “said No” (Hesse 38). Siddhartha declined the river woman’s sexual advances because he wanted this experience not to be motivated by lust, but rather as a pursuit of knowledge. Siddhartha believed having relationships based solely on lust to be primal; he explicitly described the river’s woman appearance to resemble that of “a female animal in heat” after realizing that he no longer wanted to copulate with her (Hesse 38).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at September 11, 2013 12:41 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
9 September 2013
Question:
10. What had Siddhartha never seen before? What is this important to understanding his character?
Answer:
I am using The Literature Network online version of the book. Just before Siddhartha think, “All of this had always existed, and he had not seen it” (paragraph 2) he is walking through the forest and he is really noticing all the wildlife and plants and the sky around him. In the beginning, he was so focused on his studies and achieving his goals, but now that he knows he does not have to work so hard because he already knows everything he needs to, he can take time to really appreciate things outside of the Brahman and Samanas way.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 11, 2013 12:48 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
10 September 2013

Question #10
What three things does Siddhartha say that he can do? Why is this important or irrelevant (or both?)

Answer:
Responding to Kamala Siddhartha says, “I can think. I can wait. I can fast. (Hesse Ch. 5)” This is important because it’s his foundation until he can learn more. He has to start fresh because he abandoned learning from doctrines and scriptures.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at September 11, 2013 01:34 AM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
11 September 2013

Question: How had Siddhartha previously viewed the world? How does he view the world now?

Answer: Before Siddhartha’s awakening, he assessed the physical world to be a deception of his true existence. He did not appreciate what his senses could give him. Siddhartha was unable to value the physical world around him, until he was born again. Only then, he saw the world for the first time. He absorbed the world around him, “All of this, a thousand-fold and colourful, had always been there, always the sun and the moon had shone, always rivers had roared and bees had buzzed, but in former times all of this had been nothing more to Siddhartha than a fleeting, deceptive veil before his eyes, looked upon in distrust, destined to be penetrated and destroyed by thought since it was not the essential existence, since this essence lay beyond, on the other side of, the visible.” (Hesse 35). Siddhartha finally grasped the beauty of the world around him, the beauty of being a part of it.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at September 11, 2013 01:36 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
11 September 2013
Question 25: What skill does Siddhartha have that most people in town do not? Why is this important? How will it help or hurt him?
Answer: Unlike most people, Siddhartha can read and write. When speaking with Kamala, he says, “I also know magic spells, but I do not want to speak them anymore. I have read the scriptures-” (Hesse 44). She cuts him off in surprise that he can read and write, because not that many people can (Hesse 44). It is important because these skills will help him get a job. With this job, he will get money, and the items he needs to please Kamala. It would not hurt him because he is doing this to learn from Kamala.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at September 11, 2013 01:51 AM

Cheyenne DeMaggio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question: "When Siddhartha dreams of Govinda, into what is Govinda transformed? Why is this important?"

Answer: The dream that Siddhartha has of Govinda not only revealed his feeling of guilt and sorrow for leaving Govinda, but also symbolically uncovered his passion for learning about women. The Kohn translation of the book describes Siddhartha holding Govinda close to his chest and kissing him as Govinda transforms into a woman, in turn Siddhartha drinks milk from her breast (Hesse 50). This transformation in the vision is significant because up to this point in Siddhartha's life, he has never encountered a woman in such a manner. Now that Siddhartha is awakening to himself and his feelings, he is able to engage in such relations with a woman.

Posted by: Cheyenne DeMaggio at September 11, 2013 02:05 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL-CA01
10 September 2013


Question # 20 chapter 5: In this chapter, Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. What does he mean?

Answer: “Pursuing his goal, he allowed the city to suck him in, drifted through the flow of the streets, stood still on the squares, rested on the stairs of stone by the river.” This quote is an example of how Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. When Siddhartha entered the city he was lost in the crowd of overwhelming people and caught up in all the action that was going on around him. He compares a stone to himself because Siddhartha feels ignored and not important due to his looks and how he feels about himself. There was a woman who he had greeted once and she did not show respect to Siddhartha. She did not take him serious and blew him off because he was shaggy looking with a grown out beard and dirty clothes. That is why Siddhartha is compares himself to a stone.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at September 11, 2013 08:03 AM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question #14: Hesse uses a simile to describe the woman’s (kamala’s) mouth. What is it? What does that say about the women?

Hesse uses a simile to describe the woman “mouth like a freshly cut fig”(50) it means a rape fruit ready to eat like a woman ready to give any pleasures any desire. Siddhartha’s discovers in this chapter that physical desire and sex are essential aspects of the material world he must explore. Siddhartha seems to have discovered a love with Kamala and commits to then change himself in order to receive love in return from the beautiful woman. He speaks to Kamala with deep commitment. This love can be found in the world we live in today many people change in order to obtain some sort of love that in return should be considered lust at the beginning of the relationship. In the end I understood that Siddhartha shaves his hair, which helps him to fit into the world. This example can also be found throughout the world constantly. Many people change and adapt to those around them in order to “fit in” or “feel loved”.

Posted by: matt Nicholson-Lewis at September 11, 2013 08:03 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL-CA01
10 September 2013


Question # 20 chapter 5: In this chapter, Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. What does he mean?

Answer: “Pursuing his goal, he allowed the city to suck him in, drifted through the flow of the streets, stood still on the squares, rested on the stairs of stone by the river.” This quote is an example of how Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. When Siddhartha entered the city he was lost in the crowd of overwhelming people and caught up in all the action that was going on around him. He compares a stone to himself because Siddhartha feels ignored and not important due to his looks and how he feels about himself. There was a woman who he had greeted once and she did not show respect to Siddhartha. She did not take him serious and blew him off because he was shaggy looking with a grown out beard and dirty clothes. That is why Siddhartha is compares himself to a stone.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at September 11, 2013 08:03 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question 14: How does Siddhartha act when he is with the Samanas?
Answer: Siddhartha gave away his robe and he fasted. He thought that self-denial was the key to enlightenment. Siddhartha became weak and skinny because he was fasting so much and barely eating. In reality, he was actually suffering. According to Siddhartha, he said, “Life was torture.” (Hesse p.14) He saw people going about their daily lives happy and he was miserable because he was suffering and refusing necessities.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at September 11, 2013 09:04 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
11 September 2013
“Siddhartha,” he said, “why are you waiting?”
“You know why.”
“Will you go one standing and waiting until it is day, noon, evening?”
“I will stand and wait”
“You will grow tired, Siddhartha.”
“I will grow tired.”
“You will fall asleep, Siddhartha.”
“I will not fall asleep.”
“You will die, Siddhartha.”
“I will die”
Question 11: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is Speaking?, (b.)Who is Being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version of the text.
Answer: I’m using is The Project Gutenberg EBook of Siddhartha version of the text. The conversation is between Siddhartha and his father, the Brahman (Hesse 8). Siddhartha’s father is asking him, Siddhartha if he is going to stay in one spot till he gives his approval to Siddhartha’s request about him becoming a Samana. Before the quoted passage above, the Brahman says to Siddhartha, “Not proper for a Brahman to speak harsh and angry words...” (Hesse 7), but after a while he comes to realize that his son wants his father’s best wishes. This is the conversation that happens right before the Brahman tells his son he can begin to journey towards enlightenment and become a samana (Hesse 9).

Posted by: Paula Pion at September 11, 2013 09:10 AM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
11 September 2013

Question: Who is the character, Kamaswami? Why is s/he important to the narrative?

Answer: Kamaswami is the “richest merchant of the city” (pg. 45). Siddhartha is trying to be let onto his service so that he can get money.

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at September 11, 2013 09:17 AM

Christopher Holtzhower
ENG 210 CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
11 September 2013
#23: What things does the character Siddhartha learn from the character Kamala? Be specific.
Answer: Siddhartha learns from Kamala how to earn her love. It seems as Kamala is more concerned with possessions, and how much money one has to be her lover. Siddhartha asks Kamala, “Is Siddhartha not good enough for you as he is? With oil in his hair, but without clothes, without shoes, and without money (Hesse 44)?” In which Kamala replies, “No, estimable friend, he is not good enough yet. He must have clothes, beautiful clothes, handsome shoes, plenty of money in his purse, and gifts for Kamala (Hesse 44).” Not only does Siddhartha learn how to earn Kamala’s love, he is learning how to become rich and successful. Kamala aids him in finding work with a local merchant. Kamala also tells Siddhartha, “I do not want you becoming his servant. You have to become his equal, otherwise I will not be happy with you (Hesse 48).” Therefore, she is wanting Siddhartha to be just as, if not more, successful than the merchant so he will become rich and can provide her with gifts.

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at September 11, 2013 09:42 AM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 210 CL Love and Desires in Literature
11 September 2013

Question 21: What is the merchants name? What is his role in the story? Is he an ally or shadow (or, some other type of archetype) for the hero of the story?


Answer: The merchants name is Kamaswami, as Kamala (the mistress) exclaims to Siddhartha in the Kamala chapter; “Kamaswami expects you to call on him; he is the richest merchant in the town” (Hess 59). His role in the story is basically to help Siddhartha to woe Kamala so Siddhartha can learn from Kamala; but the only way that would be possible is if Siddhartha has fine clothes, fine shoes, and presents. This is made apparent in both the Kamala chapter when Siddhartha states to Kamala; “I have come to tell you this and to thank you because you are so beautiful. And if it does not displease you, Kamala, I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher, for I do not know anything of the art of which you are mistress. [. . .] So Siddhartha is not good enough for you as he is, with oil in his hair, but without clothes, without shoes and without money” (Hess 53 and 54)! She replies back to him, “No, he is not yet good enough. He must have clothes, fine clothes, and shoes, fine shoes, and plenty of money in his purse and presents for Kamala” (Hess 54). I believe that Kamaswami I think is more of an ally who thinks he is teaching Siddhartha but is really being taught by Siddhartha. As Siddhartha exclaims to Kamaswami, in the Amongst the People chapter, “[K]amaswami could never persuade his colleague that it served any purpose to utter troubled or angry words, to form wrinkles on the forehead and sleep badly. When Kamaswami once reminded him that he had learned everything from him, he replied: “Do not make such jokes. I have learned from you how much a basket of fish costs and how much interest one can claim for lending money. That is your knowledge. But I did not learn how to think from you, my dear Kamaswami. It would be better if you learned that from me” (Hess 69).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at September 11, 2013 09:48 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 – Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

#11
Q: Who does Siddhartha encounter by the water and retreat from because his inner voice says, “No!”?

A: Siddhartha encounters a woman who is washing her clothes in the brook at the end of the village he was passing by. The woman then seduces Siddhartha when she “placed her left foot on his right and made a gesture, such as a woman makes when she invites a man to that kind of enjoyment of love” (Hesse 50). Although Siddhartha does feel the longing for sex, an inner voice deters from doing anything with the woman and his passes her by.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at September 11, 2013 09:51 AM

Jennifer Schubin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question: What is the merchant’s name? What is his role in the story? Is he an ally or a shadow (or,
some other archetype) for the hero of the story?

Answer: The merchant’s name is Kamaswami. He welcomes Siddhartha into his house. Kamaswami’s role in this story is as brief teacher to Siddhartha makes his way to his final destination. In my opinion, this character is an ally to Siddhartha because he helps him instead of hindering Siddhartha.

Posted by: Jennifer Schubin at September 11, 2013 10:21 AM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question: In this chapter, Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. What does he mean?

When Siddhartha compares himself to a stone, he means that he goes with whatever happens in the world to reach his goal. He is no rush because he knows he will get what he wants in the end. In chapter 5, Siddhartha said to Kamala, "When you throw a rock into the water, it will speed on the fastest course to the bottom of the water. This is how it is when Siddhartha has a goal, a resolution. Siddhartha does nothing, he waits, he thinks, he fasts, but he passes through the things of the world like a rock through
water,..." (Hesse 42).

Posted by: Rache at September 11, 2013 10:55 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
11 September 2013

Question 5: What reason does Siddhartha realize Gotama/Gautama sat under the tree?

Siddhartha realizes that Gotama sat beneath the tree because Gotama was listening to his inner voice commands. Siddhartha states, “He would only strive after whatever the inward voice commanded him, not tarry anywhere but where the voice advised him” (Hesse 47, 48). Therefore, Gotama sat under the tree because it was what his inner self told him to do. Siddhartha believed that the inner voice was the only thing necessary. No external influences and opinions should be taken into consideration because that would mean that they were doing more than was necessary in order to be able to be their best self.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 11, 2013 11:00 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CLCA02Love and Desire in Literature
9/11/2013

Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version

Answer: It is clear on page 50 that Siddhartha is speaking to Kamala. Kamala is listening to Siddhartha as he is teaching her. This may seem like a date but, it is in fact a teaching session and a date. As seen with Siddhartha and Kamala sitting at the lake, “Kamala, when you throw a stone into the water, it finds the quickest way to the bottom of the water. It is the same when Siddhartha has an aim, a goal. Siddhartha does nothing” (Hesse 50).

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 11, 2013 11:35 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CLCA02Love and Desire in Literature
9/11/2013

Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version

Answer: It is clear on page 50 that Siddhartha is speaking to Kamala. Kamala is listening to Siddhartha as he is teaching her. This may seem like a date but, it is in fact a teaching session and a date. As seen with Siddhartha and Kamala sitting at the lake, “Kamala, when you throw a stone into the water, it finds the quickest way to the bottom of the water. It is the same when Siddhartha has an aim, a goal. Siddhartha does nothing” (Hesse 50).

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 11, 2013 11:35 AM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature- CA01
10 September 2013

I am using the Hilda Rosner translation.

Question #22: How are the characters of Siddhartha and Kamala alike? Be specific.

Answer:Siddhartha and Kamala are alike in the way that they both want material things at one point. Hesse says, "Dear Kamala, where can I go in order to obtain these three things as quickly as possible" (46). Siddhartha is wanting clothes, shoes, and money, objects he has never wanted before until he met Kamala. She is also wanting to become more spiritual, like Siddhartha was before he came to her.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at September 11, 2013 05:36 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
12 September 2013

Question 114: What does Siddhartha’s four day trip to the village demonstrate about his character and personal philosophy? How could that be good business?

Answer: Siddhartha is able to find the positive side to every negative situation and turn things around for his benefit. He takes the time to think of others and gains joy from interacting with them. Siddhartha sees people as individuals, not just sources of wealth and commerce. By treating his customers and fellow merchants with kindness, Siddhartha will have easier relations and have more profitable business transactions.

"I have gotten to know people and places, I have received kindness and trust, I have found friendship[ . . . ] I've had a few good days, I've learned, had joy, I've neither harmed myself nor others by annoyance and hastiness. And if I'll ever return there again, perhaps to buy an upcoming harvest, or for whatever purpose it might be, friendly people will receive me in a friendly and happy manner (68).

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 12, 2013 02:02 AM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
12 September 2013

Question: Does Siddhartha have a bad life? Explain. What is good about it? Be specific.

Answer: Yes, Siddhartha had a bad life. Though he had gotten to be rich, he grew ill and vain. Instead of shrugging things off he got mad when things didn't go his way. He lost the peace he had with himself. However, there were some good things about Siddhartha's new life. Hesse says, "Years passed, surrounded by the good life" (Hesse 55). It was good when he was still getting settled in and being rich had not gone to his head. The people still looked up to him, he had money, and he had Kamala.

Posted by: Regina Green at September 12, 2013 09:26 AM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 210 CL Love and Desires in Literature
12 September 2013


Question 117: What does Kamala teach Siddhartha; or, what does Siddhartha learn from Kamala?


Answer: Siddhartha learns the “art of love” from Kamala; this is made apparent when Siddhartha addresses Kamala in the Amongst the People chapter of the Hilda Rosner translation. As it states in the text, “He visited the beautiful Kamala regularly, learned the art of love in which, more than anything else, giving and taking become one. He talked to her, learned from her, gave her advice, received advice. She understood him better than Govinda had once done” (Hess 71).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at September 12, 2013 05:28 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
11 September 2013

Question: “Explain what Siddhartha feels “dead”?

Answer: As stated in the W. K. Marriott translation of the book, Siddhartha was going through a stage in his life where he was finally doing what the world would consider being successful. Siddhartha took on the life of a wealthy man by owning a garden, servants, and the list continues. Although Siddhartha had so much he could still feel himself dying as the days went on, as soon as he started noticing signs of internal withering, “he rose, bid his farewell to the mango-tree, his farewell to the pleasure garden” [Hesse, 61]. Another moment is when he began to gamble which went against all he believed in and even though he hated everything about it he still grew an attachment to it but at a point, “Siddhartha knew that the game was over and that he could not play it anymore” [Hesse, 61]. Lastly, when Siddhartha dreamt that the bird Kamala kept in a golden cage, “had become mute, who at other times always used to sing the morning, and since this arose his attention, he stepped in front of the cage and looked inside, there the small bird was dead and lay stiff on the ground” [Hesse, 59]. Personally I feel as though Hesse used the dream to symbolize how Siddhartha never took notice of the good qualities he had possessed until he had lost them or was on the verge of loosing them.

Posted by: Jasmine Charlton at September 12, 2013 05:34 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire
13 September 2013

Question: ”[…] that tense expectation, that proud state of standing alone without teachings and without teachers, that supple willingness to listen to the divine voice in his own heart, had slowly become a memory […]”

Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage? i.e, what is going on, exactly, here?

Answer: In the above passage a third person speaker is describing Siddhartha’s spiritual journey to the reader. As his spiritual journey to reach enlightenment comes to an end, Siddhartha’s experiences and lessons from “the shramanas, from Gotama, from his father the Brahmin, remained within him for a long time- moderation in life, please in thought, the habit of meditation, intimate knowledge of the self, of the eternal self that is neither body nor consciousness” (Hesse 60). He exists at this point in the novel as a confused and conflicted man with no current influence to his thought other than the memory of his past teachers and experiences. Siddhartha, at this point, is left with many contrasting ideas and practices behind him as his soul tires out and his journey comes to an end.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at September 12, 2013 05:46 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL-CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
12 September 2013

"Here with Kamala was the worth and purpose of his present life, not with the business of Kamaswami.

Question #113. Answer the following questions about the passage above. a. who is speaking? b. Who is being addressed. c. What is the context of this passage, what exactly is going on here? Let us know what page to find this on your version.

a. It is the narrator speaking what Siddhartha was thinking.
b. The reader is being addressed, since this passage is not said aloud in the book.
c. Kamala has been teaching Siddhartha the ways of love, and he enjoys it very much. Siddhartha has been working for the merchant Kamaswami pretty much under Kamala's will. If it were not for Kamala wanting Siddhartha to work for Kamaswami, I get the feeling Siddhartha would not be working for him, but he does to keep Kamala happy. Siddhartha desires to be with Kamala and he knows deep in his heart thats where he wants to be, and not with the merchant Kamaswami.

I found this passage on page 49 in the W.K. Marriott edition of Siddhartha.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at September 12, 2013 06:48 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
12 September 2013

Question: Kamala asks Siddhartha to act a certain way toward Kamaswami. How does she want him to act and why is/will this be important? Does he need her advice? Was Kamala right?

Answer: Kamala states, “Be smart, brown Samana. I had others tell him about you. Be polite towards him, he is very powerful. But don’t be too modest! I do not want you to become his servant, you shall become his equal, or else I won’t be satisfied with you. Kamaswami is starting to get old and lazy. If he’ll like you, he’ll entrust you with a lot” (Hesse 45). This is necessary because Kamaswami is a powerful and very rich merchant and can permanently damage Siddhartha’s relationships, reputation, and pride. Siddhartha might not have needed the advice that Kamala gave him, but he should have listened to her. In the next chapter, Siddhartha begins to irritate Kamaswami with his random trips into town that make them unequal.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 12, 2013 07:04 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013

Question: What do you suppose a Samana heart is?
Answer: While reading the chapter With The Childlike People Siddhartha kept explaining his role as a Samana in the community. Like other crafts man he brought his own good, he said, “I can think. I can wait. I can fast.” (Hesse 48) He also had the ability to see the good in people and want to learn and see what it is to live in someone else’s life. The negative aspect of his life was that he felt as if his life was always passing by and he was never actually living in it. When Siddhartha talked to Kamala about love he stated, “ I am like you. You also do not love – how else could you practice love as a craft? Perhaps, people of our kind can’t love. The childlike people can; that’s their secret.” (Hesse 54) By being a Samana you need to take on all the responsibilities with it the good and the bad. The heart of a Samana is someone who is truly dedicated to living by what they believe in if its what they want or not.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at September 12, 2013 07:09 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 September 2013

Question: When Siddhartha arrived in the village after the rice harvest had already been sold, why was it good business, according to Siddhartha AND inspite of Kamaswami’s protestation, that he remain in the village for a while and become friends with the people?

Answer: Siddhartha thought it would be a good idea to stay in the village after the rice harvest to become familiar with the village and the people there. Coming to the village for his own enjoyment, Siddhartha was in no hurry to leave. By staying in the village, Siddhartha stated, “I have gotten to know people and places, I have received kindness and trust, I have found friendship” (Hesse 51). By developing beneficial connections with varieties of people, guarantees good business. Siddhartha explained, “If I’ll ever return there again, perhaps to buy an upcoming harvest, or for whatever purpose it might be, friendly people will receive me in a friendly and happy manner” (Hesse 51). Therefore, “I will praise myself for not showing any hurry and displeasure at that time” (Hesse 51), Siddhartha expressed to Kamaswami.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 12, 2013 07:28 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
12 September 2013

Question: Explain how Siddhartha takes control of the job interview with Kamaswami. Be specific.

Answer: Siddhartha disagreed with the first words that Kamaswami ever spoke to him. The job interview was a snappy debate. They discussed back and forth whether Siddhartha was eligible for the job because he had been traveling without possessions. Once Kamaswami found out Siddhartha’s way of life was thinking, waiting, and fasting he seemed unimpressed, “And what’s the use of that? For example, the fasting – what is that good for” (Hesse 48)? Then Kamaswami realized Siddhartha could read and write. Kamaswami’s fascination let him stay in his house.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 12, 2013 07:40 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013

Question: Explain the main points of Siddhartha's method of self-analysis.

Answer: Siddhartha had become like everyone else. Siddhartha gave into temptation and desire. He gambled, traded, gained wealth and every day became a little more disgusted with himself. In the book, it seems that Siddhartha started to hate himself "When he saw his face reflected in the mirror on the wall of his bedroom, grown older and uglier, whenever shame and nausea overtook him, he fled again, fled to a new game of chance" (Hesse 80). Siddhartha analyzed himself and realized he was becoming a person that he hated. Whenever Siddhartha did this, he would continue to do sinful acts to forget that he was becoming the person he did not intend to be.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 12, 2013 08:48 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng- 210CL -Ca01-Love and Desire in Literature
12 September 2013

Question # 108: When Siddhartha arrived in the village after the rice harvest had already been sold, why was it good business, according to Siddhartha AND in spite of Kamaswami’s protestation, that he remain in the village for a while and become friends with the people?

Siddhartha said It was good business because “I have gotten to know many kinds of people a Brahman has become my friend, children have sat on my knees, farmers have shown me their fields nobody knew that I was a merchant (Hesse 50).” Siddhartha also pointed out “he had not harmed himself nor others in annoyance and hastiness (Hesse 51).” He also pointed out, “if I ever return there again, perhaps to buy an upcoming harvest, or for whatever purpose it might be, friendly people will receive me in a friendly and happy manner (Hesse 51).”

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at September 12, 2013 08:50 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
12 September 2013


Question: What does Siddhartha’s four day trip to the village demonstrate about his character and Personal philosophy? How could that be good business?

Answer: Siddhartha traveled to a village on business but after his arrival finds out the purchase he was supposed to acquire had already been sold to another merchant. However, he did not fret and hurry back on his way but stayed and enjoyed this time. On this trip he “treated the farmers for a drink, gave copper-coins to their children…. And returned extremely satisfied from this trip” (Hesse, 50). Participating in such actions disgruntled Kamawami, “Kamaswami could never convince his partner that it would be useful to utter a few words of worry or anger, to have wrinkles on the forehead, to sleep badly” (Hesse, 51). This marked the difference between the two men. Kamawami is money orientated while Siddhartha still carries the values of the Samana’s. He does not take pleasure in earthly treasures but values substantial things such as love. The fact that he does not place too much value in his merchant venues business for him will always be good; a loss is a loss and winning is just that winning, either way he will be satisfied.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at September 12, 2013 09:45 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
12 September 2013

Question: Why is Siddhartha’s wealth seen as a burden? Isn’t wealth and prestige what most people seek? What’s the problem (conflict)?

Answer: Siddhartha’s wealth seemed like a burden because he finds that the spiritual voice within him has died. The more time goes by, the more he notices that Kamala’s face has wrinkles and even his own hair has traces of gray. The problem with Siddhartha that he cant find his inner Zen, what most people don’t really care about.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at September 12, 2013 09:57 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
12 September 2013
Question: What sound does Siddhartha hear right before jumping into the river?

Siddhartha heard a sound. It was one word. The holy Om, which had the meaning of "the Perfect One'.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 12, 2013 10:01 PM

Maria Benkirane 

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

8 September 2013

Question: What is the nature of Siddhartha's "inward voice"? Is his inward voice the same thing as his conscience? Explain the similarity or the difference between the two faculties.

Answer: The nature of Siddhartha's inward voice begins from the beginning of the book when he decided to leave home and join the Samanas. The inward voice is also part of his decision of when he left the Samanas, Gotama and then go on forward in his journey. Siddhartha's inward voice is the same as his conscience. As his inward voice tells him to do something, his conscience is also working at the same time telling him whether it is right or wrong. In the chapter of Samana, Siddhartha gets more wealth, desire, luxury and enters the material world that makes him want more of it, until he dreamt of the dead song bird: " This bird had become mute, who at other times always used to sing [ . . . ] there the small bird was dead and lay stiff on the ground. He took it out, weighted for a moment in his hand and then threw it away [ . . . ] his heart hear, as if he had thrown away from himself all value and everything good" (Hess 59). At that same time his inner voice and his conscience are both awakened, realizing that this material world has led him away from his path of enlightenment as he is starting to feel empty inside. The dream was a sign that this world he is living in is not the right path to achieving what he always wanted, enlightenment.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 12, 2013 10:11 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
12 September 2013

Question: 129. In what ways was Siddhartha’s life more wretched than the lives of the childlike people?

The childlike people live a life of joy and happiness. Siddhartha wants to enjoy things like them but he thinks about his life and reflects negatively. He exclaims, "In this pointless cycle he ran, growing tired, growing old, growing ill." This is due to his gambling and money problem. He wants possessions and nice things but he loses these in the process. Siddhartha goes through a stage of depression after being around the childlike people because he envies them and evaluates his life based on theirs.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 12, 2013 10:35 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013

Question #128: explain the main points of Siddhartha’s method of self-analysis.

“Self Analysis” is a method where someone tries to dissect their own life and see deeper within. Throughout the book Siddhartha is constantly self-analyzing. It is this which enables him to grow, and this is shown where he questions himself “Where is Siddhartha the Brahman? Where is Siddhartha the Samana? Where is Siddhartha the rich man? Non-eternal things change quickly” (Hesse 67). This is showing how he is analyzing himself, and in this case is thinking that who you are changes very quickly, depending on who you are around and what situation you find yourself in. This is also back up when Siddhartha admits that he does not want to be taught in a previous chapter, and therefore if he is to grow personally, it must come from within.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at September 12, 2013 10:40 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
12 September 2013

Question: Explain the significance of Kamala’s pregnancy. What is the relation of this last fact to the last trip?

Answer: Kamala’s pregnancy shows that beautiful things can come of undesirable situations. It is also significant of Kamala’s rebirth. Her rare and exotic songbird lived in a cage, which symbolizes the oppressive and vile world of materialism her heart belonged to. Herman Hesse narrates, “She opened the door of the cage, took the bird out and let it fly” (61). This signifies that her heart is free to choose a new path to follow, and that it truly belonged to Siddhartha all along because she let it go after he left.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at September 12, 2013 11:12 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

“Everyone takes, everyone gives, and such is life"

Question: 103 (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.)Who is being addressed?,(c.)What is the context of this passage, i.e what is going on, exactly here?

Answer: (a.) Siddhartha is speaking the words from the above quote. It is his response to the merchant’s statement in reference to taking money from others. “he does not take people’s money from them for nothing; he gives them his merchandise for it.” (b.) The person being addresses is Kamaswami, a merchant that Siddhartha has come to see in order to ask him for a favor. (c.) The context of this conversation is about “giving”, Siddhartha has come to the merchant in need, he addresses the fact that Kamaswami and others like him take advantage of others’ “Surely,a merchant, too,lives on other people’s wealth.” Siddhartha explains his philosophy in the above quote, it can be interpreted as a metaphor for our roles in life.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 12, 2013 11:19 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
12 September 2013

Question: How does Siddhartha’s dice playing echo his real life?

Answer: New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books publish the edition of Siddhartha that was used for this response. Siddhartha’s dice playing causes him to feel a mixture of different emotions at the same time. It brings about a sense of anxiety and panic in regards to him losing his high stakes and risking his value of worth. However, at the same time, he enjoyed that feeling of putting himself out there. His feelings are described in chapter seven as, “He loved this feeling and continually sought to renew it, to increase it, to stimulate it, for in this feeling alone did he experience some kind of happiness, some kind of excitement, some heightened living in the midst of his satiated, tepid, insipid existence” (Hesse, 79). Siddhartha lives his life in the same way. Although he is excited to learn new ways of life and to find the key to his happiness, he is also nervous and frightened as to what lies ahead of him. He knows that there is a potential to lose his own self, but he is eager to put himself out there in order to discover what it is that makes him whole.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at September 12, 2013 11:36 PM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
12 September 2013

Question #121: What was Siddhartha's dream about Kamala about? Why might it be important?

Answer: Siddhartha's dream about Kamala was about the fear of getting older and dying. He talks about himself and Kamala sitting under a tree in her pleasure garden and having a conversation that turns into lust. Siddhartha then realizes in this dream "how closely lust is related to death" (Hesse 65). His dream then continues with him spending the night in the house with dancing girls and wine. Siddhartha gets lost in the presence of the dancing girls and the amount of wine he drinks. He begins to realize how repulsive he is acting. The book shows this when it states, "the insomniac wishes to dispose of these indulgences, these customs, this entire senseless life and himself along with it in one tremendous swell of disgust" (Hesse 66). His dream ends with the vision of Kamala's song bird. He dreams the bird does not sing one morning and he finds it dead in it's golden cage. This dream is important because it shows a lesson to keep people and things of value as well as all things good close to you and don't take them for granted. It also shows how life can be short and death can take the people and things we love the most.

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at September 12, 2013 11:51 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 September 2013

Question: How has Siddhartha’s point of view been modified in this chapter of the novel? How does the writing style of Hermann Hesse show this?

Answer: Siddhartha’s reformed outlook has him viewing the world in a new light without a destination or goal set in his mind. As Siddhartha walks in the forest, he takes in the sights that were around him for all these years but never fully appreciated. “The world was transformed [. . .] his liberated eyes stayed on this side, he saw and became aware of the visible, [. . .] Beautiful was this world, looking at it thus, without searching, thus simply, thus childlike” (Hesse 35). Hesse also makes it apparent that Siddhartha’s point of view has changed through his writing. Hesse’s writing begins to become more descriptive of the setting from the smallest of minutiae, there are pages dedicated to the reader to see the world through Siddhartha’s eyes. The reader can identify this as Siddhartha is walking through the forest, “Beautiful was the stream and the banks, the forest, and the rocks, the goat, and the gold-beetle, the flower and the butterfly. [. . . ] He saw the pike hungrily hunting for its dinner; propelling themselves away from it, in fear, wiggling and sparkling, the young fish jumped” (Hesse 35). Hesse gives an atmosphere of rebirth as Siddhartha very childlike observes every detail around him.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at September 13, 2013 12:11 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 September 2013

Question 106: Siddhartha’s skills are mostly holy ones. Does Kamaswami decide to hire him, or not? Explain why or why not in your answer
Answer: During Siddhartha and Kamaswami’s first encounter, Kamaswami asks Siddhartha what he could offer to him being without any possessions. Siddhartha proudly lists his skills thinking, waiting, and fasting. Kamaswami agrees of importance of those skills and gets a scroll; he then has Siddhartha read a sales-contract. Siddhartha impresses him with his ability to read and write, “Siddhartha wrote and returned the paper. Kamaswami read: ‘Writing is good, thinking is better. Being smart is good, being patient is better! It is excellent how you are able to write’” (Hesse 48). It is at that moment Kamaswami hires him, Siddhartha’s ability to read and write is a great help in creating sales-contracts and going out through town doing business.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at September 13, 2013 12:16 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
11 September 2013
Question:
127. Why is Siddhartha’s wealth seen as a Burden? Isn’t wealth and prestige what most people seek? What’s the problem (conflict)?
Answer:
I am using The Literature Network online version of the book. As stated in this quotation in paragraph six “Property, possessions, and riches also had finally captured him; they were no longer a game and trifles to him, had become a shackle and a burden.” All of these things before know he thought were optional things to have there was no need for him to have expensive material possessions. Now he feels like he needs to have and depend on these things.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 13, 2013 12:57 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013


Question: What was Siddhartha’s dream about Kamala about? Why might it be important?

Answer: Siddhartha’s dream was about a bird. One morning Siddhartha realized the bird has gone mute. When he looked into the cage, he discovered the small bird was dead on the bottom of the cage. Siddhartha took the dead bird and threw it out onto the street. This bothered Siddhartha. He felt a strange feeling in his heart, almost as if he were throwing away all good. I feel like this is important because the bird could represent Siddhartha in the future. After Siddhartha talks about his dream, he begins to think of how he is getting older. He begins to realize he will eventually die. The narrator says, “Passionately he wished to know nothing about himself anymore, to have rest, to be dead” (Hesse 62). Siddhartha does not desire anything else in life. He is acts as if he has fulfilled all of his desires in life. He has nothing else he wants to learn about his life. He has no reason to be alive anymore; he just wants to die.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 13, 2013 12:58 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013


Question: What was Siddhartha’s dream about Kamala about? Why might it be important?

Answer: Siddhartha’s dream was about a bird. One morning Siddhartha realized the bird has gone mute. When he looked into the cage, he discovered the small bird was dead on the bottom of the cage. Siddhartha took the dead bird and threw it out onto the street. This bothered Siddhartha. He felt a strange feeling in his heart, almost as if he were throwing away all good. I feel like this is important because the bird could represent Siddhartha in the future. After Siddhartha talks about his dream, he begins to think of how he is getting older. He begins to realize he will eventually die. The narrator says, “Passionately he wished to know nothing about himself anymore, to have rest, to be dead” (Hesse 62). Siddhartha does not desire anything else in life. He is acts as if he has fulfilled all of his desires in life. He has nothing else he wants to learn about his life. He has no reason to be alive anymore; he just wants to die.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 13, 2013 12:58 AM

Hector Rosario
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
Question 120

What happened when Siddhartha’s property finally became chain and a burden?

Siddhartha realized that his longing for clothing, money, and gifts for Kamala lead him down the wrong path. Siddhartha realizes he was "slowly seized by the spiritual malaise of the rich." (Hesse, page 63) Although he had gained riches, power, and more knowledge from working with Kamaswami, he slowly saw what he was becoming. During his reflection he noted he "laughed all too loudly when he lost at dice" and how his new life "lost its color and sheen with the years that were running out." (Hesse, page 63)
He saw that the material things were getting in the way of his original goal.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at September 13, 2013 08:24 AM

Cheyenne DeMaggio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013

Question: "In both Siddhartha’s business relationship with Kamaswami and in Siddhartha’s love affair with Kamala, there was “giving and taking.” For Siddhartha, there was only meaning and passion in his relationship with Kamala. Did Siddhartha, therefore, envy the childlike people for their imposing meaning and passion on the giving and taking in everyday events? What did he have to say about it?"

Answer: Siddhartha only allowed himself to feel his meaning and passion through Kamala's teachings of love. While working as a merchant, he only observed the childlike people's meaning and passion for daily living. He never experienced it because, as a shramana, he didn't want it to effect him the same as it did others. He did not want to be angry at the little things in life, but at the same time, this inhibited him from loving and being passionate about the good little things in life. The Kohn translation of the book proclaims "he recoiled from these thoughts, wishing it were possible for him to take part wholeheartedly and enthusiastically in the childish goings-on of daily life, to be able to really live, really to act, really to enjoy life instead of merely being and observer watching it go by" (Hesse 72). Siddhartha also reveals his envy of the child like people while speaking to Kamala when he says that people like them cannot love, and the child like people's secret is that they can (74).

Posted by: Cheyenne DeMaggio at September 13, 2013 09:00 AM

Abdulaziz alsaif
Dr.Hobbs
ENG210CL: Love and Desire in Literature. CA05
9 September 2013

Question: What had Siddhartha never seen before? What is this important to understanding his character?

Answer: Siddhartha has not been seeing what is around him before, but now that its different for him, for the first time he is seeing the world differently. As the reading says: "all this had always been there, and he had not seen it; he had not been present.(Siddhartha 40).

Posted by: Abdulaziz alsaif at September 13, 2013 09:31 AM

Abdulaziz alsaif
Dr.Hobbs
ENG210CL: Love and Desire in Literature. CA05
9 September 2013

Question: What had Siddhartha never seen before? What is this important to understanding his character?

Answer: Siddhartha has not been seeing what is around him before, but now that its different for him, for the first time he is seeing the world differently. As the reading says: "all this had always been there, and he had not seen it; he had not been present.(Siddhartha 40).

Posted by: Abdulaziz alsaif at September 13, 2013 09:31 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
12 September 2013

Question: “How does Siddhartha’s dice playing echo his real life?”

Answer: Siddhartha devised both his real life and gambling habits in order to bring him happiness and help him reach a higher state. In the beginning of his journey, Siddhartha left his life as a Brahman to join the Samanas in hopes that he would reach enlightenment; however when he realized that it the Samanas could not teach him how to become enlightened he left. Similarly, when Siddhartha began playing dice he did it with a light heart (Hesse 57). As time progress, Siddhartha found himself completely “captured by the world, by lust, covetousness, and sloth”; disgusted with himself he attempted to abandon this life as he did with the Samanas (Hesse 57). The difference between these experiences developed because as attempted to Siddhartha’s depart from the world of gambling, he thrust into it by his attempts to gamble away his riches; through this act he in turn became even more invested in the games and “stopped being a Samana in his heart (Hesse 57). Reflecting on his face in the mirror, he realized that this toxic life was making him age and that if he wanted to return to the path of Nirvana he needed to walk away from his in life with the “child-like people”(Hesse 58).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at September 13, 2013 09:34 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013

Question 116: What do you suppose a Samana heart is?

Answer: A Samana Heart is someone who is not necessarily interested in material objects. They can be aware of what it is but they do not partake in it. It may seem interesting to them but it is not something their focus is. The author says "Yet for a long time he remained a Samana at heart." (Hesse p. 67) Siddhartha knew of wealth, lust, power, and material things. Yet he had been denying that of himself because of the teachings.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at September 13, 2013 09:52 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
11 September 2013

Question 109:
“Who or What are the childlike people? What was one factor that separate Siddhartha from them?”

Answer:
Siddhartha realized mankind lives much of their life in a childlike or animallike manner (Hesse 50). He noticed people suffered, complained, and would argue over things that he and other Samanas would ignore or laugh at because Samanas would not feel (Hesse 50). Although Siddhartha can easily get along with them, and he learns from them he is a Samana and that is the separating factor between him and the rest of mankind (Hesse 50).

Posted by: Paula Pion at September 13, 2013 09:59 AM

Christopher Holtzhower
ENG 210 CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
13 September 2013
Question #130: What was the bird dream about? What does it mean?
Answer: Hesse writes after Siddhartha awakes from this dream, “Waking suddenly from his dream, he was enveloped in profound sadness. It was all worthless. It seemed to him that he had led his life in a worthless and meaningless way (Hesse 64).” Siddhartha had realized that the things he is living for are worthless. He had thrown everything out in his life worth living for (family, religion, and friends), so he could receive worthless possessions. Siddhartha became disgusted with the way he was living, and realized this was not the lifestyle for him.

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at September 13, 2013 10:01 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
13 September 2013
Question 111: What is the nature of inner sanctuary that both Siddhartha and Kamala possess, but the Childlike people do not have? Is this the reason that Siddhartha and Kamala cannot truly love, whereas the childlike people can love? Is the “inner sanctuary” a kind of authentic self that the childlike people in their superficiality lack?
Answer: Siddhartha and Kamala both have this nature of inner sanctuary, that keeps them apart from the childlike people. To my understanding, this inner sanctuary is something that you have that gives you some sort of inner peace. Siddhartha states this by saying, “You are like me, you are different from most people. You are Kamala, nothing else, and inside you, there is a peace and refuge, to which you can go at every hour of the day and be at home at yourself, as can I also do” (Hesse 53). You know what is good for you and how to control your own life. This is a major reason why neither of them can truly love. Love is something that you cannot control, and sometimes not peaceful, so neither of them can truly love. The childlike people can love because they do not have their lives in control. The childlike people lack control and true peace, so they cannot gain the sense of inner sanctuary.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at September 13, 2013 10:20 AM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013

119. What had Siddhartha learned “amongst the people”? Be specific.

The contextual evidence is located on page 77 in my copy of the novel.

In this part of the novel, Siddhartha is talking about how he has learned what we may think are basic daily things in our lives. He learned “how to transact business affairs., to exercise power over people, to amuse himself with women; he had learned to wear fine clothes to command servants, to bathe in sweet-smelling waters” (77). Along with this he learned more ordinary traits such as “their childishness and some of their anxiety” (77).

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at September 13, 2013 10:35 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 September 2013
Question 117: What does Kamala teach Siddhartha; or, what does Siddhartha learn from Kamala?
Siddhartha began to regularly visit Kamala and what he learned from her was the art of love. Whenever Siddhartha was with Kamala he also learned that she was not the same as other people, “You are Kamala and no one else,” (Hesse 71). He learned that she was clever and that many of her charactersitics were very similar to his own. Siddhartha also learned that there were many feelings and emotions within him that could be controlled by her, and she taught him how to control them on his own.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 13, 2013 10:54 AM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013

I am using the translated version.

Question #115: What does Siddhartha’s inner voice say? How is life “flowing past” him?

Siddhartha's voice is saying he is, "leading a strange life, that he was doing many things that were only a game, that he was quite cheerful and sometimes experienced pleasure, but that real life was flowing past him and did touch him" (Hesse 71). Life is "flowing past" him because Siddhartha is not be affected by what's going on around him. He is more of an outsider in life than participator.

Posted by: Rache Robinson at September 13, 2013 11:12 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 210CLCA02 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013


Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.)Who is being addressed?(c.) What is the context of this passage i.e. what is going on?

Answer: The narrator is speaking about Siddhartha and his love with Kamala. The passage goes on to describe Siddhartha spending time with Kamala or the woman he loves. As the passage describes this moment, Siddhartha’s feelings are present within his actions, “wonderful hours he spent with the beautiful and smart artist, became her student, her lover, her friend. Here with Kamala was the worth and purpose of his present life, not with the business of Kamaswami” (Hesse, Kindle).

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 13, 2013 11:16 AM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 September 2013

Question: Why did Siddhartha envy the childlike people?

Answer: Siddhartha envies the childlike people because they are pure. The childlike people can love. Siddhartha explains to Kamala, “I am like you. You also do not love – how else could you practice love as a craft? Perhaps, people of our kind can’t love. The childlike people can; that’s their secret.” Siddhartha sees something in the childlike people that he cannot see in himself.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at September 13, 2013 04:12 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
13 September, 2013

Question 134: What was the only thing Siddhartha knew?

Answer: Siddhartha reflects on his live as a wealthy merchant, along with his liaisons with Kamala, and realizes that he has not reached enlightenment. Being part of the sensual world had brought him no closer to his goal than when he was exclusively in the spiritual world.

"Siddhartha wandered into the forest, already far from the town, and knew only one thing-that he could not go back, that the life he had lived for many years was past, tasted and drained to a degree of nausea (87)."

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 13, 2013 04:32 PM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
14 September 2013
Question 170: What did Siddhartha think were the only things his son had brought him?
The only two things that Siddhartha thought his son had brought him where sorrow and trouble. The fact that the boy was grieving the death of his mother made his actions somewhat understandable, but Siddhartha began to realize that he was a very spoilt boy. This made it very difficult for Siddhartha because he really wanted to have a connection with the young Siddhartha, but he was not letting him in. The boy was unfriendly, defiant, and disrespectful. Although the sorrow and the trouble were two things that Siddhartha was not happy about, “he loved him and preferred the sorrow and trouble of his love rather than happiness and pleasure without the boy” (Hesse 118).

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 14, 2013 01:58 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013

Question: What is young Siddhartha’s response to Siddhartha when he asks his son to get some twigs?

Answer:Answer: The young Siddhartha decided that he was going to say what he felt. Young Siddhartha was asked to find twigs, but the young Siddhartha did not do it. Instead, the young Siddhartha screamed “bring your own twigs” (Hesse 123). The young Siddhartha did not want to be like his father, so instead he decided he no longer wanted to do what he is told. Young Siddhartha no longer wants to accept his father as the male figure in his life.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 15, 2013 12:39 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
11 September 2013
Question #126:
What is the nature of Siddhartha’s “inward voice”? Is his inward voice the same thing as his conscience? Explain the similarity or the difference between the two faculties.
Answer:
The Nature of Siddhartha inward voice is that he finds that the aspect of being spiritual has become dead within him. He experiences only riches, pleasure and love from Kamala so he feels that he is dead and there is allot of weight and burden on his shoulder. On Page 85 “He took it out, weighed it for a moment in his hand, and then threw it away, out in the street, and in the same moment, he felt terribly shocked, and his heart hurt, as if he had thrown away from himself all value and everything good by throwing out this dead bird” (Hesse, 85). Siddhartha felt this way because he was living a life of lust and realized this was not the way to seek enlightenment, so he had to follow his conscience and leave the material world that he been living in which didn’t provide him spiritual aspects that he needed. The difference between his inner voice and his conscience is that his inner voice wakes up him from the dead world he is been living in and his conscience makes take the action and not feel dead that he really needs spiritual aspect to seek what he is been wanting to have which was enlightenment. The similarities between the two are that they both speak to him and tell him how to take the next step in his life as on page 98 “He also put an end to this, this also died in him.He rose, bid his farewell to the mango-tree, his farewell to the pleasure-garden, Since he had been without food this day, he felt strong hunger, and thought of his house in the city, of his chamber and bed, of the table with the meals on it, he smiled tiredly, shook himself, and bid his farewell to these things”. Siddhartha had left that morning and went to go follow his inner voice and conscience.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at September 15, 2013 01:34 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 September 2013

Question: Why doesn’t Siddhartha punish the boy?

Answer: Although Siddhartha’s son mistreats him, Siddhartha is persistent to win him over. Siddhartha is a master of patience and longs for his son to show any inkling of affection towards him. “How could I part with him? Give me some more time, my dear! See, I’m fighting for him, I’m seeking to win his heart, with love and with friendly patience I intent to capture it.” Siddhartha exclaims to Vasudeva (Hesse 84). Siddhartha chooses to not beat or punish his son, but this method has the opposite effect on Young Siddhartha, and he runs away.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at September 15, 2013 01:56 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 September 2013
Question: What does Vasudeva suggest Siddhartha does with his son?

Answer: After Kamala’s death, Siddhartha became the caretaker of their son. Coming from a life of luxury, young Siddhartha had a hard time adjusting to his father’s lifestyle as a ferryman. Young Siddhartha became very rebellious, and Siddhartha did not know how to tame him. So Vasudeva suggested, “Bring him into the city, bring him into his mother’s house, there’ll still be servants around give him to them. And when there aren’t any around any more bring him to a teacher, not for the teachings’ sake, but so that he shall be among other boys, and among girls, and in the world which is his own” (Hesse 85). Siddhartha never had a chance to bring young Siddhartha into the city since young Siddhartha ran away not to long after. Neither Siddhartha nor Vasudeva mentioned young Siddhartha after he disappeared.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 15, 2013 02:46 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
15 September 2013

Question: What does Siddhartha say he is doing?

Answer: After Siddhartha awakens from his deep sleep, he discovers the monk who was watching over him is Govinda. Govinda states that he stayed behind to make sure Siddhartha slept safely, and he asks Siddhartha what he is doing in the forest. Siddhartha states, “I’m going nowhere. I’m just travelling. I’m on a pilgrimage” (Hesse 66). Govinda points out that he is traveling in a rich man’s clothing, walking in a rich man’s shoes, and wears his hair as a rich man does. Siddhartha replies by saying that the world of appearances is not eternal.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at September 15, 2013 03:09 PM

Jocelyne, Kylie, Salvatore & Jalisa
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013

Question:3.In Plato’s Symposium, what is the primary claim of Erixymachus? What is interesting about it?

Answer: The primary claim of Erixymachus is , that love is omnipresent. He explains this by saying, that everything in nature exhibits some sort of love. "towards anything, but it is to be found in the bodies of all animals and in productions of the earth...” It is especially interesting because, love is always considered a human notion but Erixymachus does't believe that love has limits and can be experienced by plants and animals. For this reason, he believes love should be protected.
In addition to this , he thinks that there are two types of human love, healthy and unhealthy. He believes the healthy love is strong enough to cure the "diseased.” This could be a metaphor for emotional cure. Erixymachus claimed that love had the power to conquer all, as it can balance power "affect body and transform desires."

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 15, 2013 03:18 PM

Maria Benkirane
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013

Question: How many years does the ferry man think it has been since he last saw Siddhartha? What is important about this scene?

Answer: The ferryman thinks that it has been possibly more than 20 years that he hasn’t seen Siddhartha. This scene is important because it is the beginning of Siddhartha’s real path to enlightenment as the ferry man will guide him through it. Siddhartha offers his fine cloths to the ferryman in exchange to ferry him through the river. At that moment, Siddhartha really gives up his material life and asks the ferryman if he could be his assistant: “I wouldn’t want to continue travelling at all. Most of all I would like you, ferryman, to give me an old loincloth and kept me with you has your assistant or rather as your trainee” (Hess 73). He offers him a place to stay and food to eat. As they sat along the bank of the river, Siddhartha tells him everything about him and his life story. The ferryman listens to his words with his eyes closed then says, “It is as I thought. The river has spoken to you. It is your friend as well; it speaks to you as well” (74). Siddhartha starts feeling love for the ferryman again because the ferryman is a very good listener who gives him great advice about how to listen to the river, leading Siddhartha to his real path to enlightenment.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 15, 2013 03:52 PM


Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
14 September 2013


Question #145: According to Siddhartha, what is a good thing?

In this chapter the book talks about how Siddhartha has progressed since the start of the book. This is shown when he says “It is a good thing to experience everything oneself” (Hesse 80). He goes onto talk about how it is not just about knowing things through knowledge and teaching, but also knowing it deep inside you, shown on page 80 “with my ears, with my heart, with my stomach” (Hesse). He talks about how he was praised as a child, which made him arrogant. He also talks about how he was too busy looking at people methods of finding enlightenment and decides that he has more chance of being enlightened if he learns himself.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at September 15, 2013 05:26 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013

“But even if you would die ten times for him, you would not be able to take the slightest part of his destiny upon yourself.”

Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) who is speaking? (b.) who is being addressed?, (c.) what is the context of the passage?

Answer: In this passage Vasudeva, the ferryman, is speaking. He is talking to Siddhartha about his son who is being troublesome on the ferry. Before Vasudeva’s monologue, Siddhartha expresses his concern for his son to go through the troubles that Siddhartha went through in the real world. He was afraid that his son would give in to greed, lust, and selfishness, but Vasudeva consoles him with the quote. “But even if you would die ten times for him, you would not be able to take the slightest part of his destiny upon yourself” (Hesse 85).

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 15, 2013 05:36 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in literature
15 September 2013

Question: How many years does the ferryman think it has been since he last saw Siddhartha? What is important about this scene?

Answer: The ferryman things it's been more than twenty years since he had seen Siddhartha. The scene shows how much has changed in Siddhartha's life since he had last need the ferryman. When the ferryman had last seen him, he was a Samana and was a trustworthy person. Now Siddhartha says, "I have been looked on today because of my clothes, I have been looked upon with distrust" (Hesse 73). In the time the had been apart Siddhartha had completely changed who he was. It took a reminder for his old friend to remember him.

Posted by: Regina Green at September 15, 2013 07:31 PM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013
Question: [“Siddhartha does nothing . . . he passes through the things of the world like a rock through water, without doing anything, without stirring; he is drawn, he lets himself fall.”] Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: (a.) Siddhartha is speaking. (b.) Siddhartha is the person being spoke about. (c.) The context of the passage would be how Siddhartha problem solves. (d.) the situation here is Siddhartha using metaphors to explain to Kamala how he does problem solving in his everyday life. He is calm and collected he does not seem to get worked up about things. He just let it all blow over.

Posted by: Aye'Kendria George at September 15, 2013 07:37 PM

Alexia Chambers, Ashley Johnson, Jennifer Schubin
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
13 September 2013
Question:
5. Much has been made of a “physical attraction” type of love and a “soul-mate” type of love. This does not have to be “black-and-white.” There can be varying degrees and the love, for our purposes, does not have to be sexual to qualify. In Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha, which type best fits the relationship between Govinda and Siddhartha? Discuss it on both sides: Siddhartha’s side and Govinda’s side.
Answer:
Siddhartha and Govinda have more of a close friend kind of love. They grew up together and Govinda often looked up to Siddhartha. They provide as a companion and support each other. However, Govinda thinks of Siddhartha more as he follows him around during his travels. In the beginning of the story it is noted “He loved Siddhartha's eye and sweet voice, he loved his walk and the perfect decency of his movements,”. Siddhartha thinks of Govinda as more of just a friend. He helps Govinda when he was taking his own step into Enlightenment , he tells Govinda here to leave his side and go on his own path, “Often I have thought: Won't Govinda for once also take a step by himself, without me, out of his own soul? Behold, now you've turned into a man and are choosing your path for yourself. I wish that you would go it up to its end, oh my friend, that you shall find salvation!” In short; Govinda is more interested in Siddhartha than Siddhartha is to him.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 15, 2013 08:53 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question: Complete the passage: "To obey no other eternal command _. Nothing else was necessary." What does this passage mean?

"To obey no other external command, only the voice, to be prepared - that was good, that was necessary. Nothing else was necessary. (Hesse 48)

Siddhartha talks about the voice that Gotama heard, and how it must be nice to be able to follow that voice. He then explains the enlightenment Gotama was able to reach and hopes one day he will be able to achieve it too. Siddhartha talks about how "he heard a voice, a voice in his own heart which commanded him to seek rest [. . .] he had listened to that voice."(Hesse 48)

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at September 15, 2013 09:10 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
13 September 2013
Question:
179. What is Siddhartha’s final opinion about his son?
Answer:
I am using The Literature Network online version of the book. Stated here “his son had not brought him happiness and peace, but suffering and worry. But he loved him, and he preferred the suffering and worries of love over happiness and joy without the boy.” Ultimately, he loved his son, even if his son did like love him or think of him as his father in return. Siddhartha would rather be miserable with this boy who did not want him as his father than to have his son be with someone else.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 15, 2013 09:11 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 September 2013

I am using the Hilda Rosner translation.

Question #115: What does Siddhartha’s inner voice say? How is life “flowing past” him?

Answer:Siddhartha's inner voice is saying that he is still a Samana deep down. no matter what he does that side of him still surfaces someway or another. "His senses, which he had deadened during his ardent Samana years, were again awakened" (Hesse 60). The way life is "flowing past" him is he has all these riches that has distracted him from noticing the years passing. "Enveloped by comfortable circumstances, Siddhartha hardly noticed their passing" (Hesse 60). People liked Siddhartha, but just because he was wealthy. They would come to him if they wanted money.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at September 15, 2013 09:43 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question: Explain what Siddhartha means when he states the following assertions: "I can think. I can wait. I can fast." Explicate the consequential abilities entailed in each assertion.

Kamaswami asks what Siddhartha can give, or what he has learned that he can give. Siddhartha replies with "I can think, I can wait, I can fast."(Hesse 64)

Kamaswami was confused and asks Siddhartha what those are good for, Siddhartha replies with "It's of great value. If a man has nothing to eat, fasting is the intelligent thing he could do. If Siddhartha had not learned to fast [. . .] hunger would have driven him [. . .] Siddhartha can wait calmly. He is not impatient, he can ward hunger off at any time"(Hesse 65)

Siddhartha was able to teach Kamaswami, and in return, Kamaswami would teach Siddhartha.

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at September 15, 2013 09:44 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 September 2013

Question: How many years does the ferryman think it has been since he last saw Siddhartha? What is important about this scence?

Answer: New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books publish the edition of Siddhartha that was used for this response. The ferryman says it has been over twenty years since he has seen Siddhartha. The whole moment is important because the ferryman predicted that Siddhartha would return to the river. In Part Two’s Kamana, the ferryman states, “I have learned that from the river too; everything comes back. You, too, Samana, will come back. Now farewell, may your friendship be my payment” (Hesse, 49). It is in The Ferryman that he states, “I took you across the river and we parted good friends” (Hesse, 103). The statement proves the ferryman’s prediction from the beginning of part two to be true. Perhaps this also infers that Siddhartha will find true enlightenment through the river.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at September 15, 2013 09:50 PM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013
Question 110

In both Siddhartha’s business relationship with kamaswami and in Siddhartha’s love affair with Kamala, there was “giving and taking.” For Siddhartha, there was only meaning and passion in his relationship with Kamala. Did Siddhartha, therefore, envy the childlike people for their imposing meaning and passion on the giving and taking in everyday events? What did he have to say about it?

Answer:
Siddhartha didn’t envy the childlike people he was more afraid of the fact that every so often he wanted to be like those childlike people. Siddhartha “wished that he would also be gifted with the ability to participate in all of this childlike-naive occupations of the daytime with passion and with his heart…(Hesse 41)” Siddhartha didn’t want to just stand and watch others live he wanted to partake in this childlike world and live too.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at September 15, 2013 10:09 PM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013

139. Why was this person watching over Siddhartha?

The person in which the question is referring to is Govinda. He was passing by as Siddhartha was sleeping and felt the urge to check and she if he was okay. He “saw [Siddhartha] lying asleep in a dangerous place, so [he] tried to awaken [him]” (92). Even though Govinda did not realize it was Siddhartha at first, he still had the sense that he should watch over his friend. This is a change from before because Siddhartha always had to watch over Govinda. In this case, it is the opposite. As friends the love they have is strong and can be sensed even when they do not recognize eachother.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at September 15, 2013 11:12 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013

Question: What does Siddhartha figure out he no longer possess?
Answer: In the chapter By The River Siddhartha talks about many things he no longer possesses them being money and the noble and undefeatable feats he can concur which were fasting, waiting, and thinking. “These had been his possession, his power and strength, his solid staff; in the busy, laborious years of his youth, he had learned these three feats, nothing else. And now they had abandoned him, none of them was his any more neither fasting, nor waiting, nor thinking.” (67) Losing these possessions was a revaluating moment for Siddhartha because he had worked so hard towards being able to create the life he had dreamed about.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at September 15, 2013 11:20 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013

Question 152. What do people say about Siddhartha and the Ferryman?

When people used the ferry and met Siddhartha and the ferryman, they saw something in their faces that made them feel they could trust them. Since they were traveling, to kill time they would tell their life story, and looked for comfort in the two ferrymen. Rumors spread about the two men that they were very wise, and many curious people came to talk to the old men. Of the curious people, "who had been told that there were two wise men, or sorcerers or holy men living by that ferry. The curious people came and asked many questions, but they got no answers, and they found neither sorcerers nor wise men, they only found two friendly little old men, who seemed to be mute." (Hesse 78)

Posted by: joe Rulli at September 15, 2013 11:32 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013

Question #158. What does one have to do to conquer all difficulties and evil in the world?

Answer: Siddhartha learned from the river with the help of a ferryman that there is no time. That discovery made him very happy. Siddhartha says "Was then not all sorrow in time, all self-torment and fear in time? Were not all difficulties and evil in the world conquered as soon as one conquered time, as soon as one dispelled time?" (Hesse 88).

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 15, 2013 11:38 PM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013

Question #166 What bed did Kamala die on?

Answer:
Kamala died on Siddhartha’s bed.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at September 15, 2013 11:48 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire
16 September 2013

Question: What did Siddhartha do when he saw the reflection of his face?
Answer: When Siddhartha saw the reflection of his face in the river, he felt an emptiness as he gazed at himself desperate, aged, and experienced longing for nothing more than to end his own life. He was disgusted at the reflection that looked back at him and “spat at it. Profoundly weary, he slipped his arm from the tree trunk and turned a little to allow himself to fall strait down, so he could go under at last” (Hesse 69). He let himself sink to the bottom of the river in a final attempt to release his mind only to find himself experiencing the sound of om.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at September 16, 2013 12:33 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013

Question: “What did Siddhartha passionately wish for?”
Answer: Siddhartha wants passionately to restart his life at the river; after reaching Nirvana, he approached the river where he once crossed decades ago, and realized “by this river [he] wants to stay” (Hesse 72). Siddhartha desired to find the ferryman and follow him as though he were a Buddha himself. Siddhartha’s inner voice and soul told him to stay by the river, to love it, and learn from the river its secrets and “many other things, many secrets, all secrets” to achieving enlightenment (Hesse 72). Siddhartha desires to live and love the nature of the river in order to reach a higher state of being.

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at September 16, 2013 12:42 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013


“. . . when the Om entered his consciousness: he became aware of him-self in his misery and in his error.”


Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the test you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: The narrator speaks the quote, which is a third person of Siddhartha. The narrator is addressing the reader of Siddhartha’s new views and feelings towards himself. This is the scene where Siddhartha realizes that he no longer wants to learn about himself. He feels that he is dead and can learn no more. The narrator says, “ Om! He spoke to himself: Om! and again he knew about Brahman knew about the indestructibility of life, knew about all that is divine, which he had forgotten” (Hesse 63). In this quote, I think Hesse is trying to tell us how Siddhartha forgot the true mean of Om. He remembered it meant perfection. Siddhartha could not believe he took his thoughts as far into death. He realized how miserable he was when he thought of the definition of Om. That is what I think this quote means.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 16, 2013 03:04 AM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 September 2013

Question: What was the most hateful cunning of the old fox?

Answer: In chapter, ten of the W. K. Marriott translation, Kamala has passed away, and Siddhartha has taken custody of his, “rich and happy” [Hesse, 83] son Siddhartha the young. Siddhartha knew that the son would not have loved him because he did not know him, but he wanted to win his son’s love and affection. Siddhartha was a, “good, kind, gentle, and holy man” [Hesse, 87], but these qualities were not found to be impressive nor fearful to the son. The son would watch his father trying to show him love and compassion since his mother passed away, but he still continued to make his life hard. Siddhartha the young refused to, “work, pay respects to his elders, and sometimes eat” [Hesse, 83]. Siddhartha would usually, “answer his rudeness with a smile, respond to every response with friendliness, and every naughtiness with kindness” [Hesse, 87]. Siddhartha knew that no matter what the son would not stop rebelling against him and that it was time to let him go.

Posted by: Jasmine Charlton at September 16, 2013 07:42 AM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 210-Cl Love and Desire in Literature Ca01
16, September, 2013


When Siddhartha awakes, who does he see?

The Ferryman, who takes him across the river towards a village where he later meets Kamala; were Siddhartha learns from the ferryman “that you can learn a lot from a river (Hesse 37).”

Posted by: stephanie gilbert at September 16, 2013 07:56 AM

Cheyenne DeMaggio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013

Question: "How is Siddhartha different when he wakes up? Who is sitting with him?"

Answer: Siddhartha wakes up from a really long sleep after almost committing suicide to find himself feeling born again. He fell asleep thinking "OM," and it consumed his entire mind while sleeping. As stated in the Kohn translation, he woke feeling "remarkably well rested, remarkably alert, cheerful, and inquisitive (Hesse 90). When he woke, Govinda was sitting next to him, watching over him while he slept.

Posted by: Cheyenne DeMaggio at September 16, 2013 09:00 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 201CL CA01 – Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013
#125
Q: Why did Siddhartha envy the childlike people?
A: Siddhartha envied the people of the village he lived in who embodied childlike characteristics because they had what he didn't, which was “the sense of importance with which the lived their lives” (Hesse 77). During this time, Siddhartha had begun to fully embrace and live the lifestyle of ordinary people. He begun to care about ordinary issues, like women and gambling. However, he could never get over the feeling he had of emptiness that that life had given him. And it is that lack of emptiness feeling that the childlike people possessed that Siddhartha was envy of.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at September 16, 2013 09:05 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 201CL CA01 – Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013
#151
Q: What is the ferryman's name? What does Siddhartha learn from the Ferryman?
A: The ferryman's name is Vasudeva. Siddhartha learned from Vasudeva how to learn from the river. When Siddhartha reveals his story to the ferryman, he is amazed by how well Vasudeva is able to listen to him. He then wishes to learn how to listen like that, and Vasudeva tells him that he learned it from the river. By working with Vasudeva, Siddhartha “learned more from the river than Vasudeva could teach him” (Hesse 106).

Posted by: Diego Pestana at September 16, 2013 09:13 AM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 210 CL Love and Desires in Literature
16 September

Question 137:What sound does Siddhartha hear right before jumping into the river?

Answer: Siddhartha hears an Om right before jumping into the river contemplating suicide. As it states in the By the River chapter of the Hilda Rosner translation,"Yes, he was at the end there was nothing more for him but to efface himself, to destroy the unsuccessful structure of his life, to throw it away" (Hess 88)[.] Siddhartha continues to contemplate to himself,"[I] had to sink to the greatest mental depths, to thoughts of suicide in order to experience grace, to hear Om again to sleep deeply again and to awaken refreshed again" (Hess 97).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at September 16, 2013 09:44 AM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
16 September 2013

Question: What does one have to do to conquer all difficulties and evil in the world?

Answer: In Siddhartha one has have to peace to conquer all the difficulties, one has to believe they are brave enough to take the evil away from them for example Siddhartha live a life with the material world, but he was able to conquer all that and find the voice that told to go in the right path. On Page 101 “You've experienced suffering, Siddhartha, but I see: no sadness has entered your heart”(Hesse, 101). This shows that one can experience suffering but therefore have a peaceful heart to be able to conquer all the evils in the world.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at September 16, 2013 09:58 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013


Question #159: What word does the river pronounce when all of its ten thousand voices speak at the same time?
Answer: As Siddhartha sat by the river, which he has once passed by many years ago. He felt as if the water gazed at him with a thousand eye, very attached to, he gazed at it, “In his heart he heard the voice speaking, newly awakened voice, and it said to him: Love this water! Stay here! Learn from it! O yes, he wanted to learn from the water, he wanted to listen to it.” (Siddhartha 81)

Posted by: abdulaziz alsaif at September 16, 2013 10:07 AM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013

Question: 157. The ferryman says that Siddhartha will learn to listen from whom?

Answer: The ferryman informs Siddhartha that he cannot teach him, only help him. He tells Siddhartha that the river can teach him, if he opens up and listens to it. “It is just as I tought.The river spoke to you…(pg. 56)”The river can teach Siddhartha how to be a listener and be devout. “The river taught me to how to listen, and you will learn from it, too… (pg. 56)” By listening, Siddhartha realizes that the river teaches about the ways of life and that existence is always in present. Following Kamala’s tragic death, the river brings peace to Siddhartha’s soul.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 16, 2013 10:09 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
16 September 2013
Question: What reason did Siddhartha have to have his experiences?
Answer: Siddhartha needed a change. He has been through a lot, like being a Brahman, to a Samana, to a lover. In order for him to get to a new life he needed to change. Siddhartha states, “he had to go into the world, lose himself to lust and power, to women and money, had to become a merchant…until the priest and Samana in him was dead” (Hesse 70). As soon as these parts of him were dead, he can continue on his path of enlightenment. He went through all these things, being a priest and Samana, to reach a level of enlightenment that not many others could reach.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at September 16, 2013 10:20 AM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013

Question: What do Vasudeva and Siddhartha set out to do with Kamala?
I'm using the online version by EDB E-books translated version.

In Chapter 9, Kamala was bit by a snake and stayed with the ferryman and Siddhartha. Once Kamala died, the ferryman thought the best idea was to bury her on the same hill he buried his wife. The ferryman said, "Your son shall be welcome to me as well. But now, Siddhartha, let's get to work, there is much to be done. Kamala has died on the same bed, on which my wife had died a long time ago. Let us also build Kamala's funeral pile on the same hill on which I had then built my wife's funeral pile" (Hesse 81).

Posted by: Rache Robinson at September 16, 2013 10:51 AM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013

Question 155. What does Siddhartha offer to do with his clothes? Why is this significant?

Siddhartha offers his clothes to the ferryman. He tells the man, "I'm not joking, friend. Behold, once before you have ferried me across this water in your boat for the immaterial reward of a good deed. Thus, do it today as well, and accept my clothes for it." (Hesse*) This is significant because the man states that he envies those with nice clothing. Siddhartha has no money to pay the man so he claims that his clothes mean nothing to him and the ferryman deserved them. Siddhartha showed selflessness and the ferryman loved him for that.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 16, 2013 11:03 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
15 September 2013

Question: How does Siddhartha judge his words that he said to Gotama many years ago?
Answer: Siddhartha judged his words by thinking to himself “that they had been arrogant and precocious words” (Hesses 90). His reason for speaking to Gotama in the manner that he did was because Siddhartha believed “a true seeker could not accept any teachings, not if he sincerely wished to find something” (Hesse 90). This last statement was part of the Siddhartha’s main journey.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 16, 2013 11:09 AM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
16 September 2013

Question 199. What is the symbolism of the stone?

Govinda finds Siddhartha by the river, and they are both old men as they have not seen each other since Siddhartha left him when Govinda decided to follow Buddah. They are catching up on one another's lives when Govinda asks Siddhartha what he has learned throughout his life. Siddhartha picks up a stone and says how he used to just look at it as a stone, but now he sees it as part of a cycle. Siddhartha says, "is a stone, and will, after a certain time, perhaps turns into soil, and will turn into a plant or animal or human, in the past, I would have said this stone is just a stone it is worthless" (Hesse 101). The stone symbolizes Siddharthas change in his perception through experiences he had in his life.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at September 16, 2013 02:26 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
16 September 2013

Question: What does Vasudeva do at the end of the chapter?

Answer: At the end of the chapter, Vasudeva helps Siddhartha accept his son’s actions by telling him to listen to the river more closely. He enlightens Siddhartha that his son must embark on his own journey, and Siddhartha must let him live his life. Once Siddhartha concludes that his son must make his own mistakes, Vasudeva says, “for a long time, I’ve been Vasudeva the ferryman. Now it’s enough” (Hesse 96). Vasudeva goes into the forest, and he passes into the oneness. He has moved on to the next life.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at September 16, 2013 02:58 PM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
13 September 2013
Question # 131

Question:Why did Kamala expect Siddhartha to leave without explanation and farewells? Why does she liberate the golden songbird?
Answer: Kamala expected Siddhartha to leave without explanation and farewells because Siddhartha had felt that he was getting to old too fast. He was noticing chances on himself such as gray hairs. He had also noticed changes within others too. Kamala liberate the golden songbird because Siddhartha had some sort of an attachment to this bird that he had always dreamed about. One day when Siddhartha approached the cage of where the bird lived, Siddhartha found the bird dead and it crushed his heart.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at September 16, 2013 07:53 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 September 2013

Question: Why doesn’t Siddhartha have a doctrine? How can wisdom not be communicable? Can you communicate knowledge?

Answer: New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books publish the edition of Siddhartha that was used for this response. In chapter twelve, Siddhartha states, “You know, my friend, that even as a young man, when we lived with the ascetics in the forest, I came to distrust doctrines and teachers and to turn my back on them. I am still of the same turn of mind . . .” (Hesse, 141). Siddhartha does not want teachers or religious beings to preach to him. Although he distrusts these figures, he has not turned his back on others such as the courtesan, merchant, and dice player. He learned through them via happiness and through their own actions. He observed their way of life and acted upon it instead of being lectured about wisdom. Siddhartha also states in the chapter, “Wisdom is not communicable. The wisdom which a wise man tries to communicate always sounds foolish” (Hesse, 142). Knowledge can be communicated because it is defined as a general awareness about a matter. Knowledge is spread through facts and specific information. Wisdom, however, is how that knowledge is applied to everyday life. Wisdom is having a sense of your own views and judgment based on what you already know.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at September 16, 2013 11:14 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

“The world, my friend Govinda, is not imperfect, or on a slow path towards perfection: no, it is perfect in every moment”

Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?. (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: There is a point where Siddhartha says to Govinda “The world, my friend Govinda, is not imperfect, or on a slow path towards perfection: no, it is perfect in every moment” (Hesse 116). He is explaining how even though there are things that do not seem perfect; everything is perfect in some way, shape or form. Siddhartha explains how “every sin already carries grace within it, all small children are potential old men, all sucklings have death within them, all dying people-eternal life” (Hesse 116). Siddhartha is saying how there is a reason for everything and everything will be whole in the end. Everything will end up the way it is intended to be.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 17, 2013 10:46 AM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 September 2013

Question: 3. What is the good/beautiful that Siddhartha seeks? What is missing in his life
that, if found, will make him whole/repaired? Is this quality (or, qualities) contained
in one or more of the other characters he has encountered? Who? Why? Be prepared
to explain with quoted passages from the text.

Answer: New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books publish the edition of Siddhartha that was used for this response. The good/beautiful that Siddhartha seeks is himself. He feels as though his life has been incomplete because he has not truly found his own, true self, whatever that may be. He is searching for his soul, for what makes him truly happy, for what will cure him of his curiosity. Siddhartha had a great respect for verses from the holy books, such as, “Your soul is the whole world” (Hesse, 7). Siddhartha also ventured and strived to find love. In the very first chapter of the book it is said, “He had begun to feel that the love of his father and mother, and also the love of his friend Govinda, would not always make him happy, give him peace, satisfy and suffice him” (Hesse, 5). Although he was grateful for these relationships, he felt that he needed more. One quote from the book truly sums up everything it is that Siddhartha was searching for, “He had begun to suspect that his worthy father and his other teachers, the wise Brahmins, had already passed on to him the bulk and best of their wisdom, that they had already poured the sum total of their knowledge into his waiting vessel; and the vessel was not full, his intellect was not satisfied, his soul was not at peace, his heart was not still” (Hesse, 5). Siddhartha was empty. He would take with him what he had learned from everyone, but he knew there was more that he was missing that could potentially make him whole and repaired. In the final chapter, Siddhartha states, “You know, my friend, that even as a young man, when we lived with the ascetics in the forest, I came to distrust doctrines and teachers and to turn my back on them. I am still of the same turn of mind, although I have, since that time, had many teachers. A beautiful courtesan was my teacher for a long time, and a rich merchant and a dice player. On one occasion, one of Buddha’s wandering monks was my teacher. He halted in his pilgrimage to sit beside me when I fell asleep in the forest. I also learned something from him and I am grateful for him, very grateful. But most of all, I have learned from this river and from my predecessor, Vasudeva. He was a simple man; he was not a thinker, but he realized the essential as well as Gotama. He was a holy man, a saint” (Hesse, 142).

Posted by: Kelly Scott at September 17, 2013 11:42 AM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
17 September 2013

Question:What had Govinda heard about while at the pleasure grove?

At the pleasure grove, Govinda heard about the ferryman who has widsom and resided by the river. In chapter 12, it states, " He heard talk of an old ferryman, who lived one day's journey away by the river, and who was regarded as a wise man by many" (Hesse 96).

Posted by: Rache Robinson at September 17, 2013 02:56 PM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
17 September 2013

Question:What had Govinda heard about while at the pleasure grove?

At the pleasure grove, Govinda heard about the ferryman who has widsom and resided by the river. In chapter 12, it states, " He heard talk of an old ferryman, who lived one day's journey away by the river, and who was regarded as a wise man by many" (Hesse 96).

Posted by: Rache Robinson at September 17, 2013 02:56 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
17 September 2013

Question #194: What is wrong with seeking, according to Siddhartha?

Siddhartha had been seeking for a long time. As a young man he was seeking for knowledge, Nirvana, and enlightenment. Later Siddhartha ceased seeking. In his conversation with Govinda he said to him “You seek to much, that as a result of your seeking you cannot find” (Hesse 113). Old Siddhartha believed that when someone is seeking, he gets obsessed with his goal. He no longer can absorb things around him.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 17, 2013 03:13 PM

Vera SMirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
17 September 2013

In class discussion question #4: As a couple in a romantic relationship, do Kamala and Siddhartha symbolically complete one another (even if only partially)? If so, how? What is good/beautiful in each of them that the other desires? When Kamala and Siddhartha are together, are they whole, or is there something still missing? What is it and why ?

Answer: As a couple they only complete each other partially. At that time when Siddhartha met Kamala he did not know anything about love yet. Kamala said once to Siddhartha “You do not really love me – you love nobody” (Hesse 59). Siddhartha did not understand “ordinary” people and their lives at that time. Until he founds the love for his son and saw in himself his father he does not really understand the love. Siddhartha was seeking for a teacher of love. Kamala was interested in Samanas way of living. She was missing the peace, and he was missing a “normal” life. I would not say they were whole. Siddhartha was not happy with a city life. She new he is going to go some day, so she never considered him as her other half.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 17, 2013 03:33 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
17 September 2013

Question: What thought has most impressed Siddhartha?

Answer: When Govinda asks Siddhartha to tell him his thoughts and theories, there is one thought that comes to Siddhartha’s mind. Siddhartha says, “Look, my dear Govinda, this is one of my thoughts, which I have found: wisdom cannot be passed on. Wisdom which a wise man tries to pass on to someone always sounds like foolishness” (Hesse 99). Govinda, offended by this remark because he has been following Buddha in search of wisdom half of his life, and later confesses has not found it. Siddhartha explains when someone has a dedication of searching for what their heart desires they are blind. It is when they let go of the goal when they finally can find their desire.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 17, 2013 04:01 PM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 September 2013
Question 202: What is Govinda’s opinion of Siddhartha’s thoughts?
Answer: Although Govinda is a monk, he is still searching. When he realizes that Siddhartha is the ferryman, he is delighted and wants to ask him so many questions. Govinda asks, “You still found certain thoughts, certain insights, which are your own and which help you live? If you would like to tell me some of these, you would delight my heart” (Hesse 99). Govinda is very interested to hear what Siddhartha has to teach. When Siddhartha replies with, “Wisdon cannot be passed on. Wisdom which a wise man tries to pass on to someone always sounds like foolishness” (Hesse 99), Govinda is shocked. As Siddhartha explains himself, Govinda gets confused. When they finish talking Govinda tells Siddhartha, “Thank you for telling me some of your thoughts. They are partially strange thoughts, not all have been instantly understandable to me” (Hesse 103). So at first Govinda is eager to hear what Siddhartha has to teach him, but soon feels that Siddhartha’s “teachings” are foolish and bizarre.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at September 17, 2013 05:04 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 September 2013

Question: Why doesn’t Siddhartha have a doctrine? How can wisdom not be communicable? Can you communicate knowledge?

Answer: Siddhartha does not have a doctrine because he has lived many different lives. He did not want to be someone who spent their life searching for something he would never find. Siddhartha says that the one who searches, "is unable to find anything, to let anything enter his mind, because he always thinks of nothing but the object of his search" (Hesse 97). Wisdom cannot be communicable because it must be learned. You can be told something and still not have learned the true meaning of the lesson until you experience it for yourself. You can speak knowledge, but, again, you will not fully understand something until you have had the chance to experience it for yourself.

Posted by: Regina Green at September 17, 2013 06:38 PM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
17 September 2013
Question 204

Question: What does Siddhartha say in response to Govinda when he asks for something to help him?

Siddhartha says in response to Govinda when he asks for something to help him. "When someone is searching, then it might easily happen that the only thing his eyes still see is that what he searches for, that he is unable to find anything..." This quote left Govinda confused and speechless for a moment until the next question was asked. Siddhartha spoke in wise words that told a story and had a meaning to everything.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at September 17, 2013 06:46 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 September 2013

Question: As participants in a familial, father-son relationship, do Siddhartha and his
son, Siddhartha, Jr.(?) symbolically complete one another (even if only partially)?
If so, how? What is good/beautiful in each of them that the other desires? When the
Ferryman and Siddhartha are together, are they whole, or is there something still
missing? What is it and why? Be prepared to explain with quoted passages from the
text.

Answer: Siddhartha's son completes Siddhartha in a way. Hesse says, "Rich and happy, he called himself, when the boy had come to him" (83). Siddhartha had never felt such unconditional love for anything or anyone before he had met his son. Although his son did not want to be there Siddhartha wanted so badly for his son to accept him as his father. Although his son shows great resentment towards him, his son still calls his father wise. When the ferryman and Siddhartha are together there still seems to be a bit of an emptiness even in each others company. They were not on the same level of understanding until the ferryman decided to leave. Siddhartha still longed for his son. The ferry man did not leave Siddhartha until he helped him realized he had done the right thing in letting his son go.

Posted by: Regina Green at September 17, 2013 07:22 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 September 2013

Question: “On the day when Siddhartha decided to go to town, who was laughing at Siddhartha?

Answer: In this chapter of the W. K. Marriott translation, Siddhartha’s “wounds still burned, longingly and bitterly” [Hesse, 92]. His wounds would burn to the point where he began to envy other families as they entered and exited the ferries. One fateful day Siddhartha finally decided it was time for him to go into the city in search of his runaway son, but the, “river flowed softly and quietly, it was the dry season, but its voice sounded strange: it laughed” [Hesse, 92]. In amazement from the laughter, he heard coming from the river Siddhartha decided to take a look into the river. Siddhartha saw his face and another face reflecting in the. The face in the water, “resembled his father, the Brahman” [Hesse, 92], which he did not recognize at first, but he knew that he loved, feared, and knew it. As Siddhartha gazed into the river his life and his hurt suddenly began to make sense to him, as much as it pained him Siddhartha knew that he had to let his son go just as his father had to do from him.

Posted by: jasmine charlton at September 17, 2013 07:36 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
16 September 2013

Question: As participants in a familial, father – son relationship, do Siddhartha and his son, Siddhartha, Jr (?) symbolically complete one another (even if only partially)? If so, how? What is good/ beautiful in each of them that the other desires? When the ferryman and Siddhartha are together, are they whole, or is there something still missing? What is it and why? Be prepared to explain with quoted passages from the text.

Answer: In the W. K. Marriott translation, Siddhartha and his son Siddhartha Jr. do not complete each other at all because of their opposite lifestyles. Siddhartha Jr. was accustomed to, “finer foods, soft bed, and giving orders to servants” [Hesse, 83]. Siddhartha and his son did not have a relationship due to the absence of Siddhartha, which left Kamala to raise Siddhartha Jr. After Kamala’s death, Siddhartha Jr. was welcomed to live in Vasudeva’s hut, but he, “refused to eat, give open looks, and open his heart” [Hesse, 83] The desire Siddhartha had for Siddhartha Jr. could be seen as being beautiful because all he wanted was the love between a son and his father. However, Siddhartha Jr. had no desire what so ever to pursue his father Siddhartha because he “did not know him, so he could not love him like a father” [Hesse, 83]. On the other hand, the relationship between Vasudeva, the ferryman and Siddhartha had grown tremendously in chapter ten and eleven, as opposed to other chapters. Vasudeva allowed Siddhartha to take residence in his hut as well as allowing his ill-mannered son to reside with them. Vasudeva’s relationship with Siddhartha shown clearly through the time that Siddhartha Jr. resided with them. Vasudeva would watch Siddhartha’s attempts at forming a relationship with his son until he eventually had enough and decided to talk to Siddhartha about his relationship with his son. In the friendliest way possible Vesudeva told Siddhartha, “I’m seeing that you are tormenting yourself, I’m seeing that you are in grief” [Hesse, 84]. He also warned him, “Your son, my dear is worrying you, and he is also worrying me” [Hesse, 84]. Vasudeva could not stand watching his friend be unhappy, so he decided to help him through the process of watching his son go and staying with him until he knew for sure that Siddhartha understood what he had to do to lose all his pain and why. To me the relationship between Siddhartha and Vasudeva could be compared to the relationship Siddhartha and Govinda had because they all took pride in each other and they all admired the wisdom each other had.

Posted by: jasmine charlton at September 17, 2013 07:49 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
4 September 2013

Question:
What does Vasudeva do at the end of the chapter?
Answer: The role of Vasudeva as ferryman is that he helps convey people to their final destination, which is to reach enlightenment. People must be able to reach the river first which belongs to their own accord and know that they seek to reach other bank. On page 138 “ No longer knowing wheather time existed, wheather this display had lasted a second or a hundred years, wheather there was Siddhartha, or a Gotama, a self and others, wounded deeply by a divine arrow which gave him pleasure, deeply enchanted and exalted, Govinda stood yet a while bending over Siddhartha’s peaceful face which he had just kissed, which had just been the stage of all present and future forms”(Hesse,138). This shows that Siddhartha finally found peace at last in his heart and finally reached what he is been wanting to reach and he had no desire and love for the material world, this the life he is been wanting to have after all the peace and suffering he is been having in his life or had experienced.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at September 17, 2013 07:52 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
18 September 2013

Question:
What does Vasudeva do at the end of the chapter?
Answer: The role of Vasudeva as ferryman is that he helps convey people to their final destination, which is to reach enlightenment. People must be able to reach the river first which belongs to their own accord and know that they seek to reach other bank. On page 138 “ No longer knowing wheather time existed, wheather this display had lasted a second or a hundred years, wheather there was Siddhartha, or a Gotama, a self and others, wounded deeply by a divine arrow which gave him pleasure, deeply enchanted and exalted, Govinda stood yet a while bending over Siddhartha’s peaceful face which he had just kissed, which had just been the stage of all present and future forms”(Hesse,138). This shows that Siddhartha finally found peace at last in his heart and finally reached what he is been wanting to reach and he had no desire and love for the material world, this the life he is been wanting to have after all the peace and suffering he is been having in his life or had experienced.

Date was wrong sorry!

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at September 17, 2013 07:55 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
17 September, 2013

Question 188: What does the river do when Siddhartha goes to see his son?
Whose reflection does he see?

Answer: The river is laughing at Siddhartha because it knows something that he does not. Siddhartha is about to learn another truth that shall lead him to enlightenment. When Siddhartha sees his father's face in the river, he realizes that history is repeating itself. For the first time, Siddhartha feels sympathy for someone else and develops a connection to the mortal people that he had previously shunned.

"It was laughing, it was distinctly laughing clearly. The river was laughing clearly and merrily at the old ferryman. Siddhartha stood still; he bent over the water in order to hear better. He saw his face reflected in the quietly moving water, and there was something in this reflection[ . . . ] It resembled the face of his father, the Brahmin (131)."

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 17, 2013 08:42 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
18 September 2013
Group Question # 1
Question:
What is the good/beautiful that Govinda seeks? What is missing in his life that if found, will make him whole/repaired? Is this quality (or, qualities) contained in one or more of the other characters has encountered? Who? Or Why? Be prepared to explain with quoted passages from the text.
Answer:
The things that are Good and beautiful that Govinda seeks is enlightenment, he goes back to the river to receive enlightenment. He does not recognize Siddhartha and ask him for advice and how to reach enlightenment, this one of things that Govinda has been missing in his life. One of most amazing things that Govinda does is that him and Siddhartha achieve enlightenment together and go back to their youth days as Siddhartha tells Govinda to close his eyes as both their eyes start to cry and this when Govinda seeks what he has been missing his whole life. The things that Govinda encounters as in characters is that he goes back to his old best friend, and he has the right path and also he sees the vision of truth as he reaches enlightenment. As on Page 149 “Govinda was compelled by a great love and presentiment to obey him; he leaned close to him and touched his forehead his lips, as he did something wonderful happened to him, while he was still dwelling on Siddhartha’s strange words, while he strove in vain to dispel the conception of time to imagine Nirvana and Samsara as one, while even a certain contempt for his friend’s words conflicted with a tremendous love and esteem for his, this happened to him” (Hesse, 150). This shows that Govinda willing to go far and reach to out to enlightenment and this showed an image to Govinda as he closed his eyes that he saw those characters Nirvana and Samsara. Even though Govinda did something that was wonderful he felt that he gone through suffering to reach what he has been missing in his life.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at September 17, 2013 08:43 PM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
5 September 2013
Question: Siddhartha and Vasudeva listen very, very closely to the river. What do they hear?
Why is everything interconnected?
Answer: They Hear Voices Some Laughter but mostly cries of loneliness and suffering from his dad and his son. It is all connected because it is the music of his life, everyone voices is being played through the river.

Posted by: Aye'Kendria George at September 17, 2013 08:52 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
17 September 2013

Question: 206. What does Govinda see Siddhartha do? What does this show about Siddhartha’s final change?

Govinda sees Siddhartha smile. Govinda, "no longer saw the face of his friend Siddhartha, instead he saw other faces, many, a long sequence, a flowing river of faces, of hundreds, of thousands, which all came and disappeared, and yet all seemed to be there simultaneously, which all constantly changed and renewed themselves, and which were still Siddhartha" (Hesse 104). This showed that Siddhartha developed and grew. He had become a perfected one.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 17, 2013 09:53 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
17th September 2013
Question: What is the good/beautiful that Kamala seeks? What is missing in her life that, if found, will make her whole/repaired? Is this quality (or, qualities) contained in one or more of the other characters he has encountered? Who? Why? Be prepared to explain with quoted passage from the text.
Answer: The good and beautiful that Kamala seeks is the happiness that Siddhartha is feeling. She has so much feeling for Siddhartha that his happiness is her happiness. I think what is missing from her life is maybe someone to be with. The qualities that Kamala contained is probably also in Siddhartha because they are in a romantic relationship and have that connection that couple have.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at September 17, 2013 10:00 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
15 September 2013

I am using the Hilda Rosner translation.

Question #146: What does Siddhartha realize had been hindering him?

Answer: Siddhartha realized that the holy Om was what was hindering him. "When the sound of Om reached Siddhartha's ears, his slumbering soul suddenly awakened and he recognized the folly of his actions" (Hesse 72). He was trying so hard to find peace that he resorted to destroying his body.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at September 17, 2013 10:01 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 September 2013

Question: As friends with a close bond, do Govinda and Siddhartha symbolically complete one another (even if only partially)? If so how? What is good/ beautiful in each of them that the other desires? When Govinda and Siddhartha are together, are they whole or is there something still missing? What is it and why?

Answer: Do to knowing each other at such a very young age; Govinda and Siddhartha completed one another; they were best friends. Govinda always thought highly of Siddhartha, so when Siddhartha chose to leave the Brahmans, Govinda joined him. Govinda always admired Siddhartha’s “eye and sweet voice, he loved his walk and the perfect decency of his movements, he loved everything Siddhartha did and said and what he loved most was his spirit, his transcendent, fiery thoughts, his ardent will, his high calling” (Hesse 5). After hearing the Buddha speak, their journey together ended. They decided to go their separate ways in life, both seeking different things. Siddhartha searched for love, whereas Govinda searched for knowledge. The two seemed to find each other no matter where one would go. When Govinda and Siddhartha finally reunited for the last time, Govinda felt a rush of emotions after speaking with Siddhartha. The love he had for Siddhartha came pouring out, and Govinda “bowed; tears he knew nothing of ran down his old face; like a fire burnt the feeling of the most intimate love, the humblest veneration in his heart” (Hesse 106). Siddhartha reminded Govinda “of everything he had ever loved in his life, what had ever been valuable and holy to him in his life” (Hesse 106). Govinda and Siddhartha made one another whole again. The piece of them that was missing all along was each other.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 17, 2013 10:15 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

“Siddhartha felt more and more that this was no longer Vasudeva, no longer a human being, who was listening to him, that this motionless listener was absorbing his confession into himself like a tree the rain, that this motionless man was the river itself, that he was God himself, that he was the eternal itself.” (93)
Question: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer: The person speaking in this quote is Siddhartha to Vasudeva. In the passage they are talking about Siddhartha life and he is replaying the past, present, and future in his head to see if he has made the right decisions in his life. Vasudeva helps his see into the river and helps him listen to it. The river shows Siddhartha that everything that has happened from the start of his adventures of life had let him to this moment and everything is connected in the end. Siddhartha felt as is Vasudeva was not a human because he had helped him see things more clearly by doing almost nothing just listening, it was as if he was a god.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at September 17, 2013 10:26 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 September 2013

Question: Why is there still restlessness in Govinda’s heart?

Answer: Govinda was always on the quest for new knowledge ever since he was a young boy. When he decided to join the monks, he thought he had found the answers he had been looking for all along, but he had not. Although “he had lived his entire life by the rules, though he was also looked upon with veneration by the younger monks on account of his age and his modesty, the restlessness and the searching still had no perished from his heart” (Hesse 97). Even though he lived his life based off the Gotma teachings, he never felt he had found the right path.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 17, 2013 10:39 PM

Maria Benkirane 

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

17 September 2013

Question: What thought has most impressed Siddhartha?

Answer: Siddhartha says that the thought that has impressed him the most is as follows: Wisdom cannot be passed on. Wisdom which a wise man tries to pass on to someone always sods like foolishness" (Hess 99). Siddhartha explains to Govinda that knowledge can be passed on but Wisdom cannot. We can live, find, make miracles through wisdom but it certainly cannot be expressed through words nor can it be taught to someone else.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 17, 2013 11:05 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

Question: Where does Vasudeva go? (Hint: not just the woods)

Answer: Vasudeva does go to the forest, but he goes somewhere else besides the forest. He goes into the oneness. Oneness means to be whole. When Vasudeva says he is going into the oneness, I think it is because he feels like he is now whole. Vasudeva says, “ For a long time, I’ve been waiting for this hour; for a long time, I’ve been Vasudeva the ferryman.” (Hesse 96). He says how he waiting all this time to teach Siddhartha his final teaching. Once he realized Siddhartha gained knowledge from himself, he knew he was complete. Since he was complete, he did not have to stay with Siddhartha any longer. I think Vasudeva is a spirit sent to earth to complete Siddhartha’s destiny. Vasudeva went into the oneness because he was finally whole.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 17, 2013 11:13 PM

(This is the Monday group question)

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

Question: As participants in both a friendship and a student-teacher relationship, do
Siddhartha and the Ferryman symbolically complete one another (even if only
partially)? If so, how? What is good/beautiful in each of them that the other
desires? When the Ferryman and Siddhartha are together, are they whole, or is there
something still missing? What is it and why? Be prepared to explain with quoted
passages from the text.


Answer: In this relationship, I believe that Siddhartha does learn an important lesson from the Ferryman. I feel like the Ferryman through his teachings completed Siddhartha. The Ferryman taught Siddhartha things that he did not see before. I think the Ferryman completed Siddhartha because he showed him the lesson through the water. The lesson was that Siddhartha left his father at a young age to follow what he believes in, so maybe Siddhartha has to let his own son go. The narrator describes what Siddhartha saw in the river by saying, “ Siddhartha looked into the water, and images appeared to him in the moving water: his father appeared, lonely, mourning for his son; he himself appeared, lonely, he also being tied with the bondage of yearning to his distant son; his son appeared, lonely as well, the boy, greedily rushing along the burning course of his young wishes, each one heading for his goal. . .” (Hesse 94). At this point, Siddhartha realizes that his son is doing the same thing he did when he was younger. He left his father when he was younger to follow his beliefs and his father let him leave. Siddhartha has to realize he has to let his own son go to follow what he believes in. The Ferryman helps Siddhartha realize this. Once the Ferryman teaches Siddhartha this lesson, he leaves Siddhartha. He is complete since he taught Siddhartha the lesson. That is why he leaves. Siddhartha and the Ferryman do complete each other.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 17, 2013 11:17 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
17 September, 2013


Question 7: As fellow-seekers, in Siddhartha’s student-teacher relationship with Gotama, the Buddha (even if only temporary), do Siddhartha and Gotama symbolically complete one another (even if only partially)? If so, how? What is good/beautiful in each of them that the other desires? When Gotama and Siddhartha are together, are they whole, or is there something still missing? What is it and why?

Answer: Gotama and Siddhartha can symbolically complete one another: Gotama has found enlightenment and is open to new ideas and questions while Siddhartha is looking for enlightenment and does not want to follow any more teachings. When they are together, Gotama and Siddhartha are able to have insightful discussions about their beliefs without any mean-spirited words. Even in their last conversation, Siddhartha and Gotama show respect through their disagreement. When they do part ways, though, Gotama and Siddhartha seem to be whole without needing each other. Siddhartha even claims at one point that Gotama has deprived him of his time, along with his friend Govinda.

"You know how to talk cleverly, my friend. Be on your guard against too much cleverness!"
The Buddha walked away and his look and half-smile remained imprinted on Siddhartha's memory forever.
“[ . . . ] I, also, would like to look and smile, sit and walk like that [ . . . ] No teachings will attract me, since this man's teachings have not done so. The Buddha has robbed me, thought Siddhartha. He has robbed me, yet he has given me something of greater value. He has robbed me of my friend, who believed in me and now believes in him; he was my shadow and is now Gotama's shadow. But he has given to me Siddhartha, myself (35-36).”

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 17, 2013 11:56 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
17 September 2013

Question 206: What does Govinda see Siddhartha do? What does this show about Siddhartha’s final change?
Answer: Govinda travels the river with the ferryman and discovers the ferryman was Siddhartha himself. Govinda spends the night and speaks of Nirvana, and pure thoughts with Siddhartha, just as he is about to leave, Govinda kisses his old friend on the forehead. At that moment, he did not see Siddhartha’s face, but a series of faces flowing by the thousands. “He saw the face of a fish [. . .] face of a murderer, [. . .] he saw bodies of men and women, naked in positions and cramps of frenzied love, [. . .] he saw the heads of animals, of boars, of crocodiles, of elephants, [. . .] he saw gods, saw Krishna, saw Agni” (Hesse 105). Each transformation helped the next by giving it the chance for re-birth. After the manifestations had finished, Govinda observed his old friend’s face. “The face was unchanged, after under its surface the depth of the thousandfoldness had closed up again, he smiled silently, smiled quietly, and softly perhaps very benevolently, perhaps very mockingly, precisely as he used to smile, the exalted one” (Hesse 105). Siddhartha had finally reached Nirvana.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at September 18, 2013 12:10 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
17 September 2013

Question 206: What does Govinda see Siddhartha do? What does this show about Siddhartha’s final change?
Answer: Govinda travels the river with the ferryman and discovers the ferryman was Siddhartha himself. Govinda spends the night and speaks of Nirvana, and pure thoughts with Siddhartha, just as he is about to leave, Govinda kisses his old friend on the forehead. At that moment, he did not see Siddhartha’s face, but a series of faces flowing by the thousands. “He saw the face of a fish [. . .] face of a murderer, [. . .] he saw bodies of men and women, naked in positions and cramps of frenzied love, [. . .] he saw the heads of animals, of boars, of crocodiles, of elephants, [. . .] he saw gods, saw Krishna, saw Agni” (Hesse 105). Each transformation helped the next by giving it the chance for re-birth. After the manifestations had finished, Govinda observed his old friend’s face. “The face was unchanged, after under its surface the depth of the thousandfoldness had closed up again, he smiled silently, smiled quietly, and softly perhaps very benevolently, perhaps very mockingly, precisely as he used to smile, the exalted one” (Hesse 105). Siddhartha had finally reached Nirvana.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at September 18, 2013 12:10 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
16 September 2013
Question:
“Siddhartha felt more and more that this was no longer Vasudeva, no longer a human being, who was listening to him, that this motionless listener was absorbing his confession into himself like a tree the rain, that this motionless man was the river itself, that he was God himself, that he was the eternal itself.”
192. Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer:
I am using The Literature Network online version of the book. In this passage Siddhartha is talking to Vasudeva and thinking about how he is a good listener. They are both sitting in a a hut and they just start talking, Vasudeva tells him about things he has seen just everyday walking around “slowly he started talking. What they had never talked about, he now told him of, of his walk to the city, at that time, of the burning wound, of his envy at the sight of happy fathers, of his knowledge of the foolishness of such wishes, of his futile fight against them.”

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 18, 2013 12:14 AM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013


Question: What disappeared when young Siddhartha left?

Answer: Happiness disappeared from Siddhartha’s life when his son ran away. Siddhartha was distraught that his kindness and patience with the boy seem in vain now that he has left him. Never before had he felt such sorrow in his life that could not easily be healed. This wound burned inside of him like a hollowed aching pain. “ Many an hour he crouched, listening, saw no images any more, fell into emptiness, let himself fall, without seeing a path”(Hesse,90). The wound Siddhartha had been inflicted from love and grief. Siddhartha tried following the boy. He thought maybe if he saw him one last time it could be enough but he never reached the boy. After lying in the forest for many hours, Vasudeva found him and brought him home. “Neither one talked about what had happened today” (Hesse, 90). The pain would have to subside on its own.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at September 18, 2013 12:20 AM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013


Question: What does Siddhartha feel he has completely learned?

Answer: Siddhartha feels he has learned how to love the world. After losing his son, Siddhartha grew more of an understanding for the “childlike people.” He no longer looked at them as if they were foolish but could now relate to them, “Thus simply, thus without reason he now thought, thus similar to the childlike people he had become” (Hesse, 91). True knowledge came to Siddhartha at his lowest point in life. It came when he was at the very brink of life ready to give up and let go of his earthly sufferings. The river had awoken something inside him, showing him all the secrets it had to offer. “And everything together, all voices, all goals, all yearning, all suffering, all pleasure, all that was good and evil, all of this together was the world”(Hesse,94). From that, moment Siddhartha accepted his fate and his suffering was put to an end.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at September 18, 2013 12:37 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

Question # 200:
How can Nirvana and Sansara be the same?

Answer:
Nirvana and Sansara are the same because one cannot exist without the other. They exist as a whole.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at September 18, 2013 12:51 AM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
English 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

Question: What does Govinda see in Siddhartha?
Answer: After Govinda and Siddhartha reunite after years of separation, they have an intellectual conversation about Siddhartha’s knowledge he gained from his many experiences. When they were parting their ways after reconnecting, Govinda bent down to kiss Siddhartha goodbye and was astonished to look back at his old friend and saw in him hundreds of different faces. He looked into his eyes and “he saw the face of a fish, a carp, with its maw opened in limitless pain, a dying fish with bursting eyes. He saw the face of a newborn child, red and covered with wrinkles, distorted by crying” (Hesse 115). As these and many more forms flashed across his face, each cycling through life and transforming, all related Govinda saw in Siddhartha his identity of the Perfect One. It was at this moment when he watched all forms of life connecting and reconnecting through Siddhartha that he could be sure of his intellectual power.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at September 18, 2013 01:07 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

Question: “What had Govinda heard about while at the pleasure grove?”

Answer: While in Kamala’s pleasure gardens, Govinda heard of “an old ferryman, who lived one day’s journey away by the river” and was considered to be a “wise man by many” (Hesse 97). Intrigued by the thought of the ferryman, Govinda decided to take the road by the river that the monks forbade because “the restlessness and the searching still had not perished from his heart” (Hesse 97). Determined to meet the ferryman, Govinda departed from the pleasure garden towards the river.

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at September 18, 2013 01:09 AM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

193. Why is there still restlessness in Govinda’s heart?

The reoccurring theme in this novel is self-discovery. In the paragraph that Siddhartha says he still feels restlessness in his heart, it mentions that he has seen and learned from all sorts of different people. That is the ultimate irony of the whole book. He sets out on this journey to learn more about himself yet he feels that he should learn through others. For this reason he feels restlessness. It is impossible for Siddhartha to learn about himself through others. He has even admitted this throughout the novel when he met the Illustrious one. What he did not realize was the flaw in his own argument. If he keeps on this journey of learning from others, he will only learn their experiences. He needs experience of his own.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at September 18, 2013 01:15 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
17 September 2013

Question 8: As participants in both a friendship and a student-teacher relationship, do
Siddhartha and the Ferryman symbolically complete one another (even if only
partially)? If so, how? What is good/beautiful in each of them that the other
desires? When the Ferryman and Siddhartha are together, are they whole, or is there
something still missing? What is it and why? Be prepared to explain with quoted
passages from the text.

Answer: The Ferryman is a not only a friend to Siddhartha but a teacher as well while Siddhartha continued his life-long journey in search for Nirvana, when all along the Ferryman possessed it. Symbolically, the Ferryman had what Siddhartha lacked, which was Nirvana. As a teacher, the Ferryman did not teach Siddhartha Nirvana; instead he pointed him in the direction of the river which spoke to him. “’You will learn it,’ spoke Vasvudeva, ‘but not from me. The river has taught me to listen; from it you will learn as well’” (Hesse 75). On the other hand, Siddhartha once had what the Ferryman did not, which was the being a learned man. Siddhartha studied beneath the Brahman, under the oldest of the Samana, Gotama the Buddha, Kamala, Kamaswami, and now the Ferryman. While the Ferryman has one skill, listening, he proclaims this to Siddhartha. “I have no special skill in speaking, I also have no special skill in thinking. All I’m able to do is to listen and to be godly, I have learned nothing else” (Hesse 75). Together, they are whole as Siddhartha was more outspoken while the Ferryman listened. “Vasudeva was no friend of words; rarely, Siddhartha succeeded in persuading him to speak” (Hesse 76). Siddhartha shares his stories of all he has learned to the Ferryman and the Ferryman directs Siddhartha to the river for knowledge and to become a wise man, through this process, they complete one another.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at September 18, 2013 01:48 AM

Hector Rosario
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 September 2013

185. On the day when Siddhartha decided to go to town, who was laughing at Siddhartha?

Siddhartha had heard a sound while crossing the river, Hesse wrote "The river ran softly and gently, it was the dry season, but its voice sounded strange: it was laughing" (Hesse, page 102). The rive laughed at his thought of how Siddhartha's face looked like that of his fathers. How his father was heartbroken to let him go and the guilt of Siddhartha never returning. He felt ridiculed by the river.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at September 18, 2013 08:28 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

Question 201: What does Siddhartha mean that everyone has the Buddha in him?

Answer: Siddhartha is trying to show to Govinda that seeking a goal in finding knowledge is not going to get him anywhere. As Siddhartha explains in the reading, when concentrating on a goal, you start to miss thing in front of you because all you can think of is reaching that goal. He explains to Govinda that both of them are sinner but then again he will be Brahma. He says “No, in the sinner, now and today the future Buddha already exists, his future is already entirely here, you must revere the becoming, the potential, the hidden Buddha in him, in yourself, in everyone.” (Siddhartha 112). He says that the world is not imperfect, not to be seen as on a slow path towards perfection, the world is perfect in every moment.

Posted by: Abdulaziz Alsaif at September 18, 2013 09:32 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

Question 201: What does Siddhartha mean that everyone has the Buddha in him?

Answer: Siddhartha is trying to show to Govinda that seeking a goal in finding knowledge is not going to get him anywhere. As Siddhartha explains in the reading, when concentrating on a goal, you start to miss thing in front of you because all you can think of is reaching that goal. He explains to Govinda that both of them are sinner but then again he will be Brahma. He says “No, in the sinner, now and today the future Buddha already exists, his future is already entirely here, you must revere the becoming, the potential, the hidden Buddha in him, in yourself, in everyone.” (Siddhartha 112). He says that the world is not imperfect, not to be seen as on a slow path towards perfection, the world is perfect in every moment.

Posted by: Abdulaziz Alsaif at September 18, 2013 09:32 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 September 2013

Question 201: What does Siddhartha mean that everyone has the Buddha in him?

Answer: Siddhartha is trying to show to Govinda that seeking a goal in finding knowledge is not going to get him anywhere. As Siddhartha explains in the reading, when concentrating on a goal, you start to miss thing in front of you because all you can think of is reaching that goal. He explains to Govinda that both of them are sinner but then again he will be Brahma. He says “No, in the sinner, now and today the future Buddha already exists, his future is already entirely here, you must revere the becoming, the potential, the hidden Buddha in him, in yourself, in everyone.” (Siddhartha 112). He says that the world is not imperfect, not to be seen as on a slow path towards perfection, the world is perfect in every moment.

Posted by: Abdulaziz Alsaif at September 18, 2013 09:32 AM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 September 2013


Question #205: What happens when Govinda kisses Siddhartha?

When Govinda comes back to Siddhartha, he realizes that Siddhartha how now become enlightened, and asks for explanation on how to reach this ultimate goal. However, Govinda is not satisfied with the explanation he receives from Siddhartha. After trying this Siddhartha shows Govinda without the use of words, but through a kiss. From this Govinda is able to achieve the ultimate goal (enlightenment), which would not have been possible had Siddhartha tried to force his wisdom on him through words.

Posted by: Matt Ncholson-Lewis at September 18, 2013 09:45 AM

Christopher Holtzhower
ENG 210 CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
18 September 2013
“The world, my friend Govinda, is not imperfect, or on a slow path towards perfection: no, it is perfect in every moment.”
Question #207: Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there aremany translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.\
Answer: In this quote, Siddhartha is talking to Govinda, explaining to him that all the imperfect things in the world make it perfect. He also says that everything that happens has a reason, even if it is good or bad. Also, everything has something good, and bad about it. Siddhartha explains this while talking to Govinda, “Every sin already contains grace within it, all little children already have an old person in them, every infant has death within it, and all dying people have within them eternal life (Hesse 111).”

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at September 18, 2013 09:51 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
9 September 2013

Question 8: “What is Siddhartha’s opinion of the Ferryman and of the river? What is the significance about this?”

Answer: Siddhartha first conveys his opinion of the river. He simply states that he finds the river beautiful, which he confides to the Ferryman. After he leaves the Ferryman and the river, Siddhartha ponders on his way to the village. At first, he simply smiles, remembering and finding happiness in the “friendship and the kindness of the ferryman.” (37). He compares the Ferryman to Govinda and continues to compare all who he meets to Govinda. Because Siddhartha finds all people like his first and best friend, there is significance in the idea that Govinda does, in fact, hold a very important role in this story.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at September 18, 2013 10:20 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
11 September 2013

Question 123: “Explain the significance of Kamala’s pregnancy. What is the relation of this fact to the last trip?”

Answer: Kamala makes a life changing decision to “receive no more visitors,” or in other words, make love to any other men (61). She has made herself completely committed to Siddhartha, regardless of whether or not he is still in her life. Eventually, Kamala learns that she is pregnant with Siddhartha’s child. When Siddhartha entered Kamala’s life, she was a promiscuous woman who always had several lovers. Her pregnancy marks significance in the fact that she has decided to live her life more holly, by giving up her wealthy life and to follow in the teachings of Gotama.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at September 18, 2013 10:22 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
13 September 2013

Question 180: “How does young Siddhartha take advantage of the father?”

Answer: Siddhartha, the father, treats his son with undying patience and love. The boy, unaccustomed to the life of two old ferrymen, is very angry in this situation. He is used to a life of wealth, fine food, and servants (83). In response to Siddhartha’s friendliness, the son refused to do any work or chores, treated his father and Vasudeva with extreme disrespect, and stole from the old Ferryman. This is how the son has taken advantage of his father. Siddhartha has learned the love of a parent to a child. It is unending, and it is pure. This love would rather suffer than to not have the love at all.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at September 18, 2013 10:24 AM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

18 September 2013

Question: 189 Siddhartha and Vasudeva listen very, very closely to the river. What do they hear? Why is everything interconnected?

Answer: Siddhartha pays close attention to the river through Vasudeva’s assistance. Vasudeva tells him that the laughter Siddhartha heard previously was not “everything (pg 72”. The river sounded like a song, sung by many voices. Each voice represented different things including: goals, suffering, and pleasure, good and evil. “And all of this together, all the voices, all the goals, all the longing…(pg 73).”
Everything is interconnected because the water cycle the river partakes in is a metaphor for the cycle of life each individual goes through. Our past is connected to our present and future, even if we try to get away. Our experiences make us, and in the end, we have to just accept it.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 18, 2013 10:27 AM

Flavia Vazquez
END 210CL- Love and Desire in Literature
Question 200: How can Nirvana and Samsara be the same?
Answer:
Reincarnation leads to Nirvana, and after some reincarnations, a person would become Nirvana.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at September 18, 2013 10:38 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
17 September 2013
Group 4

Question :As a couple in a romantic relationship, do Kamala and Siddhartha symbolically complete one another (even if only partially)? If so, how? What is
good/beautiful in each of them that the other desires? When Kamala and Siddhartha
are together, are they whole, or is there something still missing? What is it and why ?

As a couple in a romantic relationship Kamala and Siddhartha symbolically complete one another. Kamala and Siddhartha show love in one way through Siddhartha in the art of physical love. Also as Siddhartha’s lover, Kamala helps him learn the ways of the city and forget about his austere life as a Samana. I believe the couple is a whole because they truly care about each other and want to learn and grow with each other.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at September 18, 2013 10:47 AM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

18 September 2013

Question: 9. As participants in a familial, father-son relationship, do Siddhartha and his Son, Siddhartha, Jr. (?) symbolically complete one another (even if only partially)? If so, how? What is good/beautiful in each of them that the other desires? When the Ferryman and Siddhartha are together, are they whole, or is there something still missing? What is it and why?

Answer: Siddhartha and his son have a very different relationship. Evidently, Siddhartha loves his son, yet his goal of finding enlightenment cannot be found if he has any attachments. Since Love is a form of attachment, Siddhartha has to let go of his son, as he left his father, and his father had to accept to let him go. “Had not his father suffered the same sorrow over him, that he was now suffering over his son..(pg71)” Siddhartha want to understand him and the world in which he is in, whereas his son seeks the comforts of life and living in the city. Due to a conflict of interests and, possible distractions from his goal, Siddhartha feels the need to transcend love, yet his son is a test of wisdom.
Siddhartha gains wisdom from the river and the ferryman, but all this he has achieved without attachment and in the absence of love. Love has been missing, despite the fact that it is an attachment, he needs to accept love for what it is despite the pain that comes with, that is the only way he can accept his destiny and achieve absolution and “serenity of knowledge.”

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 18, 2013 10:50 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 September 2013
Question 204: What does Siddhartha say in response to Govinda when he asks for something to help him?
When Govinda is reunited with Siddhartha, he realizes that Siddhartha has become enlightened and was able to find his path in life. Therefore, Govinda asks Siddhartha what he can do in order to be able to completely fulfill his own journey. Siddhartha responds with, “Wisdom is not communicable,” (Hesse 142). What Siddhartha means by this is that he cannot pass on his wisdom to Govinda because if he were to do so, Govinda would still not understand it because this wisdom was attained based in Siddhartha’s own personal fulfillment and goals. In order for Govinda to be able to gain his own wisdom would be by finding it on his own.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 18, 2013 11:03 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
18 September 2013


Question: What is the symbolism of the stone?
Answer: The symbolism of the stone is that the stone is a representation of nature that can be loved. It is considered to be one of many things that make up life itself; it cannot thoroughly be explained through words but, it can be grasped, felt or embraced as part of nature. As Siddhartha’s metaphorical respsonse to Govinda’s question goes:
“that love this very stone, and the river, and all these things we are looking at and from which we can learn. I can love a stone, Govinda, and also a tree or a piece of bark. This are things, and things can be loved. But I cannot love words. Therefore, teachings are no good for me, they have no hardness, no softness, no colours, no edges, no smell, no taste, they have nothing but words. Perhaps it are these which keep you from finding peace, perhaps it are the many words” (Hesse Kindle)

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 18, 2013 11:21 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA05
18 September 2013

Question 178: “Where does Siddhartha go after his son leaves?”

Answer: After his son runs away, Siddhartha goes to the city to find him, so he, Siddhartha can see his son one more time (Hesse 89).

Question 201: “What does Siddhartha mean that everyone has the Buddha in him”

Answer: When Siddhartha says, “…, in everyone the Buddha which is coming into being, the possible, the hidden Buddha,” on page 100, he is explaining to his old friend, Govinda that everyone has an inner Buddha. The Buddha of an individual is waiting until he or she begins to see the world for what it really is and begins to accept it (Hesse 100).

Posted by: Paula Pion at September 19, 2013 12:02 AM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 September 2013

Question: What is wrong with seeking, according to Siddhartha?

Answer: While Govinda explains that he never stops searching, Siddhartha replies, “ When someone is searching, then it might easily happen that the only thing his eyes still see is that what he searches for, that he is always unable to find anything, to let anything enter his mind, because he always thinks of nothing but the object of his search, because he has a goal, because he is obsessed with the goal. Searching means: having a goal. But finding means: being free, being open, having no goal. You, oh venerable one, are perhapbs indeed a searcher, because, striving for your goal, there are many things you don’t see, which are directly in front of your eyes” ( Hesse 98). Siddhartha makes a valid point. If one is too distracted on the destination, one will never be able to enjoy the journey.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at September 19, 2013 08:39 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
19 September 2013

Question: How does Siddhartha feel about the path that he has taken with his life?

Answer: Siddhartha feels that the path he has taken is very enlightening but he had to think about this for a while to actually come to realization. He joins back with Govinda and tells him about everything since they last saw each other. Siddhartha tells him how he still remains a pilgrim. But Govinda still remains skeptical but still respects Siddhartha.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at September 20, 2013 01:01 AM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
20 September 2013

Question: When Siddhartha looked into the water, what did he see?

Answer: Siddhartha looks into the water and sees that his face in the bank, all the memories that he experienced show up on the water. His life is dancing before him. He basically hears each emotion known to man. But nothing catches up to him, all they hear is word; which is Om.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at September 20, 2013 02:33 AM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-210CL- Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
19 September 2013


Question: # 182. What “wound” does Siddhartha have? What is the different light that he sees people in?


Answer to # 182. A broken heart; because his son said to Siddhartha his father, “You want me to become just like you, just as devout, just as soft, just as wise! I hate you, you are not my father, and if you have ten times been my mother’s fornicator.” The light he sees people in is that everyone has problems; everyone is trying to find peace for himself or herself. Now, Siddhartha values the common folk as much as he values himself

Posted by: Stephanie gilbert at September 20, 2013 10:04 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs


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McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
22 September 2013

I am using the Hilda Rosner Translation.

Question #182: What "wound" does Siddhartha have? What is the different light that he sees people in?

Answer: The "wound" that Siddhartha has is not having the happiness that other parents do with their childeren. "So many people possess this very great happiness- why not I?" (Hesse 105). The different light that Siddhartha sees people in is that he has become one of them. Hesse says that Siddhartha use to see them "not very clever, not very proud and therefore all the more warm, curious and sympathetic." Npw he knows what they go through and feels what they feel.

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Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210-CL

Question: Why does Agathon suggest that it is more intimidating to speak to a small group than a large one?

Agathon suggest it is more intimidating to speak to a small group than a large one. For this character it is easier to speak to a small group rather than a large one because Agathon feels as though the large group would question and put Agathon on the spot. Also, the fact that a large group of people is hard to speak to and control compared to a small group where you would have more control and one- on one- contact with the crowd.

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Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10//14/2013
Love and Desire in Literature Test/Quiz 1 Essay
The concept of love as a biochemical “balance” proposed by Eryximachus is true. In the situation of Kamala and Siddhartha, they were both look for enlightenment and they both happened to meet each other during the middle of their transformation periods. Since they took the time to get to know each other they ultimately learned what the other had been through and it balanced them out. Since it was a balance to them, it did give them the so-called “peace of mind” that they were looking for. Any form of homeostasis will cause a person to be relaxed and at peace. It is during distress, struggle, and fear of the unknown that cause a person to behave erratically. If you do not have a peace of mind, decisions can be harder to make. Eryximachus theory of love points out about homeostasis, not verbatim but the gist of it.
In chapter 5 Siddhartha says “"To tell you this and to thank you for being so beautiful. And if it doesn't displease you, Kamala, I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher, for I know nothing about the art of which you are a mistress” ( Hesse 50). Even though Siddhartha and Kamala come from two different paths in life, he feels that after learning from her he can be more aware of his path to enlightenment. He is willing to sacrifice his time to learn from Kamala.

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 22, 2013 09:14 AM

Why does Siddhartha speak of himself in the third person?

Siddhartha speaks of himself in the third person, in the first chapter because it is the highest form of detachment he can use. Coming from a Buddhist background on a search for higher enlightenment, the third person speech can also be a result of Siddhartha being unsure of whom he is.

Posted by: pietro inglese at January 22, 2014 10:10 AM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
22 Jan 2014

Question #10
“The father realized then that Siddhartha was no longer with him in the place of his birth. His
son had already left him behind” (10). What does this mean and why?

Answer:
Siddhartha’s father realized that Siddhartha had come to the conclusion to go and live with the Samanas. Siddhartha wanted to leave his family, the Brahman, by staying up all night and standing in the same spot showed Siddhartha’s father he was ready to move into the forest and become a Samana. When Siddhartha’s father looked into his eyes, Siddhartha was already in the forest.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at January 22, 2014 04:34 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
23 January 2014

QUESTION #2:
Govinda's "wish was to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, splendid one." Why is Govinda willing to follow Siddhartha?

ANSWER:
According to the text, Govinda "loved him more than anyone else." (Hesse 2). Govinda literally loved everything that Siddhartha did: "He loved the way he walked, his complete grace of movement; he loved everything that Siddhartha did and said, and above all he loved his intellect, his fine ardent thoughts, his strong will, his high vocation." (Hesse 2). It is clear with this evidence that Siddhartha has impacted Govinda's life in such a way that Govinda admires Siddhartha as much as he does. Govinda's endless admiration and loyalty toward Siddhartha is one reason why Govinda is willing to follow Siddhartha.

"And if he ever became a god, if he ever entered the All-Radiant, then Govinda wanted to follow him as his friend, his companion, his servant, his lance bearer, his shadow." (Hesse 2). Clearly, Govinda is willing to follow Siddhartha because he is convinced that one day Siddhartha will become a god, a rank of life that Govinda will never attain. Since Siddhartha is capable of becoming a god one day, Govinda respects and admires this fact about Siddhartha and is willing to follow Siddhartha wherever he goes.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at January 23, 2014 09:01 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love &Desire in Literature
January 23, 2014

Question #15:
“Siddhartha saw a single goal: “to be empty” what does this mean and why? What happens when he reaches that goal?

Answer:
Siddhartha wanted to be empty meaning not himself. He wanted to be free from all forms of commotion, he wanted to show no more signs of anxiety or any other emotion. The ability to feel so empty that he was able to escape the world. However, this does not happen. Siddhartha learns that him being empty could not come from all the agony of the world. Mainly because as soon as he escape “himself” and what he felt was a permanent thing he discovered it was only temporary, and all the suffering would come right back.

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at January 23, 2014 09:18 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire
23 January 2014


Question#1
“Siddhartha had begun to harbor discontent.”Why is Siddhartha unhappy? Why is his spirit like a“waiting vessel”?

Answer:
Siddhartha was unhappy for several reasons, he was starting to feel that the love he gets from his mother, father, and his friend Govinda will not always make him happy. Siddhartha started to feel discontent within himself; and he knows they cannot always provide him with peace, satisfy, and suffice. “He had begun to feel that the love of his father and mother, and also the love of his happy, give him peace, satisfy, and suffice him (Hesse 5).”
His spirit was like a “waiting vessel” because “his intellect was not satisfied, his soul was not at piece, and his heart was not still (Hesse 5)” The ablutions were good, but they were water; they did not wash sins away, they did not relieve the distressed heart (Hesse 5).In other words, Siddhartha’s spirit was so still and distressed that it felt like his soul will never gain happiness therefore it was compared to a “waiting vessel.”

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at January 23, 2014 02:52 PM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 LOVE AND DESIRE IN LITERATURE
23 January 2014

Question #17
What frustrates Siddhartha?

Answer

Siddhartha’s frustrations are being developed in a sense that he believed that the samanas where going to help him find himself. He starts to realize that not even the Samanas have everything figured out, that being in his eyes. The way the Samana's live, is not a flawless system His frustration is created by a lack of patience, time will surely help Siddhartha with his problem. Siddhartha’s mind is great. He is wise, he knows exactly what he wants, and will set forth to find his source of enlightenment.

Posted by: Devon Bell at January 23, 2014 06:35 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
January 23, 2014

Question #18
“Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might have learned
more quickly and simply. In some bar in a street full of whores, my friend, among the cart
drivers and dice players, I might have learned these things." What does this mean and why?

Answer:
While Govinda and Siddhartha have a discussion about being in the Samana’s, Siddhartha makes the comment; “Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might have learned more quickly and simply. In some bar in a street full of whores, my friend, among the cart drivers and dice players, I might have learned these things.” This conversation between the two friends began by Siddhartha asking Govinda “how do you think did we progress? Did we reach any goals?” Since the two have been with the Samanas they have learned the meaning of fasting, meditation, and what is holding one’s breath. Siddhartha feels that all of this that they are learning is a short escape from the body, the agony of one’s life. Siddhartha feels that they could instead be learning what the Samanas are teaching them from conventional people rather than learning it from the Samanas because it is normal for everyone in the world to know how to meditate and hold your breath. I feel that Siddhartha would much rather want to learn the religion and regular activities of the Samanas instead of learning ordinary things that he could learn from an ordinary person.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at January 23, 2014 07:32 PM

Rosa Esquivel


Dr. B. Lee Hobbs


ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA 01


23 January 2014


QUESTION# 11:


Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) what is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ front he version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.




ANSWER:


The father of Siddhartha is one speaking in this passage, and he is speaking to Siddhartha. The father of Siddhartha is hurt because he made the decision join the ascetics to become a Samana. The father is disappointed because he was expecting Siddhartha to follow in his steps and become a Brahmin. After talking to his father about his decision Siddhartha stayed up all night being upset because his father did not approve. In this conversation, the father then realizes that Siddhartha cannot stay with him forever; Therefore he allows him to go about his way and gives him the option to come back if he found disillusionment in the forest. The passage in my book was the same as in the homework question, and I found it on page 11.

Posted by: Rosa Esquivel at January 23, 2014 08:51 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love & Desire in Literature
January 23, 2014

Question: Who is Gotama? What does the narrator think of him?

Answer: Gotama is known as the “Illustrious One” who Siddhartha looks up to. Gotama is basically Siddhartha’s mentor, informing him on various outlooks that differ from his own. In Chapter 2, Gotama and Siddhartha discuss the idea of inspiration and how it relates to self-realization. The narrator thinks of Gotama as an extremely insightful guidance counselor who has great potential in helping Siddhartha find his inner self. From this Chapter I can infer that Gotama is going to have a tremendous impact on Siddhartha's actions and way of thinking.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at January 23, 2014 09:01 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
23 January 2014

Question #5

Why, do you suppose, Siddhartha’s mother doesn’t have more of a role in the decision?

ANSWER:
During that time, the culture and women’s input on family decisions was completely different from today. It was a patriarchal society where the women had no authority to oppose against their husband’s ideas. Since the father was the head of the house, Siddhartha’s mother had nothing to say about his decision joining the Samanas. When Siddhartha wanted to leave the house, he said to his father, “Whit your permission, my father. I came to tell you that it is my longing to leave your house tomorrow and go to the ascetics. My desire is to become a Samana. May my father not oppose this” (Hesse 9). In this passage, the importance of the role of Siddhartha’s father is evident, while his mother’s role was not even present.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at January 23, 2014 09:21 PM

Chris Lavie
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature
22 January 2014

QUESTION #12:
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage , i.e, what is going on exactly, here?

ANSWER:
In this passage, the person who is speaking seems to be the narrator of this novel. From the beginning of the story, the narrator talks to us, the readers about the protagonist’ situation from page 5 to page 7. In page 8, we finally can see Siddhartha, the protagonist having a conversation with his friend Govinda: “Govinda, my dear, come with me under the Banyan tree, let’s practice meditation.” (Hess 8).
The narrator explains us how Siddhartha is an enlightened man who followed the path of wise men called “Brahmans” in order to find the indestructible part of one’s own self: the Nirvana. However, Siddhartha cannot find even with the teachings of the Brahmans. It seems that this part is beyond our human senses and our own consciousness.
Thus, we can think that Siddhartha is not happy with his life that love is not a source of joy (Hess 6). Siddhartha seems to be looking for something more profound, much more intense than love and joy put together.

Posted by: christopher lavie ienandy at January 23, 2014 09:41 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA01
24 January 2014

QUESTION #13:
“He had started to suspect that his venerable father and his other teachers, that the wise Brahmans had already revealed to him the most and best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied.”

Answer the following questions about the passage above: (a) Who is speaking? (b) Who is being addressed? (c) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

ANSWER:
(a/b) The narrator (Hermann Hess) is talking to the readers and especially to his friend “Romain Rolland”. (c) Hermann Hess is saying these sentences when Siddhartha is feeling as if he is missing something was missing in his life. Indeed previously, Hess just said: “Siddhartha had started to nurse discontent in himself, (…) would not bring him joy for ever and ever, would not nurse him, feed him, and satisfy him.” (Hesse 6) Siddhartha feels like he learnt everything he could learn from the people around him. That is the reason why he needed to meet new people to teach him a new way of life and starting enjoying life again.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at January 23, 2014 10:34 PM

Hosameddine Elnhemani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire
24 January 2014

Question #14
How does Siddhartha act when he is with the Samanas?

Answer:
Siddhartha as mentioned is loved from everyone. As he also mentioned that, he had realized that the love of his father, mother, and his friend Govinda, does not give him enough joy anymore. Siddhartha had come to inform his father that he will be leaving the house tomorrow, and his main purpose for his journey is to become one of the Samana. The father at first had disagreed with Siddhartha’s idea to become Samana, but Siddhartha is stubborn, kept waiting until his father finally approves it, and tells him “go to the forest and be a Samana.”
On page (13). Siddhartha would spend his whole day with one meal, never cooked. Siddhartha had also fasted for fifteen days. Siddhartha’s main goal is to become empty, empty of thirst, empty of whishing. That being said Siddhartha wanted to become a fully pure person with an understanding that he should help the poor in the streets. Siddhartha as also mentioned in the book that he would learn how to control his breathing, and also learned to calm is heart beats. Siddhartha was also instructed by his Samana to practice meditation, and become familiar with, since it is one of the Samana’s rules. Some of the ways Siddhartha acted while he was with Samana is to practice himself to achieve, and overcome pain, hunger, and suffrage.

Posted by: Hosameddine at January 23, 2014 10:56 PM

Daniella Zacarias

Prof. B Lee Hobbs

Love and Desire in Literature

21.1.2014

Selected Question (#7) Siddhartha - Hermann Hesse
1. What would Siddhartha have done if his father would have said “No” to his request?

Being a well-respected Brahmin, Siddhartha’s father was probably one of the biggest factors in his religious upbringing; however, he was also the first “teacher” to no longer be able to help Siddhartha find the enlightenment he was searching. Had Siddhartha’s father answered him “No,” the son would have died standing with his arms crossed in the same room he asked his father for permission to leave. This strong willed personality trait in Siddhartha is proven in the following conversation between father and son;
"Siddhartha," he spoke, "what are you waiting for?"

"You know what."

"Will you always stand that way and wait, until it'll becomes morning, noon, and evening?"

"I will stand and wait.

"You will become tired, Siddhartha."

"I will become tired."

"You will fall asleep, Siddhartha."

"I will not fall asleep."

"You will die, Siddhartha."

"I will die."

"And would you rather die, than obey your father?"

"Siddhartha has always obeyed his father."

"So will you abandon your plan?"

"Siddhartha will do what his father will tell him to do." (“Chapter 1.”)


Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at January 23, 2014 11:36 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 214 Comparative Literatures II CA01
January 23, 2014


Question #16:

How does Siddhartha meditate?

Answer:
Meditation is a practice in which people train their minds. In order to be totally free Siddhartha looks for interior peace, he does not believe in the world surrounding him anymore. He only eats once a day because he wants to reach a level of meditation where your body does not respond physically to any kind of external senses.
However, Siddhartha way of meditating is not really different from the traditional type. Thus, he meditates according to the Samanas instructions.
The pain he has to go through in order to reach his goal shows how dedicated he is “Silently, Siddhartha exposed himself to burning rays of the sun directly above, glowing with pain, glowing with thirst, and stood there until he neither felt any pain nor thirst anymore”(Hesse 13). He even learned to stop breathing as a proof of his high determination when meditating. Siddhartha meditation does not differ from our traditional meditation. However, his meditation is really intense “Siddhartha sat upright and learned to stop breathing. He learned beginning with the breath, to calm the beat of his heart…” (Hesse 14).

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at January 23, 2014 11:40 PM

What frustrates Siddhartha?

In embarking on this spiritual quest, Siddhartha is eager to reach enlightenment. Upon his trials and tribulations, Siddhartha becomes frustrated because he killed his senses, he killed his memory, and he slipped out of his Self in a thousand different forms yet continues to return to himself in circles. In addition, upon joining the Samanas, Siddhartha finds that the eldest Samana is 60 years old and has not reached enlightenment.

Posted by: Denzel Williams at January 24, 2014 02:02 AM

1. “Siddhartha had begun to!harbor discontent.”Why is Siddhartha unhappy? Why is his spirit
like a “waiting!vessel”?

Siddhartha is unhappy because he feels that there is a void in his spirit that needs to be filled. on page eight it says, "Often it seemed near,the heavenly world, but never he had reached it completely, never he had quenched the ultimate thirst. And among all the wise and wisest men, he knew and whose instructions he had received, among all of them there was no one, who had reached it completely, the heavenly world, who had quenched it completely, the eternal thirst." (Hesse 8). Siddhartha contemplates this right before telling Govinda that he plans to leave and join the Samana.

Posted by: Marie Ryan at January 24, 2014 03:10 AM

Pietro Inglese
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 210CL Love and Desire CA01

Question 52: has Siddhartha come to any realizations in this chapter? how is he different now than before?

Answer:
-Siddhartha has come to the realization that he was unable to find himself because he "trapped in a net of senses" (Hesse 43). He uses this understanding to stop listening to his inner voice, or self conscious, and not let anything influence him from an inward standpoint. This is different from before because he felt like the only way he can find this new path to nirvana was to listen to himself. Now he is letting the external environment guide him on his journey.

Posted by: pietro inglese at January 24, 2014 10:20 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
22, January 2014

Question #9
Given that Govinda Was Siddhartha’s “lance bearer,” speculate about the conditions under which Govinda left home.

Answer:
Being that Govinda is Siddhartha’s best friend and companion, I believe he had left home in order to better follow Siddhartha’s example and find better meaning in enlightenment and spirituality.

“Govinda knew: he would not become a common Brahman, not a lazy official in charge of offerings; not a greedy merchant with magic spells; not a vain vacuous speaker; not a mean deceitful priest; and also not a decent stupid sheep in the herd of many. No, and he, Govinda as well did not want to become one of those tens of thousands of Brahmans. He wanted to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, the splendid.”(Hesse 5).

Through this meaning, I interpret that Govinda had very much admired Siddhartha as well as his motives and search for knowledge whist embarking on his own search for spiritual enlightenment. “Siddhartha was thus loved by everyone. He was a source of joy for everybody, he was a delight for them all” (Hesse 6). Like most of the Brahmans, Govinda had an admiration for Siddhartha as well. Intending to follow in his footsteps because Siddhartha showed a sense of individuality that was rare in this old world of tradition especially in the family. This, I believe would influence Govinda in joining Siddhartha on his forthcoming journey.

Posted by: Peter Grana at January 24, 2014 10:42 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 January 2014

QUESTION #41:
Explain in your own words the seeming contradiction in Buddha's doctrine of causality as described by Siddhartha. If all events, including mental events are caused, how can any action be considered right or wrong?

ANSWER:
Quoth Siddhartha, "O Illustrious One, in one thing above all have I admired your teachings. Everything is completely clear and proved. You show the world as a complete, unbroken chain, an eternal chain, linked together by cause and effect" (Hesse 26). Here, Siddhartha compliments and admires the fact that the Buddha was victorious by discovering the unbroken chain of being, regarding causes and their effects.

However, Siddhartha finds a flaw in his teachings: "But according to your teachings, this unity and logical consequence of all things is broken in one place. Through a small gap there streams into the world of unity something strange, something new, something that was not there before and that cannot be demonstrated and proved: that is your doctrine of rising above the world, of salvation" (Hesse 26). Siddhartha here points out the contradiction asking a question regarding the method of attaining enlightenment. Siddhartha asks Gotama: How it is possible to embrace enlightenment when Gotama's doctrine specifies that one must overcome the physical world? (Hesse 26).

If all events, including mental events are caused, the path between right and wrong is based solely on oneself. For example, Siddhartha's decision to journey on his own to attain enlightenment. He did not believe that Gotama's journey to enlightenment was successful, therefore he thought it was the right decision to journey by himself to seek the truth.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at January 26, 2014 04:17 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 January 2014

QUESTION #61:
What separates Govinda and Siddhartha at the beginning of this chapter?

ANSWER:
In this chapter, Govinda the loyal companion of Siddhartha chooses to stay with Gotama: “Siddhartha left the grove, where the Buddha, the perfected one, stayed behind, where Govinda stayed behind” (Hess 30). We can see that Govinda made his decision and decides to follow the teachings of Buddha. On the other hand, Siddhartha thinks that the absolute truth can be reached through experience and acceptance of himself, as Siddhartha. (Hess 32).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at January 26, 2014 05:03 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
27 January 2014

QUESTION #31:
How is Gotama different from Samanas ?

ANSWER:
Well first the Samanas had identified Gotama from his appearance, in which Gotama could be recognized by his perfection, and clamminess.(Hesse 23) Samanas had the ability to recognize Gotama from the first look, in which Gotama had no desire, no imitation, no effort to be seen, only light and peace.(Hesse 24) Siddhartha and Govinda had followed Gotama on the way back returning from town. Gotama had not eaten enough food that would satisfy a bird’s appetite (Hesse 24.) Gotama is different from Samanas. Gotama’s goal is salvation from suffering (Hesse 27.) This was what Gotama had answered, and taught Siddhartha. Samana’s have taken refuge in the teaching, and have set their goals to reach salvation, and that is what they want. Gotama respects his dear brothers Samanas, and he wishes that they would continue their path to salvation.

Posted by: Hosameddine at January 26, 2014 05:20 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
26 Jan 2014

Question #54
When Siddhartha "awakes" from his dream, what does he see for the first time?

Answer:
Siddhartha awakes from his dream and acts like he is seeing the world for the first time. "Beautiful was the world, colourful was the world, strange and mysterious was the world" (Hesse 31). Siddhartha saw that the world was full of colors and was beautiful with rivers and mountains.He realized that there were things in the world that he had not seen and was ready to lead is life through his eyes and follow is own way.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at January 26, 2014 07:20 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA 01
27 January 2014

QUESTION #53:
What is the “self”? Why has it occupied Siddhartha so?

ANSWER:
The self is one’s desire to be or want certain things. Siddhartha processes in his mind that the self was the character and nature which he desired to learn from teachers and teachings (Heese, 38). The self is what was stopping Siddhartha from knowing the great secret because the self comes with thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure, and sorrow (Heese, 14). The self has occupied Siddhartha because he realizes that knowing the self and being his own pupil he will learn from himself and the secret of Siddhartha (Hesse, 39). Siddhartha goes about his way to know himself and be alone, this way he can completely understand the self (Hesse, 41).

Posted by: Rosa Esquivel at January 26, 2014 08:03 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Prof. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
24.1.2014
Question #57
As a Samana, Siddhartha says that as he sought Atman in meditation, he lost his self. Is this different from conquering his self? Is it different from freeing his self?

Siddhartha says that in his search seeking Atman (the self), he lost himself; this means that by following others, he lost contact with his true self. The teachings of wiser men helped him become wiser; however, their teachings would always be irrelevant to the Atman because the Atman is something he must do alone. In order to find himself, he must break away from others, their ideas, teachings, etc.

This moment of realization, of "awakening," is pin-pointed when Siddhartha's thoughts go back to his father's teachings;

"Now he was only Siddhartha, the awakened; otherwise nothing else." (Hesse, 33).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at January 26, 2014 08:56 PM

Meshayla Williams
Dr B.Lee Hobbs
ENG210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 January 2014

Question#39.
What needs to be renounced in order to follow Buddha? From a psychological point of view,
Why would these sacrifices be required?

Answer#
There was several of things that needed to be renounced in order to follow Buddha, as far as; friends, family, and surroundings. “You have renounced home and parents, you have renounced origin and property, you have renounced friendship” (Hesse 30).


In a psychological view these things are a massive sacrifice because following Buddha has everything to do with mind and control which is all in a psych interpretation. Siddhartha stated to Govinda, “you know belong to Buddha’s holy men” (Hesse 30). This gives the impression as Siddhartha mentally giving himself to Buddha and following him; and psychology thinking separating himself from family and friends will be a good sacrifice for his mission to follow Buddha.

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at January 26, 2014 09:50 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 January 2014

Question #33
Why does Govinda choose to join him? Why won’t Siddhartha join him?
Answer:
For a while now Siddhartha and Govinda have waited to walk in the path of salvation. They’ve made sacrifices together by leaving the Brahman’s and going to the Samana tribe. Throughout the journey Govinda has only made decisions based on whether or not Siddhartha wanted to do the same. Now they have gone to find “Gotama, who taught the teachings of suffering, of the origin of suffering and of the way to relieve suffering”(Hesse 24). When the night had fallen, many pilgrim’s stepped forward and asked to be accepted into the community. While doing so, Govinda also stepped forward and said: “I also take my refuge in the exalted one and his teachings, and he asked to be accepted into the community of his disciples and was accepted”(Hesse 25). Govinda chose to be a part of the tribe because he has heard the teachings and has taken refuge in it. Govinda did not want to continue waiting to walk the path of salvation so he decided to join them. Siddhartha on the other hand did not join them because being such a good friend of Govinda’s, Govinda has finally matured to take this big step by himself, without his friend Siddhartha. Siddhartha is so proud of Govinda for taking his own path that he would rather watch Govinda’s success by his self rather than Govinda having success because Siddhartha had it. Siddhartha’s words to Govinda were; “I wish that you would go it up to its end, oh my friend, that you shall find salvation!”(Hesse 25) This is why Siddhartha did not join him.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at January 26, 2014 09:52 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
26 January 2014

Question #56

In the context of this chapter, what is the difference between “my self” and “myself”? Does Siddhartha make sense when he is says he tried to “free my self” from “myself”?

ANSWER:

Siddhartha expresses himself in the chapter, "Truly, no thing in this world has kept my thoughts thus busy, as this my very own self, this mystery of me being alive, of me being one and being separated and isolated from all others, of me being Siddhartha! And there is no thing in this world I know less about than about me, about Siddhartha!" (Hesse, 30)

This statement provides an interpretation of Siddhartha's quest, because it is the first time he considers the Self as a solitary unity apart from the substratum of Atman to which the ego is attached. He has sought that which unites him with all things instead of that which marks him as distinct, as Siddhartha. Siddhartha admits that while seeking Brahman, Atman he loses himself on the way.

When Siddhartha talks about "myself", I perceive it as he is talking about his personality, how he is as a person. Therefore, "my self" is the Brahman, Atman that he is seeking for, and wants to reach. To “free my self from myself”, is the progress and the way of finding what he is looking for, enlightenment.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at January 26, 2014 10:15 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
27 January 2014

QUESTION #58:
Siddhartha promised his father that he would return home. Why did Siddhartha decide not to return?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha promised his father that he would return home, but we can see that, in this chapter, Siddhartha is not returning home: “started to proceed swiftly and impatiently, heading no longer for home” (Hesse 33). To me, this chapter was like a rebirth for Siddhartha: “He, who was indeed like someone who had just woken up or like a new-born baby” (Hesse 32). He realized that his whole life he was taught a lot about all kind of things, but no one did teach him anything about himself. He did not know whom he was: “I know nothing about myself” (Hesse 30), and he thought that the way to enlightenment was to learn/understand who Siddhartha is. In short, he did not return home because he was a new person, and he had no family anywhere.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at January 26, 2014 11:25 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA 01
26 January 2014

Question:"It was the self, I wanted to free myself from, which I sought to overcome." Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a) Who is speaking?, (b) Who is being addressed, (c) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly here. This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: In the version i have this quoted passage can be found on page 30. In this passage Siddhartha is walking out of the forest where the Buddha is. He has just finished telling him why he chooses not to follow him in the path to enlightenment. While walking in the forest Siddhartha begins to wonder what he sought from the teachings and teachers he has listened to. Siddhartha realizes that while he has learned much from all theses teachers, he knows nothing about himself. In proof of this he says, "But i did not overcome it, could only deceive it, only flee from it, only hide from it" (Hesse 30). Siddhartha also says, "And there is no thing in the world i know less about than about me, about Siddhartha" (Hesse 30)

Posted by: Marie Ryan at January 26, 2014 11:27 PM

Siddhartha is researching the ultimate enlightenment. Therefore, his encounter with the Buddha is primordial. Compare to the other followers the Buddha has Siddhartha understands that the teachings of the vulnerable one would not influence him at all. Therefore, he decides to keep seeking for experience. He underlines the idea that wisdom can not gain without knowledge.

But the meeting with the Buddha is decisive in his personal progression both in positive and negative angles “He has deprived me of my friend, the one

Who had believed in me and now believes in him, who had been my shadow

And is now Gotama's shadow. But he has given me Siddhartha, myself” (Hesse 29). In definitive, the Buddha took Siddhartha’s friend but gave him the opportunity to focus on his goal.

On the other hand, it does not bother these holy men to beg for living because, in our society we usually organize our lives in order to have stable and good economic situation. But it is important to underline how the monks think differently. They beg for living because they are not insecure by their future compare to the majority of us.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at January 26, 2014 11:28 PM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
26 January 2014
Question #50:
What made Siddhartha shiver inwardly like a small animal? Why?
Answer:
Siddhartha shivered inwardly like a small animal at the thought of him being completely alone without belonging to anything. He felt like he now was a “new born baby” (Hesse 32). He felt like for years he was a part of something and now that he left all that behind him with the discovery he now was “nothing but Siddhartha, the awoken one, nothing else was left” (Hesse 32).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at January 27, 2014 12:54 AM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
26 January 2014

Question: Why did Siddhartha knowingly relate to Govinda the false statement, “Very good are the teachings of the exalted one, how could I find fault in them?”

Answer: In chapter three of Siddhartha, he is continuing to seek enlightenment and self-realization with his friend Govinda. They travel a great distance to hear the Buddha’s wondrous teaching which results in Govinda himself becoming a follower of Buddha. Excitedly, Govinda tells Siddhartha he has become a follower and assumes Siddhartha was going to do the same. Unfortunately, for him, this is not the case. Siddhartha replied saying that it was about time Govinda made a life-changing move for himself without the influence of anyone else. He then proceeds to tell him he will be leaving him the following day to continue his journey. Instead of telling Govinda his thoughts on Gotama, he tells him, “The Exalted One’s teaching is excellent; how should I find a flaw in it?” (Hesse 26).
Although Siddhartha says this to his best friend, he does not mean it. He says this false statement because Govinda finally has made a decision for himself that could potentially be the correct move for him. Everyone is different. Yes, Siddhartha believes Gotama is a great teacher and leader but does not see himself as being one of his disciples. I believe his says this to assure Govinda that he should stay because it is the right choice for him personally without anyone else’s influence.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at January 27, 2014 12:55 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
English 210CL Love and Desire
27 Jan 2014

Question #06
"Why did Siddhartha remain standing? Why didn't he just leave? Did Siddhartha’s father allow
him to leave because, in a sense, Siddhartha had “already left”?

Answer:

Siddhartha, was determined to show to his father his passion in becoming a Samana. After seeing this, his father gave him permission. At first he did not allow Siddhartha to leave, but after seeing how determined his son was he allowed it. He realized Siddhartha was going to do this no matter what.

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at January 27, 2014 01:24 AM

Brianne M. Waller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
27 January 2014

Question #1:
“Siddhartha had begun to harbor discontent.” Why is Siddhartha unhappy? Why is his spirit like a “waiting vessel?”

Answer: Siddhartha has begun to think that the love of his parents and his friend Govinda is not always going to be enough. Siddhartha searches for answers and decides he wants to leave and live with the Samanas. Siddhartha tells his father and has to wait for the approval of the Brahmin, who eventually grants his wish. He is said to be a “waiting vessel” because his mind and body would not be fulfilled by staying in his village, making him a “waiting vessel”.

Posted by: Brianne M. Waller at January 27, 2014 01:26 AM

Kara K. Marino
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210cl Love and Desire in Literature
26 January 2014

QUESTION #24
Explain Siddhartha’s discovery that there are many ways to lose the self. Why are they all tricks?

ANSWER
Siddhartha learns many new ways to lose the self. He feels that all the activities that he has done for training with the Samanas had the ultimate goal to lose the self. "It is fleeing from the self, it is a short escape of the agony of being a self, it is a short numbing of the senses against the pain and pointlessness of life"(Hesse 15). Siddhartha feels that he has not succeeded in the loss of self, and that all the things done such as fasting and holding one's breath are trickery because they are only temporary. He says,"It's true that a drinker numbs his senses, it's true that he briefly escapes and rests, but he'll return from the delusion, finds everything to be unchanged, has not become wiser, has gathered no enightenment,-has not risen several steps" (Hesse 16) Siddhartha finds that after the activities, he has gained no more enlightenment than a baby in a womb.

Posted by: Kara K. Marino at January 27, 2014 02:27 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 January 2014

Questions #34
According to Siddhartha, how will he find enlightenment?

Answer
Siddhartha feels the need to find enlightenment on his own. He is one who believes that no one can teach another to find this personal happiness that being in his case. That is why I am going on my way-not to seek another and better doctrine, for I know there is none, but to leave all doctrines and all teachers and to reach my goals alone-or die. (Hesse 34). The help of another person shows little benefit to Siddhartha, for he is independent. He has a strong desire to discover himself in his own time and fashion. The Buddha helps Siddhartha realize that he can truly become a man who posse’s enlightenment. A man only walks like that when he has conquered his self. I also will conquer myself (Hesse 35). Speaking about the Buddha, Siddhartha in a way envies him, a man with great character he is. Siddhartha understands that he must simply find a way by his lonesome. Help in his eyes is pointless; no teaching from another man will give him an advantage. He dwells in enough knowledge to complete this quest with the help from no one.

Posted by: Devon Bell at January 27, 2014 03:22 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire In Literature CA01
27 January 2014

Question #51: What does Siddhartha decide to study? How is that one field he has been ignorant in?

Answer: In Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha, the main character Siddhartha has decided not to be a shramana or a follower of Buddha. Instead, Siddhartha makes the choice of studying himself (Hesse 34). This man mentions, “In the school of myself I want to learn, that is where I want to be a pupil, I want to get to know myself, the secret that is Siddhartha” (Hesse 34). However, Siddhartha is ignorant in this field since it seems to be that he tried to not allow himself to learn certain information (Hesse 35). Siddhartha mentions, “I have, for the sake of a previously imagined meaning, held these signs and letters in contempt, calling the world of appearances deception, calling my eye and my tongue themselves contingent an worthless appearances” (Hesse 35). This statement shows that Siddhartha must not have allowed himself to open himself up to information since he did not think his own features were valuable (Hesse 35). Therefore, he is ignorant in the field of himself.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at January 27, 2014 07:45 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
24, January 2014
Question #55
In this chapter, Siddhartha experiences a “profound feeling of awakening from long
dreams.” Compare this to his time as a Samana; by contrast, how is Siddhartha now “awakened”?

Answer:

When Siddhartha had left his life as a Brahman to engage in the aescetics of the Samanas, Siddhartha’s first real experience outside the Brahman world let him see things in a different way and live a different life. “Siddhartha learned a lot when he was with the Samanas, many ways leading away from the life he learned to go” (Hesse 23). Prior to his awakening, Siddhartha’s search for wisdom and truth first lead him to different ways a former son of a noble Brahman priest wasn’t ever exposed to. Siddhartha’s first insights found new perspective in the ways of the Samanas. “He went the way of self-denial by means of pain, through voluntary suffering and overcoming pain, hunger, thirst, tiredness. He went the way of self-denial by means of meditation, through imagining the mind to be void of all conceptions” (Hesse 23). Through this, Siddhartha’s experiences and perspective of life had changed because of his toleration of pain through begging and fasting through the damage of pain, relieving himself of his prior noble heritage. By now, Siddhartha’s new awakening since leaving he teaching of both the Samanas as well as the Buddha, Siddhartha first comes to the realization of how free he is of all past convictions. “Slowly walking along, Siddhartha pondered. He realized he was no youth anymore, but had turned into a man” (Hesse 61). Realizing the feedom and entrance into man hood his “awakening” from his former life prompted him to see an entirely new perspective. “When someone reads a text, wants to discover it’s meaning, he will not scorn the symbols and letters and call them deceptions, coincidence, and worthless hull, but he will read them, he will study and love them letter by letter” (Hesse 65,66).

Posted by: Peter Grana at January 27, 2014 09:24 AM

Pietro Inglese
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL - LOVE AND DESIRE IN LITERATURE
27 January 2014

Question 88:
Hesse uses a simile to describe the woman’s (Kamala’s) mouth. What is it? What does that
say about the woman?

Answer :
When Hesse uses a smile to describe Kamala’s mouth as a “freshly cut fig” (Hesse 49). This tells the reader that Kamala can tempt someone in this case the temptation is about Love. An important quote drawn from this meeting was “try to kiss them against Kamala’s will, and not one drop of sweetness will you obtain from them” (Hesse 49) which tells the reader you must earn the desire of Kamala before caving to your desires.

Posted by: pietro inglese at January 27, 2014 10:03 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
27 January 2014
Question #85:
Who does Siddhartha encounter by the water and retreat from because his inner voice says, “No!”?
Answer:
Siddhartha greeted a young woman by the side of the stream. In the text it says “a young woman was kneeling and washing clothes... when Siddhartha greeted her she lifted her head and looked up to him with a smile” (Hesse 38). It later goes on to explain how he felt a desire from the young lady but this inner voice led him to refusal. “The voice if his innermost self, and this voice said NO. Then, all charms disappeared from the young woman’s face he was no longer saying anything else” (Hesse 38).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at January 27, 2014 10:17 PM

William Lee Fumero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
22 Jan 2014

Question #48:
“What does Siddhartha leave in the grove with the Buddha and Govinda?”

Answer:
He leaves behind his former self, the self that existed before his encounter with the Buddha and his time with the samanas. In order to obtain more wisdom and become more proficient in the sacred teachings, he leaves behind whatever of his former life he had to become a more knowledgeable individual through peace.

Posted by: William Fumero at January 28, 2014 12:27 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
28 Jan. 2014

Question: Kamala asks Siddhartha to act a certain way toward Kamaswami. How does she want him to act and why is/will this be important? Does he heed her advice? was Kamala right?

Answer: Kamala wants Siddhartha to be polite, smart, and not too modest toward Kamaswami. In support of this she says, "Be smart, brown Samana. Be polite towards him, he is very powerful. But do not be too modest!" (Hesse 45). The actions of Siddhartha are important because Kamaswami is a powerful merchant that can help Siddartha be more accepted by Kamala. Kamala was right because Siddhartha listened to her advice was treated as Kamaswami's equal. On page 49 Siddhartha says, "And thinking of Kamala's words, he was never subservient to the merchant, forced him to treat him as his equal, yes even more than his equal" (Hesse 49).

Posted by: Marie Ryan at January 28, 2014 01:59 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire In Literature CA01
28 January 2014

Question: When Siddhartha dreams of Govinda, into what is Govinda transformed? Why is this important?

Answer: In the beginning of the chapter entitled “Kamala,” Siddhartha is looking at and thinking about nature, and he thinks about Guatama as well (Hesse 39-41). After this thinking, Siddhartha goes to sleep and has a dream containing Govinda; Govinda becomes a woman during the dream (Hesse 41). At the start of the dream, Govinda expresses that he is upset that Siddhartha has gone away from him, and “while he drew him to his breast and kissed him, it ceased to be Govinda, rather it was a woman” (Hesse 41). Hesse continues to speak about Siddhartha’s dream, saying Siddhartha drank from the woman’s breast (Hesse 41). The transformation of Govinda into a woman and Siddhartha’s being so enticed by this woman’s body point to the changes that happen concerning how Siddhartha feels and acts towards women he thinks are attractive. Siddhartha has an encounter with a woman who is washing clothes; he sees her and decides to show her affection in a way that is similar to the action he takes in his dream (Hesse 42-43). When the woman goes to Siddhartha, “he stooped over a little to the woman and with his lips kissed the brown tip of her breast” (Hesse 43). Also, the transformation which occurred in his dream is important because it points to the romantic relationship that will soon begin between Siddhartha and a woman he meets named Kamala.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at January 28, 2014 03:40 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
28 Jan 2014

Question 98: What must Siddhartha have to be "good enough" for Kamala?

Answer:
For Siddhartha to be good enough for Kamala, he needed to shave his beard and put on clean clothes (Hesse 41). His clothes needed to be pretty and he needed pretty shoes. Siddhartha also need to have money in his pouch and to bring gifts for Kamala (Hesse 41).

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at January 28, 2014 04:39 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
28 January 2014

Question #89
How does Siddhartha prepare for Kamala? What does he want from her?
Answer:
Kamala is a famous courtesan of affluent men. Siddhartha felt the desire and felt the source of his sexuality moving; but since he had never touched a woman before, he hesitated for a moment while his hands were already prepared to reach out and touch her. Siddhartha’s words about approaching Kamala were; “I am still a Samana, I am still an ascetic and beggar. I must not remain like this; I will not be able to enter the grove like this” (Hesse 39). Once the evening came around, Siddhartha had made friends with the barber’s assistant. Siddhartha wanted to prepare himself to approach Kamala. The way he prepared for her was; “before the first customers came into the shop, he had the barber’s assistant shave his beard and cut his hair, comb his hair and anoint it with fine oil. Then he went to take his bath in the river” (Hesse 40). Siddhartha does not have clothes, shoes, money or gifts for Kamala, which is what satisfies her. All of the things that Siddhartha has done to prepare for Kamala she is still not satisfied but the main thing that Siddhartha wants from her is for her to teach him the art of love and to become his friend. His words are; “Kamala, I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher, for I know nothing yet of that art which you have mastered in the highest degree” (Hesse 41).

Posted by: Trey Griseck at January 28, 2014 06:22 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
28 January 2014

Question #92 : When Siddhartha kisses a woman for the first time, there is a style change. How so? Why?
Answer: In part two of Siddhartha, he meets a beautiful woman coming into the city named Kamala. It was then from that moment that he knew she would help him. Siddhartha explains, “It was my intention to learn love from this most beautiful of women. From the very moment that I formed this intention, I also knew that I would carry it out. I knew that you would help me—with the first look you gave me at the entrance to the grove, I knew it already” (Hesse 49). After Siddhartha proceeds to kiss Kamala, he instantly experiences something he has never before. From this kiss, Siddhartha discovered an internal feeling that changed his outlook forever. Before the kiss, he had never experienced a woman in this fashion by any means, but after this encounter, he realizes there is more to life and finding himself than he ever thought.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at January 28, 2014 07:14 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
29 January 2014

QUESTION # 79
What reason does Siddhartha realize Gotama/ Gautama sat under the tree?


ANSWER:
Siddhartha had urged Govinda to continue with the long walk that they come aimed at. Many pilgrims and monks were making their way to Jetavana. Siddhartha had realized something about Gotama, which Gotama would sit silently under the tree and observe the people. All the teachings that Gotama had lectured was about salvation, hunger, and suffering. The reason that Siddhartha realized that Gotama is under the tree is to take permission to talk to him. As Siddhartha mentioned, “Yesterday, oh exalted one, I had been privileged to your wondrous teaching.”(Hesse 26.) Siddhartha and Govinda had walked all this way just to hear Gotama’s teachings.

Posted by: Hosameddine at January 28, 2014 07:20 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 January 2014


QUESTION #83:
What is the ferryman’s response when Siddhartha tells him he cannot pay? Why might this be important?

ANSWER:
When Siddhartha tells the ferryman that he cannot pay (Hess 37), the ferryman answers that he knew that Siddhartha would not be able to pay him. Moreover, he expects Siddhartha to pay the next time they will see each other:” You will give me the gift another time” (Hess 37). We can think that Siddhartha will meet that character again, later in the story. Besides that, this passage also shows that Siddhartha has a certain charisma and people like him for whom he is.

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at January 28, 2014 08:13 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
29 January 2014

QUESTION #84:
What had Siddhartha never seen before? What is this important to understanding his character?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha had never paid attention to the nature around him. Indeed: “He saw trees, stars, animal, clouds, rainbows, rocks, herbs, flowers, stream and river” (Hesse 35). This is important because we understand that, before his “rebirth”, he was so focusing on thinking, meditating etc. that he was not able to be aware of the world surrounding him and enjoying simple things such as the view of the moon or the stars.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at January 28, 2014 08:44 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
23 January 2014

Question #96

How are the characters of Siddhartha and Kamala alike? Be specific.

ANSWER:

Siddhartha and Kamala are strongly intertwined and in love with each other. Both characters share a profound sense of openness and new ideas towards others. They are very curious and willing to learn from each other, even though Siddhartha does not prefer to learn from teachers. They are both courageous enough to question their deepest understandings of life and its teachers. Kamala and Siddhartha were both aware of that they could not love like everybody else until they had their son. It was first by then they realized that truly love was awakening within their souls.

"To tell you this and to thank you for being so beautiful. And if it doesn't displease you, Kamala, I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher, for I know nothing yet of that art which you have mastered in the highest degree." (Hesse 41)

This quote from chapter 5, Kamala, shows how much trust and love Siddhartha has towards Kamala. He has never shown a woman these feelings before, suggesting in genuine love. He dares to open up towards her, thanks to all the similarities between them.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at January 28, 2014 09:28 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA 01
28 January 2014

QUESTION #76:
How has Siddhartha’s point of view been modified in this chapter of the novel? How does the writing style of Hermann Hesse show this?

ANSWER:
In this chapter, Siddhartha sounds more confident and seems as though he is determined to do whatever he has to in order to find himself. “He is drawn by his goal, for he does not allow anything to enter his mind which opposes his goal” (Hesse, 60). Siddhartha is convinced that he will be friend Kamala and nothing will stand in his way until he does so. In previous chapters such as With the Samanas, Siddhartha was often skeptical about the path he chose. “He will be seventy and eighty years old, and you and I, we shall grow as old as he, and do exercises and fast and meditate, but we will not attain Nirvana, neither he nor we” (Hesse, 18). Before he chose the path to find himself Siddhartha did not sound satisfied, but now in the chapter the tone is confident and positive. Every new goal he now sets he is going in with a strong mind set. He is completely sure that find himself is what he wants.

Posted by: Rosa Esquivel at January 28, 2014 10:00 PM

Dillon Albury
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
26 January 2014
Question:90
Why might the portrayal of Kamala, in this novel, have echoes of political incorrectness today?
This Would be politically incorrect today because of how sexual she is referred to and how sexual she actually is. This type of behavior can be looked at as scandalous and might cause people to look down on the certain individual. In fact it is surprising to me that it would not be politically incorrect back in 1922 considering how conservative people tended to be in those days.

Posted by: Dillon Albury at January 28, 2014 10:51 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Prof. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
27.1.2014
Question #102
102. When Siddhartha is drawn to a goal, what does he do? What analogy does he use to explain this?
ANSWER:
Siddhartha, when he is drawn to a goal, begins to remember every piece of knowledge before the goal. One example could be;
“Siddhartha remembered all that he had experienced in the garden of Jetavana, the teachings that he had heard there from the holy Buddha, the parting from Govinda and the conversation with the Illustrious On, and he was astonished that he had said things which he did not then really know.” (Hesse, 39).

In regards to what analogy he uses to explain this, I believe he uses a river in order to describe his new sentiments toward his goal. “‘Yes,’ said the ferryman, ‘it is a beautiful river. I love it above everything. I have listened to it, gazed at it, and I have always learned something from it. One can learn much from a river.’” (Hesse, 40)

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at January 28, 2014 11:09 PM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
28 January 2014
Question#80
What dream does Siddhartha see? Will this woman lead him to enlightenment? Explain. Answer:
Siddhartha dreamt about Govinda and a woman; “He dreamt that govinda stood before him, in the yellow robe of the ascetic Govinda looked sad and asked him, “Why did you leave me?” Thereupon he embraced Govinda, put his arm round him, and he drew him to his breast and kissed him, he was Govinda no longer, but a woman and out of the woman’s gown emerged a full breast and Siddhartha lay there and drank….” (Hesse 48).
When Siddhartha woke up from this dream he felt very unusual and intoxicated, the woman does seem to enlighten him because he has never really been around a woman and touched her like he did in the dream. “Siddhartha felt his blood kindle, and as he recognized his dream again at that moment, he stopped a little towards the woman and kissed the brown tip of her breast” (Hesse 50). The woman gave him excitement and he felt like she enjoyed him too.

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at January 28, 2014 11:15 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
English 210CL Love and Desire CA01
29 January 2014

Question #94:

In this chapter, Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. What does he mean?

Answer:
This chapter is the direct consequence of what happened previously. Siddhartha decided to go on his own in order to reach enlightenment. However, he reaches the point where he feels lonely. He misses his family and people he taught will be around him forever.
The comparison he is making with a stone it is a proof of his new start in life. He is not the boy he used to be anymore. He believes enlightenment must be acquired through. I believe he feels unstoppable “His goal attracts him because he does not let anything enter his soul which might oppose the goal” (Hesse 46). The comparison with the stone emphasizes the will Siddhartha has to reach his goal.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at January 29, 2014 01:31 AM

Denzel Williams
Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
29 January 2014

Complete the passage: “To obey no other eternal command __. Nothing else was necessary.”
What does this passage mean?

The entire passage states "To obey no other eternal command, only the voice, to be prepared-that was good, that was necessary. Nothing else was necessary."(Hesse 48). This quote from Siddhartha is in essence renouncing his own desires and motives to perform actions. He is submitting himself to the will of his inner voice or inner conscious almost. Like he explains the Illustrious one "Why did Gotama once sit down beneath the bo tree in his greatest hour when he received enlightenment? He heard a voice, a voice in his own heart which commanded him to seek rest under this tree, and he had not taken recourse to mortification of the flesh, sacrifices, bathing or prayers, eating or drinking, sleeping or dreaming; he had listened to the voice."(Hesse 48). Siddhartha, now accepts this and seeks to embrace himself as a being and simply follow his heart, his inner voice.

Posted by: Denzel Williams at January 29, 2014 03:29 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 January 2014

Question # 95

What is the merchant’s name? What is his role in the story? Is he an ally or a shadow (or, Some other archetype) for the hero of the story?

Answer:

The name of this merchant is. Kamaswami expects you to call on him; he is the richest merchant in the town (Hesse 59). Kamaswami plays the role of Siddhartha’s provider. He is the man who gives to Siddhartha, what he needs and desires in his new way of life. He is a man of the business. Siddhartha greatly benefits Kamaswami. Both men receive positive outlook from one another. This is why Kamaswami is more of a mentor to Siddhartha. Kamaswami, welcomes Siddhartha into his home, and shares his wealth. He helps Siddhartha see a new way of life, which favors him greatly.

Posted by: Devon Bell at January 29, 2014 04:08 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
29 January 2014

QUESTION #75:
"Siddhartha does nothing...he passes through the things of the world like a rock through water, without doing anything, without stirring; he is drawn, he lets himself fall."

Answer the following questions about the quoted passage above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

ANSWER:
(a.) Siddhartha is speaking in third person. (b.) Kamala is being addressed by Siddhartha. (c.) At this time, Siddhartha explains how driven he was to learn about love from Kamala. He uses an analogy to describe when he wants to achieve a goal:

"Listen, Kamala, when you throw a stone into the water, it finds the quickest way to the bottom of the water. It is the same when Siddhartha has an aim, a goal. Siddhartha does nothing; he waits, he thinks, he fasts, but he goes through the affairs of the world like the stone through the water, without doing anything, without bestirring himself; he is drawn and lets himself fall. He is drawn by his goal, for he does not allow anything to enter his mind which opposes his goal" (Hesse 50). His analogy of a stone being thrown into the water greatly exemplifies his drive to learn from Kamala and to also be her friend, and that nothing was going to stop him from doing so.

This translation is slightly different than the one given in the question and can be found on page 50 in Hermann Hesse's translation.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at January 29, 2014 07:12 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
29 Jan 2014

Question #100
What does Siddhartha ask of Kamala? What does he want her to do?

He asks her to teach him about sex and love. No longer wishing to hear teachers such as the Brahmin, Samanas, or the Buddha, who speak of abstract things using the mind, he now wishes to learn using experience and by satisfying his body's desires. He also asked that she would be his mistress, and she accepted after he first had shoes, clothes, and money, and bringing presents of affection.

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at January 29, 2014 07:58 AM

Brianne M. Waller
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire
29 Jan 2014

Question #91
What three things does Siddhartha say that he can do? Why is this important or relevant or irrelevant (or both)?

Answer:
Three things Siddhartha says he can now do our simple; eat, drink, and sleep. I think these are very relevant because 3 seems to be a trending number in this story. Brahman is split into 3 parts, there are also 3 things Kamala wants Siddhartha to learn before she will teach him, and Siddhartha’s life is separated into 3 parts.

Posted by: Brianne M. Waller at January 29, 2014 08:52 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
27, January 2014
Question #87
Who is Kamala and what is her profession? Does Hesse seems to portray this in a negative way? Why is this significant to the story?
Answer:
Kamala is a beautiful & popular city courtesan. She intrigues Siddhartha when they meet for this moment as well as another women he had engaged with prior is his first real exposure to women in the story. While Hesse describes these two encounters, particularly Kamala’s, he doesn’t seem to focus on them in such a negative aspect but rather describes their positive beauty as well as Siddhartha’s curiosity. Paraphrasing, “Siddhartha saw how beautiful she was and his heart rejoiced…With a smile, the beautiful woman nodded for a moment then disappeared into the grove and then the servant as well” (Hesse 82).When meeting Kamala, she asks he why he has come and he retorts with an interesting question, “ ‘To tell you this and thank you for being so beautiful. And if it doesn’t displease you, I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher, for I know nothing of that art of which you have mastered in the highest degree” (Hesse 85,86). Because of her social standing, “respect”, and elegance in the city, it can be perceived, through certain infatuation, Siddhartha hopes to learn to love another both spiritually as well as physically for he had not met a respected woman like Kamala before.

Posted by: Peter Grana at January 29, 2014 09:23 AM

Pietro Inglese
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 210 Love and Desire
29, January 2014

Question 117: What does Kamala teach Siddhartha; or, what does Siddhartha learn from Kamala?
Answer :
Kamala has begun to teach Siddhartha the art of physical love. She has made her living in this age old profession, with her skills she begins to break down Siddhartha’s old ways of being a Samana. Siddhartha begins to learn of what the art of love means and also begins to learn more about the materialistic part of living. From this meeting with kamala, Siddhartha gets a job to pay for his meetings with the courtesan and where he realizes "Here with Kamala lay the value and meaning of his present life, not in Kamaswami's business" (Hesse 66)

Posted by: pietro inglese at January 29, 2014 10:34 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
29 January 2014

Questions:113) "Here with Kamala was worth and purpose of his life not with the business of Kamaswami." Answer the following questions about the quoted passage above: a) Who is speaking? b) Who is being addressed?, c) What is the context of the passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using ( there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: In the version I am using this quotation can be found on page 49. In it the author, Hermann Hesse is talking in regards of Siddhartha. The author is talking about how everyday at a time given by Kamala, Siddhartha would meet with her to continue learning the art of love. In a passage before this quoted passage Hesse writes, "Him, who was, regarding love, still a boy and had a tendency of plunging blindly and insatiably into lust like a into a bottomless pit, him she taught, thoroughly starting with the basics, about that school of thought which teaches that pleasure cannot be taken without giving pleasure, and that every gesture, every caress, every touch, every look, every spot of the body, however small it was, had its secret, which would bring happiness to those who knew about it and unleashed it" (Hesse 49).

Posted by: Marie Ryan at January 29, 2014 07:19 PM

Kara K. Marino
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210cl Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 January 2013

QUESTION #35:
Gotama asks him if his, Gotama’s, followers will also find enlightenment. Siddhartha dodges
this question. How?

ANSWER:
When Siddhartha is asked by Gotama, whether or not his followers will also find enlightenment, Siddhartha dodges the question. Siddhartha says, "Far is such a thought from my mind, I wish that they shall all stay with the teachings, that they shall reach their goal! It is not my place to judge another person's life." I think by this statement Siddartha is dodging answering the question.

Posted by: Kara K. Marino at January 30, 2014 05:47 AM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 January 2014

QUESTION #110:
In both Siddhartha’s business relationship with Kamaswami and in Siddhartha’s love affair with Kamala, there was “giving and taking.” For Siddhartha, there was only meaning and passion in his relationship with Kamala. Did Siddhartha, therefore, envy the childlike people for their imposing meaning and passion on the giving and taking in everyday events? What did he have to say about it?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha does not envy these childlike people for their imposing meaning and passion on giving and taking, instead he loved and despised that fact that these people feel this way. “He saw them toiling, saw them suffer and grow gray about things that to him did not seem worth the price – for money, small pleasures and trivial honors” (Hesse, 70). Siddhartha enjoyed giving and taking he helped those in need and go what he needed in order to win Kamala. Siddhartha talks to Kamala about being different from these people and enjoying being different. “Others have it who are only children in understanding. Most people, Kamala, are like a falling leaf that drifts and turns in the air, flutters, and falls to the ground. But a few others are like stars which travel one defined path: no wind reaches them, they have within themselves their guide and path” (Hesse, 72). Siddhartha does not waste time dwelling on business or whether or not he will make a profit from a transaction; instead he enjoys every transaction whether it is good or bad. Unlike him, these childlike people spend their time putting too much emotion in the transactions they have.

Posted by: rosa esquivel at January 30, 2014 12:20 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
31 January 2014

QUESTION #78
How had Siddhartha previously viewed the world? How does he view the world now?

ANSWER:
In the text as mentioned Siddhartha at first had lived in his father’s house. Siddhartha always had respected his father, but Siddhartha had constantly wanted to go, and search for the meaning of his life. Siddhartha “had started to feel that the love of his father and the love of his mother, and also the love of his friend Govinda, would not bring him joy for ever and ever, would not nurse him, feed him, satisfy him.” (Hesse 6.) This shows that Siddhartha is not in the right place. It appears to me that Siddhartha views the world nowadays differently, whereas Siddhartha and Govinda learned many things from Gotama. Siddhartha also meets Kamala where she changed his life.

Posted by: Hosameddine at January 30, 2014 06:09 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 January 2014

QUESTION #119:
What had Siddhartha learned "amongst the people"? Be specific.

ANSWER:
Siddhartha learned all of the things that people do in the city on a day-to-day basis. "Siddhartha learned how to transact business affairs, to exercise power over people, to amuse himself with women; he had learned to wear fine clothes, to command servants, to bathe in sweet-smelling waters. He had learned to eat sweet and carefully prepared foods, also fish and meat and fowl..." (Hesse 61).

"Gradually, along with his growing riches, Sidhhartha himself acquired some of the characteristics of the ordinary people, some of their childishness and some of their anxiety" (Hesse 62). Siddhartha learns about feelings as well, as an "ordinary person" would. Siddhartha, in general, has learned much about an ordinary life from that of being a Samana.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at January 30, 2014 06:36 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
30 January 2014

Question #115
What does Siddhartha’s inner voice say? How is life “flowing past” him?

Answer:
Kamala has now introduced Siddhartha to the Kamaswami people. Siddhartha realizes that he is very different compared to these people. He realizes that life is moving very fast for him and he is missing out of multiple opportunities in life. “Several times he suddenly became scared on account of such thoughts and wished that he would also be gifted with the ability to participate in all of this childlike-naïve occupations of the daytime with passion and with his heart, really to live, really to act, really to enjoy and to live instead of just standing by as a spectator” (Hesse 53). Siddhartha’s inner self has told him that he is not truly enjoying and taking advantage of the life that he is in. Life is “flowing past” him because he is not getting a chance to experience life, and how to truly live, like the Kamaswami people live in their childlike ways. Siddhartha has never experienced the lifestyle that they are used to living, which is why he feels they are so much different from him, and why he feels that he does not belong.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at January 30, 2014 07:20 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 January 2014


QUESTION #120: What happened when Siddhartha’s property finally became chain and a burden?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha became a successful merchant. He learnt, thanks to Kamaswami, how to trade products. However, gradually, Siddhartha who criticized the childlike people started to be like them. He was trapped into society’s vice, and pleasures: “He had been captured by the world, by lust, covetousness, sloth, and had been captured by that vice he used to mock: greed” (Hess 57). Siddhartha used to see people’s worries as derisory and ridiculous. Nevertheless, he started to find interest in people’s lust, and it contaminated his spirit. “It was since that time, when he had stopped being a Samana in his heart that Siddhartha began to play the game for money […] as a custom of the childlike people, with an increasing rage and passion.” (Hess 57).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at January 30, 2014 09:27 PM

Meshayla Williams
Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love &Desire in Literature
30 January 2014

Question#124 how does Siddhartha’s dice playing echo his real life?

Answer: Siddhartha’s dice playing echo’s his life in several ways, such as having the passion for money and wealth. “He played the game as a result of a heartfelt need” (Hesse 79). Before, he was against gambling and promoted it as dishonest but since he started playing; it gave him excitement about his life and money. “He derived a passionate pleasure through the gambling away and squandering of wretched money” (Hesse 79).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at January 30, 2014 10:05 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
31 January 2014

QUESTION #107:
Why does Siddhartha refer to himself in the third person perspective? For example, he says, “Siddhartha can wait calmly, he know no impatience, he knows no emergence.” Perhaps you could think of the discussion that has already been going about “the self” as part of your answer.

ANSWER:
Siddhartha refers to himself in the third person perspective because he is talking about the “old” Siddhartha, about the Siddhartha from before his rebirth. Indeed, he still does not know who he is and can only speak about the Siddhartha he used to be. We can see that when he talks about the new Siddhartha he uses the first person. For example we can notice his talk about the travel to the village: “I have travelled for amusement (…) I have gotten to know people and places, I have” (Hesse 51).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at January 30, 2014 10:20 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
30 January 2014

Question #128

Explain the main points of Siddhartha’s method of self-analysis?

ANSWER:

Siddhartha uses a method of self-analysis by looking at his personal history. He talks about what had made him happy, what had made him sad. This is a useful process for anyone in such a place in life as Siddhartha is. He tries to explain that we do not need to have materialistic things to live a happy life. Money does not bring happiness!

Siddhartha states, "I have gotten to know people and places, I have received kindness and trust, and I have found friendship (Hesse 51). This passage is trying to get us to understand that living a simple life as he did, is sometimes more instructive and meaningful than living a rich life with everything served.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at January 30, 2014 11:04 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (210 CL)
24.1.2014
Question #108
Question 108:
When Siddhartha arrived in the village after the rice harvest had already been sold, why was it good business, according to Siddhartha AND in spite of Kamaswamis protestation, that he remain in the village for a while and become friends with the people?

ANSWER:
According to Siddhartha if he “[. . .] ever go[es] back there again, perhaps to buy a later harvest, or for some other purpose, friendly people will receive me and I will be glad that I did not previously display hastiness and displeasure.” (Hesse 56). However, it can be assumed that Siddhartha stayed in the village to acquaint himself with good company, not as a merchant but a wise man.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at January 30, 2014 11:36 PM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
30 January 2014
Question #109:
Who or what are the childlike people? What was the one factor that separated Siddhartha from them?
Answer:
The childlike people are the people of the town. The text says “Siddhartha’s interest and curiosity was only concerned with the people” (Hesse 51). He later explains how he “saw mankind going through life in a childlike or animallike manner” (Hesse 52). The only thing that I would say separates him from the childlike people is the fact that his thoughts and way of life is viewed differently from theirs. He saw the whole thing as a game being played. He sees himself as being unable to feel love or joy like everyone else can.

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at January 30, 2014 11:46 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
English 210CL Love and Desire CA01
29 January 2014

Question #93:
Who is the character, Kamaswami? Why is s/he important to the narrative?

Answer:
Kamaswami is the type of person that believes material comfort should be a life goal for every one of us. The element that we have to emphasize here is the fact that Siddhartha accepter to work for a man who valued money and material as an ultimate goal. Kamaswami teaches Siddhartha the art of business and that is the reason this man is important to the narrative.
Siddhartha came into a new world where the most important thing is to make money. However he does not find happiness in that world. The business world does not bring Siddhartha happiness. The business world made him loose his sense of spirituality

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at January 31, 2014 12:46 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 January 2014

Question # 123
Explain the significance of Kamala’s pregnancy. What is the relation of this to the last trip?


Answer:
The significance of Kamala’s pregnancy was that it came at a time in which everything was changing in her life. Siddhartha had left. The same night Siddhartha left his garden and the town and never returned (Hesse). Kamala had developed a better understanding for life. She had realized that there was a better way of living compared to her lifestyle. The pregnancy helps Kamala find her enlightenment in a sense that she realizes she will accept that Siddhartha is gone and live with. This relates to the last trip in a way that, when Siddhartha realizes his time is up, he leaves. The one, who feels that they need him most, loses him. Siddhartha needs to find himself, and will continue to do so, for as long as it takes.

Posted by: Devon Bell at January 31, 2014 12:47 AM


William Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210cl
1/29/14


125.) Why did Siddhartha envy the childlike people?

Answer:
Siddhartha envied the childlike people for one reason, and that was because they had the ability to love. It was stated on page 54 where Siddhartha quotes their ability to love as “their secret” which clearly shows his awareness of that trait and his distorted admiration of it. He was also disdainful of the fact that they showed emotion and reacted to things no samana or monk would respond to, such as lust or money. His curiousity plagued him so much that he truly wished he could understand them, causing him to be envious in turn.

Posted by: William Fumero at January 31, 2014 01:26 AM

Paige Fowler
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
23 January 2014
Question #21:
What does Siddhartha do with the oldest Samana? What does that feat show?
Answer:
Upon leaving the Samana, Siddhartha puts the oldest Samana under a spell to gain control so that he can fulfill his wishes of leaving the Samana. A spell so powerful that the Samana was physically incapable of moving even a bone in his body. "The old man became mute, his eyes became motionless, his will was paralyzed, his arms were hanging down without power, he had fallen victim to Siddhartha spell". (Hesse20) The dictionary defines "feat" as ‘a noteworthy or extraordinary act or achievement, usually displaying boldness, and skill'. Casting a spell on an older Samana is very hard to do, but Siddhartha exemplified the amount of power that he possess and also put into action everything he had learned. "Oh Siddhartha you have learned more from the Samana than I knew. It is hard, it is very hard to cast a spell on an old Samana" said Govinda.(Hesse21) This also shows that Siddhartha abilities were much greater than the older Samana's.

Posted by: paige fowler at January 31, 2014 03:50 AM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
31 Jan 2014

Question 82. What is Siddhartha's opinion of the Ferryman and of the river? What is significant about this?

Answer:
Siddhartha is very found of the Ferryman. The Ferryman allowed him passage for free and said the Siddhartha could pay him at a later date. The Ferryman has learned that on the river everything comes back eventually (Hesse 37). Siddhartha also thinks the river is very beautiful and finds that the Ferryman loves the river more then anything in the world. The significance of this is that with the river, people always return to their past. Siddhartha will end up returning to his father in the long run and return to his past to resurrect his relationships (Hesse 37)

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at January 31, 2014 08:18 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
31 Jan 2014

Question #118
Does Siddhartha have a bad life? Explain. What is good about it? Be specific

Answer:
No, Siddhartha does not have a bad life. However;it has just changed drastically. This is because he has obtained enough wealth to buy his own house, and a garden near the river, just like Kamala did. He also becomes very similar to
Kamaswami. He begins to share her love of money and luxury, too. Also, Kamala remains his only real friend, in spite of his popularity among the townspeople. However; it gets worse when his Samara heart slowly begins to fade away, and Siddhartha forgets the old humble values of "thinking, waiting, and fasting." He begins to eat excessively and begins to enjoy fine clothes and drinking wine. " Due to becoming a part of the material world he now cannot appreciate the environment around him, and cannot see things the way he had before from an outsiders point of view. The quest for Atman has now been forgotten.

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at January 31, 2014 08:33 AM

Brianne M. Waller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL
31 January 2014

Question: Why is Siddhartha’s wealth seen as a burden? Isn’t wealth and prestige what most people seek? What’s the purpose?

Answer: In this village Siddhartha’s wealth is seen as a burden because the monks here have no use for all the wealth that he has. They seek enlightenment and contentment within Gautama. Wealth and prestige is what most people seek, but here wealth is of little importance other than for sufficing for what they need to survive…the bare minimum. Gautama even warns Siddhartha to not seek too much enlightenment. The purpose of this is simple. Wealth will only get in the way of clarity of self that is why Govinda is sad. One because he is leaving his friend, but because he is leaving everything else behind to stay with the monks as well.

Posted by: Brianne M. Waller at January 31, 2014 08:43 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
30, January 2014
Question #112
What makes Siddhartha so good at the art of business? Is he an excellent partner for
Kamaswami? Why or why not?

Answer:
Siddhartha has a more sound and ethical approach to dealing with people which makes him a better candidate for better business. For example his experience with reading and writing impresses the merchant Kamaswami because it is such a rare and useful talent. Paraphrasing, “Siddhartha looked at the scroll, on which a sales-contract had been written down and began reading out it’s contents… ‘Excellent,’ said Kamaswami. ‘And would you write something for me on this piece of paper?’” (Hesse 103,104). He makes an even better partner in business because of his charming demeanor as a business representative with Kamaswami. “’But he has that mysterious quality of those people to whom success comes all by itself, whether this may be a good star of birth, magic, or something he has learned among Samanas. He always seems to be merely playing without business-affairs, they never fully become a part of him, they never rule over him, he is never afraid of failure, he is never upset by a loss’” (Hesse 107). What Kamaswami means to say to his friend is, Siddhartha, even though having no real knowledge of the actual ancient trade concept or basics, he flows an aura of complete confidence in business ventures that makes him very reliable towards a consumer market of the trade.

Posted by: Peter Grana at January 31, 2014 09:20 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
31 January 2014

Question: “Everyone takes, everyone gives; such is life.”

Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above.
(a.)Who is speaking?, (b.)Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using(there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on in your version.
In this chapter, Siddhartha is having his first meeting with Kamaswami, who he is supposed to start working for (Hesse 53-57). Siddhartha is telling Kamaswami that he is a shramana, and he is telling him about how he lived as a shramana, without owning materials (Hesse 53). Siddhartha says, “ . . . I come to you from the shramanas,” and speaking about his lack of needing possessions, he says, “But I gave them up of my own free will, and thus I am in no distress” (Hesse 53). The later statement illustrates how Siddhartha feels about the importance of owning items (Hesse 53-54). Siddhartha, when he says the quoted passage the question is on, is responding to Kamaswami as a part of a discussion in which Kamaswami accused Siddhartha of getting goods from other people but not giving anything back to them (Hesse 53). Siddhartha, before Kamaswami said this, mentions that Kamaswami, as a merchant, makes a living from other people’s possessions (Hesse 53). Siddhartha is letting Kamaswami know that each person gives goods he has in life, but he also gains goods as well (Hesse 54). Siddhartha expresses that this is just how life happens and works (Hesse 54). My pages are according to the New Translation that was done by Rika Lesser.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at January 31, 2014 09:30 AM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
31 Jan 2014

Question #164 Why does Kamala scream out in pain?

Answer:
Kamala was bitten by a small black snake under her dress (Hesse 79).

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at January 31, 2014 12:27 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 January 2014

QUESTION #158:
What does one have to do to conquer all difficulties and evil in the world?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha makes an important discovery from the river that will forever change his life, that is time does not exist. "Was then not all sorrow in time all self-torment and fear in time? Were not all difficulties and evil in the world conquered as soon as one conquered time, as soon as one dispelled time?" (Hesse 88). According to Siddhartha, one must let go of the concept of time completely in order to conquer all difficulties and evil in the world.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at January 31, 2014 04:03 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
1 February 2014

Question:"...did you learn that secret from the river:that there is no time?" Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: a)Who is speaking?, b) Who is being addressed?, c) what is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using ( there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: This quoted passage can be found on page 76 in the W.K. Marriot translation. In this passage Siddhartha is speaking to Vasudeva. Siddhartha is asking him if this is the secret he learned from the river. To prove to Siddhartha that this is the secret of the river Vasudeva says, "'Is this what you mean isn't it: that the river is everywhere at once, at the source and at the mouth...and that there is only the present time for it, not the shadow of the past, nor the shadow of the future" (Hesse 76).

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 1, 2014 01:27 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
2 February 2014


QUESTION #167:
What do Vasudeva and Siddhartha set out to do with Kamala?

ANSWER:
Kamala is dying in Siddhartha and Vasudeva’s hut. A snake bite her (Hess 79) while she was about to see Gotama. At the end of this chapter, Kamala ends up dying because of the poison caused by the snake’s bite. Kamala died on the same bed on which Vasudeva’s wife died a long time ago. Thus, they decide to build a funeral pile for her next on the same hill on which Vasudeva’s wife has been placed too: “Let us build Kamala’s funeral pile on the same hill on which I had then built my wife’s funeral pile.” (Hess 82).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 2, 2014 02:21 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
3 February 2014

QUESTION #155: What does Siddhartha offer to do with his clothes? Why is this significant?

ANSWER: Siddhartha offers his clothes as a payment for the ferryman’s service of taking Siddhartha to the other side of the river since he does not “have money with which to pay the fare” (Hesse 82). Also, Siddhartha says his clothes, which are the clothes of someone who is wealthy, “have become a burden” (Hesse 82). This “burden” may be one which is making him have some sort of pride, which would keep him from becoming the meek person he is wanting to be now (Hesse 82). Furthermore, the ferryman mentions to Siddhartha that ferrymen do not wear the type of clothes which Siddhartha is wearing, so Siddhartha decides he must not be wearing them (Hesse 82). Siddhartha mentions to the ferryman, “Keep me with you as your assistant, or rather as your apprentice” (Hesse 82). Also, in the previous chapter, Govinda had told Siddhartha, “Few go on a pilgrimage in such clothing, few in such shoes, few with such hair” (Hesse 73). Therefore, I believe by giving the clothing to the ferryman, Siddhartha was hoping to take a step back toward being a person who lived humbly; this was a very significant meaning in the offering of the clothes to the ferryman.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 2, 2014 07:10 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
2 February 2014

Question #170

What did Siddhartha think were the only things his son had brought him?

ANSWER:

Siddhartha explained himself as a rich and a happy man before the son entered in his life. Since Siddhartha found out about his son late in life, he was like a stranger to him. The boy did not want to do any work, and he did not respect the old men. The more time they spent together, Siddhartha began to understand that his son had only brought him suffering and worry, but Siddhartha still loved him. He preferred the suffering and worries of love to happiness and joy without his son.

“See, I am fighting for him, I’m seeking to win his heart, with love and with friendly patience I intent to capture it. One day the river shall talk to him, he also is called upon” (Hesse 84). This passage shows Siddhartha’s love for his son, even though he is not happy with his behavior.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 2, 2014 07:25 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
2 February 2014

QUESTION #173:
What was the most hateful cunning of the old fox?

ANSWER:
In The Son Siddhartha is trying as hard as he can to gain the love of his son. However no matter what he does his son does not respond the way Siddhartha wishes because he is used to living a life of riches. Hesse uses the concept of the most hateful cunning of the old fox to describe the type of father Siddhartha is. “This father who kept him in this wretched hut bored him, and when he answered his rudeness with a smile, every insult with friendliness, every naughtiness with kindness, that was the most hateful cunning of the old fox” (Heese, 123).

Posted by: Rosa Esquivel at February 2, 2014 08:26 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
03 February 2014

QUESTION # 176
Why does the son hate the father?


ANSWER:
After the son’s mother had died, the boy is in complete shock. Years had passed by as Siddhartha had treated the young boy as his son. He had taken good care of him. Siddhartha would pick the best meal for him. Siddhartha had sensed “that this love, this blind love for his son was a passion, something very human that it was Sansara, a murky source, and dark waters.” (Hesse 86.) Siddhartha was a great man but “the son let him commit his foolish acts, let him court for his affection, let him humiliate himself every day by giving in to his moods.” (Hesse 87) This might explain why the son hates the father. Siddhartha should be stricter with his son.

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 2, 2014 08:39 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
English 210CL Love and Desire CA01
3 February, 2014

Question #179:
What is Siddhartha’s final opinion about his son?
Answer:
Siddhartha does not know how to deal with his son. He knows his son is totally different from him, and does not aspire to be a man of God. However Siddhartha knows patience is the key to earn the respect of his son.
There is an important difference between the two men and the author makes us understand how important is the son feelings for Siddhartha “Siddhartha spared him and let him do as he pleased, he honored his mourning. Siddhartha understood that his son did not know him, that he could not love him like a father “(Hesse).

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 2, 2014 09:08 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
2 February 2014

Question #151
What is the ferryman’s name? What does Siddhartha learn from the ferryman?

Answer:
In Siddhartha, the ferryman is a guide for the river and the path to enlightenment. Siddhartha meets this man and wants to learn the knowledge of how to listen. Listening to the river to help guide people back and forth across the river is a talent that the ferryman has. The ferryman’s name is Vasudeva (Hesse 74). Siddhartha accepts the fact that Vasudeva is going to teach him the knowledge of how to listen (Hesse 75). This is what Siddhartha is with the ferryman to learn. A couple years after meeting this ferryman, Siddhartha goes to search for knowledge from the river itself from Vasudeva. Vasudeva guides him to hear what the river has to say. Siddhartha eventually becomes a ferryman after he reaches enlightenment. Just as the ferryman does, Siddhartha now guides people back and forth across the river and now is trying to help Govinda find enlightenment.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 2, 2014 10:19 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
2 February 2014

Question 116: What do you suppose a Samana heart is?

Answer: In the mere end of Chapter 6, Siddhartha has a sudden realization where he believed he was “leading a strange life, that the things he was occupied with were purely a game, that though he was in a cheerful frame of mind and sometimes felt happy, real life was passing him by without touching him” (Hesse 56). He tries to explain this to Kamala who replies by saying he is thinking shrama thoughts. From the events and information gathered, I believe a Samana heart is one who takes his own path and tries to succeed in every field of life. One who has a Samana heart can feel the great things of life such as power, wealth and luxury, but will always resort back to their personal question on what life truly is. So far in this novel, Siddhartha has excelled in a variety of fields in life, but is still constantly contemplating the meaning of life.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 2, 2014 10:24 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
31.1.2014
Question #159

QUESTION # 159:
What word does the river pronounce when all of its ten thousand voices speak at the same time?

ANSWER:
“‘And do you know,’ continued Siddhartha, ‘what word it pronounces when one is successful in hearing all its ten thousand voices at the same time?’ Vasudeva laughed joyously; he bent towards Siddhartha and whispered the holy OM in his ear. And this was just what Siddhartha had heard.” (Hesse 88).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 2, 2014 10:40 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 February 2014

QUESTION #169:
What did Siddhartha start to realize about his son?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha started to realize that his son did not know him because he grew up 11 years with his mom. He also realized that the son was a “pampered boy, a mother’s boy, and that he had grown in the habits of rich people” (Hesse 83). He finally understood that the kid would not be happy with a life among stranger and in poverty.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 2, 2014 11:20 PM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
2 February 2014
Question# 162
How does Siddhartha judge his words that he said to Gotama many years ago?


Answer:
Siddhartha’s judging of his words he had once displayed on Gotama, were confident words with great intelligence. Remembered the words he had once uttered as a young man to the Illustrious One. It seemed to him that they had been arrogant and precocious words (Hesse 110). Siddhartha was having positive thoughts of Gotama, while he remembered the day in which the two spoke. He had realized that the two of them were not too different from one another. He thought to himself that Gotama was a great teacher, and that A great teacher is needed in one's life. (Hesse 110).

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 2, 2014 11:51 PM

Meshayla Williams
Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love &Desire in Literature
03 February 2014

Question#157
The ferryman says that Siddhartha will learn to listen from whom?

Answer#
Siddhartha will learn to listen from Vasudeva. “I also thank you, Vasudeva, for listening so well. There are few people who know how to listen and I have not met anybody who can do so like you. I will also learn from you in respect” (Hesse,105).

When Siddhartha woke up from this dream he felt very unus

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 3, 2014 01:12 AM

William Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210cl
2/1/14


154.) What is the first secret that Siddhartha learns from the river?

The first secret is that water would always be running and be unchanged. It symbolizes stability and consistency, something most people would have trouble with. Siddhartha found this to be the most enchanting and valuable of all the secrets, simply because of that meaning. He said “Great be who would grasp this, understand this!” It is quite obvious that he views this to be a valuable trait to have.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 3, 2014 02:47 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
3 February 2014
Question #160:
What sometimes would happen when a traveler looked at the face of either Siddhartha or the ferryman?
Answer:
When the people would look at the ferryman and Siddhartha together it’s almost like they wanted to share confessions. They wanted to talk and tell them about their troubles. “a traveler, after having looked at the face of one of the ferrymen, started to tell the story of his life, told about his pains, confessed evil things, asked for comfort and advice” (Hesse 77).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 3, 2014 08:58 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
1, February 2014
Question #156
How many years does the ferryman think it has been since he last saw Siddhartha?
What is important about this scene?

Answer:
In this chapter, the ferryman gives his input as to the distance of years the duo haven’t encountered each other. “’Now I recognize you,’” he finally said, ‘At one time I, you’ve slept in my hut, this was a long time ago, possibly twenty years, and you’ve been ferried across the river by me, and we parted like good friends.’”(Hesse 164). This can be taken into consideration due to the description through the story, which details a long period of Siddhartha’s travels as well as how each character is described in age and appearance. This is important because early in the story when the two first met, Siddhartha was ferried across the river once by Vasudeva, and the ferryman knew one day he’d come back. “’Surely this too, I have learned from the river: everything is coming back! You too, Samana, will come back. Now Farewell! Let your friendship be my reward. Commemorate me, when you’ll make your offering to the gods’” (Hesse 78).

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 3, 2014 09:21 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
3 Feb 2014

Question #152
What do people say about Siddhartha and the Ferryman?

Answer:

Travelers would say that they were "Two wise men, or sorcerers, or holy men living by that ferry." (pg.77) Curious travelers would try and ask questions but would rarely get answers. No wise men or sorcerers were found, but instead two little friendly old men were discovered. "They seemed to be mute and to have become a little bit strange and gaga." (pg.78)

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at February 3, 2014 09:35 AM

Pietro Inglese
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
Eng. 210 Love and Desire
3 February 2014

Question 189: Siddhartha and Vasudeva listen very, very closely to the river. What do they hear? Why is everything interconnected?

Answer: Siddhartha and Vasudeva listen to the river very closely and begin to hear the river “laughing of everything” (Hesse 97). The laughing of the river is being compared to both the good and bad of the world. Everything is interconnected because everything in this world has a way of beginning and coming back around again and does not seem to change.

Posted by: pietro inglese at February 3, 2014 10:30 AM

Pietro Inglese
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
Eng. 210 Love and Desire
3 February 2014
(make up question)

Question 172: What is the strangest passion that Siddhartha has experienced?

Answer : The strangest passion Siddhartha experienced in this chapter was belatedly. “for once in his life, the strongest and strangest passion; he suffered tremendously through it and yet was uplifted” (Hesse 86). This feeling helped him feel “very human” (Hesse 86) and even with the pain and follies he felt it necessary for his journey to renewal.

Posted by: pietro inglese at February 3, 2014 10:46 AM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
3 February 2014

Question # 203 What does Govinda see in Siddhartha?

Answer:
After discussing Siddhartha's life Govinda came to the conclusion that some of Siddhartha's ways and ideas were crazy and didn't make sense.However, Govinda felt that Siddhartha was a holy man and was close to Nirvana as anyone he ever met (Hesse 103).

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at February 3, 2014 12:22 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
4 February 2014

Question 201: What does Siddhartha mean that everyone has a Buddha in him?

Answer: When Siddhartha say that everyone has a Buddha in him he means that just as everyone has the ability to be a robber, they to have the ability it a peaceful person such as Buddha. In support of this he says, "... in the robber and dice-gambler, the Buddha is waiting; in the Brahman, the robber is waiting" (Hesse 100). This means that we have the ability to become both a sinner and a Buddha, if the sinner is present then the Buddha is waiting inside of us to come out, and vice versa.

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 4, 2014 02:45 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 February 2014

QUESTION #204:
What does Siddhartha say in response to Govinda when he asks for something to help him?

ANSWER:
When Govinda asks for something to help him, Siddhartha says "Bend near to me! Come, still nearer, quite close! Kiss me on the forehead, Govinda" (Hesse 120). Based on Siddhartha's response, he asks for Govinda to kiss him on his forehead.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 4, 2014 05:40 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
4 February 2014

Question #193
Why is there still restlessness in Govinda’s heart?
Answer:
Govinda is still traveling with these same monks in the yellow robes. These monks in these yellow robes now look up to Govinda because he is now old and wise. Govinda now knows mostly all of the rules of being in the Gotama tribe. “Because, though he had lived his entire life by the rules, though he was looked upon with veneration by the younger monks on account of his age and his modesty, the restlessness and the searching still had not perished from his heart” (Hesse 97). Govinda still has restlessness in his heart because he still feels that he has not found what he is seeking.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 4, 2014 06:01 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
4 February 2014

Question #182

What “wound” does Siddhartha have? What is the different light that he sees people in?

ANSWER:

Siddhartha feels the wounds from the loss of his son, a wound of not being happy. He also realizes that he was not the perfect son himself. Siddhartha sees the families with children and he envies them. He looks at them in a different way than before. Siddhartha now feels a sense of kinship with all the various travelers from the childlike world that pass by. He also sees Vasudeva as Buddha, a God. The voices of the river help him to heal his wounds.

“But the wound still burned, longingly and bitterly Siddhartha thought of his son, nurtured his love and tenderness in his heart, allowed the pain to gnaw at him, committed all foolish acts of love. Not by itself, this flame would go out” (Hesse 92).

This statement from “OM” clearly demonstrates that the wound Siddhartha is suffering from is about the loss of his son.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 4, 2014 09:02 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature
4 February 2014

QUESTION #206:
What does Govinda see Siddhartha do? What does this show about Siddhartha’s final change?

ANSWER:
Govinda sees that Siddhartha has finally found his peace. He sees the look on the face of Siddhartha and mentions that it is the same look at the Illustrious one had when he passed into Nirvana. “But Siddhartha’s hands and feet, his eyes, his brow, his breathing, his smile, his greeting, his gait affect me differently from his thoughts” (Hesse, 148). This shows that Siddhartha finally found the peace he was seeking since the beginning of the book. He found his path after all the obstacles that stood in his way through his journey. “He smiled peacefully and gently, perhaps very graciously, perhaps very mockingly, exactly as the Illustrious one had smiled” (Heese, 151).

Posted by: Rosa Esquivel at February 4, 2014 09:49 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
4.2.2014
Question #199

QUESTION # 199:
What is the symbolism of the stone?

ANSWER:
The stone is symbolic of life, and all its cycles. “This [. . .] is a stone, and within a certain length of time it will perphaps be soil and from the soil it will become plant, animal or man.” (Hesse 117).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 4, 2014 09:57 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
05 February 2014

QUESTION # 200
How can Nirvana and Samsara be the same?

ANSWER:
The meaning of Samsara as I mentioned in the previous questions is suffering through desire. Siddhartha is considered as a Samsara because he had decided to leave his father’s house, and go look for joy, and he had found it in suffering through hunger, fast, and thinking. “A person or an act is never entirely Sansara or entirely Nirvana, a person is never entirely holy or entirely sinful.” (Hesse 100) That being said as human beings we tend to sin. The good thing about Siddhartha, and Govinda, as they are close friends they learn not to commit these sins again. I believe that there is not much of difference between Nirvana and Sansara, whereas Nirvana is turning the passion and joy away.

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 4, 2014 10:00 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 February 2014


QUESTION #205:
What happens when Govinda kisses Siddhartha?

ANSWER:
Right before Govinda is about to leave Siddhartha, the protagonist asks him to bend down to him and kiss his forehead: “Bend down to me! […] Kiss my forehead, Govinda!” (Hess 104). All the sudden, Govinda sees several faces on Siddhartha’s face. Govinda was able to see thousands of human and animal faces. According to him, each face was in relationship with one another (Hess 105). However, those faces have something in common; they had been covered with Siddhartha’s smiling face. Thus, Govinda understood that his friend like Gotama is a perfected one: “Like this, Govinda knew, the perfected ones are smiling.” (Hess 105).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 4, 2014 10:14 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
4 February 2014

Question 196: What does Siddhartha say about doctrines and teachers?

Answer: Throughout Siddhartha’s journey for self-exploration, he never once chose a path of one of the teachers before him. During his travel to find himself, Siddhartha met with many teachers to gain insight and experience behind what their vision of life consisted of, but never stuck with their teachings. In the end, Siddhartha made his own path to discover himself and the meaning of life. Curious to know how Siddhartha found his way, Govinda asks intently what teachings and beliefs he goes by and what particular insights has he gained that have aided him in life’s journey. Siddhartha replied, “I had come to mistrust teachers and teachings and had turned away from them. I stuck with that approach. Nevertheless, I have had many teachers since then” (Hesse 109). By this statement, Siddhartha is expressing the fact that none of the teachers he has encountered was suitable for him. He feels that their teachings were very one sided, and that is not how the earth is. “A truth can be expressed and cloaked in words only if it is one-sided. Everything that can be thought in thoughts and expressed in words is one-sided… but the world itself, existence around us and within us, is never one-sided” (Hesse 110).

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 5, 2014 12:05 AM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
English 210CL Love and Desire CA01
5 February, 2014

Question #195:
What had Govinda heard about while at the pleasure grove?

Answer:
While Govinda was at the pleasure grove, he hears the rumor of the wise ferryman. In order to reach enlightenment, Giovinda decides to seek and therefore visit the old man. It seems like Govinda cannot stop searching for the real enlightenment “"It's true, I'm old," spoke Govinda, "but I haven't stopped searching. Never will I stop searching, this seems to be my destiny.” (Hesse 112)

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 5, 2014 12:07 AM


William Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210cl
2/3/14


154.) What thought has most impressed Siddhartha
The thought that has impressed him the most has to be the idea of knowing what the good and bad are in having lust for nice things. He finds it interesting how the best way to understand a concept is by actually experiencing it as opposed to being told about it. As a young boy, he was educated and told about the dangers of the world and how bad lust and power can be. He points out “that lust for the world and the riches” is a bad thing to have in society, and does not belong. He was able to experience this however, and it gave him a better understanding of the concept.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 5, 2014 02:03 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
4 February 2014
Question #184:
What does Siddhartha realize is the only thing ordinary people lack?
Answer:
Siddhartha realizes that ordinary people did not lack anything. “They lack nothing, there was nothing the knowledgeable one, the thinker, had to put above them except for one little thing, a single, tiny small thing: the consciousness, the conscious thought of the oneness of all life.” (Hesse 91). He realizes that he feels the same pain as them. The death of his son made him realize this although he understands this feeling it does not make the pain go away.

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 5, 2014 02:05 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 February 2014
Question# 197
Why doesn’t Siddhartha have a doctrine? How can wisdom not be communicable? Can you communicate knowledge?


Answer:
Siddhartha lacks a doctrine because he does not find it to be necessary. I came to distrust doctrines and teachers and to turn my back on them (Hesse 141). Wisdom comes from one individual and is shared with others. Everyone is different; the wisdom I believe may appear to another person as foolishness. One may not take in my beliefs and use them to benefit their life. Communicating knowledge can be like trying to communicate wisdom; some people simply are going to have trouble comprehending. Though if enough people listen to what a person has to say, many will others will take sight of what is what is being stated. This will make it in fact easy to communicate; having many followers makes life easier.

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 5, 2014 02:25 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
5 Feb 2014

Question #194: What is wrong with seeking according to Siddhartha?

Answer:
As said in the passage "Siddhartha speaks with great wisdom, explaining the flaw of a seeker's life, "When someone is seeking...it happens quite easily that he only sees the thing that he is seeking; that he is unable to find anything, unable to absorb anything...because he is obsessed with his goal. Seeking means: to have a goal; but finding means: to be free, to be receptive, to have no goal" (Chapter 12, pg. 113.)" While seeking you only see the thing that you are seeking, nothing else. You cannot find or absorb anything, due to being too obsessed with your goal.

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at February 5, 2014 08:23 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
5 February 2014

QUESTION #188: What does the river do when Siddhartha goes to see his son? Whose reflection does he see?

ANSWER: Hesse mentions, when Siddhartha goes to the other side of the river, trying to find his son, “The river laughed, bright and clear it laughed at the old ferryman” (Hesse 102). Then, when Siddhartha sees his reflection, ”It resembled the face of his father, the Brahmin” (Hesse 103). Siddhartha thinks then, about how he feels like his father felt when he went away from him (Hesse 103).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 5, 2014 08:23 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
4, February 2014
Question #185
On the day when Siddhartha decided to go to town, who was laughing at Siddhartha?
Answer:
While Siddhartha travels down the river towards the town, he notices out of it calmness an unusual sound. “The river flowed softly and quietly, it was the dry season, but it’s voice sounded strange: it laughed!” (Hesse 208, 209). The river laughed at him, as he was leaning over to hear better, he sees his reflection. Paraphrasing, “…which reminded him, something he’d forgotten, and as he thought about it, he found it: this face resembled another face, which he used to know and love and also fear, it resembled his father’s face, the Brahman” (Hesse 209). In a metaphorical sense, Siddhartha was reminded of an important past, that he had not seen his father, as was the case with Siddhartha and his son who had run away, prior, from his father believing it would be the a similar fateful circle.

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 5, 2014 09:22 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
04 February 2014

Question#186
When Siddhartha looked into the water, what did he see?

Answer:
He saw the reflection of his face, and it resembled to the face of his father. “He saw his face reflected in the quietly moving water, and there was something in this reflection that reminded him of something he had forgotten and when he reflected on it, he remembered. His face resembled that of another person. Whom he had once loved and even feared. It resembled the face of his father” (Heese 131).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 5, 2014 10:57 AM


William Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210cl
2/3/14


4.) How did Siddhartha convince his father? Why didn’t he go? (catch up assignment)
Siddhartha obeyed the Brahman’s commands, but obviously did not agree with them. He clearly stated, “Siddhartha will do what his father will tell him to do”, and with that he clearly chose to obey his father’s will. Still, he was unhappy and unresponsive, and quickly the Brahman took notice by see his blank and steadfast expressions on his face. He too knew he was unhappy, and for the most part was no longer with him mentally. He ended up granting his wish and letting him become a Samana.

-----------------


*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: William Fumero at February 5, 2014 11:37 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
7 February

Siddhartha Homework Questions


Question: Complete the passage: “To obey no other eternal command __. Nothing else was necessary.” What does this passage mean?
Answer: The entire passage states "To obey no other eternal command, only the voice, to be prepared-that was good, that was necessary. Nothing else was necessary."(Hesse 48). This quote from Siddhartha is in essence renouncing his own desires and motives to perform actions. He is submitting himself to the will of his inner voice or inner conscious almost. Like he explains the Illustrious one "Why did Gotama once sit down beneath the bo tree in his greatest hour when he received enlightenment? He heard a voice, a voice in his own heart which commanded him to seek rest under this tree, and he had not taken recourse to mortification of the flesh, sacrifices, bathing or prayers, eating or drinking, sleeping or dreaming; he had listened to the voice."(Hesse 48). Siddhartha, now accepts this and seeks to embrace himself as a being and simply follow his heart, his inner voice.

Question: How does Siddhartha instantly recognize the Buddha?

Answer: Siddhartha immediately recognizes the Buddha not from appearance but from his demeanor and glow to him. Siddhartha says the Buddha floated along quietly in his thoughts. “His peaceful countenance was neither happy nor sad. He seemed to be smiling gently inwardly. With a secret smile, not unlike that of a healthy child he walked along, peacefully and quietly.” This is what separated Gotama from the rest of the monks all scattered among the place.

Question: What is the nature of inner Sanctuary that both Siddhartha and Kamala Possess, but the childlike people do not have? Is this the reason that Siddhartha and Kamala cannot truly love, whereas childlike people can love? Is the “inner sanctuary” a kind of authentic self that the childlike people in their superficiality lack?

Answer: The nature of the inner sanctuary that both Kamala and Siddhartha possess in a sense of understanding or “awakeness” to them. They see each other for what they are, beautiful beings apart of life and love is just an expression; it is meaningful and empty at the same time. Siddhartha states in one conversation “I am like you. You cannot love either, otherwise how could you practice love as an art? Perhaps people like us cannot love” The inner sanctuary is what they make of it perception plays a crucial part in this part of the question.

Question: How does young Siddhartha take advantage of the father?

Answer: Since the passing of his mother Kamala, young Siddhartha is forced to stay with his father and Vasudeva by the river. Being accustomed to riches, young Siddhartha despises his living conditions and rebels against his father in many ways. In hopes with bettering a relationship with his son, Siddhartha does not scold or reprimand the boy in anyway shape or form; he only smothers him with kindness and patience that he will soon come around. The boy takes advantage of both Siddhartha and Vasudeva by not doing any of his chores, speaking poorly to his elders and even steeling from the fruit tree of Vasudeva. Siddhartha learns of the boys true feelings when he vents saying:
“Bring your own twigs, I am not our servant. I know that you do not beat me; you dare not! However, that you continually punish me and make me feel small with your piety and indulgence. You want me to become like you so pious, so gentle, so wise, but just to spite you, I would rather become a thief and a murderer and go to hell, than be like you. I hate you; you are not my father even if you have been my mother’s lover a dozen times!””

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 9, 2014 08:57 AM

Olivia N Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
12 September 2014

QUESTION #13
“He had started to suspect that his vernerable father and his other teachers, that the wise Brahman had already revealed to him the most and best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, that spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied.”

Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version to the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page this is on your version.

ANSWER:
The speaker of the quote above was the author, Hermann Hesse. He was addressing Siddhartha about how he was not truly happy with himself. Siddhartha is wandering somewhere outside in a fig garden thinking about how he feels good helping other people but is not truly satisfied with himself. The quote in the book used was written like this: “He had begun to suspect that his worthy father and his other teachers, the wise Brahmins, had already passed on to him the bulk and best of their wisdom, that they had already poured the sum total of their knowledge into his waiting vessel; and the vessel was not full, his intellect was not satisfied, his soul was not at peace, his heart was not still (Hesse 5). ”


Work Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 12, 2014 05:29 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative CA01
13 September 2014

Question #6:
Why did Siddhartha remain standing? Why didn’t he just leave? Did Siddhartha’s father allow him to leave because, in a sense, Siddhartha had “already left”?

Answer:
Siddhartha remained standing because that was his way of showing his father that he made up his mind and he was going to be persistent about it. He didn’t just leave because Siddhartha grew up listening to his father and he couldn’t just disobey him. That is shown in the following conversation Siddhartha and his father had, “And you would rather die than obey your father?” “Siddhartha has always obeyed his father”(Hesse 10). When Siddhartha’s father saw Siddhartha just standing there, in a sense he knew that he already made up his mind so he yes he did think Siddhartha already left because his mind was made up. There is evidence of this in the following quote, “And he came silently again, hour after hour, looked into the room, and saw him standing unmoving. His heart filled with anger, with anxiety, with fear, with sorrow” (Hesse 11).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 13, 2014 10:07 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #19:
According to Siddhartha, what can one learn? Explain this.

ANSWER:
According to Siddhartha, one does not learn anything because knowledge is everywhere; however, what we learn from others is not knowledge. Atman is real knowledge and this is in every living being.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 13, 2014 09:54 PM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 September 2014

QUESTION: #30
“We are not going around in circles, we are moving up, the circle is a spiral, we have already ascended many a level.” (Hesse 18) a. Who is speaking? b. Who is being addressed? c. What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here?

ANSWER:
In the passage, “We are not going around in circles, we are moving up, the circle is a spiral, we have already ascended many a level,” (Hesse 18) Govinda is speaking to Siddhartha. Both Govinda and Siddhartha had left the forest to go into town and beg for food. While in the town, Siddhartha continues to be plagued by his unquenchable thirst for knowledge and begins to question his path with the Samana. Siddhartha asks Govinda, “Are we on the right road? Are we gaining knowledge? Are we approaching salvation? Or are we perhaps going in circles-we who thought to escape from the cycle?” (Hesse 17-18) Govinda’s response suggests that, although Govinda feels that he has learned a lot, he lacks the understanding of what Siddhartha has learned. Siddhartha feels as though everything moving in a connected a circle.

Works Cited
Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books, 1971. Novel.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 14, 2014 11:21 AM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
14 September 2014

Question #24:
Explain Siddhartha’s discovery that there are many ways to lose the self. Why are they all tricks?

Answer:
Siddhartha discovered many ways to lose the self by “travelling along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst, and fatigue.” (Hesse 15). All of these ways of losing the self are tricks, because in the end, one always goes back to one’s self. “-in the end they always led back to it.” (16).

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 14, 2014 04:29 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
14 September 2014

Question #10:

“The realized then that Siddhartha was no longer with him in the place of his birth. His son had already left him behind.” What does this mean and why?

Answer:

Siddhartha’s father is realizing that his son is leaving him for good. It’s up to Siddhartha if he wants to return in the distant future or not, but most people that leave to join the ascetics do not return. His father now knows that he has lost his son. His father may also feel that his son has become a better person than he was.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 14, 2014 05:59 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
15 September 2014

Question #9
Given that Govinda was Siddhartha’s “lance bearer,” speculate about the conditions under which Govinda left home.

Text Source: Siddhartha By Herman Hesse

Govinda was described in the book to be Siddhartha’s lance barer, “And if he ever became a god, if he ever entered the All-radiant, then Govinda wanted to follow him as his friend, his companion, his servant, his lance bearer, his shadow” (Hesse 4 & 5). Through speculation, Govinda may have not had someone to look up to during his home life and lacked a positive role model. Govinda seems to be in search of someone to fill that void, in this case Siddhartha, to shadow and strive to be more like him. Govinda wants Siddhartha to take him under his wing and mentor him.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 14, 2014 06:22 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
14 September 2014

Question #27:
“A goal stood before Siddhartha, a single goal: to become empty, empty of thirst, empty of wishing, empty of dreams, empty of joy and sorrow.”
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer:
In the chapter “With the Samanas,” Siddhartha spoke his inner thoughts, sharing what he encountered around him. Siddhartha was reflecting on the area and describing what he could contribute and help to change his view. Before the quoted passage, Siddhartha shared what life was like surrounding him; “And all of his was not worthy of one look from his eye, it all lied, it all stank, it all stank of lies, it all pretended to be meaningful and joyful and beautiful.” (Hesse 163) The passage displayed that Siddhartha believes his life and the world is tortuous. He feels that the world encompasses bitterness and lies. Siddhartha believes he needs to be awakened and tranquil by not letting the world affect his journey and inner thoughts.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 14, 2014 07:02 PM

Bryce A Veller
Dr.Hobbs
ENG-220 Journeys in Narratives
September 14, 2014

QUESTION #21 What does Siddhartha do with the oldest Samana? What does this feat show?

ANSWER
Siddhartha stood near the Samana, his mind intent: he looked in to the old man's eyes and held him with his look, hypnotized him, made him mute, conquered his will, commanded him silently to do so as he wished.
The feat show Siddhartha's thoughts conquered those of Samana and that he possessed more power than the older Samanas.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 14, 2014 07:36 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
14 September 2014

Question# 15
“Siddhartha saw a single goal: to become empty” what does this mean and why? What happens when he reaches that goal?
Siddhartha had one goal to become empty, to become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure, and sorrow to let the Self die" (Hesse14)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 14, 2014 07:45 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
14 Sept 2014

Question #25:
Why is Siddhartha unimpressed with the magic arts?

Answer:
The reason why Siddhartha is unimpressed with the magic arts is that he feels that it is a waste of time and useless and does not help him learn anything.

“ He is sixty years old and has not attained Nirvana. He will be seventy and eight years old, and you and I, we shall grow as old as he, and do exercises and fast and meditate, but we will not attain Nirvana. Govida, I believe that amongst all the Samanas, probably not even one will attain Nirvana. We find consolations, we learn tricks with which we deceive ourselves, but the essential thing, the way, we do not find” (Hesse 18).
“Let the old Samanas satisfy themselves with such arts” (Hesse24).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 14, 2014 08:39 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
14 September 2014

Passage:
“He had started to suspect that his venerable father and his other teachers, that the wise Brahmans had already revealed to him the most and best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied.”

Question #13:
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here?

Answer:
At this point in the novel, readers are unsure of the identity of the narrator. However, it is clear that the story is being told in the third person format – “He had begun to suspect that his worthy father…” (Hesse 5). I think that the author intended the above passage to be addressed to readers who may be feeling similar to Siddhartha. Siddhartha acknowledges his belief that his teachers have already taught him all that they know and that they have nothing else to offer; he is left feeling unsatisfied and spiritually incomplete. Following this acknowledgement, Siddhartha attempts to find “bliss” (Hesse 12), understanding, and completion of the soul by embarking on a journey.

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Hilda Rosner. Toronto: Bantam, 1971. 5+. Print.


Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 14, 2014 09:24 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
14 September 2014

Question #15:
“Siddhartha saw a single goal: to become empty” What does this mean and why? What happens when he reaches that goal?

Answer:
Siddhartha felt to care more about the worldly issues and society. However, Siddhartha wanted to become empty within himself to gain more focus on the spiritual world. His experience is to desire peace and pure thought. Siddhartha reaches his goal by becoming a religious man in his community (Hesse, 14).

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 14, 2014 09:46 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
14 September 2014

Question #12: “But where, where was this self, this innermost part, this ultimate part? It was not flesh and bone, it was neither thought nor consciousness, thus the wisest ones taught. So, where, where was it?”
(A) Who is speaking? (B) Who is being addressed? (C) What is the context of this passage, ie what is going on, exactly, here?

Answer: On page 6 of Siddhartha, the narrator is speaking about Siddhartha and talking about what his opinions are. The page leading up to this quote is the narrator informing the reader that Siddhartha feels “the seeds of discomfort within him.” (Hesse 5) He thought to himself that he had learned all that he was able to learn, but still felt like there was something missing and he was unsure of how to go and fill that missing gap. According to the quote, as listed in the question, Siddhartha is unsure of where to go to find himself and his true identity so that he can feel happy and complete.

Posted by: zachary sabo at September 14, 2014 09:55 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01

Question # 14:
Part one- How does Siddhartha act when he is with the Samanas?

Answer:
During his time with the Samanas, Siddhartha quickly adopted their ways. He began to dress as they did and purged himself of desires, like food and property. "Now he wore only a loincloth and an unstitched shawl, the color of earth. He ate but once a day, and never any cooked food" (Hesse 13).

* Quotes were found using the Barnes and Noble classics edition of Siddhartha.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 14, 2014 10:47 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 September 2014


Question #23:
What do you think is the reason for the attempt to capture the archetypes of life itself in meditation?

Answer:
I think the reason behind the attempt in capturing the archetypes of life itself in meditation is that meditation is a relaxing way for people to let loose. Meditation helps people to think deeply and explore their inner self. A hero can identify with this because some people carry the characteristics of a hero within themselves until they explore it and express the hero in them.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 14, 2014 11:47 PM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
15 September 2014

Question #12: “But where, where was this self, this innermost part? It was not flesh and bone, it was neither thought nor consciousness, thus the wisest ones taught. So where, where was it?

Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer:
The previously quoted passage is not from a single individual, but the entity of the narrator since the novella from a third person point of view. The narrator is explaining what is going on in Siddhartha’s sub-consciousness. The person addressed in the story is Siddhartha. He is questioning the beliefs of the Brahman and Atman. Atman is a spiritual principle in which one finds themselves. So essentially, Siddhartha is asking where he can find himself, where he can find his self-joy. He is questioning if it even exists and how he can come to terms with himself to achieve it and be enlightened. This quote can is in the first chapter, The Son of the Brahman, in the eighth paragraph after the twelfth sentence.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 15, 2014 01:21 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
15 September 2014

Question #2:
Govinda’s “wish was to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, splendid one.” Why is Govinda willing to follow Siddhartha?

Answer:
Between Govinda and Siddhartha, a special bond existed. To Govinda Siddhartha was everything, “Govinda, his friend, the Brahmin’s son, loved him more than anybody else” (Hesse 4). From this bond and deep love, Govinda looked at the young but enlightened Siddhartha with reverence, and could see the potential Siddhartha held. Govinda in his heart and soul felt that one day Siddhartha would “enter the All-Radiant” and Govinda as either his “friend,” “companion,” “servant,” “lance bearer,” or “shadow” dreamt of following in his footsteps (Hesse 4).

Work Cited

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing Company, 1971. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 15, 2014 07:27 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
September 15 2014

Question #17:
What frustrates Siddhartha?

Answer:
Siddhartha was frustrated by his lack of knowledge. He had been taught everything he could be by his father, and the other Brahman elders, but "his mind was not satisfied, his soul was not at ease, his heart was not contented" (Hesse 3). Siddhartha feels like there has to be more in the world, and be begins to question the core beliefs of his culture in order to find the knowledge the other men lack (Hesse 3).

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 15, 2014 08:28 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative
15, September 2014


Question: What would have Siddhartha have done if his father would have said no to his request?

Answer: When Siddhartha goes to ask his father for permission to go to follow his heart he truly knows that what he wants more then anything and that there’s not much that can stop him but he goes to his father not for a answer but for the support of his father going into the shaman world. When Siddhartha says “I trust my father will not object” (Siddhartha 10). you know that Siddhartha’s set on the idea when he tells his father after standing in the same spot all night “I will stand and wait”(Siddhartha 11). Siddhartha does get permission form his father but through siddhatha that permission him being relentless showed his father that he was in a sense already gone and that he needed to be sent (Siddhartha 12).

Posted by: aaron virelli at September 15, 2014 08:54 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
14 September 14

Question #11: “Siddhartha,” he said, “why are you waiting?”
“You know why.”
“Will you go on standing and waiting until it is day, noon, evening?”
“I will stand and wait.”
“You will grow tired, Siddhartha.”
“I will grow tired.”
“You will fall asleep, Siddhartha.”
“I will not fall asleep.”
“You will die, Siddhartha.”
“I will die.”

Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer:
This answer comes from the online text in the LibGuide.
(a.) Siddhartha’s father and Siddhartha are speaking. (b.) Siddhartha is the one being addressed. (c.) Siddhartha has just told his father he would like to move out, and pursue becoming a Samana. His father is unhappy with his request and does not tell him if he agrees or opposes the matter, so Siddhartha decides to stand and wait until he is told whether he can go. Following this the passage above ensues.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 15, 2014 09:48 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative (CA02)
15 September 2014

QUESTION #20:
Who is Gotama? What does the narrator think of him?

ANSWER:
In the novel Siddhartha, written by Hermann Hesse, a character by the name of Gotama was discussed. Many believed the Gotama was just “a rumor, a myth” (Siddhartha 18). However, he had truly appeared, a man with the name of Gotama, the “exalted one, the Buddha” (Siddhartha 18). The Gotama had “overcome the suffering of the world in himself and had halted the cycle of rebirths” (Siddhartha 18).

The rumors continued saying that Gotama was traveling through the lands, with many disciples, teaching. The Gotama was without worldly possessions, “without home, without a wife” (Siddhartha 18). He simply had a “yellow cloak of an ascetic” (Siddhartha 18) but wore a “cheerful brow” (Siddhartha 18). A man of happiness, who “Brahmans and princes would bow down before” (Siddhartha 18), in hopes that Gotama would take them in as students.

The narrator believes that the “myth of Buddha sounded sweet” (Siddhartha 18), because in a time of sickness and peril, “life was hard to bear” (Siddhartha 18), and the people needed guidance. Then a light appeared to guide the people, a “source seemed to spring forth” (Siddhartha 18), and from this source a “messenger seemed to call out” (Siddhartha 18). This messenger, Gotama, was “comforting, mild, and full of noble promises” (Siddhartha 18). Everything that the people needed at this time.

Furthermore, the narrator, through Siddhartha, states his real thoughts of Gotama, saying, “I have grown distrustful and tired against teachings and learning” (Siddhartha 19), because his “faith in words” (Siddhartha 19) is small. However, he is “willing to listen to these teachings” (Siddhartha 19), but believes they have “already tasted the best fruit of these teachings” (Siddhartha 19).

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 15, 2014 10:18 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
15 September 2014

QUESTION #4:
How did Siddhartha convince his father? Why didn't he just go?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha went up to his father and stated to him: "Quoth Siddhartha: "With your permission, my father. I came to tell you that it is my longing to leave your house tomorrow and go to the ascetics. My desire is to become a Samana. May my father not oppose this."' Siddhartha's father did not saying anything and Siddhartha continued to wait. When Siddhartha's father asked him what he was waiting for Siddhartha told him that he already knew. Siddhartha did not want to disobey his father so he wanted his father to give him permission to go be a Samana. Siddhartha continued to wait for hours until his father came down from bed and finally gave him permission to go.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 15, 2014 10:24 AM

Douglas Ross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative.
14 September 2014


Question #27:
“A goal stood before Siddharta, a single goal: to become empty, empty of thirst, empty of wishing, empty of dreams, empty of joy and sorrow.”
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) who is speaking? (b.) who is being addressed? (c.) What is the context of this passage, I.e what is going on exactly here?

Answer:
(A.) The narrator of the story is the one speaking. (B.) The narrator is discussing Siddharta. (C.) The narrator is discussing Siddharta’s need to find the inner peace he’s searching for. By becoming empty of everything Siddharta can attain a state of “pure thought” and he can leave his Self behind and achieve a higher state of being. (Hesse 14)

Works Cited
Hesse, Hermann. Siddharta. New York: Bantam Books, 1951.

Posted by: Douglas Ross at September 15, 2014 10:46 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
12 September 2013

Question #16: How does Siddhartha meditate?
Answer: Siddhartha “traveled the way of self-denial through mediation, through the emptying of the mind of all images.” (Page 15, Line 26) Siddhartha accomplished this through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering, and through hunger, thirst, and fatigue.
Work Cited
Hesse, H. (1951). Siddhartha; New York: New Directions.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 15, 2014 10:54 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
14 September 2014

Question 29:
“What is meditation? What is leaving one’s body? It is fleeing from the self. The same escape, the same short numbing is what the driver of an ox cart finds in the inn, drinking a few bowls of rice wine.”
29. Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above:
(a.) Who is speaking?
Answer:
Siddhartha is the one speaking in this quote from the book.

(b.) Who is being addressed?
Answer:
Siddhartha is speaking to Govinda in this context.

(c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e. what is going on exactly here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer:
Siddhartha and Govinda are having a conversation about their progress and learnings from their time with the Samanas. This is found on page 16 of my version of the story.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 15, 2014 11:01 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
14 September 2014

Question 29:
“What is meditation? What is leaving one’s body? It is fleeing from the self. The same escape, the same short numbing is what the driver of an ox cart finds in the inn, drinking a few bowls of rice wine.”
29. Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above:
(a.) Who is speaking?
Answer:
Siddhartha is the one speaking in this quote from the book.

(b.) Who is being addressed?
Answer:
Siddhartha is speaking to Govinda in this context.

(c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e. what is going on exactly here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer:
Siddhartha and Govinda are having a conversation about their progress and learnings from their time with the Samanas. This is found on page 16 of my version of the story.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 15, 2014 11:01 AM

Abrar Nooh, Blake Bromrn

Q#3
In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “psychological function” of the [Threshold] Guardian archetype as it exists in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Who or what are the “inner demons” of a/the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol? (b.) Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you understand the actual meaning of “neurosis” (look it up, if you don’t know it), AND you will need to identify the HERO in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, in order to locate accurately this variety threshold guardian.

Answer:
we identify scrooge as the hero in "A Christmas carol" the inner demons are the 3 spirits that Scrooge encounters. they can also be viewed as the threshold gardens, because they display the characteristics of an inner demo, but also help the main character on his journey. (Vogler 49-50)

Posted by: Abrar Nooh, Blake Bromrn at September 15, 2014 11:13 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative ENG 220 CA01
15 September 2014

Question:
28.)
“Siddhartha learned a great deal from the Samanas; he learned many ways of losing the Self. He traveled along the path of self-denial through pain, through voluntary suffering and conquering of pain, through hunger, thirst and fatigue. He traveled the way of self-denial through meditation, through the emptying of the mind through all images. Along these and other paths did he learn to travel. He lost his Self a thousand times and for days on end he dwelt in non-being. But although the paths took him away from Self, in the end they always led back to it.”
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e. what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Analysis: This passage is actually being spoken by the narrator of the novel, and it appears that he is addressing the reader, telling the audience about the events of Siddhartha’s journey. Siddhartha had just left his family in order to pursue enlightenment and the “non-self”. This part of the story can be found on page 15-16 in the Hilda Rosner translation.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at September 15, 2014 11:22 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
15 September 2014.

QUESTION #26: “I do not wish to walk upon water.” What does this mean and why?

ANSWER:
In the text Siddartha by Herman Hesse, we see the story of Siddartha and his friend Govinda in their quest for spiritual enlightenment. Siddartha is seen as the most promising upcoming Brahmin; however, he was not happy, “There was happiness in his father’s heart because of his son… But Siddartha himself was not happy.” (Hesse 4-5) because he had learned all the wisdom he could from the Brahmins, thus going through the motions.

With his Father’s permission, Siddartha and Govinda joined the Samanas and learnt their ways. However, in a short period he mastered the ways of the Samanas, thus making their mediations and way of life seem trivial, “Siddartha you have learned more from the Samanas than I was aware…learned how to walk on water.” (Hesse 24), and did not provide the enlightenment (Nirvana) which he sought. Therefore, to Siddartha walking on water was a circus act, “Let the old Samanas satisfy themselves with such arts.” (Hesse 24), illustrating Siddartha’s opinion that this was not a true representation of spiritual enlightenment.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 15, 2014 11:30 AM

Peter Bellini & Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA02
15 September 2014


Question #8:


In several paragraphs of his discussion of one of the “dramatic functions” of the [Threshold] Guardian, Christopher Vogler discusses about six ways (there may be more) that a HERO can “deal with [the] apparent obstacles” presented to him/her by a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN. (a.) Identify each of these possible reactions, and (b.) explain which of them, if any, were used by the HERO in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far. Before beginning, you will need to be sure that you have identified correctly both a/the HERO and a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far.


Answer:


Opening the story we see Siddartha, the main character has a conflict within himself. “Siddhartha had started to nurse discontent in himself, he had started to feel that the love of his father and the love of his mother, and also the love of his friend, Govinda, would not bring him joy for ever and ever, would not nurse him, feed him, satisfy him.”(Hesse 4) So Siddhartha has psychological issues that hold back his growth and progress into his destiny of becoming enlightened, and he knows he must make a change in order to grow. Conflicts arise and a massive threshold to cross appears when Siddhartha brings up becoming a Samana to Govinda and his father. “It is not seemly for Brahmins to utter forceful and angry words, but there is displeasure in my ear. I should not like to hear you make this request a second time.” (Hesse 10) Becoming a Samana drives the plot in the story to bring a change ultimately to Siddartha. This change can happen to the Hero with Growth by learning, taking action, sacrifice, dealing with death and heroes arising from other places.
Throughout a life, there are many positive influences. Classically you could list your parents as a positive influence, but when we need the most guidance in our life, such as our teenage years it seems we seems to have the most resistance to their guidance even when it is in our best interests. "With your permission, my father. I came to tell you that it is my longing to leave your house tomorrow and go to the ascetics. My desire is to become a Samana. May my father not oppose this."(Hesse 7) In our younger years we are full of growth and change, we seem to be tested many times for good or bad consistently in our young, accident-prone teenage years. Many times when we are young we are wrong but sometimes the lesson sticks better if you dive head-on into it and grow from the experience.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini & Anet Milian at September 15, 2014 03:29 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #51:
What does Siddhartha decide to study? How is that the one field he has been ignorant in?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha decides to study himself so that he could learn about himself and therefore be able to understand himself. This is one field he has been ignorant in because he does not even know about himself; he never observed himself throughout his journey and just avoided it by searching for self within others instead of within him.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 15, 2014 04:42 PM

Question #22:


Siddhartha’s goal is to conquer the self. Explain what this means.


Answer:


Looking at chapter one, we see the main character, Siddhartha at conflict with himself this drives the story to take change. “Siddhartha had started to nurse discontent in himself, he had started to feel that the love of his father and the love of his mother, and also the love of his friend, Govinda, would not bring him joy for ever and ever, would not nurse him, feed him, satisfy him”(Hesse 4) Siddhartha must make some significant changes in order to reach a healthy balance in life as the quoted passage above seems to reek of dark thoughts possibly on the verge of suicide. Eventually, these dark, oppressive thoughts drive Siddhartha to confront his father into becoming a Samana that eventually becomes the case. Upon becoming a Samana There is much knowledge learned, and Siddhartha begins to become enlightened and conquer himself. “A goal stood before Siddhartha, a single goal: to become empty, empty of thirst, empty of wishing, empty of dreams, empty of joy and sorrow. Dead to himself, not to be a self any more, to find tranquility with an emptied heard, to be open to miracles in unselfish thoughts, that was his goal. Once all of my self was overcome and had died, once every desire and every urge was silent in the heart, then the ultimate part of me had to awake, the innermost of my being, which is no longer my self, the great secret.”(Hesse) Siddhartha wishes to conquer his selfish ways and become enlightened and truly, freely, happy.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 16, 2014 02:35 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 September 2014

Question # 63: Part One-
After awakening, Siddhartha thinks he is like a newborn child and should return to his father, however, he doesn't. Why does he not go home?

Answer:
Siddhartha did not return home because he realized that his father was part of his past and if he was truly reborn, then he must start from a new beginning. " I am no longer who I was, I am no longer an ascetic, I am no longer a priest, I am no longer a Brahmin. What then should I do back home in my father's house? Study? Perform sacrifices? Practice meditation? All this is past, none of this is on my path any longer" (Hesse 35).

* The quote was found using The Barnes and Noble classics edition of Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 16, 2014 09:08 AM

Question #39:
What needs to be renounced in order to follow Buddha? From a psychological point of view, why would these sacrifices be required?
Answer:
Siddhartha began his journey in hopes of discovering knowledge and wisdom from the world. Siddhartha has since begun finding this beauty in other leaders he has encountered. Siddhartha respects others teaching however puts great thought into every decision he is making. He knows that following someone is not going to create a quick solution; his happiness will take time. Siddhartha recognizes that the outside world has many problems that he has no desire to fix because the world knows nothing about him.
Siddhartha pushes aside Govinda because he knows it will get him further, “you have renounced home and parents, you have renounced your own will, you have renounced friendship. That is what the teachings preach, that is the will of the Illustrious One. That is what you wished for yourself.” (Hesse 25) Govinda however chooses to renounce everything and follow Buddha. These sacrifices make it so his opinions mean nothing and all his knowledge is gained from one source, Buddha. Siddhartha sees the sacrifice in this and wants his journey taken somewhere where his opinion matters, and he is an individual.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 16, 2014 10:05 AM

Question #31:


How is Gotama different from the Samanas?


Answer:


When Govinda and Samanas reach the teachings of the Gotama, and the Samana both of them become filled with information. “But there is one thing which these so clear, these so venerable teachings do not contain: they do not contain the mystery of what the exalted one has experienced for himself, he alone among hundreds of thousands. This is what I have thought and realized, when I have heard the teachings. “(Hesse). This quote illustrates how the Samana are followers of the teaching while the Gotama went out and experienced these things to create the lessons learned. Siddartha realizes this and decides he will go out and experience the world for himself to create his teachings.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 16, 2014 03:57 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
16 September 2014

Question #61:

What separates Govinda and Siddhartha at the beginning of this chapter?

Answer:

Govinda follows Siddhartha. He is his “friend, his companion, his servant, his lance beater, his shadow” (Hesse 5). He loves Siddhartha. He knows Siddhartha will be something great, but Govinda was only Siddhartha’s follower; he was only there to help Siddhartha.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 16, 2014 04:56 PM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
16 September 2014

QUESTION 45:
“…nobody will obtain salvation by means of teachings!” Who is speaking? Who is being addressed? What is the context of this passage?

ANSWER:
The passage is found on page thirty-four of our text, “…nobody finds salvation through teachings.” (Hesse 34) Siddhartha is addressing “The Illustrious One,” and communicating that there is a flaw in the teachings. Siddhartha is explaining that none of the disciples or followers can experience the enlightenment that the Illustrious One experienced because his teachings “do not contain the secret of what the Illustrious One himself experienced.” (Hesse 34)

Works Cited
Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books, 1971. Novel.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 16, 2014 07:16 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
16 September 2014

Question# 34
According to Siddhartha, how will he find enlightment?
He will find that through no further education at all. Through the journey of finding whom he is.
Siddartha says, “There is so I believe, in essence of everything, something that we cannot call learning. There is my friend only knowledge that is everywhere.”

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 16, 2014 08:46 PM

Question #59
What epithet does Hesse use for Siddhartha in this chapter? What part of himself does Siddhartha leave behind with his youth?

Text Source: Siddhartha By Herman Hesse

When Siddhartha joined with the Samanas, he gave away everything he had as part of becoming empty. He wanted to rid himself of his human nature and characteristics. In the book, Hess writes, “Siddhartha had one single goal- to become empty, to become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure and sorrow- to let the Self die. No longer to be Self, to experience the peace of an emptied heart, to experience pure though- that was his goal” (Hesse 14). Through my understanding, Siddhartha wanted to completely clear his mind and body of everything and rid any worldly distraction within himself.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 16, 2014 09:01 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
16 September 2014

Question # 8
Why does Siddhartha speak of himself in third person?

Answer

Siddhartha speaks of himself in the third person because he views himself from a more objective point of view. Usually it is people other than ourselves that can provide us with insight that we cannot see for ourselves. However, when Siddhartha meditates, uses active awareness to provide insight about himself. “Often he spoke of himself from a Chadogya-Upanishad the words: Truly, the name of the Brahman is satyam-verily, he who knows such a thing, will enter the heavenly world every day.”(pg 3)

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 16, 2014 09:10 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
16 September 2014

Question #55

In this chapter, Siddhartha experiences a “profound feeling of awakening from long
dreams.” Compare this to his time as a Samana; by contrast, how is Siddhartha now
“awakened”? Explain.

Answer

During the time Siddhartha was with the Samanas he was instructed by the oldest of the Samanas. “Siddhartha practiced self-denial, meditation, according to the new Samanas rules.” He also learned how to stray away from the path he had learned to go. When Siddhartha was awakened he had realized that he no longer needed to go home once he had found himself. After all of his searching for more and more insight, “Siddhartha emerged, more firmly concentrated. He felt: This had been the last tremor of the awakening, the last struggle of this birth. And it was not long until he walked again in long strides, started to proceed swiftly and impatiently, heading no longer for home, no longer to his father, no longer back.” (pg 20)

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 16, 2014 09:36 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative
16 September 2014

Question #66:
After Siddhartha decides not to join the Buddha’s community , from who does he choose to learn, instead?

Answer:
After Siddhartha decided not to join the Buddhist community, Siddhartha decided to learn from himself. He had sort of an epiphany where he realized that he knows about everything except himself and who he is. This is shown in the following quote, “I will learn from myself, be my own pupil; I will learn from myself the secret of Siddhartha” (Hesse 39).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 16, 2014 09:36 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
16 September 2014

Question #62: “No longer, I want to begin my thoughts and my life with Atman and with the suffering of the world. I do not want to kill and dissect myself if any longer, to find a secret behind the ruins.”
(A) Who is speaking? (B) Who is being addressed? (C) What is the context of this passage, ie what is going on, exactly, here?


Answer: On page 39, Siddhartha is the speaker of this quote, addressing the issue of finding his self-enlightenment. He is talking to himself and listing all of the reasons why “he did not know anything about himself” (Hesse 38) One of the reasons, as seen in the quote in the question, is that Siddhartha believes he has been trying to gain knowledge from teachings that others give him, and he has come to the realization that true knowledge comes from within. While he has not disputed any sort of knowledge that has come his way, he believes it is in his best interest to move on and seek understanding by himself.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 16, 2014 09:57 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
16 September 2014

Question #60:
“It was the self, I wanted to free myself from, which I sought to overcome.” From Chapter 4 - Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer:
Siddhartha was speaking to himself. Siddhartha is addressing himself in this quote. What is Siddhartha trying to address is that he is unable to overcome “self.” He would only deceive “self.” Siddhartha would only escape from the inner beam of “self.” However, Siddhartha would let his thoughts run rapid, trying get rid of himself. He felt that self is a mystery of him being alive. I believed that Siddhartha try to overcome “Man vs. Himself.”

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 16, 2014 10:22 PM

Bryce A Veller
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in Narratives
Sept .16, 2014

QUESTION 49)
What does Siddhartha want to learn from the teacher that he has been unable to learn ? Why hasn’t he learned this?
ANSWER
Siddhartha wanted to learn how to reach Nirvana, knowing that none of his fellow Brahmins have achieved Nirvana he knows he has to leave to find better teachers.
With the Samanas, "Siddhartha had one goal - to become empty, to become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure, and sorrow to let the Self die" (14). His path to self-negation was through physical pain, pain he endured until he no longer felt it as pain. When pain is gone, the Self-fades into oblivion and peace is attained. However, while pain became a memory for Siddhartha, peace did not come.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 16, 2014 10:23 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
16 September 2014

Question #60:
“It was the self, I wanted to free myself from, which I sought to overcome.” From Chapter 4 - Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.
Answer:
Siddhartha was speaking to himself. Siddhartha is addressing himself in this quote. What is Siddhartha trying to address is that he is unable to overcome “self.” He would only deceive “self.” Siddhartha would only escape from the inner beam of “self.” However, Siddhartha would let his thoughts run rapid, trying get rid of himself. He felt that self is a mystery of him being alive. I believed that Siddhartha try to overcome “Man vs. Himself.” (Hesse, 38)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 16, 2014 10:26 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
14 September 2014

Question #56:

Ch 4: In the context of this chapter, what is the difference between “my self” and “myself”? Does Siddhartha make sense when he says he tried to “free my self” from “myself”?

Answer:

Hesse portrays the “Self” as the consuming thoughts that Siddhartha is to conquer, whereas “myself” refers to the true person that he becomes when he conquers this “Self”: “Truly, nothing in the world has occupied my thoughts as much as the Self, this riddle, that I live…” (Hesse 38) Siddhartha views his Self as a burden, and in order to live a life of holiness, wholeness, and enlightenment, he must free his Self from himself.

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Hilda Rosner. Toronto: Bantam, 1971. 38. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 16, 2014 10:48 PM

Jazlynn Rosario and Bryce Veller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
16 September 2014


Group#10 Question:
In Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far, how has the HERO, if at all, recognized a “Threshold Guardian not as [a] threating [enemy], but as [a] useful [Ally]”? In other words, how has a/the [THRESHOLD] GUARDIAN who, at first, appeared “to be attacking” the HERO, in Hesse’s Siddhartha, in the readings, thus far, helped the hero by doing him/her “a huge favor”?


Answer:
Siddhartha's father is a threshold guardian who prevents Siddhartha from going into the forest, so Siddhartha initially thinks. At first, Siddhartha was skeptic about telling his father that he was leaving with Govinda. When Siddhartha goes to tell his father he is nervous of what his father’s response might be, “with your permission, Father, I have come to tell you that I wish to leave your house tomorrow…” (Hermann Hesse 10). Siddhartha ultimately thought his father was going to deny him the right to leave but instead the father tells him to go and if he learns anything of value to share it with his family. Another threshold guardian, thus far, is the eldest Samana because he is the one who teaches Siddhartha how to meditate, survive, how to deal with pain, and how to be a Samana. Siddhartha goes to leave with Govinda when the eldest Samana blocks him from leaving and is angry at him. Siddhartha then shows him that he has learned a great deal, and the Samana ultimately lets him go with his blessings.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 16, 2014 11:05 PM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Bursgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
September 16 2014

Question #42:
Evaluate the Buddha's pragmatic and implied response that is disciples are better off with him than in the world of desires even though they will not find salvation through his teachings. Is the Buddha intentionally deceiving his disciples "for their own good"?

Answer:
While Buddha doesn't give a direct response to Siddhartha's questioning about his doctrine and his teachings, he does imply that he believes his followers to be better off in his care. He asks Siddhartha if he has "see the throng of [his] samanas, of [his] many brothers who have taken refuge in the law?" (Hesse 19) With this query Buddha is implying that his disciples are lost without his law and his guidance, and that he is helping them by protecting them from the world's temptations. Buddha may very well be decieving his followers with some of his teachings, convincing them that they are reaching a higher level of enlightenment in order to protect them from the sin the world leads it's inhabitants into. By teaching them his doctrine, Buddha is helping his flock avoid the world's corrupting "pleasures" (Hesse 19).

Works Cited:
Hesse, Jermann. Siddhartha. Mineola: Dover, 1922. Print.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 16, 2014 11:20 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
16 September 2014


Question #36:
What has the Buddha robed from him? What has he given? Why doesn't it bother these holy men to beg for a living? Explain the difference in cultural values.


Answer:
The Buddha has robbed Siddhartha of his friend Govinda, who believed in him, but he now believes in the Buddha. Siddhartha is not happy about losing his close friend and shadow, Govinda, “he was my shadow and is now Gotama’s shadow. But he has given to me Siddhartha, myself” (Hermann Hess 36). Siddhartha was given himself in return for losing his close friend. It does not bother these men to beg for a living because that is what they have given up to follow the Buddha’s teachings. Siddhartha found a flaw in the teachings and did not agree or see eye to eye with the Buddha. Siddhartha ultimately does not want to judge “another life” he wants to judge for himself (Hesse 35). The main cultural difference is that the Samanas “seek release from the Self” (Hesse 35). The Buddha has his group of followers that learn through his teachings.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 16, 2014 11:38 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
17 September 2014

QUESTION:
After Siddhartha met with the Gotama, he declared that he would only learn from himself from that point on. After this week’s reading, do you think Gautama has stayed true to his self-promise? What or why not?

ANSWER:
Initially, Siddhartha was pleased with Gotama and was instructed to follow the Eightfold Path, the four main points, and other aspects of Buddhism. While this process he began to have doubts, he noticed a contradiction in Gotama’s teachings. Siddhartha later on finds out that Buddhism will not give him the answers he is looking for; he leaves Govinda behind and starts to begin a search for the meaning of life. Gotama himself grew up as a prince that had everything; despite all of the luxury’s in his life Gotama felt trapped midst the luxury like a bird in a golden cage.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 17, 2014 01:00 AM

Olivia N Ago-Stallworth

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative

17 September 2014

QUESTION #44

“Be aware of too much wisdom!”

Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page you find this on you version.

ANSWER:

A character named the Illustrious One spoke the quote that stated above, and he is addressing this quote to Siddhartha because they were discussing the Illustrious One’s teachings. Siddhartha was asking questions about how he did not learn from anyone or anything to develop his teachings. Siddhartha thought that if the Illustrious One could do it, it would be difficult because he lived a life of learning something. The Illustrious One asked Siddhartha what his goals in life are and would things in life be better to return to a life with and desires without the teachings at all. Siddhartha resulted in an astonished viewpoint of that scenario. He had never thought of living that way (Hesse 35). Siddhartha was defending himself by telling the Illustrious One that he is in no right to judge anyone and that the only life he should judge is his own (35). He then mentioned the teachings from the Semanas he learned as far as they seek release from Self. He regrets the fact he would be more interested in the Illustrious One’s teachings if he had gone to him before the Semanas (35). The Illustrious One then half-smiled and complemented Siddhartha on his cleverness, but told him, “Be on guard your against too much cleverness (35).”

Work Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 17, 2014 01:45 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
17 September 2014

Question #57:
As a Samana, Siddhartha says that as he sought Atman in meditation, he lost his self. Is this different from conquering his self? Is it different from freeing his self?

Answer:
“The hour was inevitable when he would again find himself, in sunshine or in moonlight, in shadow or in rain, and was again Self and Siddhartha, again felt the torment of the onerous life cycle” (Hesse 16). The connotation of “losing one’s self” implies that self only goes away for a short time, because what is lost can always be found, and this is how Siddhartha feels whenever he meditates. However, after enlightenment Siddhartha frees himself of the burden of negative connotation the Samana’s once gave to Self. “I want to rid myself of the Self, to conquer it, but I could not conquer it, I could only deceive it,” to Siddhartha losing his self and conquering his self were the same thing, both ways of trying to avoid what Self truly means (Hesse 38). However, freeing himself of Self, lead him to enlightenment because this idea of “Self” was no longer a negative, but the key to empowerment, he realized that discovering himself as an individual within the system of the world lead to enlightenment, not trying to rid himself of what made him Siddhartha.

Work Cited

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing Company, 1971. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 17, 2014 07:54 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
17 September 14

Question #53:
What is the “Self”? Why has it occupied Siddhartha so far?

Answer:
This answer comes from the online text in the LibGuide. The “self” is the pursuit of enlightenment, and it has occupied Siddhartha throughout the beginning of the novel. He is trying to rid himself of the “self” to experience an empty mind to be in tune with himself and the world around him. As he wants to leave home and become a samana, the idea is similar to that of a monk trying to become one with nature and the gods, by living a pure life.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 17, 2014 07:56 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 September 2014

Question:58# Siddhartha promised his father he would return home. Why did Siddhartha decide not to return?

Answer: Siddhartha did promise his father he would come back his first thought after realizing he would be released after all these it was time to his home and his father (Hesse). He finds himself telling himself, “ I am no longer what I was, I am no longer an ascetic, and I am not longer a priest…what shall I do home with my father?...all this is over for me now”(Hesse). Siddhartha gets this icy chill over his body as this happens he starts to question everything, who he is? Where does he belong? Whose life would he share? Shortly after this he started walking quickly and impatiently, no longer homewards, no long to his father, no longer looking backwards. In all Siddhartha is looking for new direction and a new place for him and this is just a journey that has to happen for him to be one with himself.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at September 17, 2014 08:59 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative CA01
15, September 2014


Question: What would have Siddhartha have done if his father would have said no to his request?

Answer: When Siddhartha goes to ask his father for permission to go to follow his heart he truly knows that what he wants more than anything. You could tell from his attitude that there's not much that can stop him. He goes to his father not for an answer but for the support of his father going into the shaman world. When Siddhartha says, "I trust my father will not object" (Siddhartha 10). You know that Siddhartha's set on the idea when he tells his father after standing in the same spot all night "I will stand and wait"(Siddhartha 11). Siddhartha does get permission from his father, but through Siddhartha that permission him being relentless showed his father that he was in a sense already gone. In turn, he needed to be go because he is already gone(Siddhartha 12)

Posted by: aaron virelli REDO at September 17, 2014 09:09 AM

Tashanna Harris
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
Siddhartha
17 September 2014

Question #3
How are the Samanas described? From his description, how does the author feel about them?

Answer:
"He saw businessmen trading, princes going to the hunt, mourners weeping over the dead ,prostitutes offering themselves" (Hermann Hesse 13). He also says lovers where making love and parents where attending to there children. "They were all illusions of sense, happiness and beauty" (Hermann Hesse 14). Siddhartha described them as soon going to die off one day because the town was living a bitter life. life wasn't simple it was painful for the people in the town.
The author describes them as a community of individuals whose since of life was like how we live in the present world, a world full of lies, pain and crime.

Posted by: Tashanna.harris at September 17, 2014 09:43 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative (CA02)
17 September 2014

QUESTION #48:

What does Siddhartha leave in the grove with the Buddha (Gautama/Gotama) and Govinda?

ANSWER:

In the Grove, Siddhartha leaves his “past self” (Hesse 35) behind. All his old ways and knowledge was left right there in that grove along with the Buddha and Govinda. Siddhartha believed that the way to enlightenment could not be found through teachings because “they do not contain the mystery of what the exalted one has experienced for himself” (Hesse 31). Only through one’s journey can a person find enlightenment. It was this idea, this thought that sparked Siddhartha’s decision.

Siddhartha knew that there were no “better teachings” (Hesse 31), yet he still had to “depart from all teachings and all teachers” (Hesse 31) if he wanted to achieve his goal. This goal, the “salvation from the self” (Hesse 31) is what the Samanas seek.

Only after the Buddha had left did Siddhartha realize the gift the Buddha had given to him, himself. It was “the self, the purpose and essence of which” Siddhartha “sought to learn” (Hesse 35). Through these thoughts he realized that he had “called the visible world a deception, called my eyes and my tongue coincidental and worthless” (Hesse 37). However, it was this deception that had blinded him, and he realized that he had “start his life anew” (Hesse 38).

Works Cited

Mueller, Gustav E. "Hermann Hesse." Books Abroad 21.2 (1947): 30-40. Web. .

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 17, 2014 10:52 AM

Matthew Basin
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220CL-On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformational in Narrative
16 Sept. 2014

Question #33:
Why does Govinda choose to join him? Why don’t Siddhartha join him?

Answer:
The reason why Govinda chose to join him is that Govinda agrees with Gotama sayings, so he decides to stay with him. Siddhartha does not join him because he does not believe the teachings from Gotama and thinks Govinda is a distraction to him, so he decides to leave.

“ Siddhartha, it is not for me to reproach you. We have both listened to the Illustrious One, we have both heard his teachings. Govinda has listened to the teachings and has accepted then, but you, my dear friend, will you not also tread the same path” (Hesse 29)?

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 17, 2014 11:23 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
16 September 2014.

QUESTION # 47:
“[T]here is one thing that this clear, worthy instruction does not contain; it does not contain the secret of what the Illustrious One himself experienced—he alone among hundreds of thousands. That is what I thought and realized when I heard your teachings. That is why I am going on my way—not to seek another doctrine, for I know there is none, but to leave all doctrines and all teachers and to reach my goal alone—or die.”
Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?,(b.)Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations).Let us know what page to find this on your version.

ANSWER:
The above quote is from Siddhartha’s conversation with Gotama in the grove (Hesse 34) after Govinda had taken an oath to be a follower of the Buddha. Siddhartha is addressing Gotama, The Illustrious One, to point firstly out a flaw in the doctrine of the Buddha, “O prefect one. But according to your teachings, this unity… broken in one place.” (Hesse 32) and seek clarification for his thoughts, “My talk is perhaps too bold,…communicating to him my thoughts. Will the Illustrious One hear me a little longer?” (Hesse 32), before he continued on his journey to achieve his goal of Nirvana. As Siddhartha points out to Gotama that no one taught him how to reach Nirvana, “To nobody, O Illustrious One … hour of your enlightenment.”,(Hesse 34), it was something he had to do for himself. Thus causing Siddhartha to conclude that he will not find enlightenment through doctrines but in a self-directed approach in finding himself, “But he has given to me Siddhartha, myself.” (Hesse 36).

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 17, 2014 11:32 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
15 September 2013

Question #16: What made Siddhartha shiver inwardly like a small animal? Why?
Answer: Siddhartha shivered inwardly like a small animal because he realized how alone he was. He felt great despair because he felt as if he didn’t belong anywhere. “Even the most secluded hermit in the woods was not one and alone; he also belonged to a class of people. Govinda had become a monk and thousands of monks were his brothers, wore the same gown, spoke the same language. But he Siddhartha, were did he belong? Whose life would he speak?” (Page 41, Line 20)
Work Cited
Hesse, H. (1951). Siddhartha; New York: New Directions.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 17, 2014 12:17 PM


Matthew Basin and Peter Beoleli
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220CL-On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformational in Narrative
17 Sept. 2014

Question:
(a.) Why, according to Christopher Vogler, do students/readers “often have trouble grasping the elusive archetype of the Shapeshifter”? (b.) What, exactly, is his or her job? (c.) Who, or what, best fits this archetype in Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol?
Answer:
Shapeshifters change appearance or mood, and are difficult for the hero and the influence to pin down. The shapeshifter serves as the dramatic function of bringing doubt and suspense into the story. Jacob Marley would be the shapeshifter in A Christmas Carol because he sent the three ghost to show Scrooge how his life would be if he changed his mood. Marley brought suspense to the story by showing up in Scrooges room and turned Scrooges mood around.

“Shapeshifters change appearance or mood, and are difficult for the hero and the influence to pin down (Volger 59).”
“The shapeshifter serves as the dramatic function of bringing doubt and suspense into the story (Volger 61).”

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 17, 2014 12:20 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
17 September 2014

Question #89:
From Chapter 5 - How does Siddhartha prepare for Kamala? What does he want from her?

Answer:
Siddhartha prepare for Kamala by cutting his hair and losing his Samana style. He wants to learn the pleasure of love. (Hesse, 53-54)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 17, 2014 11:00 PM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
15 September 2014

Question #41: Explain in your own words the seeming contradiction in Buddha’s doctrine of causality as described by Siddhartha. If all event, including mental events are caused, how can any action be considered right or wrong?

Answer
Siddhartha expresses that although Buddha’s doctrine of causality “has been presented so irrefutably; truly…” (Hesse 22), he argues that there is a small gap that leads to a contradiction within the doctrine. Siddhartha states that unity and necessary can be broken in a single place, and this gap causes the uniform law of the world to break apart and become void. Whether an action is right or wrong depends on the outcome, the cause produces. Even if destiny foretold a person to perform a certain act, the consequences of this deed deem whether the action is justifiable or not. The effect of the cause determines whether the initial action was right or wrong.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 17, 2014 11:52 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
18 September 2014

Question #92: When Siddhartha kisses a woman for the first time, there is a style change. How so? Why?

Answer: After Siddhartha kisses Kamala, he has a new found outlook on life. After he kisses her, he feels “overwhelmed with pride” (Hesse 58), and believes that he is no longer a Samana. When he was a Samana, it was their duty to beg for food, but now he believes it is o longer fitting for him to do so. Siddhartha states that the life in the area he has come to is one of simplicity and to work and make money has much more fulfillment in it than to just beg for things. Siddhartha now intends to work as a merchant so he can buy things, including shoes and clothes for himself so that he is able to impress Kamala.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 18, 2014 01:38 PM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative
18 September 2014

Question #93
Who is the character, Kamaswami? Why is he/she important to the narrative?

Answer:
The character Kamaswami is the richest merchant in town. He holds a lot of power in the town. He is important to the narrative because he is growing old and soon some one will have to take his place, Siddhartha has been put in a position to take on the role as a merchant. Kamaswami teaches Siddhartha the business of a merchant, Siddhartha took on a big role in his masters business even though he just moved in Kamaswami was very comfortable with him as he "grew accustomed to conferring with him about all important affairs" (Hesse 67).

Posted by: Tashanna.harris at September 18, 2014 10:27 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
19 September 2014

Question # 147:
From Chapter 8 - What reason did Siddhartha have to have his experiences?

Answer:
Siddhartha goes through experiences of the world of average people by gaining financial wealth. However, Siddhartha acknowledges the way he and the Kamaswami people acted on stupidity, error, nausea, disillusionment, and sorrow in order to become a child again and reborn again. He had to suffer a mental breakdown, by having suicide thoughts in order to experience grace again (Hesse, 96-97).

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 19, 2014 04:25 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #118:
From Chapter 7- Does Siddhartha have a bad life? Explain. What is good about it? Be specific.

ANSWER:
Siddhartha does not have a bad life because he has people that care about him. He is also engaged with his surroundings, the world; however that is maybe a reason why he may be unhappy because he might not be involved the way he wants to be.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 20, 2014 04:12 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #142:
From Chapter 8- What does Siddhartha think he has become?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha realized that he had lived a life of sins because all the values that he once had were all lost. He thinks that he became an arrogant person meanwhile he talked bad about everyone else that was like that but he did not realize he was one himself.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 20, 2014 04:12 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #183:
From Chapter 11- Why did Siddhartha envy some of the people he ferried across the river?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha envied some of the people that he ferried across the river because he did not have “the sense of importance with which they lived their lives, the depth of their pleasure and sorrows, the anxious but sweet happiness of their continual power to love” (Hesse 77).

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 20, 2014 04:13 PM

Tashanna Harris
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
20 September 2014

Question #152
What do the people say about Siddhartha and the Ferryman?

Answer:
People often mistaken Siddhartha and the ferryman as brothers because they were always together. Siddhartha soon began to resemble the ferryman both having equal personality traits. People would often refer the two wise men as either magicians or holy men bling by the water. When people went down to the river to see who the men were they "only found two friendly old men, who appeared to be mute, rather odd and stupid" (Hesse 109).

Posted by: Tashanna.harris at September 20, 2014 09:57 PM

Tashanna Harris
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
20 September 2014

Question:#171
What does Vasudeva suggest Siddhartha does with his son?

Answer:
Vasudeva suggest that Siddhartha take his don back to the town back to where his mother lived, he wants Siddhartha to take his son back to his place of comfort instead of being in a hut with two old men. He wants Siddhartha to take his son around boys and girls around his age, take him back to the world he belongs in. The son didn't belong around two old men day in and day out , Vasudeva also wanted Siddhartha to understand that no matter how much he loved his son he had to let him be out in the world to get the experience that he once had.

Posted by: Tashanna harris at September 20, 2014 10:42 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
17 September 2014

Question #98:
From Chapter 5 – What must Siddhartha have to be “good enough” for Kamala?

Answer:
In order to be “good enough” for Kamala the courtesan, Siddhartha must “have clothes, fine clothes, and shoes, fine shoes, and plenty of money in his purse and presents for Kamala” (Hesse 54).

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Hilda Rosner. Toronto: Bantam, 1971. 54. Print.


Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 21, 2014 01:17 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
21 September 2014

Question #88:
Hesse uses a simile to describe the woman’s (Kamala’s) mouth. What is it? What does that say about the woman?

Answer:
“He put his face against hers, placed his lips against hers, which were like a freshly cut fig,” these words describe Kamala’s lips as the fresh sweetness of a fig (Hesse 57). Figs have a natural sweetness in their fruits, and the skin to the fruit is moist and soft, comparing Kamala’s lips to such fruits highly complimenting her subtle lips with the qualities of this such fruit.

Work Cited

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing Company, 1971. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 21, 2014 04:56 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
21 September 2014

Question #155:
What does Siddhartha offer to do with his clothes? Why is this significant?

Answer:
Extrinsically the clothes become offerings to the Ferryman, “You once previously took me across this river without payment, so please do it today and take my clothes instead,” as a debt repaid to an old from a past life (Hesse 103). However, intrinsically, the shedding of the clothes at the river represents Siddhartha relinquishing the bonds to his old life in the town. Repulsed by his life he lived in the city, Siddhartha wanted a new start and began his restarted journey to enlightenment when he shed his clothes at the river that day, taking note of the nauseating life of the ordinary man; however, moving forward towards his goals.

Work Cited

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing Company, 1971. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 21, 2014 04:58 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
21 September 2014

Question #169:
What did Siddhartha start to realize about his son?

Answer:
Siddhartha knew that raising his son out in the wild, by the river would be difficult since his son grew up in luxury (Hesse 117); however “Siddhartha began to realize that no happiness and peace had come to him with his son, only sorrow and trouble of his love” (Hesse 118). Though Siddhartha loved his son, the lifestyle of Siddhartha could not be forced upon him for he grew up with a different lifestyle, hopes, and dreams separate from his father’s, much like Siddhartha and his father (Hesse 123). When young Siddhartha left Siddhartha chased after him, but knew that ultimately this was pointless, for young Siddhartha needed to find his own way, just like Siddhartha did when he left his father’s home as a child (126).

Work Cited

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing Company, 1971. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 21, 2014 05:01 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
18 September 2014

Question 112:
From Chapter 6 – What makes Siddhartha so good at the art of business? Is he an excellent partner for Kamaswami? Why or why not?

Answer:
Siddhartha is good at business because he knows that he does not need money, he knows how to be patient. He also seems to be a people person, taking time to get to know people. He does not let his work stress him out. In the sense that Siddhartha does not lose money for Kamaswami, and the business thrives, he is an excellent partner for Kamaswami. However, they are very different in their approach to doing business when they begin their partnership.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 21, 2014 05:27 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
22 September 2014

Question #146: What does Siddhartha realize had been hindering him?

Answer: On page 99, Siddhartha believes that “too much knowledge had hindered him.” (Hesse) In his neverending quest to receive enlightenment, he found that he had always had too much on his mind, and that in order to find himself, he had to kill off the Siddhartha with all of the knowledge and information, and lose himself. He realized that no teacher could have brought him salvation, so he had to lose all of the knowledge in order to find himself.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 21, 2014 07:52 PM

Caitlin Christian
21 September 2014
ENG 220 CL

Question #126:
From Chapter 7- What is the nature of Siddhartha’s “inward voice”? Is his inward voice the same thing as his conscience? Explain the similarity of or the difference between the two faculties.
Answer:
Siddhartha seems to have an inner voice throughout each chapter, which guides him. Kamala is a big influence on whether to listen to this inner voice or not. Kamala represents desire and love, which brings up feelings of resistance to other spiritual influences. Siddhartha seems to have a battle within himself about Kamala. Once Kamala and Siddhartha decide to be lovers it is clear that this is a conscious decision that Siddhartha is making. Very often Siddhartha seems to have a switch between whether he is deciding on listening to his inner voice or making a conscious decision. Siddhartha seems to understand the difference between obeying this inner voice and trusting his conscience. These faculties have similar influences even though his consciousness seems to want to be more spiritually guided than his inner voice.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 21, 2014 11:29 PM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220 CL
19 September 2014

Question #111:
From Chapter 6- What is the nature of inner sanctuary that both Siddhartha and Kamala possess, but the childlike people do not have? Is this the reason that Siddhartha and Kamala cannot truly love, whereas the childlike people can love? Is the “inner sanctuary” a kind of authentic self that the childlike people in their superficiality lack?
Answer:
Siddhartha and Kamala seem to handle every situation with ease and laughter, letting it all pass. Living the life like a Samana has shown Siddhartha the simple ways of life instead of complicating himself with things such as wealth. Siddhartha feels these childish ways of stressing over materialistic items is a form of suffering. Siddhartha’s true search is for enlightenment, no matter what his life is centered around. This search is no different from with Kamala; even with feelings of love Siddhartha is searching for enlightenment. Siddhartha and Kamala possess inner sanctuary making them incapable of suffering from normal troubles like childlike people do. Siddhartha and Kamala put their whole selves into this search instead of superficial things of the world.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 22, 2014 01:59 AM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
22 September 2014

Question #101
Kamala asks Siddhartha to act a certain way toward Kamaswami. How does she want him to act and why is/will this be important? Does he heed her advice? Was Kamala right?

Text Source: “Siddhartha,” By Herman Hess

In Chapter 5, Kamala wants Siddhartha to be friendly, respectful, and honest towards Kamaswami. Hesse writes, “Kamaswami expects you to call on him; he is the richest merchant in town. If you please him, he will take you into his service…” (Hesse 59). This will be important for Siddhartha so he can obtain a trustworthy job and make money as well as being a merchant to please Kamala (Hesse 59). Siddhartha takes Kamala’s advice and earns the respect of Kamaswami. In fact, Kamaswami is delighted in the kind of person Siddhartha is and gives Siddhartha a job and has him stay at his own house with all Siddhartha’s needs provided for (Hesse 65).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 22, 2014 07:24 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
22 September 2014

Question #157
The ferryman says that Siddhartha will learn to listen from whom?

Text Source: “Siddhartha,” By Herman Hesse

In chapter 9, the ferryman says that Siddhartha will learn to listen from the river. Hesse writes, “You will learn it,” said Vasudeva, “but not from me. The river has taught me to listen; you will learn from it, too. The river knows everything; one can learn everything from it” (Hesse 105).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 22, 2014 07:25 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
22 September 2014

Question #168
“… did you too learn that secret from the river: that there is no time?” Answer the following question about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking? , (b.) Who is being addressed? , (c.) What is the context of the passage, i.e., what is going on exactly here?

Text Source: “Siddhartha,” By Herman Hesse

Siddhartha was the one who asked Vasudeva this question. This was when Siddhartha let Vasudeva know that he really understood how the river was. The river was everywhere at the same time, that Siddhartha’s life was a river (Hesse 107). This quote was found in the conversation between Siddhartha and Vasudeva on pages 106 and 107.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at September 22, 2014 07:27 PM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220 CL
22 September 2014

Question #185
From Chapter 11- On the day when Siddhartha decided to go to town, who was laughing at Siddhartha?
Answer:
Siddhartha goes on living his life but realizes life without his son is what causes a lot of his pain. He seeks great wisdom from his sorrow but Siddhartha begins to understand how desperate he is becoming. Siddhartha begins searching for his son in hope of filling his pain but along his journey, he stops because he realizes the river is laughing at him. In the river, Siddhartha sees his father which he concludes means he has undergone sorrows which are passing. Vasuveda makes Siddhartha go back to the river and listen closely. Siddhartha realizes that he does not hear sorrows; he hears joy from the voices, which brings joy to him. Siddhartha begins to understand the concept of unity in his life, which creates the sound of “Om” surrounding him.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 22, 2014 10:19 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
22 September 2014

QUESTION #180:
From Chapter 10- How does young Siddhartha take advantage of the father?

ANSWER:
“Siddhartha understood that his son did not know him, that he could not love him as a father. Slowly, he also saw and realized that the eleven-year-old child was a spoilt mother’s boy and had been brought up in the habits of the rich, that he was accustomed to commanding servants. Siddhartha understood that the spoilt and grieving boy could not suddenly be content in a strange and poor place. He did not press him; he did a great deal for him and always saved the best morsels for him. Slowly, by friendly patience, he hoped to win him over”. (Hesse, 118) Young Siddhartha takes full advantage of his father because he knows that Siddhartha is not the kind of father to punish him, and Young Siddhartha continuously ask Siddhartha for more even though he knows that he is poor. Young Siddhartha continues to do whatever he please.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 22, 2014 10:25 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
22 September 2014

QUESTION #138:
From Chapter 8- When Siddhartha awakes, who does he see?

ANSWER:
“He had slept wonderfully. He was remarkably awake, happy and curious. Siddhartha raised himself and saw a monk in a yellow gown, with shaved head sitting opposite him in the attitude of a thinker”. (Hesse, 91) After a while he realizes the monk in the yellow gown was Govinda. Govinda was a friend and monk from his childhood. He did not recognize him at first because Govinda did not have hair on his head nor a beard, he also aged. “He still showed the old characteristics in his face- eagerness, loyalty, curiously, anxiety” (Hesse, 91)

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 22, 2014 11:28 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
19 September 2014

“…when the Om entered his consciousness: he became aware of him-self in his misery and in his error.”

Question #150:

From Chapter 8 – Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here?

Answer:

In the Hilda Rosner version of Siddhartha, it says, “All the torment of these recent times, all the disillusionment, all the despair, had not affected him so much as it did the moment the Om reached his consciousness, and he recognized his wretchedness and his crime.” (Hesse 89)

An unnamed narrator seemingly addresses readers who are in desperate need of spiritual enlightenment and support; it is illogical to think that the narrator is speaking to those who are spiritually satisfied. Prior to this passage, Siddhartha was going to commit suicide by drowning himself in a river. This passage reflects the rebirth of Siddhartha when “Om” revisited his mind and soul. This “Om,” used as a method of reflection, has allowed him to become intensely aware of his “wretchedness and his crime,” which lead to his deterred soulful happiness. (Hesse 89)

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Hilda Rosner. Toronto: Bantam, 1971. 89. Print.


Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 22, 2014 11:40 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
22 September 2014

Question #164:
Why does Kamala scream out in pain?

Answer:
“Kamala herself was tired, and while the boy ate a banana, she crouched down on the ground, half-closed her eyes and rested. Suddenly, however, she uttered a cry of pain. The boy, startled, looked at her and saw her face white with horror. From under her clothes a small black snake, which had bitten Kamala, crawled away (Hesse, 111).” Kamala screams out in pain because she gets bit by a snake, while walking in the forest with her son.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 22, 2014 11:51 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL – CA02
23 September 2014


Question 104:


From Chapter 6 - Explain how Siddhartha takes control of the job interview with Kamaswami. Be specific.


When Siddhartha gains the favor of Kamala he is essentially given letters of recommendation to Kamaswami and when Siddhartha arrives to state his worth, it is quite obvious. “But like this, Siddhartha can wait calmly, he knows no impatience, he knows no emergency, for a long time he can allow hunger to besiege him and can laugh about it. This, sir, is what fasting is good for."…"And would you write something for me on this piece of paper? ..." Siddhartha wrote and returned the paper …"Writing is good, thinking is better. Being smart is good, being patient is better."(Hesse Ch. 6) We see how Kamaswami needs to have a worker who is both able to read and write but that is not all there is to becoming a merchant. Siddhartha has learned many skills from the Samana, such as the fasting cited above, and it is these skills that help him gain employment and become Kamaswami’s equal.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 23, 2014 02:14 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL – CA02
23 September 2014


Question 140:


From Chapter 8 - What does Siddhartha say he is doing?


In the eighth chapter, Siddhartha contemplates suicide but is saved by the holy word, “Om." When Siddhartha utters this word, he no longer feels the need to commit suicide, but instead slips into a deep sleep to awake against the coconut tree looking right up at Govinda. When the two recognize each other past the clothes and years, the question arises on what Siddhartha will do to which he responds. "Right so, my dear, you have observed well, your keen eyes see everything. But I haven't said to you that I was a Samana. I said: I'm on a pilgrimage. And so it is: I'm on a pilgrimage."(Hesse Ch. 8) Siddhartha goes on a pilgrimage, but he does not make it too far finding solace in the river and its ferryman with a golden ear.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 23, 2014 02:15 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL – CA02
23 September 2014


Question 179:


From Chapter 10 - What is Siddhartha’s final opinion about his son?


At the end of Chapter ten, we see Siddhartha collapsing near the garden he met Kamala at when searching for his son. Siddhartha demonstrates his last opinion about his son when he realizes the oneness of the world in chapter eleven. Siddhartha looked into the water, and images appeared to him in the moving water: his father appeared, lonely, mourning for his son; he himself appeared, lonely, he also being tied with the bondage of yearning to his distant son; his son appeared, lonely as well, the boy, greedily rushing along the burning course of his young wishes, each one heading for his goal, each one obsessed by the goal, each one suffering. The river sang with a voice of suffering, longingly it sang, longingly, it flowed towards its goal, lamentingly its voice sang… And everything together, all voices, all goals, all yearning, all suffering, all pleasure, all that was good and evil, all of this together was the world. All of it together was the flow of events, was the music of life.(Hesse Ch. 11) Siddhartha learns from the river that all desires are equal, and all that is evil is also good because of the great balance in each person. This oneness of the river brings a calm over Siddhartha when he finally allows the will within himself to let his son strike it out on his own just as he had at the same age.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 23, 2014 02:15 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
22 September 2014

QUESTION #119:
From Chapter 7 - What had Siddartha learned "amongst the people"? Be specific.

ANSWER:
According to Hermann Hesse, the only thing that Siddartha learned from the people were unpleasant things that he despised (Hesse 78). He learned the facial expressions that the people would use at different types of awful moments like, "discontent, sickliness, displeasure, idleness, of lovelessness (78)."


Work Cited
Hesse, Hermann. Siddartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 23, 2014 02:20 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth

Dr. B Lee Hobbs

ENG-220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

23 September 2014

QUESTION #128:

From Chapter 7 - Explain the major points of Siddartha’s method of self-analysis.

ANSWER:

Siddartha’s major points of his self-analysis method were various ways of him discovering the changes he was going through in his new life. These moments occurred when he was trying to learn from experience but was influenced heavily by his surroundings. During this self-discovery, he would listen to his conscience, and he referred to it as “bright and clear inward voice, that had once awakened him in his finest hours....(Hesse 78).” His dreams would also assist with this process especially when he was having that one crazy night and woke up from a dream back to what his reality he evaluated, “Awakening from this dream, he was overwhelmed by a feeling of great sadness (82).” In addition, the major parts of his self-analysis were the moments when he was all alone in Kamala’s garden because that gave him the time to reflect on events that have happened in this crazy life of his that were not right.

Work Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 23, 2014 02:46 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 September 2014

QUESTION #190:

From Chapter 11 - What does Vasudeva do at the end of the chapter?

ANSWER:

At the end of chapter 11, Vasudeva tells Siddartha that he is leaving his life of being a ferryman and Siddartha resulted in a sense of pride that he was stepping into a world of peace. Siddartha thinks that his role in the world has influenced Vasudeva towards a better life (Hesse 137).

Work Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 23, 2014 02:59 AM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 September 2014

QUESTION 45: “Everyone takes, everyone gives, Life is like that.” Who is speaking? Who is being addressed? What is the context of this passage?

ANSWER:
The passage is found on page sixty-four of our text, “Everyone takes, everyone gives, Life is like that.” (Hesse 64) Siddhartha is addressing the business merchant and explaining that everyone has something of value to give in exchange for something they want. This conversation with the merchant is happening because Siddhartha is trying to convince the merchant to teach him about being a business man.

Works Cited
Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books, 1971. Novel.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 23, 2014 09:19 AM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 September 2014

QUESTION 45: “Never before, had it become so strangely clear to Siddhartha, how closely lust was akin to death.” Who is speaking? Who is being addressed? What is the context of this passage?

ANSWER:
The passage is found on page Eighty-one of our text, “Never before, had it become so strangely clear to Siddhartha, how closely lust was akin to death.” (Hesse 64) Siddhartha is not addressing anyone, but rather, he is coming to the realization that he has slipped away from all his teachings. Siddhartha is starting to realize that he is transforming into the very type of people he despised growing up.

Works Cited
Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books, 1971. Novel.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 23, 2014 09:29 AM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 September 2014

QUESTION 45: Why does the son hate the father?

ANSWER:
The son hates the father because the son lost his mother during a pilgrimage to see the great Buddha. When the son’s mother died from a snake bite, that’s when he met Siddhartha, his father. Siddhartha exercised great patience when dealing with the son. The patience and love infuriated the boy. “I know, however, that you continually punish me and make me feel small with your piety and indulgence.” (Hesse 123) In addition, the son grew up in a different lifestyle than that of Siddhartha. “The young bird is accustomed to a different life, to a different nest” (Hesse 118,119)

Works Cited
Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books, 1971. Novel.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at September 23, 2014 11:08 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 September 2014

Question # 99: Chapter 5-
What skill does Siddhartha have that most people in town do not? Why is this important? How will it help or hurt him?

Answer:
The skill that Siddhartha has is the ability to read and write. This is important because Siddhartha desperately wants to learn about love from Kamala, however, she will only teach him if he has money to nicely clothe himself and buy her gifts. Being able to read and write gives him an opportunity to earn money with a wealthy merchant. " Most people cannot. Even I cannot. It is very good that you can read and write, very good" (Hesse 48).

* All quotes are found using the Barnes and Noble Classics edition of Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 23, 2014 11:15 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 September 2014

Question # 149: Chapter 8-
How is Siddhartha different when he wakes up? Who is sitting with him?

Answer:
When Siddhartha wakes up he is rejuvenated and feels as if he has been reborn. " What a wondrous sleep this had been after all! Never had sleep so refreshed him, so renewed him, so rejuvenated him! Maybe he really had died, had perished and been reborn in a new form" (Hesse 71). When he wakes, a monk is seated across from him and he quickly realizes that it is Govinda. " Seated across from him in the posture of meditation, a person, a strange man, a monk in a yellow robe with a shaved head. He looked closely at the man, who had no hair on his head or face, and it was not long before he recognized Govinda in the monk" (Hesse 72).

* All quotes are found using the Barnes and Nobles Classics edition of Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 23, 2014 11:28 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA01
23 September 2014

Question # 163: Chapter 9-
Where is Kamala on her way to see?

Answer:
Kamala is on her way to see the dying Buddha."One of these days, when so many were making pilgrimage to the dying Buddha, Kamala, once one of the most beautiful of all the courtesans, was also on a pilgrimage to him" (Hesse 88).

* All quotes are found using the Barnes and Noble Classics edition of Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 23, 2014 11:35 AM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
22 September 2014

Question #150:

From Chapter 9 – Why were so many monks crossing the river?

Answer:

There were many monks crossing the river to visit the dying Buddha before he passed. “…monks came along, followers of Gotama, the Buddha…” “…the Illustrious One was seriously ill and would soon suffer his last mortal death and attain salvation.” (Hesse 109)

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Hilda Rosner. Toronto: Bantam, 1971. 109. Print.


Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 23, 2014 07:18 PM

RESUBMITTION

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
22 September 2014

Question #161:

From Chapter 9 – Why were so many monks crossing the river?

Answer:

There were many monks crossing the river to visit the dying Buddha before he passed. “…monks came along, followers of Gotama, the Buddha…” “…the Illustrious One was seriously ill and would soon suffer his last mortal death and attain salvation.” (Hesse 109)

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Hilda Rosner. Toronto: Bantam, 1971. 109. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 23, 2014 07:21 PM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
September 23 2014

Question #105:
From Chapter 6-Explain what Siddhartha means when he states the following assertions: "I can think. I can wait. I can fast." Explicate the consequential abilities entailed in each assertion.

Answer:
Siddhartha is stating the useful abilities that he learned from being a Samana. When he says he "can think" (Hesse 35) he really means that he can use logic and reason to deduce the right way to deal with elements of life, like he does when he works with Kamaswami (Hesse 36). By saying he "can wait" (Hesse 35) he is actually stating that he is patient with every aspect of life, even if they are unpleasant. Finally, by stating that he "can fast" (Hesse 35) Siddhartha is saying that he has the self-control not to let his bodily desires and impulses drive his life, thus letting him life it to the fullest.

Works Cited:
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Mineola: Dover, 1998. Print.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 23, 2014 07:23 PM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
September 23 2014

Question #133:
From Chapter 7-Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on you version.

Answer:
The quote found on pages 40-41, is spoken by the narrator of the text. The reader is being addressed to the reader of the text. The context of the question is that Siddhartha has lost his direction in life, he has lost the spark that lead him through his journey, instead he lives a meaningless life, surrounded by material possessions that are irrelevant to him (Hesse 43).

Works Cited:
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Mineola: Dover, 1998. Print.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 23, 2014 07:44 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
24 September 2014

Question #87:

From Chapter 5 – Who is Kamala, and what is her profession? Does Hesse seem to portray this fact in a negative or positive way? Why is this significant to the story?

Answer:

Kamala is a very beautiful woman whom Siddhartha goes to for advice about love and lust. She lives in a palace and has servants, but she is not wealthy. Hesse portrays Kamala in a positive way. She does teaches him all that he must know involving love and Siddhartha gives her money and gifts. This is significant to the story because Siddhartha has a strong urge for learning, but he has never learned about love. She plays an important part in his life showing that he must know all things about every aspect of life.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 23, 2014 07:58 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
23 September 2014.

QUESTION # 115:
From Chapter 6- What does Siddhartha’s inner voice say? How is life “flowing past” him?

ANSWER:
As moral human beings, we all have a conscience, a deep-rooted inner desire, or something similar to what Siddhartha refers to as his inner voice. Siddhartha describes this inner voice as, “a soft, gentle voice, which reminded him quietly… hardly hear it.,” (Hesse 71) which directs his moral compass. As such, his inner voice tells him that the life he is leading is far from who he is, “Then he suddenly saw clearly he was leading a strange life… real life was flowing past him and did not touch him.” (Hesse 71), bringing about the feeling of disconnection from who Siddhartha truly is, as this is all a game to him, because it is an epistemological shift from what he knew.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 23, 2014 08:22 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
23 September 2014.

QUESTION # 134:
From Chapter 8- What was the only thing Siddhartha knew?

ANSWER:
The only thing that Siddhartha knew was, “and knew only one thing- that he could not go back… degree of nausea.” (Hesse 87), as he had become tired of the past life he leads as a merchant that he had to escape.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 23, 2014 08:22 PM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
September 23 2014

Question #179: From Chapter 10-What is Siddhartha's final opinion about his son?

Answer:
Siddhartha's final opinion about his son is that he "could not help his son, [and] that he ought not to attach himself to him." (Hesse 68) Siddhartha realized that his son was not like him, but was instead part of the world of greed and physical pleasure that he had left behind. While this realization hurts Siddhartha he also realizes that he needs to move on, and simply let the hurt subside (Hesse 68).

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 23, 2014 08:23 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
24 September 2014

Question #148:

From Chapter 8 – Why does Siddhartha wish to kill himself?

Answer:

He feels like there is nothing left for him to do. There is nothing left for him to learn. He feels like he has lost his way to enlightenment. He looked back on his life and wondered, “When had he really been happy?” (Hesse Pg. 83).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 23, 2014 09:03 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
24 September 2014

Question #159:

From Chapter 9 – What word does the river pronounce when all of its ten thousand voices speak at the same time?

Answer:

The river says and continuously repeats the word “Om”. Om means “’The perfect One’ or ‘Perfection’”(Hesse 89).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 23, 2014 09:10 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
10 Sep 2014

Question 120:
From Chapter 7- What happened when Siddhartha’s property finally became a chain and a burden?
Answer:
He becomes depressed because he realized that these possessions had brought him down to the level of an average person.

“He had tasted riches, passion, and power, but for a long time he remained a Samana in his heart (Hesse 75)”.
“Siddhartha had to learn how to transact business affairs, to exercise power over people, to amuse himself with women; he had learned to wear fine cloths, to command servants, to bathe in sweat-smelling waters (Hesse 77)”.

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 23, 2014 09:11 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
10 Sep 2014

Question #137:
From Chapter 8- What sound does Siddhartha hear right before jumping into the river?
Answer:
The sound that Siddhartha hears right before jumping into the river is he hears the sound "om" from within.

“The from a remote part of his soul, from the past of his tired life, he heard a sound. It was one word, one syllable, which without thinking he spoke indistinctly, the ancient beginning and ending of all Bramin prayers, the holy Om, which had the meaning of “ the Perfect One” or “Perfection” (Hesse 89)”.

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 23, 2014 09:12 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
10 Sep 2014

Question # 188:
From Chapter 11- What does the river do when Siddhartha goes to see his son? Whose reflection does he see?
Answer:
The river laughs at Siddhartha when he goes to see his son and then he sees his father’s reflection in the water.

“ The river was laughing clearly and merrily at the old ferryman. Siddahartha stood still, he bent over the water in order to hear better (Hesse 131)”.
“ His face resembled that of another person, whom he had once known and loved and even feared. It resembled the face of his father, the Bramin. (Hesse 131)”.

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 23, 2014 09:13 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
23 September 2014

Question #156:
From chapter 9- How many years does the ferryman think it has been since he last saw Siddhartha? What is important about this scene?

Answer:
The ferryman believes that is has been more than 20 years since he was seen Siddhartha. This is shown in the following quote, “It is a long time ago, maybe more than twenty years ago” (Hesse 103).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 23, 2014 09:15 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
23 September 2014.

QUESTION # 177:
From Chapter 10- What disappeared when young Siddhartha left?

ANSWER:
When young Siddhartha disappeared the coin basket and boat was missing, “A small two- colored basket... The boat, too, had gone.” (Hesse 124)

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 23, 2014 09:16 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
23 September 2014

Question #165:
From chapter 9- What does Kamala ask Siddhartha if he found?

Answer:
Kamala asks Siddhartha if he has found peace. This is shown in the following quote, “ Have you attained it,” she asked. “Have you found peace?”

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 23, 2014 09:24 PM

Bryce Veller
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in Narratives
Sept.23, 2014

QUESTION
What did Siddhartha do when he saw the reflection of his face?

ANSWER
After seeing himself in the water, Siddhartha starts to reflect on his previous experiences and realizes that "he had never found his Self, because he had wanted to trap it in the net of thoughts" (47). Neither, though, is the Self to be trapped in the net of senses. The Self is a totality, which cannot be understood through only one aspect. Siddhartha, then, resolves, "only to strive after whatever the inward voice commanded him, not tarry anywhere but where the voice advised him" (48).

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 23, 2014 09:41 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
23 September 2014

Question #94:
From chapter 5- In this chapter, Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. What does he mean?

Answer:
When compares himself to a stone to shoe that he is drawn by goals and he allows himself to fall. This is shown in the following quote, “Strength and desire were reflected in the swiftly moving whirls of water formed by the raging pursuer” (Hesse 46).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at September 23, 2014 09:44 PM

Bryce Veller
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in Narratives
Sept.23, 2014

QUESTION 116
What do you suppose a Samana heart is?
ANSWER
A Samana heart is one that is cold, has no emotion due to all the violence that has drained their hearts of an emotional side that life has to offer.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 23, 2014 09:51 PM

Bryce Veller
Dr.Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in Narratives
Sept.23, 2014

QUESTION 182
What wound does Siddhartha have? What is the different light that he see people in?

ANSWER
The wound Siddhartha has is because of the son he lost. He sees that Vasudeva has seemed to absorb all of his sorrows and he sees him as Buddha, as a god.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at September 23, 2014 10:00 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
24 September 2014

Question #170: What did Siddhartha think were the only things his son had brought him?

Answer: Siddhartha is very happy to learn he has a son, but instead of everything going smoothly in their relationship, Siddhartha notices that “no happiness or peace had come to him with his son, only sorrow and trouble.” (Hesse 118) Young Siddhartha has spent his entire life living with Kamala in the city, and as a result he is very spoiled and not thrilled at the idea of living of the side of the river. Siddhartha remains optimistic that his son will one day want to pursue fulfillment in his life so that he can be fully enlightened.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 23, 2014 10:16 PM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
23 September 2014

Question 18:
“Everything I have learned to this day from the Samanas, O Govinda, I might have learned more quickly and simply. In some bar in a street full of whores, my friend, among the cart drivers and dice players, I might have learned these things.” What does this mean and why?

Answer:
What Siddhartha is saying here is that the Samanas are inefficient in their teaching. He is also saying the Samanas are not needed because what they teach he has learned from observing the common people.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at September 23, 2014 10:23 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
22 September 2014


Question 189:
From Chapter 11 – Siddhartha and Vasudeva listen very, very closely to the river. What do they hear? Why is everything interconnected?

Answer:
Siddhartha and Vasudeva listen intently to the river to gain knowledge. They hear voices, as Siddhartha states, "all voices of the creatures are in its voice (Hesse 67)." Everything is interconnected because everything has been everything at the same time. They say the river is all parts at the same time. It is the source, waterfall, sea, mountains, every aspect of the river.

Posted by: James Sierra at September 23, 2014 10:39 PM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 225CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
24 September 2014

QUESTION #117:
From Chapter 6 – What does Kamala teach Siddhartha; or, what does Siddhartha learn from Kamala?

ANSWER:
Kamala teaches Siddhartha about the material world, the world of “pretty clothes…pretty shoes and lots of money” (Siddhartha). She teaches Siddhartha that these things are what it takes to get a woman of her stature, if he wanted to receive her favor. Which was the favor of lust, transferred through a kiss Siddhartha felt how “she taught him, how wise she was, how she controlled him, rejected him, lured him” (Siddhartha).

Kamala shows Siddhartha the idea of love and how “you will not obtain a single drop of sweetness” (Siddhartha) if you try to take love from Kamala against her will. Furthermore, she teaches Siddhartha how to be a merchant dictating how Siddhartha should approach Kamaswami. Kamala tells Siddhartha he should be “polite towards him…but don’t be too modest” (Siddhartha). She does not want Siddhartha to “become his servant” (Siddhartha) but his equal.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 23, 2014 10:45 PM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 225CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
24 September 2014

QUESTION #135:
From Chapter 8 – What did Siddhartha wish passionately for?

ANSWER:
However, Siddhartha was wrong, for what he truly sought was a spiritual death and rebirth. He found this reincarnation when he attempted to drown himself in the river. Hearing a voice speaking the word “Om” Siddhartha finally awoke his “dormant spirit” and “realized the foolishness of his actions” (Siddhartha). After Siddhartha had fallen into a deep sleep, and awaken did he feel “transformed, renewed, strangely well rested, strangely awake, joyful and curious” (Siddhartha).

Only after Siddhartha had died and been born again could he be “full of joy” (Siddhartha). Only now after Siddhartha the Brahman, Siddhartha the Samana, and Siddhartha the greedy had all died could he truly “wake up from the sleep” (Siddhartha). He realized that it took all of these different Siddhartha’s to understand the true Siddhartha.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 23, 2014 10:47 PM

DO OVER
Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey of Narrative CA01
22 September 2014

Question #37:
How was it that Siddhartha could instantly recognize the Buddha and Govinda could not?

Answer:
The reason why Siddhartha could recognize the Buddha and Govinda could not is because the Buddha is so pure and enlightening.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 23, 2014 10:48 PM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 225CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
24 September 2014

QUESETION #175:
From Chapter 10 – Why doesn’t Siddhartha punish the boy?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha chose not to punish the boy because he understood his son's feelings. He knew that his son “did not know him, that he could not love him like a father” (Siddhartha). It was this understanding that made Siddhartha smother his son with kindness, love, and affection hoping one day to “win him over, by friendly patience” (Siddhartha).

It was this friendly patience, this love for his son that allowed Siddhartha to bend to his child’s every whim. Siddhartha believed “soft is stronger than hard” that “love stronger than force” (Siddhartha). Thus, by showing his son love and affection he hoped to overcome his son’s horrible nature, his rudeness, his lack of respect. His love for his son was just so great that Siddhartha was blind to reason and understanding.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 23, 2014 10:49 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey of Narrative CA01
22 September 2014

Question #110:
In both Siddhartha’s business relationship with Kamaswami and in Siddhartha’s love affair with Kamala, there was “giving and taking.” For Siddhartha, there was only meaning and passion in his relationship with Kamala. Did Siddhartha, therefore, envy the childlike people for their imposing meaning and passion on the giving and taking in everyday events? What did he have to say about it?

Answer:
Siddharth learned a lot from Kamaswami, but he learned more from Kamala about love. Siddhartha did not envy people for their imposing meaning and passion on the giving and taking in everyday events. If anything he looked down upon it because he learned from the Samanas that one cannot let little everyday things bother them.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 23, 2014 11:00 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey of Narrative CA01
22 September 2014

Question #127:
Why is Siddhartha’s wealth seen as a burden? Isn’t wealth and prestige what most people seek? Whats the problem (conflict)?

Answer:
Siddhartha’s wealth is seen as a burden to him because he finds that he has lost his spiritual self. He spent many years learning how to be very spiritual, and now that he is wealthy he has forgotten about that part of his life that is very important to him.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 23, 2014 11:09 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey of Narrative CA01
22 September 2014

Question #178:
Where does Siddhartha go after his son leaves?

Answer:
After Siddhartha’s son leaves him, Siddhartha goes to the river to find peace.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 23, 2014 11:14 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
23 September 2014

Question# 125 why did Siddhartha envy childlike people?
Siddhartha had a different attitude towards businesses worldly people and possessions. Siddhartha comes to hate these untellectual kinds of people.

Question# 106 Siddhartha skills are most holy ones. Does Kamaswami decided to hire him or not?
Yes, He does hire him because he is impressed by his skills of reading and writing. Eventually hires him to work in the house. Kamaswami tested siddthara on his reading and writing skills .Not to long after “he was not long in kamaswami”. (hesse 66)
Question# 186 When Siddhartha looked into the water, what did he see?
Siddartha reviewed his life when staring at the water. According to the text “ this is it said Siddhartha “ and when I learned that I reviewed my life and it was also a river.”.

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 23, 2014 11:43 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #102:
When Siddhartha is drawn to a goal, what does he do? What analogy does he use to explain this?

Answer:
As Siddhartha is drawn to a goal he pursues it, "surveyed the town, wandered about in the maze of streets, stood still in places, and rested on the stone steps to the river" (Hermann Hesse 52). Siddhartha had his beard shaved off, his hair combed through, and rubbed with oil. Siddhartha tells Kamala how beautiful she is and how she was the first person he met before coming to the town. The analogy he uses is " Your mouth is like a freshly cut fig, Kamala. My lips are also red and fresh, and will fit yours very well, you will see" (Hesse 54).

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 24, 2014 12:24 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
20 September 2013

Question #121: From Chapter 7- What was Siddhartha’s dream about Kamala about? Why might it be important?
Answer: Siddhartha dreamt that Kamala's songbird died. He noticed that the little bird that usually songs in the morning was dead, so he went up to it and noticed it had died. He then took the bird out of the cage, held it in his hands and threw it away on the road. In the dream, he was scared and unhappy as if he had thrown away with the dead bird all that was good and of value in himself. After he woke up from the dream, he felt death and great sadness. (Page 82, Line 11)
At the beginning of chapter five, Siddhartha told himself that he would only strive for whatever his inner voice would tell him to strive for. (Page 47, Line 31) The songbird from his dream represents his inner voice. He realized that if he continued his path as a Samsara that he would always be confined until he died.
Work Cited
Hesse, H. (1951). Siddhartha; New York: New Directions.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 24, 2014 12:28 AM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #124:
How does Siddhartha's dice playing echo his real life?

Answer:
Siddhartha's dice playing echoes his real life because his life has gotten unpredictable just like dice. You never know what is going to be next in store for Siddhartha or the decisions he will make. Siddhartha let the world catch up with him; "pleasure, covetousness, idleness, and finally also that vice that he had always despised and scorned as the most foolish- acquisitiveness" (Hermann Hesse 79). Siddhartha lost touch of the main reason he was going into the forest which was to gain enlightenment. He instead became part of the worldliness around him. When he played dice it was like his life twisted, obscured from his path of enlightenment, and entangled with the world.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 24, 2014 12:40 AM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #180:
How does young Siddhartha take advantage of the father?

Answer:
Young Siddhartha takes advantage of the father by not being scared of him, nothing that "attracted him" (Hermann Hesse 123). The young Siddhartha said whatever was on his mind, and "openly turned against his father" (Hesse 123). Young Siddhartha has a horrible temper towards his father and treats him with so much disrespect.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 24, 2014 12:55 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #122:
From Chapter 7- Explain what Siddhartha feels is “dead.”

Answer:
Siddhartha wakes from a dream of Kamala’s songbird being mute because it has died. His dream self chucks the dead bird in the street; he compares that action to him throwing away all his values and good. When he awakes, he feels as if everything inside of him has died, he does not want to live his rich meaningless life anymore. “Siddhartha knew that the game was finished, that he could not play it no longer. A shudder passed through his body; he felt as if something had died” (Hesse 84). Siddhartha knows it is time to leave the town and continue in life because his songbird, he thirst for knowledge and love of nature, has diminished and died.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 24, 2014 03:23 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #143:
From Chapter 8- How does Siddhartha feel about the path that he has taken with his life?

Answer:
Siddhartha is very upset with the path that he has taken in life. After he leaves the village he contemplates throwing himself into the river for the fish to fed upon his body, “…he was so lost and confused, so devoid of all reason, that he has sought death… this childish wish has grown so strong within him: to find peace by destroying his body” (Hesse 89). He is disgusted that he allowed himself to let material objects dictate his life for over two decades. He accepts death, until the holy word, Om, speaks to him, and he finds the strength to continue life studying by the river.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 24, 2014 03:40 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #184:
From Chapter 11- What does Siddhartha realize is the only thing ordinary people lack?

Answer:
Siddhartha having lived in Samsara for a long period of time realizes that ordinary people are just as able and ready as the great thinkers of the world. He no longer sees them beneath him, especially since he identifies himself as an ordinary person now, and admits that ordinary people are superior to great thinkers in some respect. He seems them equal “with the exception of one small thing,… and that was the consciousness of the unity of life” (Hesse 130). Siddhartha concluded that thinkers were just thinking children that understood the interconnection of all living things, and that was because they were taught to think in that aspect.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 24, 2014 04:04 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative ENG 220 CA01
24 September 2014

Question 108: When Siddhartha arrived in the village after the rice harvest had already been sold, why was it good business, according to Siddhartha AND in spite of Kamaswami’s protestation, that he remain in the village for a while and become friends with the people?
Analysis: It was good business because Siddhartha was building personal relationships with the individuals in town so that if he ever returned to the town, they might look on him with favor and would be more willing to buy and sell goods with Siddhartha.

Question 131: Why did Kamala expect Siddhartha to leave without explanation and farewells? Why does she liberate the golden songbird?
Analysis: Kamala understood that Siddhartha was a Samana, a pilgrim, and that she always knew that he would leave someday, that he had no true home. She released the songbird as a symbolic gesture, symbolizing that just as Siddhartha had left her life, so had any trace of Siddhartha in her life. Or the songbird could have been representative of Siddhartha himself.

Question 174: What is young Siddhartha’s response to Siddhartha when he asks his son to get some twigs?
Analysis: Young Siddhartha had an outburst against Siddhartha because Young Siddhartha had felt belittled and overwhelmed by his father’s influence. The young boy told Siddhartha to get his own twigs, he had felt punished by Siddhartha for no reason; he then went on to say that Siddhartha was not his real father, and that it didn’t matter if he was his Mother’s lover.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at September 24, 2014 04:21 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative CA01
15, September 2014

Question: 91# what three things does Siddhartha say that he can do? Why is this important or irrelevant?


Answer: The three things that he states that he can do or can do is he can think wait and fast (Siddhartha 60). These qualities are good to have and help Siddhartha on his journey. This is important somewhat important from my reading I can see a lot of things come in threes, and it unifies the story more. The struggles, qualities, such as the ones given or even religious qualities these all having the same number three helps tie together the threes in each situation as you go along.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at September 24, 2014 08:43 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative CA01
24, September 2014


question 154#: what is the first secret that Siddhartha learns for the river?

Answer: The first secret from the river that Siddhartha gets is when the ferrymen states on page 106, “have you also learned that secret from the river; that there is no such thing as time?” this secret will help Siddhartha on his journey. He goes on to gather assumptions based on that secret. “Siddhartha spoke with delight. This discovery had made him very happy” (Siddhartha 106). this leads to him getting more in touch with his wisdom.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at September 24, 2014 09:00 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
24 September 2014

QUESTION #97:
From Chapter 5- What things does the character Siddhartha learn from the character Kamala? Be specific.

ANSWER:
One of the things that Kamala teaches Siddhartha is how to kiss. Since Siddhartha had been living as a poor Samana, he had no experience with women or really how to interact with them. "She beckoned him with her eyes, he tilted his head so that his face touched hers and placed his mouth on that mouth which was like a freshly cracked fig. For a long time, Kamala kissed him, and with a deep astonishment Siddhartha felt how she taught him, how wise she was, how she controlled him, rejected him, lured him, and how after this first one there was to be a long, a well ordered, well tested sequence of kisses, everyone different from the others, he was still to receive." Siddhartha also learned that he could not expect to just get "lessons" from Kamala or any other women. Women want to be taken care of, and in Kamala's case, she wanted money.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 24, 2014 09:03 AM


Tyler Sommers
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative
24 September 2014

Question # 158-What does one have to do to conquer all difficulties and evil in this world.

Answer

Siddhartha states that all difficulties and evils can be conquered. “Were not all difficulties and evils conquered as coon as on conquered time, as soon as one dispelled time.” (pg 30)

I used an online website for this book. The website is http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2500/2500-h/2500-h#2H_4_0002

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 24, 2014 09:05 AM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative
24 September 2014

Question # 160-What sometimes would happen when a traveler looked at the faces of either Siddhartha or the ferryman?

Answer

Occasionally after looking at the face of either Siddhartha or the ferryman he would “tell the story of his life, told about pains confessed evil things, asked for comfort and advice. (pg 31)

I used an online website for this book. The website is http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2500/2500-h/2500-h#2H_4_0002

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at September 24, 2014 09:07 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
18 September 14

Question #95:
From Chapter 5 – What is the merchant’s name? What is his role in the story? Is he an ally or a shadow (or, some other archetype) for the hero in the story?

Answer:
Kamaswami is the merchant’s name. He is an ally to the hero, as Siddhartha (the hero) was sent to the merchant to gain knowledge of the town and become wealthy to please Kamala so she will teach him her knowledge of love. (Hesse 67)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 24, 2014 09:12 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

QUESTION #145:
From Chapter 8- According to Siddhartha, what is a good thing?

ANSWER:
"It is good," he thought, "to get a taste of everything for oneself, which one needs to know. That lust for the world and riches do not belong to the good things, I have already learned as a child. I have known it for a long time, but I have experienced only now. And now I know it, don't just know it in my memory, but in my eyes, in my heart, in my stomach. Good for me, to know this!" Siddhartha has always had a yearning for the world and has never been satisfied with anything in his life. This yearning has pushed him to change himself many times over and Siddhartha was still always unsatisfied. Now Siddhartha is thinking that maybe having hands-on experience in everything instead of just taking a person's word for everything.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 24, 2014 09:13 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
22 September 14

Question #151:
From Chapter 9 – What is the Ferryman’s name? What does Siddhartha learn from the Ferryman?

Answer:
The Ferryman’s name is Vasudeva. Siddhartha is taught how to listen from the Ferryman, it is very important to Siddhartha so throughout his endeavors he can get the most out of what his mentors are teaching him. (Hesse 103)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 24, 2014 09:14 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative CA01
15, September 2014

Question #172: what is the strangest passion that Siddhartha has experienced?

Answer: one of the strangest passions came when Siddhartha had to leave his son alone and let him go cause that was what would make him happy and if he was happy so was Siddhartha. The author states, ” He was madly in love, a fool because of love. Now he also experienced belatedly, for once in his life, the strongest and strangest passion; he suffered tremendously through it and yet was uplifted, in some way renewed and richer.” (pg.122) This overall passion is love for his son this passion leads to him feeling bad because he does not know how he would say no to his sin and make him upset because that would upset him.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at September 24, 2014 09:19 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

QUESTION #167:
From Chapter 9- What do Vasudeva and Siddhartha set out to do with Kamala?

ANSWER:
Kamala had set out to go see the dying Buddha with her son and along the way she got bit by a snake. "But suddenly, she uttered a wailing scream, the boy looked at her in fear and saw her face having grown pale from horror; and from under her dress, a small, black snake fled, by which Kamala had been bitten." Siddhartha and Vasudeva find Kamala and take her back to their hut to try to cure her, but she dies anyways.

Posted by: summer taylor at September 24, 2014 09:23 AM

Erin Gaylord & Joshua Natonio
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
24 September 2014

Group Question #6:

Siddhartha Chapter 9 – In this chapter, how did Kamala change in the years that Siddhartha has been at the river? Why is this significant?

Answer:

She grew up. She is ill, and she does not dress the way she used to. “She had long retired from her previous way of life…”. “She set off on foot, wearing simple clothes, together with her son…” (Hesse 110). This is significant because it shows her own life journey and her maturity from having a child. The child is the son of Siddhartha. The boy is very needy “he wanted to go home, he wanted to rest, he wanted to eat. He was often sulky and tearful” (Hesse 110).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 24, 2014 11:11 AM

Caitlin Christian & Sharrad Forbes
ENG 220 CL
24 September 2014

Question #4:

Siddhartha, Chapter 9 (“The Ferryman”): In this chapter, what is Siddhartha learning from the river? Why is this significant? Explain with quoted passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer:
Siddhartha goes to the river in hopes to search for his son, which he feels, is causing the most pain in his life. When Siddhartha goes to the river, he sees his father, which brings back other pain and suffering in his life. Siddhartha concludes that his suffering is passing but still contemplates suicide. “Water ran and ran, was always there, was always the same and yet new in every moment!” (Hesse Ch.9) This quote represents how Siddhartha feels the river compares to him. He heads back into town and tells Vasuveda of his journey and he tells him to go back and listen to the river clearly. Siddhartha realizes that the river is actually speaking of joy and unity, which creates a sense of “Om” for Siddhartha.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian & Sharrad Forbes at September 24, 2014 11:56 AM

Maria Aguilera and Bryce Veller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #8:
Siddhartha, Chapter 10 (“The Son”): In this chapter, what is Vasudeva’s advice to Siddhartha about how to handle his son? Does Siddhartha take Vasudeva’s advice? What does the boy do? Why is this significant?

ANSWER:
Vasudeva’s advice to Siddhartha about how to handle his son is by trying to help him understand the reason as to why his son is unhappy. He does not take Vasudeva’s advice because he believes that his son will eventually hear the voice of the river, Om, and understand how life works. The young boy ends up becoming rebellious because he is unhappy about living by the river, he does not like it at all. "You want me to become like you, so pious, so gentle, so wise, but just to spite you, I would rather become a thief and a murderer and go to hell, than be like you. I hate you; you are not my father even if you have been my mother's lover a dozen times!" (Hesse 100) This is significant because when Siddhartha was a child he ran away from home too and his son appears to be doing the same as he did at one point but Siddhartha tries to avoid his son leaving because his love for his son was so big; however, his son rebels and eventually leaves.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 24, 2014 11:58 AM

Nuri Salahuddin and Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
24 September 2013

Question:
Siddhartha, Chapter 10 (“The Son”): In this chapter, Siddhartha’s son does not bring him happiness and hope like he expected, what does his son bring? How does Siddhartha react to this? Why is this significant? Explain with quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
Siddhartha’s son does not bring him happiness and hope like he would have liked because he believes his son does not want the same things as him. In a way, his son does want the same type of things, just not the way Siddhartha would have wanted. Siddhartha’s son, just like Siddhartha, was unhappy with his home life and his father. Both of them want something beyond what is given to them. Although Siddhartha is not pleased with his son, he does love him like he was unable to do with anyone else. “He felt a deep love for the runaway boy, like a wound, and yet felt at the same time that this wound was not intended to fester in him, but that it should heal.”

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 24, 2014 12:03 PM

Matt Basin and Jonah Robertson
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
24 Sep 2014

Question 6:
Siddhartha, Chapter 9 (“The Ferryman”): In this chapter, how did Kamala change in the years Siddhartha has been at the river? Why is it significant? Explain with quoted passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer:
She not as beautiful as she once was and she’s more passive because she lets her son run all over her. She has also found piece since she is following Buddha.

“The most beautiful of the courtesans (Hesse 60)”.

“ He became defiant and querulous (Hesse 60)”.

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 24, 2014 12:04 PM

Joanna Ozog, Rebeccah Braun, James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Chapter 9, Question 2:
In this chapter, what is the first secret the river shared with Siddhartha? Why is this significant?

Answer:
The secret the river shared with Siddhartha is that “this water flowed and flowed, it kept on flowing, and yet it was always there; it was always and at all times the same and yet new every moment” (Hesse 54). This is significant because it relates to Siddhartha directly. Like the river, he is still in the same body, but with his changed path, he is something new.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog, Rebeccah Braun, James Sierra at September 24, 2014 12:05 PM

DO OVER
Nuri Salahuddin and Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
24 September 2013

Question:
Siddhartha, Chapter 10 (“The Son”): In this chapter, Siddhartha’s son does not bring him happiness and hope like he expected, what does his son bring? How does Siddhartha react to this? Why is this significant? Explain with quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
Siddhartha’s son does not bring him happiness and hope like he would have liked because he believes his son does not want the same things as him. In a way, his son does want the same type of things, just not the way Siddhartha would have wanted. Siddhartha’s son, just like Siddhartha, was unhappy with his home life and his father. Both of them want something beyond what is given to them. Although Siddhartha is not pleased with his son, he does love him like he was unable to do with anyone else. “He felt a deep love for the runaway boy, like a wound, and yet felt at the same time that this wound was not intended to fester in him, but that it should heal.”
Siddhartha realizes he cannot control what his son does because he was in a way, exactly like him when he was younger.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 24, 2014 12:07 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth and Britney Polycarpe

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

24 September 2014

QUESTION #3:

Siddhartha, Chapter 9 (“Ferryman”): In this chapter, what is Siddhartha learning from the river? Why is this significant? Explain with quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

ANSWER:

Siddhartha is learning as if the river was a teacher and even though he learned one secret that the river stayed the same even though the water changed every day he then learned every day (Hesse 101-102). The significance of this river is that the water symbolized him changing with the knowledge he gained from the river. Siddhartha loved the river, and how it enchanted him the river said, “Love this river, stay by it, learn from it (101).”

Work Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 24, 2014 12:20 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA01 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives
25 September 2014

Question #184:
What does Siddhartha realize is the only thing ordinary people lack?

Answer:
In his reflection of life and how he has progressed through his different phases of life, Siddhartha begins to ponder the difference between him and the ordinary person. Searching for how he has reached his “high[er] stage of self-discipline,” he realized the one thing the ordinary people lack was “the consciousness of the unity of all like” (Hesse 130). He acknowledges that the ordinary people know how to truly live; however, the lack of picturing all life being one, in present, past, and future, causing them to be unable from reaching enlightenment.

Work Cited

Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions Publishing Company, 1971. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at September 25, 2014 08:44 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION #199:
From Chapter 12- What is the symbolism of the stone?

ANSWER:
The symbolism of the stone is that it is like a person because it can become anything. It can change into dirt, or it can become a plant. The stone is everything all at once. Therefore, the stone is a part of Om. Nature is essentially everything

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 25, 2014 10:07 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
25 September 2014

Question # 204: Chapter 12-
What does Siddhartha say in response to Govinda when he asks for something to help him?

Answer:
Siddhartha responds by telling Govinda that if he continues to seek so much then he will never arrive at finding. He also tells him that wisdom and enlightenment cannot be taught, they are learned through experiences, like the ones that Siddhartha had. The last thing that Siddhartha does is show Govinda visions of things that brought him to tears and reminded him of everything that was sacred in life. "When someone seeks, then it happens all too easily that his eyes will see only the thing he is seeking, that he cannot find anything, cannot let in anything, because he is always thinking of that thing he seeks, because he has a goal, because he is possessed by the goal" (Hesse 110).

** Quotes were found using the Barnes and Noble classics edition of Siddhartha.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 25, 2014 11:06 AM

Ashley Gross, Kyle VanBuren
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
25 September 2014

Question # 3: Chapter 9-
In this chapter, what is Siddhartha learning from the river?

Answer:
Siddhartha learns that his own life is much like the river. The river is always there and it is always changing. "Of the river's secrets, however, today he saw only one that seized his soul: This water ran on and on, it always ran, and yet it always was there, it was always and ever the same and yet at every moment new" (Hesse 81).

* Quotes were found using the Barnes and Noble classics edition of Siddhartha.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at September 25, 2014 11:15 AM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
25 September 2014

Question # 185:

From Chapter 11 – On the day when Siddhartha decided to go to town, who was laughing at Siddhartha?

Answer:

The river was laughing at Siddhartha. “…laughed at by the river, in conflict with himself, verging on despair, and no less inclined to laugh aloud at himself and the whole world” (Hesse 132).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at September 25, 2014 02:47 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL – CA02
25 September 2014


Question 182:


From Chapter 11 - What “wound” does Siddhartha have? What is the different light that he sees people in?


Answer:


When we open to chapter eleven, we see that Siddhartha has a wound on the inside that is gravely hurting him. Siddhartha finds a parallel between his pain and the childlike people and their desires. "So many, so many thousands possess this sweetest of good fortunes—why don't I? Even bad people, even thieves and robbers have children and love them, and are being loved by them, all except for me." Thus simply, thus without reason he now thought, thus similar to the childlike people he had become.”(Hesse Ch. 11) Siddhartha finds that even in his awakened state he is still finding joy in the childlike life and its boundless love and devotion that he feels towards his son. Siddhartha realizes with this thought that the childlike people did not live a bad life, but they just lived a different life with its experiences and lessons. “Differently than before, he now looked upon people, less smart, less proud, but instead warmer, more curious, more involved. When he ferried travellers of the ordinary kind, childlike people, businessmen, warriors, women, these people did not seem alien to him as they used to: he understood them, he understood and shared their life, which was not guided by thoughts and insight, but solely by urges and wishes, he felt like them.” Hesse Ch.11) Siddhartha comes into his own as he makes the realization that every person is different, and every person’s success essentially depends on their perspective. “Everyone is special and prays the Om in its own way, each one is Brahman, but simultaneously and just as much it is a stone, is oily or juicy, and this is this very fact which I like and regard as wonderful and worthy of worship.” (Hesse Ch. 10) Every person is a different chip off the old block and each with their respective hopes and desires.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 25, 2014 03:03 PM

Bronwen Burke and Blake Bromen
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
25 September 2014

Question #5:

Siddhartha, Chapter 9 (“The Ferryman”): In this chapter, reflecting on the past, how does Siddhartha now view what he said previously to the Buddha? Why is this significant?

Answer:

Siddhartha views his past words to the Buddha as “arrogant and precocious” (Hesse 110), signifying the true enlightenment and maturation of Siddhartha. He also solemnly admits, “…a true seeker could not accept any teachings, not if he sincerely wished to find something” (Hesse 110).

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Hilda Rosner. Toronto: Bantam, 1971. 110. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 25, 2014 06:08 PM

Bronwen Burke and Blake Bromen
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #187:

From Chapter 11 – What does Siddhartha feel he has completely learned?

Answer:

Siddhartha mastered the art of listening – “He felt that he had now completely learned the art of listening.” (Hesse 135) Although Siddhartha listened plenty in his past, this time it was different because he listened “intently, completely absorbed, quite empty, taking in everything” (Hesse 135). We can assume that at this moment, Siddhartha felt the most wholeness than he had ever felt in his nomad life.

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Hilda Rosner. Toronto: Bantam, 1971. 135. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 25, 2014 06:54 PM

Tashanna Harris and Aaron Virelli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
25 September 2014
Group 7

Question #7
While Siddhartha's son does not bring him happiness and hope like he expected what does the son bring? How does Siddhartha react to this?

Answer:
Even though Siddhartha's son doesn't bring him happiness or hope his son only brung him trials and tribulations . Siddhartha loves him so much that he doesn't know how to punish him he doesn't want his son to feel unloved since his missed his most valuable moments in life. His son brings him hopelessness, he feels that his son needs him after his mother died because he never knew his son. Siddhartha feels like he owes him the world, unconditional love and everything else a father is suppose to give his son. " But stronger than his knowledge was his love for the boy, his devotion, his fear of losing him. Had he ever lost his heart to anybody so completely, had he ever loved anybody so much, so blindly, so painfully, so hopelessly and yet so happily" (Hesse 121).

Siddhartha reacts to his son's actions by finally listening to Govinda and the river and eventually allows his son to go back to his comfort zone. He took his son back to the town where he belonged where he would feel more at home. Siddhartha had to let his son flourish just like he had to do when he was a young child. Even though Siddhartha didn't want to he knew that it was the right thing to do for both of them and Govinda.

Posted by: Tashanna Harris at September 25, 2014 08:06 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG: 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
25 September 2014

Question # 183:
From Chapter 11- Why did Siddhartha envy some of the people he ferried across the river?

Answer:
“Siddhartha took many travelers across the river who had a son or a daughter with them, and he could not see any of them without envying them, without thinking: So many people posses this very great happiness—why not I? Even wicked people, thieves and robbers have children, love them and are loved by them, except me (Hesse, 129).”
Siddhartha felt that his son did not love him, but envy people who were wicked, thieves, and robbers, have children and love them, and is love by them, but except from him and his own child. He understood that his son did not know him, so how can he love someone that he does not know.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at September 25, 2014 08:35 PM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey's in Narrative
25 September 2014

Question #205
What happens when Govinda kisses Siddhartha?

Answer:
As Govinda bows, his lips soon touch Siddhartha's forehead and he saw different forms and faces of creatures and humans. He says " all these forms and faces in a thousand relationships to each other, all helping each other, loving, hating and destroying each other and become newly born" (Hesse 150). He also says each form was an image of pain, had no end of life but yet so passionate for life. They displayed examples of "transitory" (Hesse 150). The only thing that was in between each face was time.

Posted by: Tashanna.harris at September 25, 2014 08:42 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
26 September 2014

Question #207
“The world, my friend Govinda, is not imperfect, or on a slow path towards perfection: no, it is perfect in every moment.” Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.) Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e., what is going on, exactly, here?
Text source: “Siddhartha,” By Herman Hesse

In the story, Siddhartha is the one who is speaking to Govinda. Siddhartha explains that inside every sinner, like him and Govinda, there is a Buddha (Hesse 144). Siddhartha tells Govinda that the sinner will then attain Nirvana, and then become a Buddha (Hesse 143).

Posted by: kyle VanBuren at September 25, 2014 10:23 PM

Dr B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL-On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
25 September 2014

Question- In this chapter, how does Siddhartha compare his life to the river? Why is this significant?

Answer
Siddhartha says his life is like a river because he connects it to what Vasudeva says it resembles. Vasudeva says “that there is only the present time for it, not the shadow of the past, not the shadow of the future.” (pg 107) That is when Siddhartha says that, “and that is when I learned it, I looked at my life, and it was also a river, and the boy Siddhartha was only separated from then man Siddhartha and from the old man Siddhartha.” (pg 107) He also mentions “nothing was, nothing will be; everything is, everything has existence and is present.” (pg 107)

Posted by: Tyler Sommers and Nathanael Jones at September 25, 2014 10:27 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
25 September 2014

Question #194:
What is wrong with seeking, according to Siddhartha?

Answer:
According to Siddhartha, the problem with seeking is that if you seek too much, one will not be able to find anything.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at September 25, 2014 10:39 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
25 September 2014


QUESTION #196:
From Chapter 12- What does Siddhartha say about doctrines and teachers?

ANSWER:
“Govinda said: It seems to me, Siddhartha that you still like to jest a little. I believe you and know that you have not followed any teacher, but have you not yourself, if not a doctrine, certain thoughts? Have you not discovered certain knowledge yourself that has helped you to live? It would give me great pleasure if you would tell me something about this”. (Hesse, 142) Siddhartha believed that knowledge can be communicated and wisdom cannot. “One can find it, live it, be fortified by it, do wonders through it, but one cannot communicate and teach it”. (Hesse, 142) He believed that this was the reason of what drove him away from his teachers at a young age.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at September 25, 2014 11:10 PM

Jonah Robertson
Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
September 25 2014

Question #201:
From Chapter 12-What does Siddhartha mean that everyone has the Buddha in him?

Answer:
Siddhartha means that the sainthood and peace of Gotama can be replicated in anyone, if only they find the peace within themselves that he had. Instead of simply following the Buddha's teachings, instead of simply being students, people must instead become connected with themselves, because they "already [are] that Buddha" (Hesse 76). That is what Siddhartha realized, living as a ferryman, and that is what he is attempting to tell Govinda with this statement.

Works Cited:
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Mineola: Dover, 1998. Print.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at September 25, 2014 11:46 PM

Jazlynn Rosario, Ashlee English, and Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
26 September 2014


Group Question #1:
Siddhartha Chapter 9 ("The Ferryman"): In this chapter, what did Siddhartha's new "awakened voice" say? Why is this significant? Explain with quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
Siddhartha's new awakened voice said, "In his heart he heard the newly awakened voice speak, and it said to him: “Love this river, stay by it, learn from it.” Yes, he wanted to learn from it, he wanted to listen to it. It seemed to him that whoever understood this river and its secrets would understand much more, many secrets, all secrets.” (Hermann Hesse 101-102). In this quote his inner voice was asleep during his journey due to the outside world around him. The awakened voice is more philosophical, refined, less egocentric, and more spiritual. Siddhartha loses himself and the main reason he left his home to a darker side where its all about money, materialistic things, and gambling. When he goes back to the river he finally gets to hear what his inner voice has to say and instead of suppressing the voice he listens to it.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 26, 2014 01:12 AM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220Cl Journeys in Narrative
26 September 2014

Question #193:
From Chapter 12- Why is there still restlessness in Govinda's heart?

Answer:
Govinda still feels restlessness because this entire time he has been under the rule of the monks. Govinda has not had a chance to feel accomplished at anything he did. Govinda tells Siddhartha, "I can see, my dear friend, that you have found peace. I realize that I have not found it. Tell me one more word, my esteemed friend, tell me something that I can conceive, something that I can understand" (Hermann Hesse 149). Govinda said "he preached benevolence, forbearance, sympathy, patience- but not love. He forbade us to bund ourselves to earthly love" (Hesse 147).

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 26, 2014 01:23 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
24 September 2014

QUESTION #189:
From Chapter 11 - Siddhartha and Vasudeva listen very, very closely to the river. What do they hear? Why is everything interconnected?

ANSWER:
Siddhartha and Vasudeva heard laughter from the river. Everything is interconnected because when Siddhartha was hearing the laughter and different words of wisdom from the river he was acting as if he heard these statements before from other people in his life. He was connecting what the river was saying with statements from his father, Govinda, and Kamala. They weren’t just statements either they were goals and lessons of good and evil. “They were all interwoven and interlocked, entwined in a thousand ways. And all the voices, all the goals, all the yearnings, all the sorrows, all the pleasures, all the good and evil, all of them come together was the world (Hesse 135).”

Hesse, Hermann. Siddartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at September 26, 2014 02:13 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
26 September 14

Question #190:
From Chapter 11 – What does Vasudeva do at the end of the chapter?

Answer:
Vasudeva finishes teaching Siddhartha all he knows about listening. Then Siddhartha finally understands his teachings of attentive listening, which means Vasudeva has past on his knowledge. Vasudeva realizes he has nothing left to teach, so he tells Siddhartha, “I have waited for this hour, my friend. Now that it has arrived, let me go.” and with that Vasudeva leaves to live among the nature of unity. (Hesse 136-137)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 26, 2014 08:26 AM

Summer Taylor, Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
26 September 2014

QUESTION #1:
Siddhartha, Chapter 9: In this chapter, what did Siddhartha's new "awakened" voice say? Why is this significant? Explain with quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

ANSWER:
"How did he love this water, how did it delight him, how grateful was he to it! In his heart he heard the voice talking, which was newly awaking, and it told him: Love this water! Stay near it! Learn from it! Oh yes, he wanted to learn from it, he wanted to listen to it. He who would understand this water and its secrets, so it seemed to him, would also understand many other things, many secrets, all secrets." Siddhartha's new awakened voice tells him to stay near the water and learn from it. Eventually Siddhartha finally finds what he has been searching for his entire life- peace.

Posted by: summer taylor at September 26, 2014 09:12 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220 CL journeys in narrative CA01
26, September 2014


Question: when Siddhartha looked into the water, what did he see?


Answer: when Siddhartha gazes into the water se sees many of things he starts by seeing himself and how much he’s grown as a boy and realizes how much he looks like his father. Other faces were in the river also such as Kamala, Govinda, and so many others he had known. They are all within the river, and Vasudeva is in the river, too. He is where he becomes one with the river it is within him, and he feels more whole. After he sees the cycle in the rive he gazes back in the water and it states, "all the voices, all the goals, all the yearnings, all the sorrows, all the pleasures, all the good and evil, all of them together was the world. All of them together was the stream of events, the music of life...then the great song of a thousand voices consisted of one word: Om - perfection"(Siddhartha 110-11). This is where he conquers his last obstacle and has yet and another awakening by the river.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at September 26, 2014 09:13 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
26 September 2014

QUESTION #189:
From Chapter 11- Siddhartha and Vasudeva listen very, very closely to the river. What do they hear? Why is everything interconnected?

ANSWER:
"And when Siddhartha was listening attentively to this river, this song of a thousand voices, when he neither listened to the suffering nor the laughter, when he did not tie his soul to any particular voice and submerged his self into it, but when he heard them all, perceived the whole, the oneness, then the great song of the thousand voices consisted of a single word, which was Om: the perfection." Vasudeva explains to Siddhartha that the river has no end and no beginning it goes in an endless circle of life. The river flows, the water evaporates, the rain falls down, the river flows again. The world, like the river, has no definite end; though people may pass away they are always connected to other people by memories.

Posted by: summer taylor at September 26, 2014 09:23 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL – Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
26 September 2014

QUESTION #198:
From Chapter 12 - What thought has most impressed Siddhartha?

ANSWER:
The idea that “wisdom cannot be passed on” (Siddhartha 129). This thought is deep and explains why many followers cannot reach enlightenment. Siddhartha believes that when a wise man tries to explain his wisdom it “always sounds like foolishness” (Siddhartha 129).

Siddhartha found “knowledge can be conveyed, but not wisdom” (Siddhartha 129). A person can do many things with or through wisdom, but “it cannot be expressed in words and taught” (Siddhartha 129). Siddhartha had suspected this when he was a young man and was the reason he stayed away from teachers.

Adding on to this thought Siddhartha states “the opposite of every truth is just as true” (Siddhartha 129). Siddhartha explains that to understand the truth or teach it one must look at it from one side. An example of this was Gotama, who divided his teachings into “Sansara and Nirvana” (Siddhartha 129). Gotama could not explain his wisdom any other way. However, “the world itself, what exists around us and inside of us, is never one-sided” (Siddhartha 130). Siddhartha knows that a person or act “is never entirely Sansara or entirely Nirvana” (Siddhartha 130).

Works Cited
Bloom, Harold. Hermann Hesse. Philadelphia: Chelsea House, 2002. Web. .

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 26, 2014 09:38 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
26 September 2014

Question #206: What does Govinda see Siddhartha do? What does this show about Siddhartha’s final change?

Answer: Govinda seeks out the ferryman in chapter 12 because although he has learned a lot, he was still “unsatisfied”(Hesse 139) He sees the ferryman and asks him to take him across the river, not knowing the ferryman is Siddhartha. He asks Siddhartha many questions, to which Siddhartha had a lot to tell him. This shows that Siddhartha has found peace with himself in taking over as the ferryman, and he has become so absorbed in this place that Govinda does not recognize him. He is happy and content where he is.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 26, 2014 10:01 AM

Joshua Natonio
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01
26 September 2014

QUESTION #191:
Chapter 11: Where does Vasudeva go? (Hint: not just the woods)

ANSWER:
Vasudeva the ferryman and long-time mentor of Siddhartha goes into woods to ascend to the afterlife. In the final exchange between Siddhartha has with Vasudeva, Vasudeva proclaims: “I have waited for this hour, my friend. Now that it has arrived, let me go. I have been Vasudeva, the ferryman, for a long time. Now it is over. Farewell hut, farewell river, farewell Siddhartha” (Hesse 136-137). “With a radiance about him, Vasudeva tells Siddhartha that “I am going into the woods; I am going into the unity of all things” (Hesse 137).

WORKS CITED:
Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Toronto New York: Bantam Books, 1971. 136-137. Print.

Posted by: Joshua Natonio at September 26, 2014 10:18 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
25 September 2014


Question 192:
““Siddhartha felt more and more that this was no longer Vasudeva, no longer a human being, who was listening to him, that this motionless listener was absorbing his confession into himself like a tree the rain, that this motionless man was the river itself, that he was God himself, that he was the eternal itself.”
192. From Chapter 11 - Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above:
(a.) Who is speaking?
(b.) Who is being addressed?
(c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e, what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version. (Page 80)

Answer:
In the quoted text above, the narrator is explaining a conversation Siddhartha is attempting to have with Vasudeva. Vasudeva is listening, but doesn’t respond verbally. As he is speaking Siddhartha is realizing that Vasudeva “was now seeing old Vasudeva as the people see the gods, and that this could not last; in his hear, he started bidding his farewell to Vasudeva.” (Hesse 81)

Posted by: James Sierra at September 26, 2014 10:36 AM

Kyle VanBuren, Erin Gaylord, Tashanna Harris
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
26 September 2014

Question #1
Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha features substantial activity and narrative action. At the same time, it is about one man’s largely internal spiritual quest. What is the relationship between the internal and exterior worlds of Siddhartha? How does Siddhartha negotiate these worlds?

Siddhartha does not feel like he needs anything but to think, wait, and fast (Hesse 56). In the story, Hesse writes, “I am certainly without possessions, but of my own free will, so I am not in need” (Hesse 64). This would demonstrate Siddhartha’s internal world that he faces. In his external world, Siddhartha doesn’t really know much about physical things. In the text, “… but that he had a happy knack and surpassed the merchant in calmness and equanimity” (Hesse 67). Siddhartha connects these two worlds together by really only focusing on his internal world and seeking enlightenment while managing external things that come his way.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren, Erin Gaylord, Tashanna Harris at September 26, 2014 10:58 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
25 September 2013

Question #190: From Chapter 11 – What does Vasudeva do at the end of the chapter?

Answer: At the end of the chapter, Vasudeva listens to Siddhartha’s sorrows and enlightens and helps him realize his place in the world. Afterwards, Vasudeva takes off for the forest and leaves Siddhartha as the Ferryman.

Work Cited
Hesse, H. (1951). Siddhartha; New York: New Directions

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 26, 2014 11:10 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
25 September 2014.

QUESTION #191: From Chapter 11- Where does Vasudeva go? (Hint: not just the woods)

ANSWER:
After providing Siddhartha with well-needed council, Vasudeva achieved his goal/purpose for life. He taught Siddhartha how to listen, live and learn from the river, consequently causing Siddhartha to understand the role everything in life plays, “From that hour Siddhartha ceased… unity of all things” (Hesse 136). As, such Vasudeva goes into the forest to become ‘one’, “Yes, I am going into the woods; I am going into the unity of all things” (Hesse 137), this physical act is one representative of spiritual enlightenment on the path of Vasudeva. He has learnt from his life as a ferryman and has acknowledged that this is the time of a new chapter in his life, “I have waited for this hour my friend…farewell Siddhartha.” (Hesse 136-137), one in which he has to continue the cycle of Samsara just like the river always flowing.

Works Cited
Hesse, Herman. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 26, 2014 11:12 AM

Matthew Basin

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

Eng 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01

26 Sept 2014

Question Chapter 11- 184:

What does Siddhartha realize is the only thing ordinary people lack?

Answer:

The one thing Siddhartha realizes the only thing ordinary people lack is that people lacked enlightenment. This is not found in material things like big houses, nice cloths. It is found rather in self-denial.

“Their vanities, desires, and trivialities no longer seemed absurd to him; they had become understandable, loveable, and even worthy of respect (Hesse 130)."

“He saw life, vitality, the indestructible and Brahman in all their desires and needs (Hesse 130)."

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 26, 2014 11:16 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #122:
From Chapter 7- Explain what Siddhartha feels is “dead.”
Answer:
Siddhartha wakes from a dream of Kamala’s songbird being mute because it has died. His dream self chucks the dead bird in the street; he compares that action to him throwing away all his values and good. When he awakes, he feels as if everything inside of him has died, he does not want to live his rich meaningless life anymore. “Siddhartha knew that the game was finished, that he could not play it no longer. A shudder passed through his body; he felt as if something had died” (Hesse 84). Siddhartha knows it is time to leave the town and continue in life because his songbird, he thirst for knowledge and love of nature, has diminished and died.


Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #143:
From Chapter 8- How does Siddhartha feel about the path that he has taken with his life?

Answer:
Siddhartha is very upset with the path that he has taken in life. After he leaves the village he contemplates throwing himself into the river for the fish to fed upon his body, “…he was so lost and confused, so devoid of all reason, that he has sought death… this childish wish has grown so strong within him: to find peace by destroying his body” (Hesse 89). He is disgusted that he allowed himself to let material objects dictate his life for over two decades. He accepts death, until the holy word, Om, speaks to him, and he finds the strength to continue life studying by the river.


Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
24 September 2014

Question #184:
From Chapter 11- What does Siddhartha realize is the only thing ordinary people lack?

Answer:
Siddhartha having lived in Samsara for a long period of time realizes that ordinary people are just as able and ready as the great thinkers of the world. He no longer sees them beneath him, especially since he identifies himself as an ordinary person now, and admits that ordinary people are superior to great thinkers in some respect. He seems them equal “with the exception of one small thing,… and that was the consciousness of the unity of life” (Hesse 130). Siddhartha concluded that thinkers were just thinking children that understood the interconnection of all living things, and that was because they were taught to think in that aspect.


Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
26 September 2014

Question #197
From Chapter 12- Why doesn’t Siddhartha have a doctrine? How can wisdom not be communicable? Can you communicate knowledge?
Answer:
Siddhartha does not live by a doctrine because he believes when a person is searching for an answer or has a guide in life their line of vision is narrowed. Siddhartha believes “…the only thing his eyes still see if that what he searches for, that he is unable to find anything, to let anything enter his mind, because he always thinks of nothing but the object of his search” (140 Hesse). He would rather be free of the desire of searching, so he is open to more ideals and perceptions. Siddhartha also says wisdom cannot be passed onto somebody because when the listener tries to explain this wisdom he just sounds foolish. Siddhartha believes wisdom “can be found, it can be lived, it is possible to be carried by it, miracles can be performed with it, but it cannot be expressed in words and taught” (142 Hesse). He believes wisdom has to be learned from experience, not from a teacher. However, knowledge can be conveyed through words and teachers. Knowledge is learning about something while wisdom knows when to execute it.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 26, 2014 11:41 AM

Anet Milian
Jonah Robertson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
25 September 2013

Group 5


Question: Revisit and contemplate Siddhartha’s relationship with Govinda. How are the two men similar, and how are they different? What are the narrative functions of Govinda’s reappearance throughout the novel? (In other words, what purpose/s does it serve?) How does the relationship between Govinda and Siddhartha impact the novel’s ending?
Answer: Siddhartha and Govinda are alike and different in many instances. They are alike because they both share the passion for knowledge. Throughout the novel, they are both on a quest for enlightenment.
What makes them unique is their techniques in reaching their enlightenment. For example, Siddartha believes, “Knowledge can be imparted, but not wisdom. (Page 76) However, Govinda believes that knowledge and wisdom must be gained through teaching.
The narrative functions of Govinda’s reappearance throughout the novel, serves to help Siddhartha move forward in his journey.
The relationship between Govinda and Siddhartha impacts the novels ending because throughout the entire novel, they are on a quest for enlightment and at the end, they both helped each other reach it.
Work Cited
Hesse, H. (1951). Siddhartha; New York: New Directions.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 26, 2014 12:02 PM

Rebeccah Braun and Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
26 September 2014

QUESTION #1:
Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha features substantial activity and narrative action. At the same time, it is about one man’s largely internal spiritual quest. What is the relationship between the internal and exterior worlds of Siddhartha? How does Siddhartha negotiate these worlds? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
The relationship between the internal and exterior worlds of Siddhartha is that Siddhartha’s internal world is about quenching his thirst for knowledge and finding peace within himself. In Siddhartha’s external world, he has followed a path surrounded by riches, greed, and love. He has attached himself to material objects sucking him into samsara and away from nirvana. He realizes that he is stuck in a cycle and cannot escape if he stays in the village. When Siddhartha leaves the village he ends up by the river and is struggling to face himself after falling so far from his path. He considers committing suicide “…when the sound of Om reached Siddhartha’s ears, his slumbering soul suddenly awakened, and he recognized the folly of his actions” (Hesse 89). At that moment, his external and internal world collides and Siddhartha finds a consensus between them. He once again sheds his material objects and proceeds to learn from the river.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at September 26, 2014 12:15 PM

Matthew Basin and Claudia Pierre

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

Eng. 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA 01

26 Sept 2014

Question 6:
Lessons/Epiphanies: What, exactly, does Siddhartha learn from Kamaswami, his new boss? What are these “lessons” significant? What does Siddhartha do for him? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
While living in Kamaswami house, he learned several things about himself. He learned that he can wait calmly, he is not impatient, he is not in need, and “he can ward of hunger for a long time and laugh at it.” Siddhartha became Kamaswami and how to imitate the worldly path. When Siddhartha first begins working with Kamaswami, they notice that there is a contrast between the two. As Siddhartha starts to lose his sense of spirituality, he becomes just like Kamaswami. During his stay he heard a lot but said little and it was long before Kamaswami house when Siddhartha was already in his business. He learned the goods, warehouses, and accounts of the business.

“He soon saw that Siddhartha understood little about rice and wool, shipping and trade, but that he had a happy knack and surpassed the merchant in calmness and equanimity, and in the art of listening and making a good impression on strange people (Hesse 67).”

Posted by: Matthew Basin at September 26, 2014 12:18 PM

Peter Bellini & Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA02
26 September 2014


Question 2:


What, exactly, does Siddhartha seem to learn/glean from the ferryman? What are these “lessons” significant? How might the ferryman be important to the story, thus far? Does a ferryman serve any “symbolic” purpose? What? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


Siddhartha learned to listen and become whole from the ferryman this allows him to respect all walks of life and to become at peace. “Vasudeva listened with great attention; he heard all about his origin and childhood, about his studies, his seekings, his pleasures and needs. It was one of the ferryman’s greatest virtues that, like few people, he knew how to listen” (Hesse Pg. 104). Siddhartha now submits himself to live a new life giving up his rich clothes for a ferryman’s loincloth. Siddhartha humbles himself in his new life and gains an awakened voice. “This stone is a stone, it is also animal, it is also god, it is also Buddha, I do not venerate and love it because it could turn into this or that, but rather because it is already and always everything.”(Hesse Ch. 11) The ferryman serves as a guide to Siddhartha in order to live his life like the river everywhere at once and full of all energy.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini & Jazlynn Rosario at September 26, 2014 12:47 PM

Doug Ross
Caitlin Christian
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Eng 220cl On the proverbial road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
26 September 2014

Question 4:
Lessons/Epiphanies: What, exactly, does Siddhartha learn from Kamala? What are these “lessons” significant? How will this knowledge be of any use to him? Who benefits more from the “arrangement” Kamala has helped him to arrange. Her, Siddhartha, or Siddhartha’s employer? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The greatest lesson that kamala teaches Siddhartha is the lesson of love, even though neither of them can actually love one another. Siddhartha comes to Kamala to learn a physical love, but in the end sees it only as a friendship. ”I have come to tell you this and to thank you for being so beautiful. And if it doesn’t displease you, kamala, I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher, for I know nothing yet of that art which you have mastered in the highest degree.” (pg53)
Kamala teaches Siddhartha the importance of having skills that can help not only him, but help others as well. She doesn’t see Siddhartha as having anything of value to her because he came to her a poor, dirty man. The only things he had to offer at the time of his arrival were being able to fast, wait, and think. Kamala shows Siddhartha what people really desire is not knowledge, but material possessions.

Posted by: Doug Ross Christina Christian at September 26, 2014 02:01 PM

Aaron Virelli, Bronwen Burke
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
Eng. 220 CL journeys in narrative CA01
26, September 2014

Question:Revisit and contemplate Siddhartha’s relationship with Govinda. How are the two men similar, and how are they different? What are the narrative functions of Govinda’s reappearance throughout the novel? (In other words, what purpose/s does it serve?) How does the relationship between Govinda and Siddhartha impact the novel’s ending? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Govinda is Siddhartha’s old friend he comes into the story very early when they were in their childhood this is where they make the decision to go out on a mission to find a higher power together. As the story goes on you can see that they have the same interest at heart in this story yet, play different roles Siddhartha is the hero and Govinda are the ally to him. He meets most of the things that Vogler defines as an ally such as, companion, sparring partner, conscience(Vogler 71). He plays as a foil for Siddhartha. The main thing that makes them different Govinda is more of an aid. The narrative functions of Govinda reappearance is this novel is to keeping the faith and help to push Siddhartha on to the next level. Govinda is the one that asks him the most serious questions that he can’t even ask himself. Through the relationship impact end of story how brought them back together although they took different paths one going the more conventional way and one gong more natural and earthy.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at September 26, 2014 06:09 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
26 September 2014

Question #14:

In his discussion on the subject, Vogler claims that, like “the other archetype, Shadows can express positive as well as negative aspects.” (a.) “What possible “positive” aspects could there be to the shadow’s functioning in Hesse’s Siddhartha, if any? (b.) Be sure to use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

In The Writer’s Journey, Vogler describes the shadow archetype as a representation of “the energy of the dark side, the unexpressed, unrealized, or rejected aspects of something” (Vogler 65). The lack of spiritual satisfaction that Siddhartha feels appears to be his shadow. “…the vessel was not full, his intellect was not satisfied, his soul was not at peace, his heart was not still” (Hesse 5).

However, this dissatisfaction leads to Siddhartha’s journey and his experience of worldly pleasures. To name a few, he learned how to: “transact business affairs, to exercise power over people, to amuse himself with women...” (Hesse 77). Although these experiences slowly drain his spirit, it allows him to comprehend the world in another ‘light’. Siddhartha eventually learns from his shadow, and in turn, enlightens Govinda as well by having him kiss Siddhartha on the forehead. Through this kiss, Govinda learns of the endless “unity over the flowing forms…the simultaneousness over the thousands of births and deaths” (Hesse 151).

Works Cited

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Trans. Hilda Rosner. Toronto: Bantam, 1971. 5+. Print.

Vogler, Christopher. The Writer's Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers. Studio City, CA: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. 65. Print.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at September 28, 2014 04:14 PM

Jazlynn Rosario
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
28 September 2014


Question #6:
(a.) In your own words, explain Vogler's discussion of the "psychological function" of the Shadow Archetype.
(b.) How is this energy represented in Hesse's Siddhartha?

Answer:
(a.) The shadow archetype can "represent the power of repressed feelings" (Christopher Vogler 65). The shadow can also depict the dark side of ourselves. It can be a "destructive force" if it is not confronted or brought to light (Vogler 66). The Shadow can be in the form of a monster, demon/devil, aliens, vampires, werewolves, and many other scary enemies or creatures.
(b.) This energy is represented by Siddhartha's longing to gamble, play dice, want money, and the need for egotistical items. Siddhartha has to battle his own self at the end to finally find his enlightened side. Siddhartha was his own shadow when it came down to being shady, having a lot of bad habits, and this side of him almost destroyed him. Siddhartha was "full or arrogance" and his self "had crawled into this priesthood, into this arrogance, into this intellectuality" (Hermann Hesse 99).

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at September 28, 2014 06:47 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL JOURNEYS TO NARRATIVE
28 September 2014

QUESTION #4
In your own words explain how they are differentiated, according to Volger. Then use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words. (B) Which one of these types of shadow is present in Hesse siddhartha and why is more than one present.
A. All three of these are not the same because they all mean three different meanings in a story. However, all mean the same thing in general. According to volger “Villains and enemies are usually dedicated to the death and destruction or defeat of the hero” .And, “antagonists may not be quite so hostile they maybe allies who are after the same goal but who disagree with the hero’s tactics”. (Volger 65)
B. Hesse siddartha had the antagonist in the novel.

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at September 28, 2014 07:33 PM

James Sierra, Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
26 September 2014


Question 3:
There were several ways Siddhartha attempted to attain spiritual enlightenment. Identify and then discuss each of them before answering these questions: Which approaches were successful? Which ones were not successful, and which ones had limited effectiveness? How did Siddhartha progress from one approach to the other? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Siddhartha tried to attain spiritual enlightenment several ways. Initially, he was learning from his spiritual leaders with his family. They did a lot of meditation, self-sacrifice by fasting and would refrain from obtain worldly possessions. Another way he attempted to become spiritually enlightened was by joining the secular world, and wanted to experience what it had to offer. A third way he tried to obtain spiritual enlightenment was by listening to the river.
For the most part, all of the ways he tried to obtain spiritual enlightenment were successful. They all lead him to his eventual destination. The least helpful to his journey was meeting the Illustrious One. He did not feel that he was obtaining any additional enlightenment, and felt that staying there was not going to help him to obtain the enlightenment he was seeking. He says to himself “now I would not let Siddhartha escape from me again! No longer, I want to begin my thoughts and my life with Atman and with the suffering of the world. I do not want to kill and dissect myself any longer, to find a secret behind the ruins. Neither Yoga-Veda shall teach me anymore, nor Atharva-Veda, nor the ascetics, nor any kind of teachings. I want to learn from myself, want to be my student, want to get to know myself, the secret of Siddhartha (Hesse 29)."

Posted by: James Sierra at September 28, 2014 09:12 PM

Caitlin Christian
28 September 2014
ENG 220 CL

Question #200 From Chapter 12- How can Nirvana and Samsara be the same?

Answer: Nirvana is what Siddhartha is essentially in search of through his journey. Through others beliefs and knowledge, Siddhartha is pushed to suffer and learn how his body copes without basic physical needs. Once the body suffers, it is believed that one will develop perfect understanding. The Samaras are the ones who search for enlightenment and inner peace however, so do other priests which make them all very similar. Both Nirvana and Samsara refer to a person’s soul and the way of their being. These similarities make it a very similar journey from life to death, which is held very sacred.
In summary of Siddhartha’s journey, he finally comes to a realization that he has his own destiny, which means he is in the state of Nirvana. Siddhartha realizes this journey has taught him a lot about himself and about his instincts and true knowledge.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at September 28, 2014 11:16 PM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
27 September 2013

Question: (a.) In your own words, explain Vogler’s discussion of the “dramatic function” of the shadow archetype. (b.) How does the shadow “challenge” the hero in Hesse’s Siddhartha? Be sure to use quotes passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: According to Vogler’s discussion, the dramatic function of the shadow archetype serves to challenge the hero. In Siddhartha, the shadow archetype can be described as Siddhartha himself. In the chapter “By The River”, Siddhartha is contemplating suicide. This specific instance is a great example of how the shadow has overtaken Siddhartha.
Work Cited
Hesse, H. (1951). Siddhartha; New York: New Directions.

Posted by: Anet Milian at September 29, 2014 12:30 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
29 September 14

Question #6:
(a.)In your own words, explain Vogler’s Discussion of the “psychological function” of the shadow archetype. (b.)How is this energy represented in Hesse’s Siddhartha? Finally, use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
(a.)The Shadow archetypes psychological function is to create psychosis that can impede the journey of the hero or even destroy the hero completely. (Vogler 65-66) (b.) I would say Kamala is a shadow character in Siddhartha because the merchant she puts Siddhartha with tries to destroy all the work Siddhartha has been trying to do to get rid of his materialistic mindset. (Hesse 45-61)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at September 29, 2014 09:43 AM

Joshua Natonio

Nathaniel Jones

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220CL - On The Proverbial Road: Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative CA01

29 September 2014

QUESTION #2:

Lessons/Epiphanies: What, exactly, does Siddhartha seem to learn/glean from the ferryman? What are these “lessons” significant? How might the ferryman be important to the story, thus far? Does a ferryman serve any “symbolic” purpose? What? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:

The ferryman’s role within the narrative is that of a Mentor to Siddhartha. Vasudeva lives the life that Siddhartha yearns for, one with patience and serenity. The ferryman physically guides passengers across the river and symbolically guides Siddhartha throughout his life and to the eternal Mentor of the river. Vasudeva acts as a liaison between Siddhartha and the river and advises Siddhartha to listen to the river. In one exchange between Siddhartha and the ferryman, Vasudeva explains “the river has taught me to listen; you will learn from it, too” (Hesse 105).

The river was, is, and will be there for ages. It is a constant. The ferryman urges Siddhartha to listen actively and learn from the river to help guide him to the inner peace that Siddhartha craves. “Siddhartha listened. He was now listening intently, completely absorbed, quite empty, taking in everything. He felt that he had now completely learned the art of listening” (Hesse 135). Vasudeva is the pen-ultimate Mentor for Siddhartha and guides him to the river, which acts as the final and most crucial Mentor for Siddhartha. Through actively listening to the river, Siddhartha reaches inner peace/enlightenment “[he] heard them all, the whole, the unity; then the great song of a thousand voices consisted of one word: Om-perfection” (Hesse 136).

WORKS CITED:

Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. Toronto New York: Bantam Books, 1971. 105-136. Print.

Posted by: Joshua Natonio & Nathaniel Jones at September 29, 2014 10:02 AM

Zachary Sabo, Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
29 September 2014

Group Question #4: What, exactly, does Siddhartha learn from Kamala? What are these “lessons” significant? How will this knowledge be of any use to him? Who benefits more from the “arrangement” Kamala has helped him to arrange. Her, Siddhartha, or Siddhartha’s employer? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Siddhartha learns many new things from Kamala, including how to talk to people, specifically women. He did not have much interaction with women in his life, but Kamala teaches him how to treat and love a woman, which started with him needing to change his outfit. He uses these new ideas while he is around Kamala, which ultimately leads to him having a son with her. The arrangement that Siddhartha has with his employer affects the employer and Kamala much more than it affects Siddhartha. Siddhartha “seemed indifferent about business” (Hesse 67), and it seemed like his heart wasn’t into it. However his employer learns a lot from him, because he has so much knowledge and enlightenment and everyone he interacts with learns a lot. Kamala also benefits because she wanted to have a son with him, and that is what ended up occurring. “Some day, when I am older, I will have a child by you.”(73) This affects Kamala more than anything else in her life.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at September 29, 2014 10:04 AM

Sharrad Forbes, Leroy Pianka, Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 225CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
29 September 2014

QUESTION #8:
Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha concerns the quest for spiritual enlightenment, and by the end of it four characters have achieved this goal: Govinda, Gotama (Gautama), Vasudeva, and Siddhartha. Is the enlightenment achieved by each of these characters the same? Why, or why not? What ~distinctions and similarities exist between the paths these characters use to reach their final goal? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
The enlightenment of Govinda, Gotama, Vasudeva, and Siddhartha is all the same. All these characters share the same smile, which was the telltale sign of enlightenment in Siddhartha. The smile of Siddhartha was similar to the “thousand-fold smile of Gotama, the Buddha” (Hesse 64). The result of nirvana was the same for each character although the roads they took to achieve them was different.

All the characters realized “Knowledge can be conveyed, but not wisdom” (Hesse 60). Furthermore, they all understood “teachings are no good” (Hesse 62). Both Vasudeva and Siddhartha realized that spiritual enlightenment is not taught. Vasudeva gently guides Siddhartha onto the path of enlightenment, as Siddhartha does to Govinda.

The distinction lies in the ways each character finds nirvana. Siddhartha goes through his path of not feeling anything, to experiencing love and having a son, to understanding and enlightenment. Vasudeva never has a true teacher and finds nirvana through the river. Gotama finds enlightenment on his own through a revelation in the forest. Whilst Govinda receives spiritual enlightenment from Siddhartha.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at September 29, 2014 10:58 AM

Ashlee English and Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
26 September 2014.

QUESTION #7: In addition to the story of a spiritual quest, Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha is also a love story. How does Siddhartha’s romantic love for Kamala, and his love for his son impact his spirituality? How does Siddhartha’s spirituality, in turn, impact Kamala and his son? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
“I have come to tell you this and thank you because you are so beautiful. And if it does not displease you Kamala, I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher, for I do not know anything of the art which you are mistress” (Hesse 53). The above quote described Siddhartha’s state of mind when he approached Kamala. He did not approach her with the intentions of spiritual growth but rather physical exploration that bore him a son. As such, this exploration did nothing for Siddhartha’s spiritual growth but hindered it. Moreover, he becomes so tethered to his new family that he is lost when he loses them both, “Siddhartha took many… - why not I?” (Hesse 129) and looks to the river for guidance.
However, Siddhartha had an impact on both his son and Kamala. As Kamala sought out Gautama to learn his was and gain enlightenment like Siddhartha, whereas his son despises the ways of his father, “You want me to become like you…lover a dozen times!” (Hesse 123) and ran away to his mother’s home.

Posted by: Ashlee English at September 29, 2014 11:13 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL-CA02
29 September 2014


Question 4:


According to Christoplers Vogler, Heroes “on a great epic journey may acquire whole ship-loads of allies.” Is this also true in Herman Hesse’s novel Siddhartha? If so, who or what compose the “team of adventurers”? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:


When we look at Siddhartha, and the journey he went on it is quite obvious that he didn’t go at it alone. Siddhartha had education given to him by his father, help from his friend Govinda, Guidance from the exalted Gotama, advice from the Ferryman, as well as experiencing bliss with Kamala and becoming a slave to his wants with Kamaswami. While the lessons taught by these people did not always overlap with each other in a timely fashion or even share a common goal, they did guide Siddhartha to his ultimate fate. These lessons eventually steer him to a complete, whole life and realize the reality of human nature. “It is not possible for any person to see how far another one has already progressed on his path; in the robber and dice-gambler, the Buddha is waiting; in the Brahman, the robber is waiting. In deep meditation, there is the possibility to put time out of existence, to see all life which was, is, and will be as if it was simultaneous, and there everything is good, everything is perfect, everything is Brahman.” (Hesse Ch. 12) The whole of the lesson Siddhartha experiences eventually bring about the true lesson that there is always room for radical change. Siddhartha had experienced what it was like to become a gambler from a holy man, and he felt what is was to become a gambler to a ferryman. This lesson brings about the realization that in all good, there can be a shadow evil, and all evil can become good.


Works Cited:


Hesse, Hermann. Siddhartha. New York: New Directions, 1951. Print.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at September 29, 2014 01:30 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL-CA02

QUESTION#8:
According to Christopher Vogler, “Allies need not be human.” For instance, they could be spirits, gods, animals, ghosts, or aspects of the hero’s own mind. Do any non-human Allies exist in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
A non-human Ally in Hesse’s novel Siddhartha is perhaps the ferryman because the ferryman was a relief for Siddhartha due to the fact that the ferryman was a guide for him for the path of enlightenment. After having many teachers “helping” him find enlightenment and failing at it, Siddhartha was successful with the ferryman. Further, the ferryman was also a companion for Siddhartha because without the ferryman Siddhartha would not have found enlightenment. However, the teachers Siddhartha had before the ferryman could have possibly helped him find enlightenment but he perhaps denied a path or a goal that they proposed and therefore failed at finding enlightenment. "A true seeker could not accept any teachings, not if he sincerely wished to find something. But he who found, could give his approval to every path, every goal; nothing separated him from all the other thousands who lived in eternity, who breathed the Divine" (Hesse 90)

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at September 29, 2014 04:57 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at September 30, 2014 12:51 PM

Abrar Nooh
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220

5. Why, do you suppose, Siddhartha’s mother doesn’t have more of a role in the decision?

In the first chapter of this book, Siddhartha realizes that he wants to become a Samana. He believes that his father, as well as his teachers, have taught him everything they know (Hesse 9). Then when Siddhartha told his friend Govinda about his decision, the only concern was if he would obtain his father’s approval (Hesse 13). Furthermore, later in the chapter when Siddhartha obtain his father approval, his father said, “Go now and kiss your mother, tell her where you are going to” (Hesse 16). Throughout this chapter, it can be easily concluded that women did not have a role in the decisions of men, in fact, they are just expected to accept things just as they are. Siddhartha’s mother was never given the opportunity to express herself as it was the case with his father.

Posted by: Abrar Nooh at October 28, 2014 10:11 PM

Abrar Nooh
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220

203. From Chapter 12 – What does Govinda see in Siddhartha?

In the precise moment when Siddhartha asked Govinda to bend down and kiss him in the forehead, Govinda obeyed his order and as soon as Govinda touched Siddhartha’s forehead with his lips “something miraculous happened” (Hesse 124). “He no longer saw the face of his friend Siddhartha, instead he saw other faces, many, a long sequence, a flowing river of faces, of hundreds, of thousands, which all came and disappeared, and yet all seemed to be there simultaneously, which all constantly changed and renewed themselves, and which were still all Siddhartha” (Hesse 124). Govinda saw in Siddhartha’s face the perfect combination of all people and all species and their thousands of relationships, at this point Govinda knew that “Like this,[...], the perfected ones are smiling” (Hesse 125). In other words, Govinda saw that Siddhartha had finally reached perfection.

Posted by: Abrar Nooh at October 28, 2014 10:11 PM

Abrar Nooh
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220

52. Has Siddhartha come to any realizations in this chapter? How is he different now than before?

In the chapter “Awakening” Siddhartha has come to realize “that he was no youth any more, but had turned into a man” (Hesse 32). His desire to have teachers and learn from them had disappeared. Instead, he had realized that there was one thing that his teachers could never teach him, and it was about himself. He said, “And there is no thing in this world I know less about than about me, about Siddhartha!” (Hesse 33). After this realization, he became different because now he felt “like a man who knows what he has got to do” (Hesse 33). He then started to look at the world as if he had never seen it before as if he was just reborn, a new person on the path to his discovery.

Posted by: Abrar Nooh at October 28, 2014 10:13 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
4 February 2015

Question: From Chapter 2 - What frustrates Siddhartha?

Answer: In Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha, Siddhartha is practicing the ways of the Samana through which is the goal is to “attain Nirvana” (Hesse 14). Siddhartha's frustration is apparent as he speaks with Govinda, “we will not attain Nirvana, neither he nor we… not even one will attain Nirvana” (Hesse 14). Leading to Siddhartha’s explanation that “I am beginning to believe that this knowledge has no worse enemy… than learning” (Hesse 15), which concludes Siddhartha’s reason for leaving Govinda.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 3, 2015 03:22 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 February 2015

According to Siddhartha, what can one learn?

According to Siddhartha, "there is nothing to be learned!" and " There is, oh my friend, just one knowledge, this is everywhere, this is Atman!" (Hesse 9). Atman essentially refers to the soul, which Siddhartha says that one ought to already know. Everything that can be known is internal. This reminds me of Rene Descartes’s "I think therefore I am."


Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at February 3, 2015 08:16 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
Question: From chapter 1. Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above (A). Who is speaking? (B). who is being addressed? C what is the context of this passage, i.e what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: Siddhartha’s father is addressing Siddhartha, Siddhartha wants to become a Samana and his father opposes it, so Siddhartha stands and waits for approval in his father’s room. The main content of this passage is found on page eleven.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at February 3, 2015 09:00 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 February 2015

Siddhartha

Question #7: What would Siddhartha have done if his father would have said “No” to his request?

Answer: If Siddhartha’s father would not have let him go on this journey/adventure that he had desired to do, then he would have stayed there. Siddhartha would have just waited there “mute, with [his] arms crossed” standing is the same position as he waited (Hesse 5). He would have waited until his father to told tell him what to do because “Siddhartha has always obeyed his father …[and]… Will do what his father tells him to” (Hesse 6). Siddhartha would do whatever his father says to do because that is something that is very significant in the Indian culture, and how they are raised. They obey and respect their elderly and parent. Because the father is usually the head of the household in Indian homes, he had to go ask his father for permission.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at February 3, 2015 09:13 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 February 2015

Question: Why does Siddhartha speak of himself in third person?

Answer: Siddhartha speaks of himself in third person because it gives the audience he is intending to clarify his mindset of meditation and self-denial to an overall point of view rather than just a personal view. The omniscient point of view Siddhartha uses implies that his intentions are to provide an unbiased perspective on his discussion of self-denial and meditation. In a discussion, Siddhartha says, "But that I, Siddhartha, find only a short numbing of the senses in my exercises and meditations and that I am just as far removed from wisdom, from salvation, as a child in the mother's womb, this I know, Govinda, this I know" (Hesse 9). Overall, Siddhartha's discussion of self-denial and meditation is elaborated upon from a third person perspective to implicate an unbiased and a selfless objective on the topic.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 3, 2015 11:30 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 February 2015

Question: how does Siddhartha meditate?

Answer: According to new Samana rules, Siddhartha meditated by practicing self-denial and meditating. Siddhartha feels a lot of pain while standing in the hot weather and the rain. He was also having problems, “suffering, and overcoming pain, hunger, thirst, tiredness.” Siddhartha have been trying many times to run away from himself until he found himself under the sun, the moon, and the rain (Hesse 7, 8). Siddhartha was also wondering by asking himself “what is meditation?” thinking that it’s only a way to get out of his soul or running away from himself (Hesse 9).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 3, 2015 11:32 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 February 2015

Question: From Chapter 1- Govinda’s “wish was to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, splendid one.” Why is Govinda willing to follow Siddhartha?

Answer: Govinda is eager to follow Siddhartha because he treasured all that Siddhartha believed and did. He loved his beliefs, intelligence, and resilient determination to achieve moksha. Govinda thought that one day Siddhartha will become godhead so he would have a legitimate reason to following Siddhartha. As Hesse writes, “In the evening, after the hour of contemplation, Siddhartha is going to join the Samanas. He is going to become a Samana… Govinda realized that if his friend, Siddhartha, was going to pursue his own path as a Samana, he also wanted to start his own “beginning”. “Siddhartha’s destiny was about to unfold as Govinda became as pale as a dried banana skin” (Hesse 9)

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 4, 2015 09:55 AM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA02
04 February 2015

Question: Who is Gotama? What does the narrator think of him?

Answer: In Chapter Two of Siddhartha, Gotama is essentially “the Buddha” (Hesse 19). Gotama is a wanderer with no possessions but has a blissful demeanor who has found Nirvana. The narrator, however, keeps referring to Gotama as “this myth, this rumor” (Hesse 19). It seems as though he’s speaking in a mocking tone. However, Siddhartha feels great love and respect for Gotama.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at February 4, 2015 11:20 AM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
4 February 2015


Questions: Siddhartha’s goal is to conquer the self. Explain what this means.


Answers: According to Siddhartha, he believed “to conquer the self” meant to “to find tranquility with an emptied heard, to be open to miracles in unselfish thoughts” (Hesse 9). The concept means that the only way of “to conquer the self” is to rid oneself of the otherworldly troubles to garner a sense of inner peace and tranquility.

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at February 4, 2015 11:22 AM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Literature CA02
4 February 2015

Question: Why did Siddhartha remain standing? Why didn’t he just leave? Did Siddhartha’s father allow him to leave because, in a sense, Siddhartha had “already left”?


Answer: When Siddhartha told his father that he wanted to leave the next morning to become a Samana, the father did not approve and felt like it was unfair treatment towards him. After the father went to lay in bed, Siddhartha stood in the same spot for hours. He stood there until he received his father’s blessing to leave the house. Siddhartha was not going to leave because he has always obeyed his father and will do what his father will tell him to do. After hearing that, the father saw his son’s eyes were fixed on a distant spot. “Then his father realized that even now Siddhartha no longer dwelt with him in his home that he had already left.” That is why the father let Siddhartha go. He knew that his son was no longer with him (Hesse 10-12).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at February 4, 2015 12:21 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
4 February 2015

Question: (#1) From Chapter 1 – “Siddhartha had begun to harbor discontent” Why is Siddhartha unhappy? Why is his soul like a “waiting vessel”?

Answer: Siddhartha is unhappy because he does not feel enlightened. All of the Brahmins have, “poured the sum total of their knowledge into [him]…” (Hesse, 5) yet their practices of ablutions and sacrifices have not brought Siddhartha the happiness that they promise. Therefore, his soul is like a waiting vessel because he is waiting for someone or something to come by and fill him (the vessel) with enough knowledge so that he can truly be enlightened.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 4, 2015 12:40 PM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA02
4 February 2015

Question:9. From Chapter 1 - Given that Govinda was Siddhartha’s “lance bearer,” speculate about the conditions under which Govinda left home.

Answer: I believe that Govinda could never stand to live without Siddhartha. The author makes this clear "Govinda, his friend, the Brohmin's son, loved him more than anybody else. He loved the way he walked, his complete grace of movement; he loved everything that Siddhartha did and said, and above all he loved his intellect, he fine ardent thoughts, his strong will, his high vocation." (Hesse,4) It is clear that Siddhartha is a special person, not only in personality, but his dedication to his faith. Govinda realizes how great of a person he is, so he knows he would be doing the right thing by following him wherever he goes.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at February 4, 2015 12:54 PM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01

4 February 2015

Question: What does Siddhartha do with the oldest Samana? What does that feat show?

Answer: In the text, Siddhartha hypnotized the oldest Samana by looking into his eyes and Samana did whatever he commanded. It shows Siddhartha had more powers than Samana. When Siddharta told Govinda “But Siddhartha put his mouth close to Govinda’s ear and whispered to him: “Now, I want to show the old man that I’ve learned something from him” (Hesse, 23). Then Siddharta hypnotized the eldest Samana “Positioning himself closely in front of the Samana, with a concentrated soul, he captured the old man’s glance with his glances, deprived him of his power, made him mute, took away his free will, subdued him under his own will, commanded him, to do silently, whatever he demanded him to do (Hesse, 23) .Then the oldest man became which Hesse writes “The old man became mute, his eyes became motionless, his will be paralyzed, his arms were hanging down without power he had fallen victim to Siddharta spell” (Hesse ,23 ) . When this defeat happened, it showed that Siddharta had more powers than the Samanna.

Posted by: Marie Destin at February 4, 2015 01:15 PM

Duane Daye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 February 2015

Question: Chapter 1 – Why, do you suppose, Siddharthas’s mother doesn’t have more of a role in the decision?

Answer: I believe that Siddhathas’s mother didn’t have much of a say in the decision because I believe that women in this particular society don’t have much of a say. In the beginning of the chapter it states “ Siddhartha had already long taken part in learned men’s conversations” (HESSE 3) shows that men have power over women and that women are not equal to men. It also says “when with learned men” (HESSE 3) which shows that only men have education or the right to education.

Posted by: Duane Daye at February 4, 2015 01:23 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA02
4 February 2015

Question: 4. From Chapter 1 - How did Siddhartha convince his father? Why didn’t he just go?

Answer: Siddhartha convinced his father by standing all day and night. After his father realized his determination and that he had to do it for himself he let him go. He didn't just go because he didn't want to disobey his father, his journey would not have the same respects. His father says " "So you would rather disobey your father?", "Siddhartha has always obeyed his father" "So you will give up your project?" "Siddhartha will do as his father tells him"...then the father realized Sidhartha could no longer remain with him at home." (Hesse 12)

Posted by: William Pereira at February 4, 2015 01:25 PM

Bobbi Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
English 220
4 Feb. 2015


Q: How does Siddhartha act when he is with the Samanas?

A: Siddhartha’s time spent with the Samanas, seems to be a time when he deprives himself and truly lives with the earth and no excess things whatsoever. “On another occasion when Siddhartha left the wood with Govinda in order to beg for food for their brothers and teachers..”(Hesse,17). In order to obtain food, he (Siddhartha), must beg in the streets. But despite having to do so, and other similar acts he never complains or seems resentful towards anyone. Siddhartha, truly learns to live with little or in some cases since one can’t always be lucky to always get food when begging from strangers and for a group of people none the less he must also learn to live without. So in the grand journey, he learning to better himself.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at February 4, 2015 01:41 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
6 February 2015

Question: 87. From Chapter 5 - Who is Kamala and what is her profession? Does Hesse seem to portray this fact in a negative or positive way? Why is this significant to the story?

Answer: Kamala is “the well-known courtesan” (Hesse 43), who’s profession appears in a positive manner. This optimistic light of courtesans stems from Hinduism’s view of the importance of their profession [Kama Sutra]. Kamala’s trade is significant to Siddhartha as it opens up a new world to the former Samana that “his inward voice…said No” (Hesse 42) to up until his encounter with a beautiful woman “whom Siddhartha has spoken without lowered eyes” (Hesse 44).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 4, 2015 04:17 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 February 2015

Question: Explain what Siddhartha means when he states the following assertions “I can think. I can wait. I can fast.” Explicate the consequential abilities entailed in each assertion.
Answer: Siddhartha is in a conversation with a merchant, named Kamala, when he says “I can think. I can wait. I can fast.” (Hesse,98). This assertion describes the lack of ability which the poor have to obtain the most basic resources such as clothes, shoes and money. Siddhartha then goes on to add that he can write poetry. This assertion connects with the idea of being reborn and adjusting to living with little.

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at February 5, 2015 01:49 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 February 2015

Siddhartha

Question #117:What does Kamala teach Siddhartha; or what does Siddhartha learn from Kamala?

Answer: In Hesse’s Siddhartha, Kamala did teach Siddhartha quite a bit. The main thing that she had taught him was “the art of love” (Hesse 39). Kamala was the one to teach him about love as in physical love and the importance of love. Siddhartha “became her pupil, her lover, her friend… [she gave] value and meaning [to] his present life” (Hesse 36). Kamala nevertheless taught Siddhartha a lot, that he possibly could not learn from someone else.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at February 5, 2015 10:33 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
6 February 2015

Question: (#112) What makes Siddhartha so good at the art of business? Is he an excellent partner for Kamaswami? Why or Why not?
Answer: Siddhartha is good at the art of business because he is what is commonly referred to as a man of the people that is to say that he poses all of the desirable traits that a consumer desires. Traits such as compassion, understanding, kindness, patience, and intelligence make up Siddhartha’s character. This, of course, makes him an ideal partner for Kamaswami because Kamaswami lacks these traits but has the all of the traits of a great businessman. One quote that really brings this to light is when Siddhartha remarks, “I have learned from you how much a basket of fish costs and how much interest one can claim for lending money… But I did not learn how to think from you… It would be better if you learned that from me” (Hesse, 69). So while Siddhartha think of how to properly treat the customer, Kamaswami thinks of how best to turn a profit. In a sense, the two balance each other out in a similar fashion to yin and yang.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 6, 2015 02:36 AM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA02
6 February 2015

“Everyone takes, everyone gives; such is life.”
Question: 103. From Chapter 6 - Answer the following questions about the passage quoted above: (a.)Who is speaking?, (b.) Who is being addressed?, (c.) What is the context of this passage, i.e.,what is going on, exactly, here? This translation may differ from the version of the text you are using (there are many translations). Let us know what page to find this on your version.

Answer: Siddhartha is speaking to Kamaswami the merchant. The event that is taking place is Saddhartha coming to "seek service with a merchant" (63). I found this passage on page 64 the quote is mostly the same but it differs slightly. "Everyone takes, everyone gives, Life is like that." (64)

Posted by: William Pereira at February 6, 2015 10:16 AM

Christina Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative CA02
06 February 2015

Question: From Chapter Five: In the Chapter, Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. What does he mean?

Answer: In Chapter Five of Siddhartha, Siddhartha compares himself to a stone. This comparison is because, as he states, “when you throw a stone into the water, it finds the quickest way to the bottom of the water” (Hesse 30). He states that when he has a goal, Siddhartha does nothing but think about it. There’s no action, so he sits at the bottom of the river like a stone.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at February 6, 2015 10:57 AM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 February 2015

Question 109: From Chapter 6- Who or what are the childlike people? What was the one factor that separated Siddhartha from them?

Answer: In Chapter 6, Siddhartha meets Kamaswami in his house and discusses potentially what Siddhartha could offer if he has no possessions. Kamaswami suspects that he has gone through adversities while living as a Samana because he believes that it was wrong for him to accept service over scholarship and philosophy. Siddhartha replies that he has not been knowledgeable of any adversities because he know that these adversities are voluntary. He says they are not real. Overall, Siddhartha says he can offer fasting, which he explains it as thinking and waiting. Kamaswami is not happy with what he has to offer and thinks he should give more. Kamaswami is considered childlike because he cannot accept Siddhartha and his model of a Samana. The rice workers are the “childlike” people because Siddhartha loves and despises the lives of the people they transact with, however feels separated from them by his past and his samana knowledge. Hesse writes, “He saw them toiling, saw them suffer and grow gray about things that to him did not seem worth the price- for money, small pleasures and trivial honors” (Hesse 70) This passage describes how Siddhartha does not like the business aspect of life.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 6, 2015 11:50 AM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
6 February 2015

Question: From chapter 6- siddharthas skills are mostly holy ones. Does kamaswami decide to hire him, or not?

Answer: Siddhartha seeks to find Kamaswami, who is a wealthy merchant. This merchant asks him questions about his skills and wants. Siddhartha claims he wants and needs nothing, he instead argues that his ability to fast can be an asset. He is not troubled by the shortage of food, therefore no one can force him to do something for food. It has also taught him patience. When the merchant sees that Siddhartha can read and write well, he offers Siddhartha both a job and shelter.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at February 6, 2015 12:25 PM

Duane Daye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 February 2015

Question: Chapter 6 - Explain how Siddhartha takes control of the job interview with Kamaswami. Be specific.

Answer: Siddhartha takes control from the very beginning of the interview by saying “No, I am not in need and I have never been in need” (Hesse 63) which shows the merchant that he doesn’t “need” the job but rather “wants the job. Siddhartha feels as if he has something to give to the customers, “I can think, I can wait, I can fast” (Hesse 64) which shows that he is an intelligent man who is patient and wouldn’t be bothered by hunger. Siddhartha has flipped the interview around and by doing this, Siddhartha has shown that it isn’t he who needs the job but rather the merchant needing him for the job.

Posted by: Duane Daye at February 6, 2015 12:35 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
6 February 2015


Questions: What things does the character Siddhartha learn from the character Kamala? Be specific.


Answers: He learned that his goal was the reason for his determination to improve. When talking with Kamala, he states “Siddhartha does nothing, he waits, he thinks, he fasts, but he passes through the things of the world like a rock through water, without doing anything, without stirring; he is drawn, he lets himself fall. His goal attracts him because he doesn't let anything enter his soul that might oppose the goal (Hesse 24).”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at February 6, 2015 12:58 PM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01

3 February 2015

Question: What does Siddhartha ask of Kamala? What does he want her to do?

Answer: Siddhartha asks Kamala to teach him the art of love which Siddhartha said “. How shouldn’t I reach that goal, which I set for myself yesterday: to be your friend and to learn the joys of love from you! “(Hesse, 50). Also, Siddhartha asked Kamala to be his teacher and to guide him through life, and Siddhartha said in the text ““To tell you this and to thank you for being so beautiful. And if it doesn’t displease you, Kamala, I would like to ask you to be my friend and teacher, for I know nothing yet of that art that you have mastered in the highest degree “ (Hesse , 49 ) .

Posted by: Marie Destin at February 6, 2015 01:08 PM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA02
6 February 2015

Question: 115 What does Siddhartha’s inner voice say? How is life “flowing past” him?

Answer: I think Siddhartha feels as if life is flowing past him because this is the first time he has been caught up in something other than his religion. He found a girl who he connects with. This is shown here, "Perhaps people like us cannot love. Ordinary people can- that is their secret."(Hesse, 72) This is showing that Siddhartha finally found something special, and it happens to be with Kamala. This makes their moments slow down while the rest of the surroundings jsut flow by.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at February 6, 2015 01:22 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 February 2015

Question: When Siddhartha arrived in the village after the rice harvest had already been sold, why was it good business, according to Siddhartha AND in spite of Kamaswami's protestation, that he remain in the village for a while and become friends with the people?

Answer: Siddhartha said that since he was nice to the people and made new friends there, he did not hurt anyone. So if maybe in the future Siddhartha would return for business, friendly people would receive him (Hesse 68).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at February 6, 2015 01:29 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
6 February 2015

Siddhartha

Question 92: when Siddhartha kisses a woman for the first time, there is a style change how so? Why?

Answer: Along Siddhartha’s travel, he comes across a woman next to a stream. He gives her the traditional greeting among travelers and asks how much further he has until the Large City? She proceeded to get up and walk towards him. They communicate for some time before she asks, “if he has eaten already. Also, if it was true that the Samanans slept alone in the forest at night not allowed to have any women with them (Hesse 29)”. She then makes the move “climbing the tree” (Hesse 29), Siddhartha remembered his previous dream the other night and leans forward kissing her. Following this his most inner self brings him to a halt by telling him no! He then puts her on her cheek and walks into the bamboo forest. It is the first time in his life he has touched a woman in his life, once his inner self told him this he came to see a female in heat compared to all her beautiful features (Hesse 28-29).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 6, 2015 02:05 PM


Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
9 February 2015

Question 143:From Chapter 8 - How does Siddhartha feel about the path that he has taken with his life?

Answer: As Siddhartha wanders he “wished passionately for oblivion… to be dead” (Hesse 70) showing he sees the pain of his livelihood after meeting Kamala. Upon finding a barren river, he compares it to “the terrible emptiness of his soul” (Hesse 71) embodying the realization that he gained nothing from life with Kamala, Kamaswami, or the worldly experiences. Only when he hears the Brahman’s ‘Om’ does he acknowledge “all the disillusionment, all the despair” (Hesse 72) did not affect his conscious as intensely as his previous lifestyle.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 6, 2015 04:08 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
8 February 2015

Siddhartha

Question # 166: What bed did Kamala die on?

Answer: In Hesse’s Siddhartha, Kamala dies toward the ending of the book. She dies on the Ferryman’s, Vasudeva, bed. The bed that Kamala dies is “on the same bed on which my wife [Vasudeva’s wife] once died [on] (Hesse 62-63). Due to Kamala dying on the same bed as Vasudeva’s wife did, she shall also have a pyre built on the same hill as his wife’s pyre is.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at February 8, 2015 03:41 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. HobbsENG
220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 February 2015

Question: According to Siddhartha, what is a good thing?

Answer: In Chapter 8, "By the River", Siddhartha awakens with a bigger realization about his life. Siddhartha had recently overcome the temptation to commit suicide and end his life, but once he wakes up by the river, he realizes it was a good thing for him to experience those emotions of despair and misery (Hesse 54). In the chapter of "By the River" he states, "It is good, to get a taste of everything for oneself, which one needs to know" (Hesse 55). This explains that it is a good thing for him to have experienced these emotions because that is what life is about. Life will have times of misery and times of happiness, and in order to experience life at it's fullest, one must experience all types of emotions.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 8, 2015 08:32 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 February 2015

Question: What does Siddhartha's four-day trip to the village demonstrate about his character and personal philosophy?

Answer: Siddhartha does not allow worry into his mindset and lifestyle. He enjoys the positive factors of life and travelling. In Chapter 6, he states, "Surely I have travelled for my amusement. For what else? I have gotten to know people and places and I have received kindness and trust, I have found friendship" (Hesse 40). His philosophy about life is clearly about the positive and better things in life rather than worrisome factors (Hesse 40).

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 8, 2015 08:41 PM

Adam Alexander
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01
9 February 2015

Question: What does Siddhartha say he is doing?

Answer: Siddhartha is meditating when Govinda comes around. They talk to one another, and Govinda asks where he is going. Siddhartha responds, “I'm going nowhere. I'm just travelling. I'm on a pilgrimage."
Govinda states the Siddhartha does not look like a pilgrim because of his clothes and perfumes, to which Siddhartha replies “Remember, my dear: Not eternal is the world of appearances, not eternal, anything but eternal are our garments and the style of our hair, and our hair and bodies themselves.” Siddhartha tells Govinda that it does not matter what he is wearing, that is irrelevant. Clothing is not eternal and should not infringe upon somebody’s journey or aspirations, which could be the eternal. What somebody does with their life is what matters, not the small details.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at February 9, 2015 03:21 AM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA02
9 February 2015

Question: 158. From Chapter 9 - What does one have to do to conquer all difficulties and evil in the World?

Answer: Siddhartha realizes that the conquering of all the evil of the world is to realize that not everything is final, and that the past doesn’t always reflect the future and the future is not definitive. In the passage Vasudeva explains to Siddhartha

“Yes, Siddhartha," he said. "Is this what you mean? That the river is everywhere at the same time, at the source and at the mouth, at the waterfall, at the ferry, at the current, in the ocean and in the mountains, everywhere, and that the present only exists for it, not the shadow of the past, nor the shadow of the future?" "That is it," said Siddhartha, "and when I learned that, I reviewed my life and it was also a river, and Siddhartha the boy, Siddhartha the mature man and Siddhartha the old man, were only separated by shadows, not through reality. Siddhartha’s previous lives were also not in the past, and his death and his return to Brahma are not in the future. Nothing was, nothing will be, everything has reality and presence." Siddhartha spoke with delight. This discovery had made him very happy. Was then not all sorrow in time, all self-torment and fear in time? Were not all difficulties and evil in the world conquered as soon as one conquered time, as soon as one dispelled time?”(107).

Posted by: William Pereira at February 9, 2015 08:05 AM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
8 February 2015

Question: from chapter 9- the ferryman said that Siddhartha will learn to listen from whom?

Answer: The ferryman instructs Siddhartha that he cannot teach, but that he can help Siddhartha to learn from the river and essentially to learn how to be devout and listen. For instance Siddhartha realizes that the river is everywhere and continuous.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at February 9, 2015 09:17 AM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journey’s in Narrative CA01
09 February 2015

Question: Chapter Five: What did Siddhartha do when he saw the reflection of his face?

Answer: Siddhartha felt empty and angry at himself so when, “he stared into the water, saw the reflection of his face and spit at it” (Hesse 61). He dropped himself into the river but when he heard the word “om” (Hesse 63), he was shocked. He felt so lost that this word made him rethink his actions.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at February 9, 2015 10:46 AM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA02
8 February 2015

Question 159:What word does the river pronounce when all of its ten thousand voices speak at the same time?

Answer: When Siddhartha and Vasudeva are by the river practicing the art of listening they hear the river speak to them. "When Siddhartha listened attentively to this river, to this song of thousand voices; when he did not listen to the sorrow or laughter, when he did not mind his soul to any one particular voice and absorb it in his Self, but heard them all, the whole, the unity; then the great song of a thousand voices consisted of one word: Om-perfection." (Hesse, 136) It is easy to tell that Vasudeva was waiting for this moment and felt extremely proud that Siddartha had discovered Om.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at February 9, 2015 12:04 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
9 February 2015

Question: (#151) What is the ferryman’s name? What does Siddhartha learn from the ferryman?

Answer: In chapter nine of Hermann Hesse’s novel, Siddhartha, The ferryman character is explored in greater detail. The reader discovers that the ferryman’s name is Vasudeva and that he will be an important character for chapters to come. This really comes to light a few pages later when Siddhartha learns quite a few things from Vasudeva. Vasudeva taught Siddhartha, “…how to make oars, how improve the boat, how to make baskets,” (Hesse, 106). Though not directly taught by Vasudeva, Siddhartha learned how to listen to the river and learned that “there is no such thing as time” (Hesse, 106) while in Vasudeva’s company.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 9, 2015 12:41 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 February 2015

Question 152: From Chapter 9- What do people say about Siddhartha and the Ferryman?

Answer: Through Chapter 9, the people think that both Siddhartha and Vasudeva the Ferryman are looking to achieve illumination. They both are looking for paths to choose to continue their lives. They eventually begin to think alike when Vasudeva talked about time and the secret of the river. “He once asked him, “Have you also learned that secret from the river; there is no such thing as time?” (Hesse 106) The Ferryman also told him time is everywhere along the river. It is more of a journey because time is at the mouth, the waterfall, the ferry, and the current. The river is the present time and not a shadow of the past or future. This means that wherever you are, you u are continuing to flow in the river of time. You make your own decisions in life and choose the right path in which you were meant to take.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 9, 2015 12:42 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
8 February 2015

Question 137: what does Siddhartha hear right before jumping into the river?

Answer: Siddhartha seems to attempt suicide. He realized the “foolishness” of his action, but before that, his spirit woke up. He heard himself saying the “old word which is the beginning and the end of all prayer of the Brahmins.” However, those old words, the holy “Om” means “that what is perfect.” Those are the most effective words to Siddhartha before attempting the suicide (Hesse 50).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 9, 2015 01:36 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
4 February 2015
Question 134 What was the only thing Siddhartha Knew? As that everyone has a soul, everything he doesn’t know including himself. This is expressed in Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse “That I know nothing about myself, that Siddhartha has remained thus alien and unknown to me, stems from one cause, a single cause: I was afraid of myself, I was fleeing from myself!” The only thing he knows, is that he was a being that existed and everything else was taught to him.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at February 9, 2015 01:57 PM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

5 February 2015

Question: What do you suppose a Samana heart is?

Answer: The meaning of a Samana heart is that it is looking for peace. In the text, “Siddhartha had lived the life of the world and of lust, though without being a part of it. His senses, which he had killed off in hot years as a Samana, had awoken again, he had tasted riches, had tasted lust, had tasted power; nevertheless he had still remained in his heart for a long time a Samna; “ (Hesse ,70) .

Posted by: Marie Destin at February 9, 2015 02:07 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
11 February 2015

Question 191: From Chapter 11—Where does Vasudeva go (Hint: not just the woods)

Answer: At the conclusion of Chapter 11 of Siddhartha, Vasudeva not only goes into the woods but “into the unity of all things” (Hesse 111). Vasudeva’s departure symbolizes the final step in the Dharmashatras [Hinduism’s Path of Life]. This path represents the renouncing one’s social obligation and further exploration of one’s spiritual self. Vasudeva is leaving his apprentice, Siddhartha since Vasudeva has learned everything “because he believed in the river” (Hesse 118).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 10, 2015 03:21 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
10 February 2015


Question: from chapter 12- What is wrong with seeking, according to Siddhartha?

Answer: Siddhartha explains that because he is so focused on one single objective or goal he is missing everything else that is going on in the world. Siddhartha is arguing that point because govinda is focused primarily on the search.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at February 10, 2015 09:57 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
10 February 2015

Siddhartha

Question 206: What does Govinda see Siddhartha do? What does this show about Siddhartha final change?

Answer: Govinda saw Siddhartha smile, the "perfect" smile (Hesse 81). As Siddhartha smiles, Govinda saw "a long series, a flowing river of faces" which was his life and past lives (Hesse 80). Govinda at that moment realized that Siddhartha had become the Buddha and had reached Nirvana.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at February 10, 2015 10:15 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 February 2015

Question:What had Govinda heard about while at the pleasure grove?

Answer: Govinda heard about a ferryman, who lived by the river, whom many considered to be a sage (Hesse 139).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at February 11, 2015 10:47 AM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 February 2015

Question 203: What does Govinda see in Siddhartha?

Answer: In Chapter 12, and throughout Siddhartha’s journey, Govinda sees a doctrine that Siddhartha abides by (one of his own). Govinda conveys this because he believes in Siddhartha’s teachings and his ways of life. “By this, Govinda knows that Siddhartha does not follow any other teacher, however, not always himself. Govinda believes he may not have discovered any knowledge that has helped him live” (Hesse 142). Hesse also writes, “Siddhartha said: I have become aware of knowledge, just as one feels life in one’s heart… Wisdom is not communicable. The wisdom which a wise man tries to communicate always sounds foolish.” (Hesse 142) By this passage, Govinda thinks that Siddhartha is “jesting” (142), but for Siddhartha to explain himself and about the wisdom he has gained, it would be impossible for Govinda to understand. Nevertheless, a person can achieve it, live it, and be heartened by it.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 11, 2015 11:06 AM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
9 February 2015

Question: 202. From Chapter 12 - What is Govinda’s opinion of Siddhartha’s thoughts?

Answer: Govinda's opinion if Siddhartha's thoughts are that he sounds foolish and crazy, but he says he radiates calmness and purity. So although he thinks his thoughts are foolish and strange he thinks he a holy man. Govinda says:
"(But secretly he thought to himself: This Siddhartha is a bizarre person, he expresses bizarre thoughts, his teachings sound foolish. So differently sound the exalted one's pure teachings, clearer, purer, more comprehensible, nothing strange, foolish, or silly is contained in them. But different from his thoughts seemed to me Siddhartha's hands and feet, his eyes, his forehead, his breath, his smile, his greeting, his walk. Never again, after our exalted Gotama has become one with the Nirvana, never since then have I met a person of whom I felt: this is a holy man! Only him, this Siddhartha, I have found to be like this. May his teachings be strange, may his words sound foolish; out of his gaze and his hand, his skin and his hair, out of every part of him shines a purity, shines a calmness, shines a cheerfulness and mildness and holiness, which I have seen in no other person since the final death of our exalted teacher." (148-149 Hesse)

Posted by: Will Pereira at February 11, 2015 12:07 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
11 February 2015

Question: (#200) How can Nirvana and Samsara be the same?

Answer: Nirvana and Samsara can be the same due to the drive to reach Nirvana. Some people head out on this quest to reach Nirvana and they will stay on the same path no matter how long they walk it. Thusly, they get stuck in a rut that offers no deviation towards enlightenment.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 11, 2015 12:14 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 February 2015

Question: What is the symbolism of the stone?

Answer: Siddhartha uses the stone as a symbolism of life. Siddhartha says that the stone may transform into anything in the cycle of transformation which is why even a stone that may appear as worthless, actually has a purpose in life just like everything else does (Hesse 53). Siddhartha also mentions that even a stone is something we should all love. All things in life should be loved regardless of how insignificant they may seem. Speaking to Govinda, Siddhartha says, "I can love a stone, Govinda, and also a tree or a piece of bark. This are things and things can be loved" (Hesse 53).

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 11, 2015 12:17 PM


Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11, February, 2015

Question: Why is there still restlessness in Govinda’s heart?

Answer: For Govinda he felt like he was not an accomplished monk. Although he followed the rules of the monks he still felt inadequate. This is recognized by Hesse when he writes “When Govinda went back on his way, he chose the path to the ferry, eager to see the ferryman. Because, though he had lived his entire life by the rules, , though he was also looked upon with veneration by the younger monks on account of his age and his modesty, the restlessness and the searching still had not perished from his heart.” (Hesse, 234).

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at February 11, 2015 12:52 PM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01

9 February 2015

Question: What “wound” does Siddhartha have? What is the different light that he sees people in?

Answer: The wound Siddhartha has is the loss of his son. In the text it is shown , “The blind love of a mother for her child, the stupid, blind pride of a conceited father for his only son, the blind, wild desire of a young, vain woman for jewelry and admiring glances from men, all of these urges, all of this childish stuff, all of these simple, foolish, but immensely strong, strongly living “ (Hesse , 117) . The different light that he see people and he envies them because he see them being happy . In the text , Siddhartha any more, he saw people living for their sake, saw them achieving infinitely much for their sake, travelling, conducting wars, suffering infinitely much, bearing infinitely much, and he could love them for it, he saw life, that what is alive, the indestructible, the Brahman in each of their passions, each of their acts ( Hesse , 118 ) .

Posted by: Marie Destin at February 11, 2015 01:24 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2/10/2015
Q) At the end of the chapter what does vasudeva do?
He goes into the forest to seek enlightenment, he leaves his boat and everything to

Posted by: Sergio at February 11, 2015 02:06 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
11 February 2015


Questions: What does Siddhartha realize is the only thing ordinary people lack?

Answers: He realizes the only thing ordinary people lack is “the consciousness” which is the conscious thought of the oneness of all life. He explains this by stating “They lacked nothing, there was nothing the knowledgeable one, the thinker, had to put him above them except for one little thing, a single, tiny, small thing: the consciousness, the conscious thought of the oneness of all life (Hesse 48).”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at February 11, 2015 02:36 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
11 February 2015

Question: on the day when Siddhartha decided to go to town, who was laughing at Siddhartha?

Answer: Siddhartha sat down to an old man. He was saying everything he needed to say. He said embarrassing things that he never said to anyone. He told the old man of the fled he did and ferried across the water. He also told him about the river laughing at him when he was walking to the city.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at February 12, 2015 02:42 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 February 2015

Question: What according to Christopher Vogler, is the "psychological function" of the Ally archetypes? Do ally archetypes in Charles Dickens' novel "A Christmas Carol" perform this function, if at all?

Answer: The "psychological function" of the Ally archetype is to represent the hidden emotions and thoughts which may play a role in the personality farther along into the story (Vogler 75). In "A Christmas Carol", the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is the ally archetype in bringing about certain emotions in Scrooge. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come causes Scrooge to realize a lot about how he may end up if he remains on this path of negativity and hostility towards the Christmas holiday. Once Scrooge is flooded with the realization of how he must alter his life, he says, "I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year" (Dickens 125). The ally archetype, The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come", is the factor which causes Scrooge to make this change in his life by bringing about specific emotions in Scrooge to make Scrooge change his life.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at February 12, 2015 10:56 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12, February, 2015

Question: What, exactly, does Siddhartha seem to learn/glean from the ferryman? What are these “lessons” significant? How might the ferryman be important to the story, thus far” Does a ferryman serve a “symbolic” purpose? What?

Answer: Siddhartha’s fascination with water encourages him to learn more from the ferryman. The ferryman and Siddhartha exchange offerings in both a spiritual and symbolic sense. Siddhartha is tired of being judged for his nice clothes and offers them to the ferryman. This gesture may seem simple but it reflects his move toward an inner voice and identity. As Siddhartha shares his store Vasudeva listens closely and sincerely. The two share a bond and connection with the river. Siddhartha seems to gain knowledge from the ferryman. The lessons are important in Siddhartha’s spiritual journey. The ferryman seems to play a symbolic purpose by offering comfort and understanding. The connection that the two share illustrated when Hesse expresses “There was something about this ferry and the two ferrymen which was transmitted to others…” (184, Hesse)

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at February 13, 2015 12:32 AM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
13 February 2015

Question: According to Vogler, Allies sometimes play the role of “helpful servant.” Do any of the Ally archetypes in Hermann Hesse’s novel Siddhartha play the role of “helpful servant”? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha, Vasudeva, the ferryman represents the “helpful servant” ally archetype. Once Siddhartha left his life as a wealthy tradesman, Vasudeva becomes his soundboard, does not “hinder him [Siddhartha]” (Hesse 102), and who cares for Siddhartha. Ultimately, Vasudeva leads Siddhartha to enlightenment through the ways of the river.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 13, 2015 01:08 PM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
13 February 2015

Question 210: What, exactly, does Siddhartha learn from Kamaswami, his new boss? What are these “lessons” significant? What does Siddhartha do for him?

Answer: When Siddhartha and the merchant, Kamaswami meet, they have very different views on things but soon realize they both live off of other people.Siddhartha is able to give Kamaswami insight on how to live off of nothing and the merchant in return, shows how to exchange for something. Siddhartha began to work for Kawaswami, "If he made a profit, he accepted it calmly; if he suffered a loss, he laughed and said, "Oh well, this transaction has gone badly.""(Hesse, 67) This shows that Siddhartha began to accept the idea of a business and learn how to take what he was given.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at February 13, 2015 01:14 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Literature CA02
13 February 2015

Question: (a.) What, according to Christopher Vogler, is the "psychological function" of the Ally archetype, and (b.) do Ally archetypes in Hermann Hesse's novel Siddhartha perform this function, if at all? Explain your response. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Vogler explains that Allies are there to represent powerful internal forces that help the Hero in a spiritual crisis (Vogler 75).
In Siddhartha, Govinda represents this when he teaches Siddhartha to be patient when he felt like there was nothing left, if at all, to learn from the Samanas (Hesse 18).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at February 13, 2015 02:04 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
13 February 2015


Questions: What, exactly, does Siddhartha learn from Kamala? What are these “lessons” significant? How will this knowledge be of any use to him? Who benefits more from the “arrangement” Kamala has helped him to arrange. Her, Siddhartha, or Siddhartha’s employer?


Answers: He learned that his goal is the driving force behind his determination which will help him achieve his goal. He explains, “When you throw a rock into the water, it will speed on the fastest course to the bottom of the water. This is how it is when Siddhartha has a goal, a resolution. Siddhartha does nothing, he waits, he thinks, he fasts, but he passes through the things of the world like a rock through water, without doing anything, without stirring; he is drawn, he lets himself fall. His goal attracts him, because he doesn't let anything enter his soul which might oppose the goal.”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at February 13, 2015 02:30 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
16 February 2015

Question: (#212) there were several ways Siddhartha attempted to attain spiritual enlightenment. Identify and then discuss each of them before answering these questions: Which approaches were successful? Which ones were not successful, and which ones had limited effectiveness? How did Siddhartha progress from one approach to the other? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: There were many ways in which Siddhartha attempted to attain spiritual enlightenment. Primarily was the time he spent practicing faith among his father and the other Brahmin. This was probably one of the least effective methods, however, its ineffectiveness led Siddhartha to leave his father to leave the Brahmin way behind and join the Samanas. With the Samanas Siddhartha learned what he considered the most important traits: to think, to wait, and to fast. Siddhartha even told Kamala, “You will see that [these traits] are very useful” (Hesse, 59). Therefore, his time with the Samanas only had a limited effectiveness. However, Siddhartha eventually left the Samanas for a similar reasoning to that of his reason for leaving the Brahmin; he perceived their attempts at reaching Nirvana as ineffective. From here, he searched for Gotama and his Buddhist followers only to leave Gotama. Although Gotama and his lessons did not seem to pose much of an effect on Siddhartha, we later find out that his words had more of an impact than we initially thought. In fact, it is not until near the end of the book that Siddhartha, reflecting on the words of Gotama, that he admitted, “The wisdom which a wise man tries to communicate always sounds foolish” (Hesse, 142).
Once Siddhartha leaves Gotama and his Buddhist buddies, Siddhartha heads out to society in order to gain an understanding on how to love someone as a part of his path to enlightenment. Here he meets Kamala, a courtesan who teaches him the art of love and persuades him to live a more materialistic lifestyle. These methods were rather ineffective as they hindered Siddhartha and led him to a self-described state of, “Samsara” (Hesse, 84). Lastly, Siddhartha decides to drop his materialistic lifestyle and begins to listen to the river under Vasudeva’s guidance. It is this method that truly helps Siddhartha attain enlightenment as he begins to formulate his theory that the only thing holding you back from nirvana is the strive to achieve nirvana, itself. A lesson that neither Gotama nor Vasudeva could properly lay out because the knowledge that they gained through wisdom was far too complicated to put into words.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at February 16, 2015 01:23 AM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys in Narrative
16 February 2015

Question: Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha concerns the quest for spiritual enlightment, and by the end of it four characters have achieved this goal: govinda, gotama, Vasudeva and Siddhartha. Is the enlightenment achieved by each of these characters the same? Why or why not? What distinctions and similarities exist between the paths these characters use to reach their final goal? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parenthesis) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The overall content of this novel depicts that of characters who are seeking spiritual enlightenment. These characters are diverse in how and what they are seeking specifically, but at the end of the day they are all seeking generally the same idea and do achieve it in one form or another. Siddhartha achieves his enlightenment by spending time with different groups in society and ultimately his time with the ferryman down by the river. Siddhartha helps his friend govinda to achieve this enlightenment through the same means. Vassudea also achieves enlightenment through the same means but more so by being the teacher role to Siddhartha and govinda.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at February 16, 2015 01:36 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
16 February 2015

Siddhartha

Question 214. In addition to the story of a spiritual quest, Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha is also a love story. How does Siddhartha’s romantic love for Kamala, and his love for his son impact his spirituality? How does Siddhartha’s spirituality, in turn, impact Kamala and his son? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Siddhartha’s son shows him that he can, in a different way than Kamala’s love, more than anything else in the world, in the universe. Kamala helped him realizes things that he had never noticed or felt before until he meet her, as in love for another person, that you wish to be with. Siddhartha makes Kamala want to stop what she is doing and have more in life, to be with someone. While his son at first does not like his father, because he said, “you are not my father” (Hesse 67). Siddhartha is the only person that he has left in his life. They all learned from each other in many ways.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at February 16, 2015 02:50 PM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01

Question : According to Christopher Volger , Allies are sometimes “ audience characters “ that perform the function of seeing “ the Special World of the story with fresh eyes as we [ , the readers ] would do if we were there “ and , consequently , “ask the questions we would be asking .” How is this function performed, if at all, by an Ally archetype in Herman Hesse‘s novel Siddhartha? Explain your response.

Answer: n the text, I would say Kamala is Siddhartha ally because when reading you see that Kamala introduced him to a new lifestyle and that when being a Samana coming to new materialistic world Kamala helped him get a job. Which Kamala stated, “Things are working out well,” she called out to him. “They are expecting you at Kamaswami’s, and he is the richest merchant of the city. If he likes you, he’ll accept you into his service. Be smart, brown Samana. I had others tell him about you. Be polite towards him, he is very powerful. But don’t be too modest! I do not want you to become his servant, you shall become his equal, or else I won’t be satisfied with you. Kamaswami is starting to get old and lazy. If he likes you, he’ll entrust you with a lot (Hesse,53).

Posted by: Marie Destin at February 16, 2015 03:44 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
16 February 2015

Question 212: There were several ways Siddhartha attempted to attain spiritual enlightenment. Identify and then discuss each of them before answering these questions: Which approaches were successful? Which ones were not successful, and which ones had limited effectiveness? How did Siddhartha progress from on approach to the other? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Hesse’s Siddhartha chases spiritual enlightenment throughout this novel. First Siddhartha ventures into the ascetic lifestyle of the Samanas (10-34) which changes after his encounter with the Buddha. Following his decision to “no longer try to escape from Siddhartha”, he ventures into the more physical based world. Siddhartha becomes absorbed in the material world of Kamala and Kamaswami, during which many years pass until his realization through dreams that he has pushed enlightenment off too far (37-59). The realization that he was “apart from them [ordinary people]” (60) was the spiritual propeller for Siddhartha’s final method of enlightenment, which brought him back to Vasudeva, the ferryman. Vasudeva facilitates Siddhartha’s enlightenment through allowing Siddhartha to remain with him to learn the ways of the river (82-111).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at February 17, 2015 09:49 PM

Will Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
17 February 2015
Question: 219. Why do you think there is so much emphasis on (reuse of the word) “thirst”? What is Siddhartha thirsty for? Why can’t he find it? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: “Thirst” is used so many times because is becomes apparent that his thirst is for enlightenment and peace within himself. He is a Samana so it is not earthly thirst of water. Siddartha says “on this long Samana path my thirst has not grown les, I have always thirsted for knowledge, I have always been full of questions.” (19)

Posted by: Will Pereira at February 18, 2015 11:32 AM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys of Narrative CA02
15 February 2015

Question 224: Go back and examine/think about that bird of Kamala’s. What might be the significance of Kamala’s bird in this story? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In Siddhartha, the song bird sits in the cage all day and sings for its freedom. Siddhartha nourishes and gazes at the song bird. Just like the song bird sings for the life he does not have, Siddhartha cannot find contentment where he is in his place in the world. Later he has a nightmare that the song bird dies. Within Siddhartha’s nightmare, Hesse writes, “He took it out, held it a moment in his hand and then threw it away on the road, and at the same moment he was horrified and his heart ached as if he had thrown away with this dead bird all that was good and of value in himself.” (Hesse 82) This is symbolic of Siddhartha’s feelings of oppression in his current life and his need to escape. At the same time, Siddhartha realizes the fact that riches and acquiring them is just a game, he is also not capable of loving another human. Kamala lets the songbird go free just as she let Siddhartha go free. Siddhartha is now back to his innocent and pure self.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at February 19, 2015 01:48 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
31 January 2016

Question 3: How are the Samanas described? From his description, how does the author feel about them?

Answer: The Samanas are described as “neither young or old, with dusty and bleeding shoulders, practically naked, scorched by the sun, solitary, strange and hostile- lean jackals in the world of men.” (Hesse 9) The author is unsure of them because they are very different from the people in his community.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 31, 2016 10:27 AM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
31 January 2016

Question 16: How does Siddartha meditate?

Answer: The way in which Siddartha meditated was “He killed his senses, he killed his memory, he slipped out of his Self in a thousand different forms. He was animal, carcass, stone, wood, water, and each time he reawakened.” (Hesse 15) He goes through the life cycle of everything he comes across; that is how the Samanas meditate.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 31, 2016 10:35 AM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
31 January 2016

Question 35: Gotama asks him if his, Gotama’s, followers will also find enlightenment. Siddartha dodges this question. How?

Answer: Siddartha dodges the question by replying, “It is not for me to judge another life. I must judge for myself.” (Hesse 34) Siddartha believes he cannot find enlightenment through a teacher that he must find it on his own.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at January 31, 2016 10:39 AM

Chapter 2 Question 20: Who is Gotama? What does the narrator think of him?
Answer: Gotama is what is described as an religious leader and who does what they can to make sure that things go correctly with whoever needs the help. The narrative speaks highly of Gotama \, and thinks even though Siddhartha may of made mistakes in possibly choosing hi he still thinks that it was smart to go forth with this. (sparknotes

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 31, 2016 06:25 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL journeys into Narrative
31 January 2016

Chapter 1 Question4 : How did Siddhartha convince his father? Why didn’t he just go?
Answer: He knows that his father will not go unless he shows him that he really wants to go through with this and isn’t just saying these things to get out of doing something else. Siddhartha didn’t just want to go was because he wanted to make sure his father understood that he really wanted to go with this and nothing would stop him from doing so. (sparknotes)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 31, 2016 06:27 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL journeys into Narrative
31 January 2016

Chapter 1 Question4 : How did Siddhartha convince his father? Why didn’t he just go?
Answer: He knows that his father will not go unless he shows him that he really wants to go through with this and isn’t just saying these things to get out of doing something else. Siddhartha didn’t just want to go was because he wanted to make sure his father understood that he really wanted to go with this and nothing would stop him from doing so. (sparknotes)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 31, 2016 06:27 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL journeys into Narrative
31 January 2016
\
Chapter 2 Question 20: Who is Gotama? What does the narrator think of him?
Answer: Gotama is what is described as an religious leader and who does what they can to make sure that things go correctly with whoever needs the help. The narrative speaks highly of Gotama \, and thinks even though Siddhartha may of made mistakes in possibly choosing hi he still thinks that it was smart to go forth with this. (sparknotes)

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at January 31, 2016 06:28 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
31 January 2016
Siddhartha

Part One

Question 2: The Brahmin’s Son: Govinda’s “wish was to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, splendid one.” Why is Govinda willing to follow Siddhartha?

Answer: Govind did not want become like the other Brahman who was, “a lazy official in charge of offerings, not greedy merchant with magic spells” but he wanted to become more like Siddhartha who was admired by everyone, who was the source of joy …he was a delight for them all” (Hesse 2) With such love and admiration for Siddhartha, Govind desired to follow him.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 31, 2016 11:21 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
31 January 2016
Siddhartha

Part Two

Question 22: With the Samanas: Siddhartha’s goal is to conquer the self. Explain what this means.

Answer: Siddhartha desired to conquer himself through freeing himself of all earthly connections. He desired “to become empty, empty of thirst…wishing…dreams…joy and sorrow. To find tranquility with an empty head, to be open to miracles in unselfish thoughts” (Hesse 9). In doing so, he wishes to disconnect all things which merged him into this physical world to become better.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 31, 2016 11:22 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative
31 January 2016
Siddhartha

Part Three

Question 31: Gotama: How is Gotama different from the Samanas?

Answer: Gotama was different from the Samanas because he took the principles to heart. Though they both were required to “renounce your home…parents…birth…possessions…freewill…friendship” he took his convictions seriously while the Samanas still had connections to this earth because they wept when he “realized that their friends had left him” (Hesse 22). Unlike the Samanas, who renounced their affiliations to this world, Gotama was entirely dedicated to the lifestyle and strictly abides by it.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at January 31, 2016 11:26 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
31 January 2016

Question: 1. “Siddhartha had begun to harbor discontent.” Why is Siddhartha unhappy? Why is his spirit like a “waiting vessel”?

Answer: In the story “Siddhartha” by Hesse, Siddhartha was discontent when he realized that the love and affection from his friends and family were only temporary and limited. Siddhartha explained that, “He had started to suspect that his venerable father and his other teachers, that the wise Brahmans had already revealed to him the most and best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied” (Hesse 4). Siddhartha spirit was like a waiting vessel because he had not found the answer to his questions, as a result of the limits of the persons who surrounded him.

Posted by: Q1_Andre Gilbert at February 1, 2016 12:39 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
31 January 2016

Question: 15. “Siddhartha saw a single goal: to become empty ” What does this mean and why? What happens when he reaches that goal?

Answer: Siddhartha did not want to be affected by emotions and selfish wants. He wanted to have an open mind, but before he could achieve this he had to get rid of himself and all the things that were distractions, he wanted to be, “empty of thirst, empty of wishing, empty of dreams, empty of joy and sorrow. Dead to himself, not to be a self any more, to find tranquility with an emptied heard, to be open to miracles in unselfish thoughts, that was his goal” (Hesse 12). Siddhartha’s wanted to get rid of all the things that prevented him from becoming aware of his true reality. Siddhartha said that, "Once all of my self was overcome and had died, once every desire and every urge was silent in the heart, then the ultimate part of me had to awake, the innermost of my being, which is no longer my self, the great secret” (Hesse 12). For Siddhartha to awaken, he would have to first become empty of all the things that were distractions.

Posted by: Q15_Andre Gilbert at February 1, 2016 12:40 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
31 January 2016

Question: 34. According to Siddhartha, how will he find enlightenment?

Answer: Siddhartha is convinced that he would reach his goal on his own and without the need for teachings, and he said,
“This is why I am continuing my travels, not to seek other, better teachings, for I know there are none, but to depart from all teachings and all teachers and to reach my goal by myself or to die” (Hesse 30). The path of Siddhartha was to keep searching until he found enlightenment through himself.

Posted by: Q34_Andre Gilbert at February 1, 2016 12:40 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
30 January 2016

Chapter 1

Question 7: What would Siddhartha have done if his father would have said “No” to his request?

Answer: By how Siddhartha communicated with his father on this issue, readers are able to see that Siddhartha would have done what his father told him to do. This can be seen when they talk about the issue. “"So will you abandon your plan?” "Siddhartha will do what his father will tell him to do."(Hesse 8) Siddhartha would have done what his father said.

Chapter 2

Question 17: What frustrates Siddhartha?

Answer: Siddhartha was consumed in frustration from not having his innermost part awake. He says “A goal stood before Siddhartha, a single goal…Once all of my self was overcome and had died, once every desire and every urge was silent in the heart, then the ultimate part of me had to awake, the innermost of my being, which is no longer my self, the great secret.” (Hesse 11)

Chapter 3

Question 32: How did they recognize him?

Answer: They recognized his calm immediately. “Siddhartha saw him, and he instantly recognised him,as if a god had pointed him out to him. He saw him, a simple man in a yellow robe, bearing the alms-dish in his hand, walking silently.” (Hesse 20) the two Samanas recognised him solely by the perfection of his calm, by the quietness of his appearance, in which there was no searching, no desire, no imitation, no effort to be seen, only light and peace. (Hesse 21)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 1, 2016 10:31 AM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 February 2016

Question 49: What does Siddhartha want to learn from the teachers that he has been unable to learn? Why hasn’t he been able to learn this?

Answer: Siddhartha wants to learn how to rid himself of Self. He thought to himself, “What is it that you want to learn from teachings and teachers, and although they taught you much, what was it they could not teach you? It was the Self,” (Hesse 38) He wasn’t able to learn this because he could only “deceive it, could only fly from it, could only hide from it.” (Hesse 38) All of his teachers have only shown him how to cover it up and not actually escape from the Self.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at February 1, 2016 07:46 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 February 2016

Question 78: How had Siddhartha previously viewed the world? How does he