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January 03, 2013

Exodus: Movement of the Bunnies in Richard Adams's _Watership Down_


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 3, 2013 01:47 PM

Readers' Comments:

Hello Dr. Hobbs! I just wanted to let you know that I was an SA today. Thanks and have a great weekend!

-Erin K.
ENGL 121.003 MWF

Posted by: Erin K. at February 16, 2007 04:21 PM


Dr. Lee Hobbs
Hawkbit
I am doing my close reading on the character Hawkbit from the novel Watership Down written by Richard Adams. Hawkbit was brought into the story by Dandelion, whom is another warren rabbit. Hawkbit does not appear to be that important in the novel, although he does appear a few times throughout the story, but he is indeed not one of the main characters. Hawkbit is what authors and editors would call a flat, static character. A flat character is not multifaceted at all, they are rather very straightforward and to the point characters, these types of characters normally only have one responsibility or job in the entire novel (Roberts). A static character typically ends approximately where they began from the start (Roberts). I suppose that even if Hawkbit would have been omitted from the story altogether it really would not have made a different. If Hawkbit was not part of the story the others still would have been able to continue on their way and proceed to do the same things they did with or without Hawkbit.
Hawkbit first met the other warren rabbits last year during the snow season when they all ended up in the same burrow, after that they went separate ways and didn’t see each other for a while (Adams pg 17). Then once Hazel and Fiver decided to leave the warren and find a new one Hawkbit showed up and was persuaded to join them by dandelion. Hazel goes on to describe Hawkbit as a sort of slow, stupid rabbit (Adams pg 17). Towards the beginning of the narrative Hawkbit questions Hazel’s authority; however, shortly after he listens to the rabbits and follows their specific instructions, and eventually helps out the other rabbits on their expedition to leave their current warren, to seek a new one.
To me Hawkbit’s function in the novel is kind of like a tag-a-long, some who just wanted to leave the old warren and go to an entire new warren. Throughout the story Hawkbit does not have a specific job or role that he part takes in. He was essentially just a rabbit whom was asked to come along by dandelion. Even though Hawkbit did not have a big role in the book he did indeed speak up for the other rabbits and himself from time to time. In chapter 10, the road and the common, he went to Hazel and explained to him how the other rabbits as well as, he did not think it was a good idea to continue on, because the further and further they get away from their old warren the worse it gets (Adams pg 50-52). In the story the other characters do not react to Hawkbit, in any type of manner at all. They all seem to get along with him, except Hazel describing him to be a sort of stupid, slow rabbit. Hawkbit just goes with the flow of things and seems to only speak his mind, and do things when he feels that it is right.
I could relate Hawkbit to someone I know right now, he relates to my friend Faith. Hawkbit and she are alike because she does the same things that he did in the story. She just goes with the flow of things, whatever we want to do, she does unless she can sense that something is going to wrong, or that we should not do. For example when Hawkbit said that he thinks they should not continue on in chapter 10, by friend Faith did that same thing to us. We were going to the mall that was hour and a half away and the further we got the worse the weather became and she kept insisting that we turn around and go back home. Hawkbit and she resemble each other in more than just a few ways. On the other hand I can not relate Hawkbit to any other movie or book I have read off hand. As a result Hawkbit tried to help the group out as best he could, and I believe that he succeeded in his function that he played in the novel.
Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down.1972.New York; Scribner, 2005.
Roberts V. Edgar. Writing about Literature Brief 11th edition. 2006. Saddle River, New Jersey.

Until our next class
B. Decker

Posted by: Brooke Decker at February 17, 2007 11:59 AM

Bettina Herold
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature
18 February 2007
Leading the Pack
In Richard Adams’ novel, Watership Down, the prevailing idea of leadership is exposed throughout many characters and situations. Such use of the “leadership” theme gets readers to thinking about what gives a leader successful qualities and what characteristics are found in each of the leaders that eventually have an impact on the others. Captain Holly is a character found variously throughout the rabbits’ journey. He appears briefly in the beginning as Hazel and Fiver approach him for guidance, and then reappears later in the novel, changed in his mindset, once the rabbits have reached Watership Down. Holly was the “Chief Rabbit” at the old warren which was ran almost like a dictatorship that included the use of commands and enforcement by Owsla rabbits. Later, Holly makes a dramatic change in his attitude, which reveals his great realization that leadership includes more than just giving out orders to be followed. Holly is an important character to the novel in that he shows how a leader’s downfalls can have a negative outcome for its followers, as well as how the willingness to accept and make changes to one’s role can benefit an entire community in the end.
In Chapter 2, “The Chief Rabbit” Holly is first shown when he barely gives Hazel and Fiver the time of day to explain Fiver’s premonitions. His ignorance and unconcern for rabbits of non-Owsla rank is clearly seen as he rushes Hazel out the door with no show of emotion for Fiver who is clearly distraught. He calls Hazel, “Walnut,” and does not even bother to try to guess at Fiver’s name (12). This paints a picture of a leader in charge who does not listen to others and views members of lower classes to be of no importance and a waste of time. Also, Holly’s leadership styles reappear in Chapter 4 “The Departure” when he confronts the departing rabbits and claims to be there to arrest them for their plans. Holly’s cockiness and unwillingness to listen is illustrated as he remarks, “I am Captain of the Owsla. You know that, don’t you?” (21). It is at this point in the novel, that the Oswla have a supreme position in their society that they expect others to respect and heed to what they believe is the law. As seen through many societies in history, a dictatorship, with strict laws and no room for negation or participation by citizens, is often not the most efficient or comfortably lived in as those that utilize the idea of everyone such as in a democracy. Holly is seen to be unfair by the other rabbits who cannot understand why he would not listen to their words of advice.
Holly makes a dramatic change in the story as he reappears to the runaway rabbits in Chapter 19, “Fear in the Dark,” torn up in exhaustion and desperate for forgiveness. In dismay, Holly informs the rabbits of the news of how their old warren was destroyed by men. He is in deep regret that he could not do anything to save his suffering community as they panicked and fought amongst themselves to their death. At this point, readers can see that Holly has undergone a humbling experience. He realizes the impact of his decision to take the easy way out and ignore Fiver’s warnings of future danger. A comment that marks this transformation shows up at the end of Chapter 21, “For El-ahrairah to Cry,” as he says, “You can imagine what it means to Bluebell and me to find ourselves underground, among friends. It wasn’t I who tried to arrest you Bigwig-that was another rabbit, long, long ago” (160). Holly has made a change from a close-minded and uncompromising leader, to a sorrowful rabbit who realizes the value of his fellow rabbits’ companionship and an appreciation of their wellbeing. Such a change is important to the novel since it shows the idea of adaptation that many of the rabbits had to do as they made their journey to the downs. Holly was able to realize his past mistake and had a newfound respect for Hazel in this new community at Watership down as he acknowledges the fact that Hazel is their “Chief Rabbit.” In Holly’s old community, this cooperation would never have been seen. But after the hardships and struggles to find his fellows rabbits, Holly can now see that there is more to life than ordering others around. As the story progresses and finishes, Holly is very helpful with his knowledge of traveling and is able to help the rabbits in various situations. He is never seen to have a negative or conceited attitude again and proves he has officially changed for the benefit of the new warren.
Holly is just one of the many characters who illustrate the use of leadership in the novel. His old and new ways show a promising idea that characters can change and personalities do not always have to remain negative throughout a lifetime. Each of the rabbits in the novel has their own strength and styles of leadership. Some may be more subtle than others, but each rabbit has an impact on the outcome of the journey. Just as Holly is able to change his ways, each of the rabbits finds it within themselves to express their knowledge and influence the others as they make their way to their goal.

Work Cited: Adam, Richards. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Scribner 2005.

Posted by: Bettina Herold at February 18, 2007 08:54 AM

Stephanie Vrabel
Professor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature
13 February 2007

Professor Hobbs,
The Animal Airforce
He was just a little bit larger than Bigwig, just about a foot long. It was hard to tell what the creature was as he was hiding in the hollowed out ground. He had a white, curved back with deep brown feathers on top of his head and outlining his wings and tail. His stood on two high Venetian red legs that ended each in three strong claws connected by webbing. As Bigwig and Silver approached the bird, a foreign, breathy warning was expelled from an intimidating beak that pointed sharply toward the ground. It was not until the approach that the rabbits, Bigwig and Silver, had realized this was a nonnative bird that appeared to be injured. As they ran for cover they bumped into the chief rabbit, Hazel, who decided it might benefit the warren to help this bird recover.
The novel, Watership Down, by Richard Adams, is the tale of a group of rabbits who begin a journey to find a new home in order to avoid the danger their previous warren would soon face. In Chapter 23 the rabbits come a across an exotic bird, a natural predator of our furry friends, who ends up being a very important Allie to their warren. Hazel realizes that they may need a larger bird that is able to survey the surrounding scenes.
After a while Hazel also noticed that the bird was hurt and starving.. “‘I believe it’s starving,’ said Hazel. ‘We’d better feed it. Bigwig, go and get some worms or something.’ ‘Me, dig for worms?’ replied Bigwig.” (Adams, 181). Hazel is initiating his plan to help save the bird, though Bigwig and Silver are not too sure of this idea at first. Hazel realizes this when Bigwig questions his authority and refuses to search for worms. Eventually the rabbits agree to help Kehaar return to good health by finding it food and providing him his very own burrow for protection, but purely because they trust Hazel’s judgment.
In the beginning, the rabbits never thought that they would benefit greatly from the help of a bird. Kehaar turns out to be a very vital character in the survival of the newly formed warren, the Honeycomb. After the rabbits settle in the Honeycomb, they realize that, with no does, their warren will not last very long. This is where Kehaar begins to contribute back to the warren.
Once the exotic bird returns to appropriate health, he flies around in approximately a three to four mile radius from the Honeycomb in search for another warren where they may be able to find some does. Upon his return, he informs Hazel of two places where they could find mothers for their warren. One of the areas where female rabbits were located was at a warren called Efrafa. Kehaar helps to illustrate Hazel’s role as a leader and how he is able to use and expand his resources for the good of the warren.
During their plan to capture some of the does from Efrafa, Kehaar also came in handy to inform the rabbits when they were being followed by the officers of the other warren. This gave the Honeycomb rabbits time to hide from their enemies. Not only did Kehaar help the rabbits in their deviousness, he also came to aid in their protection. Kehaar is kind of like the father figure to these rabbits. Not only does he look out for them and inform them when they are running into danger, but he will do his best to protect them as well.
As Bigwig was fighting the vicious General Woundwort of Efrafa, Kehaar finally comes to the rescue to help save Bigwig, the bird’s biggest admirer, and the rest of the Honeycomb warren rabbits and their newly found does. “Then Bigwig realized that Woundwort was no longer looking at him, but staring over his head at something beyond, something he himself could not see. Suddenly, Woundwort leaped backward and in the same moment…there sounded a raucous clamor. “Yark! Yark! Yark!” Some big white thing was striking at Woundwort, who was cowering and guarding his head as best he could.” (Adams, 360).
It is very hard for someone to fight a battle alone. In this previously quoted scene, the rabbits would have never have been able to escape from their enemies without the help of Kehaar. This seems to reflect many battles that the human population seems to struggle with. Whether it be a battle to overcome a disorder like bulimia or even a battle between several countries like World War II, it is very hard to win your battle without the help of others. A person with bulimia will go to a psychologist for help and a country like Britain or France may need the help of the Soviet Union and United States to defeat Germany and Japan. Kehaar is very similar to the army’s air force. He has the ability to fly overtop of his enemies and “drop the bomb” to protect his side.
This foreign bird not only protects the rabbits from the Honeycomb, he also shows that forming friendships with the least likely of animals may be beneficial. Kehaars character was, in the end, very important for the continuation of the Honeycomb warren. Battles are not fought or won alone; they are fought and won with the help of others.


Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Scribner, 2005.

Sincerely,
Stephanie Vrabel

Posted by: Stephanie Vrabel at February 18, 2007 11:42 AM

April A. Hunsberger
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121 Humanities Literature
16 February 2007
Dandelion

From reading Watership Down, by Richard Adams, I have learned a lot about Dandelion’s character. Dandelion plays a major role as a flat character in the book with the characteristics he pursues. Throughout the story, Dandelion’s main function is preaching stories about El-ahrairah, the master of all tricks. All the stories that are told by Dandelion relate to trickery, which is a form of survival to the rabbits. However, each of the four stories spoken by Dandelion has a special meaning during their journey for a new warren. Without Dandelion in the story, the audience would have no background knowledge about the rabbits, nor would they understand the importance of trickery. During the rabbit’s adventure Dandelion’s personality, knowledge of classic rabbit tale stories, and speed as a rabbit has added to the uniqueness of his character. Altogether, Dandelion made the rabbits journey more entertaining with the stories he told. In addition, he used his talent for speed to help relocate their new warren, known as the Honeycomb.

From all the information I have gathered about Dandelion and other knowledge on other literary characters, I feel that Dandelion could be compared to Master Splinter from The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Master Splinter has been a father figure to the four turtles that he took in and raised. He taught them valuable information and trained them in defeating their enemy. In relation to Master Splinter, Dandelion resembles his personality. Dandelion informs the other rabbits and preaches classic stories that are valuable to their survival. Through his stories he can communicate morals and lessons from the stories about El-ahrairah. Without these stories the rabbits would have a hard time escaping humans and other animals that may be harmful to them. Furthermore, these two characters have similar roles. They are both responsible for teaching their followers different strategies for defeating their enemies. For example, trickery is used by the rabbits to survive and Master Splinter trains his turtles in self defense. In general, Dandelion and Master Splinter are looked upon for words of wisdom, which then passes down from generation to generation.

Additionally, Dandelion can also be categorized as a stock character. He may not be the main character in the story, but his role as a story teller strikes him as a unique individual. The only time Dandelion is present in the story is when a story is told or when Hazel uses Dandelion for one of his schemes. For example in chapter 19, Dandelion runs ahead into an open pasture to check for anything suspicious that may endanger the others (123). However, his main purpose throughout the novel, is telling stories. Another similar situation can be compared to the disciples in the Bible, who also share stories that pass on God‘s word. It is apparent that the disciples, Master Splinter and Dandelion all pass on meaningful stories to their listeners.

All of Dandelion’s stories relate to a particular point in their journey. The characters turned to Dandelion when they were in danger, down on their luck, or in need for new ideas. Throughout the book Dandelion does not have a large dialogue role. However, when he is present he is of great importance. The other characters reacted to Dandelion in multiple ways. For instance, Hazel uses Dandelion because of his speed and quickness. In chapter 47, Hazel has a plan to use Dandelion as a distraction to the dog. Thus, Dandelion’s task was to get the dogs attention and persuade the dog to follow him into another direction (444-445). This proves that Hazel trusts and relies on Dandelion because he knows Dandelion will not get caught. In chapter 14, Hazel recommends Dandelion to tell a story and he whispers, “That can’t go wrong, anyway”(92). In this case Hazel puts his faith into Dandelion because he knows he is a great story teller. From these two examples it is apparent that Dandelion is looked upon and well liked.

Overall, I believe Dandelion’s role as a character brought out the entertaining side of the novel, because of his speed and story telling. He may not be like Hazel, the leader of the rabbits, or as strong as Bigwig, but his persona creates a very unique individual. Dandelion displays a great and flexible personality throughout the story, and he always cooperated on their journey. I believe if Dandelion was omitted from the story, my understanding of the novel would be dramatically changed. For me, Dandelion created a unique side of the story, which made my reading more enjoyable. Overall, Dandelion presented valuable information through his stories that he told in order to understand and analyze the rabbits behavior adequately.

Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down.1972. New York; Scribner, 2005.

Posted by: April Hunsberger at February 18, 2007 05:59 PM

Shayne Schmidt

Instructor: Lee Hobbs

ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature

19 February 2007

The Lonely One

In the novel Watership Down you meet a character named Blackavar and when introduced it is as if he is the odd one out. The author is Richard Adams who describes Blackavar as if he is a depressed, confused and a lonely rabbit. When you first meet Blackavar he answers to Bigwig in a sense of being a shamed or guilty of something he has done. His response was polite by saying sir and his reaction was also of no expression. At first it seems that Blackavar is really of no importance at all. Although later on you realize Blackavar is stronger than you think. Blackavar is an unusual one whose father was an Efrafa captain and his mother who was a prisoner of Woundwort’s attack on Nutley Copse. This conflict could play an important role as to why he behaves the way he does.
Blackavar is first introduced on page 316 in chapter 35 of the text where he is basically described as a deformed rabbit. This is probably the most continuous dialogue and description given of Blackavar. When Blackavar first replies to Bigwig he looks down and replies with out even looking up. By avoiding eye contact this could be a negative character trait that Blackavar may be guiltily or a shame of something. Then later on he then replies that he deserve the treachery that was place upon him. Also the author’s description of Blackavar shows how he really has no social status with the other rabbits. One thing is that when Blackavar first speaks he replies with a sir to Bigwig possibly revealing that he might be a polite rabbit that is just emotional about what he did. Also it seems as if Blackavar is a one dimensional character that means that he may only play in one or two roles of the story. One idea right away is that Blackavar is made to be an example to the rest of rabbits by the Council to show what not to do. Although later on page 318 it seems that Kehaar feels for Blackavar and really wants to help him. That could show that the other characters can reveal where Blackavar is coming from. Later on near the end of the chapter Bigwig reveals that he will go back for Blackavar. In the next couple chapters Blackavar is really only mention when Bigwig and the others are going to leave and take him with them. Finally in chapter 38 Bigwig jumps in and takes off with Blackavar. In chapter 38 on page 358 it seems Blackavar’s attitude is really appearing for the first time. Campion demands he returns but Bigwig and Blackavar think otherwise. Blackavar wants to fight him and later on thinks they can take a couple does. With Blackavar saying these things it shows that he is revealing that he may have a pretty big ego.
The traits and ideas revealed by the others and Blackavar himself show how he may be the perfect spy and a scout of the grounds. Blackavar’s personality of being shut out is probably what makes him a great observer of patrolling the land. The way he has been treated and the way he grew up makes him question what others are really up to. Blackavar’s traits defines what it means to be a great patroller. Compared to the rest of the rabbits it seems Blackavar is the perfect scout because of the way he was brought up in family. The conflict with Blackavar is a struggle between a mother who a prisoner and a father who was an Efrafa captain. The conflict could affect this lonely rabbit with having some sort of mixed emotions. In the rest of the story Blackavar really has no major dialogue but does interact by helping the others and patrolling the grounds for the others to remain safe and sound.
Since the first time Blackavar is introduced to us it seems as if he is the odd one out. The ways in which Richard Adams describes Blackavar to be that he is lonely, depressed and confused from many different things that happen in his life. With Blackavar basically being an outcast his whole life it is no wonder he is such a great patroller because of his ability of observing and listening to others talk about him. Blackavar is a character I think everyone wants to be in one way or another because of his toughness, strength and ability to watch others.

Posted by: Shayne Schmidt at February 18, 2007 06:57 PM

Joseph M. Tuorinsky
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121. Humanities Literture
12 February 2007
The Black Rabbit of Inlé: The Rabbit Angel of Death
The Black Rabbit of Inlé isn’t exactly a pertinent character in the main story of Watership Down, he is an important icon in rabbit folklore. The Black Rabbit of Inlé is seen almost as a deity in the stories of the rabbits. He is not a normal living rabbit, but rather an immortal being of great power, mystery, and wisdom.
In Watership Down by Richard Adams, The Black Rabbit of Inlé is only really found in chapter 31, “The Story of El-ahrairah and the Black Rabbit of Inlé.” Where Dandelion tells an epic story of El-ahrairah’s efforts to save the rabbits of his warren by visiting the mysterious Black Rabbit of Inlé (267). Any other time he is mentioned in the story it is nothing but that, a mention, and there is nothing more revealed about this character anywhere but here.
The first thing you might learn about the Black Rabbit is about his mysterious dwellings. He lives far up in an area where there is much mist, large rocks, and his burrow is carved into rock in the mountain side. El-ahrairah and his servant Rabscuttle were hard-pressed to journey from their warren to the lair of The Black Rabbit of Inlé. They traveled far distances in the dark through types of terrain they had never before seen. They endured a daring climb, only to come to the entrance of the Black Rabbit’s burrow. Their first meeting with the Black Rabbit, who had been standing there the whole time, was mistaken for a rock and described as “still as lichen and cold as the stone” (272).
Dandelion continues his story of the Black Rabbit as El-ahrairah and Rabscuttle enter the burrow delved into the mountainside. The two travelers quickly noticed their keen senses of sound and smell were hard pressed to detect anything in the hall of the Black Rabbit of Inlé. Not only is the location odd, but the burrow itself seemed to be not of their world (273).
From El-ahrairah’s first plea to The Black Rabbit, you can tell he is often troubled by those who wish to lay down their lives to save others. However you can never detect any hint of impatience or intolerance in The Black Rabbit of Inlé of his visitors. He shows no emotion at any time. However this does not stop the Black Rabbit from being a hospitable host. He offers El-ahrairah and Rabscuttle shelter, food and nourishment, and entertainment (274).
While in the warren of The Black Rabbit of Inlé, El-ahrairah makes two separate wagers with his host. First, in a game of bob-stones, where for the salvation of his people El-ahrairah wagers his tail and whiskers (274). And Second, in a story selling competition, where El-ahrairah loses his ears (276). It becomes evident that The Black Rabbit of Inlé is indeed not a mortal rabbit and he holds mystical powers which make it a complete impossibility for El-ahrairah to win the safety of his people on any kind of bet.
The mystery of the Black Rabbit is furthered upon the discovery of “the pit” (277). Different rabbit holes in “the pit” contain pestilence, plagues, and diseases of all kinds. El-ahrairah quickly comes up with a plan to use one of the sicknesses to defend his warren from the invading army. In the middle of his plan, he encounters The Black Rabbit of Inlé. The Black Rabbit tells him that he’s incapable of carrying the disease without his ears, and I believe it was the will of the Black Rabbit for such a thing to happen, because he was testing El-ahrairah the whole time. After this event, The Black Rabbit of Inlé says he has himself already saved his people, and then disappears.
The Black Rabbit has himself the ability to control how, when, and where a rabbit may die. However he is not easily persuaded by any who offer compromises to him. It seems that he and his Owsla, stand for and believe in one principle-“What is is what must be” (274, 278).


Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005. 267-282.

Posted by: Joe Tuorinsky at February 18, 2007 07:11 PM

Professor Hobbs,

Buckthorn: A Pillar Beneath Watership Down

The characters of Richard Adams’ Watership Down seem to follow the “hero’s quest” archetype. Hazel: the cunning leader, Bigwig: the sturdy warrior, Fiver: the wise cleric, Blackberry: the intelligent wizard, and Dandelion: the eloquent bard, all have a distinct role to play while also showing some traits of the others. However, where do the “peripheral” characters, Hawkbit, Speedwell, Acorn, and particularly Buckthorn for example, fit in? Are they filler characters whose chief purpose is to have complementary interactions with the main characters or do they have a more significant role to play? How did they come join the main characters and what are their motivations for leaving? Could the other rabbits have made it to Watership Down without them? I seek to answer these questions in relation to the stalwart sergeant Buckthorn by using parts mythic, formalist, and a little of the reader-response method and also draw some connections between my subject and two other characters from popular culture.

Buckthorn first appears on page 18 in a description from Hazel as the rabbits are gathering to leave Sandleford Warren. “He was glad to see him, for he knew him for a tough, sturdy fellow who was considered certain to get into the Owsla as soon as he reached full weight.” (Adams 18) In this statement we see that Buckthorn has a promising future with the Sandleford Warren: “… considered certain to get into the Owsla…” (Adams 18) So why does he wish to leave? Like Silver, who was serving his first month in the Owsla but still wanted to leave, he could have been the target of veteran Owsla members’ harassment. Or he could have grown impatient waiting to get into the Owsla and wanted to start new where he would have more power. While these two are the more likely scenarios, throughout the novel Buckthorn is described as a “…straight forward…” and tough individual which makes it seem unlikely that he was running from a bullying Owsla or his own impatience. (Adams 18, 301, 427)

Another possibility, however, is that Buckthorn, like the others, was frightened by Fiver’s statements and also curious to see what was outside of Sandleford. On page 393 as the raiding party sent to Efrafra is returning, Buckthorn asks in quick succession: “… What happened? Where are the others? Did you get any does? Is everyone alright?” (Adams 393) This shows us that Buckthorn is inquisitive and able to put his thoughts to words. I do not have evidence to show that he in particular believed Fiver’s premonition, but as he arrived with Blackberry and Blackberry does an excellent job of persuading the rabbits in other parts of the novel (Adams 37, 301-302), and Buckthorn being as he is and not prone to much abstract thought, might have been easily persuaded by Blackberry.

A major aspect of Buckthorn’s character is his willingness to fight and his uncanny knack for getting injured in battle. As the rabbits are fleeing Silverweed’s Warren they are attacked by a group of rats while resting in an old barn. Bigwig, Silver, and Buckthorn cover their escape and Buckthorn is bitten on the leg. (Adams 122-123) Again he was wounded while on the first mission to Efrafa. (Adams 224-239) In other parts of the story he is either chosen or volunteers for the dangerous duty: guard duty while the others dig the Watership Warren (Adams 134), as a member of the envoy to Efrafa (Adams 195), and he alone guards Kehaar’s run, the only open entrance to Watership Warren, during the Efrafan attack. (Adams 427).

If I were to apply the same hierarchy as was found in Sandleford to the rabbits who left, it might look something like this: Hazel would be the Chief Rabbit, Bigwig the head of the Owsla, and Silver his second in command. The council would be made up of (in reality all of their opinions and thoughts were valued, however) Fiver, Blackberry, and Dandelion. As for Buckthorn, I would consider him an Owsla sergeant: a skilled fighter, a good tactician, but not as dynamic or diverse a character as Bigwig or Silver. Buckthorn most reminds me of Chewbacca from the Star Wars series and Gimli from the Lord of the Rings. While both of these characters had larger overall roles in their respective stories, they were above all solid and dependable warriors, not given to fleeing a fight. Chewbacca (sometimes) took orders from Han Solo and Gimli respected Gandalf and Aragorn just as Buckthorn respects and obeys orders from Hazel and Bigwig.

Buckthorn was not an innovative thinker or an eloquent speaker; however, he possessed many skills that any group of adventurers would be amiss without. When he was confronted by an enemy and later ordered to guard against further attacks by the Efrafan Wide patrol he held up well under the pressure(Adams 423 and 427); when presented with an opportunity to disrupt Captain Holly’s attack on Bigwig he wasted no time (Adams 20). While Bigwig is prone to starting fights and being brash, Buckthorn seems to be more sedate and balanced; more of a martial artist than a brawler. While his role was never as robust as that of Bigwig or Silver, I believe that the motley crew of Sandleford rabbits would have never made it to Watership Down, or beyond, and that the warren at Watership Down would be missing a significant supporting pillar in the Honeycomb without him.

Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. Rex Collings, Ltd.;1972. First Scribner trade paperback edition, 2005. Simon & Shuster.

Best Regards,

Justin Bleggi

Posted by: Justin Bleggi at February 18, 2007 08:06 PM

Professor Hobbs,
Walter 1
Tina Walter
Professor Hobbs
English 121.003
19 February 2007
A Lesson Learned
In Richard Adams’ novel, Watership Down, the reader is introduced to a character named Hawkbit. In chapter four, “The Departure”, he is described as a rather “slow, stupid rabbit who was distinctly tedious” (26). He learned from another rabbit, Dandelion, that Hazel, a rabbit he had met in a burrow last winter, was planning to leave the warren that night. He decided that he wanted to tag along.
Although a minor character in the story, in the end, Hawkbit plays an important role. He is the type of character who seems to be constantly searching for a specific, clear answer to every question. At the beginning of his journey with the rabbits, he questions many things. This characteristic resulted in a few repercussions. Obviously, he hadn’t yet learned when to open his mouth, and, more importantly, when to keep it closed. His first big mistake was asking Bigwig who the Chief Rabbit was. Bigwig wasn’t at all thrilled with the question and ended up attacking and biting Hawkbit. The other rabbits agreed that Bigwig had reacted badly. Was it really a bad question? Or did Bigwig over-react? His second mistake was not believing or understanding the reasons why Fiver and Hazel decided to take the journey. In his own stupid, stubborn way, he decided that he wanted to turn around in spite of the fact that he was the one who decided to come on the journey in the first place. Luckily he decided to stay.

Walter 2
It was obvious by the end of the rabbits’ journey that his views slowly changed as he continued to grow. He no longer questioned the reasons for having to do things. Instead, he found various ways to help the rabbits, not as a single member, but as part of the group. He contributed ideas when the rabbits were stuck in a rut. He became more outgoing, talking to other animals like the mice, for instance, in order to find new grass to feed on. He also went off on his own and proved that he could be a vital member of the “team” by taking the initiative to scope out old holes he found, in order for the others to sleep there that night. He is a character that has grown, in his own right, for the better.
There were a few questions that, I felt, were left unanswered by the end of the novel. In the beginning, having heard of Hawkbit wanting to join, Hazel stated that “this wasn’t a time to pick or choose” (26). Why then did Hazel decide to allow Hawkbit to come along if they didn’t see him as a valuable tool? It seems as though Hazel didn’t really see Hawkbit as a “stupid slow rabbit”(26). Rather, Hazel’s leadership qualities allowed him to see in Hawkbit what he thought would be vital for all of them to reach the safe warren in the end.
Through the novel, I would have preferred to see the author give a more detailed account of Hawkbit’s behavior and traits. He seemed to be a somewhat flat character in that not many details were given about his character. There were relatively few adjectives used to describe him. He also had some round character traits. By the end of the story Hawkbit had changed, becoming more knowledgeable and more mature in his actions. He had learned to follow and trust the leadership of others.


Walter 3
Hawkbit is a perfect example of learning to understand oneself and to become more comfortable in one’s own skin, or, in his case, fur. Not everyone may learn from his example. Change is sometimes good, sometimes bad, but, when it is good, it deserves to be noticed.
I think many people can relate to the character of Hawkbit. College is a great example. Students come from various parts of the state to meet people with diverse cultural backgrounds and social customs. Personally, I have changed considerably since I began attending college. I have learned that maybe the beliefs I had until then, the beliefs I had been taught, were not always necessarily the best for me if I was going to move forward in life. I am constantly learning to question those beliefs, to learn from mistakes I have made in the past in the hope that I will grow into yet a better person.

Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Macmillan, 1996.


Thank you,
Tina W

Posted by: Tina W at February 18, 2007 08:28 PM

Lauren E. Wozniak
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121 Humanities and Literature
14 February 2007

Close Reading of Clover

In the novel Watership Down by Richard Adams, Clover is the first rabbit to produce a litter in the new warren. Clover is one of the lucky rabbits who Hazel decided to set free from the barn. Clover is one of the few rabbits who were able to adjust to her new environment very easily. Clover mates with Speedwell, who is a Sandleford rabbit who is unsure of the group and the new warren, but eventually gains faith as the story unfolds.
Clover is first introduced in Chapter 25, “The Raid” when she was rescued by Blackberry and Bigwig from the barn. Clover is one of the domestic white rabbits owned by the farmer. Rescuing these rabbits from the barn was very important to Bigwig and Blackberry, because now, the clan of rabbits were able to add more members to take with them to the new warren. From the beginning, Clover showed no fear to the other rabbits or to the environment around her. When another rabbit suggested an idea, Clover never hesitated and proceeded with full force. Clover was also very flexible and never questioned the “older rabbits.” For example, as Bigwig was leading the way into the yard, and saw the cat Boxwood, Clover knew something was up. Even though they just had met Bigwig, Boxwood and Clover trusted him enough to follow him and believed that Bigwig could get them out of the terrifying situation. This shows that this particular group of rabbits were not only friends, but instead family. They all look out for one another, and try their best to stick together.
Clover is again introduced in Chapter 42, “News at Sunset” where she gives birth to her litter of six kittens. This is exciting news, because Clover’s litter is the first of the new warren. She had six healthy kittens; three bucks and three does. Speedwell, the father of the litter spreads the word by “…going up in the beech tree and singing.” (Adams, pg. 410) Clover’s litter symbolizes hope for the rabbits in the new warren. The birth of the litter, gives hope to the rabbits that they will soon be able to live a natural and normal life. Clover’s litter also contributes to the number of rabbits they have at the new warren. The birth of the litter brings the warren together; and in a way makes them stand up for what they believe in. For example, when Hazel found out that the Efrafans were coming to the warren to attack, she refused to leave the warren, which she now referred to as her home.
Although Clover was not a main character in Watership Down, Clover was able to contribute many characteristic traits; like her personality and determination that influenced the development of the new warren. Clover was a well-developed character and had her own unique personality. The trials and tribulations that Clover and the rest of the rabbits went through depict the struggles they faced between freedom and tyranny.
Throughout the novel Watership Down, Richard Adams makes it apparent to the audience that a community or family resulted when a group of rabbits came together and shared a common purpose in life. The groups of rabbits who are all individually different soon realize that in order to survive, it is necessary to trust the talents of each and every rabbit. Another theme Richard Adams made apparent was maturity. As the journey continued most of the rabbits started to mature and grow up. They begin to work as a whole; such as think of ideas collectively, think out strategies, and begin to appreciate everyone in the warren.


Work Cited:

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Scribner, 2005.

Posted by: Lauren Wozniak at February 18, 2007 09:11 PM

Andy Hood
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature
15 February 2007
To Live and To Learn
The Watership Down, by Richard Adams, introduces a variety of rabbits that portray what we know to be very human-like characteristics. The chief rabbit of the warren, the Threarah, is considered a flat character in this story and only makes two actual appearances in the story. The name Threarah actually means “Lord Rowan Tree” (10). Threarah isn’t just a name for the Chief Rabbit though; it’s something that represents him as an individual. Similar to that of a name in the Native American culture such as “The Running Horse”, the name fits his description. It’s part of his swagger, if you will.
Richard Adams clearly tries to create a representation of the way of the European world about the time of World War II with the characters in the story. He gave the Threarah characteristics of an old wise man, worn down by a lifetime full of paying his “do’s” and putting in work. He has now taken the reigns, for he is smartest of all the rabbits in the warren and must make all the important decisions. You can get the sense of a dominant figure with power even before his first appearance, simply by the fear in Hazel and Bigwig when they speak of him (9-10).
The Threarah reminds me of my grandfather on my mother’s side and my father, two men alive during the same time period as Richard Adams. The Chief Rabbit, and both my grandfather and father all share similar characteristics and play the same role as the head of the family. Now as old wise men, they feel they know best and are not too fond of youngsters going against their opinion. They will, however, indulge you in a sort of sly, manipulative way to amuse themselves when an ignorant or sometimes brave one will attempt to do so. They politely listen to your side of the story, but guide your thoughts toward the logic that they see without you knowing it, using cute, sarcastic responses. The Threarah demonstrates this well when approached with the astonishing request of Fiver and Hazel (11). I image this type of attitude could be a common denominator among the blue collar elderly population during those times.
The Threarah did have to earn his spot as Chief Rabbit though. His legends may speak for themselves now, but he was not always feared and obeyed by all. As a young adult, the Threarah did possess the necessary attributes to succeed. He was a strong, independent rabbit in nature that did not show the same high level of paranoia other rabbits do. One might say he was calm, cool, and collected. He was capable of balancing his forces, and he demonstrated his abilities as a leader early in the warren. The Threarah saved the warren from extinction by standing his ground and making the vital decision to lock out all sick rabbits (10). In another situation, he displayed heroic characteristics by leaping onto a farmer’s rifle in front of a pheasant coop (10). Surely, it was the Threarah’s fierce combination of physiology and psychology that landed him Chief Rabbit and head of the warren.

Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Scribner, 2005
Hobbs, Lee. ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature Course Pack. 2007
Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature: Brief Eleventh Edition. 2006. Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006.

Posted by: Andy Hood at February 18, 2007 09:19 PM

Greg Crossland
Eng 121
Dr. Lee Hobbs
2/12/07
Reading Response #1:Rabscuttle


Significant or Irrelevant?


While doing a close reading of the character, Rabscuttle (Rab), in Richard Adams’s novel, Watership Down, I have come across some interesting findings. Rabscuttle holds many important relations to the characters in the novel, primarily El-ahrairah (El). Also, I will discuss how he affects the novel from a couple different points of view.
Rabscuttle is mentioned only while the band of hermits retells stories of there idol/God like figure, El-ahrairah. He is the captain of El-ahrairah’s Owsla and is El’s best friend and sidekick. Rabscuttle seems to be a flat character, because throughout the novel he does not show much, if any development. This is especially true when he is brought into comparison with the protagonists of this novel, like Hazel and Bigwig, who show a great deal of character progression and evolution. Therefore, I can reason that Rabscuttle is a static character, because his character ends in the same manner in which he starts. I can build an inference about Rabscuttle’s character in comparison to other characters from different works of literature.
It is safe to say that Rab is a stock character due to the likeness of his traits and personality in comparison to many other characters in numerous literary works of fiction. Rabscuttle falls into the category of a sidekick, because of his relationship with El-ahrairah. Rab is his confidant, best friend, and El-ahrairah’s source of personal security. Rabscuttle is a physically strong character, yet he is submissive and respectful of El-ahrairah. He follows the orders given to him by El-ahrairah, but shows compassion and love for him. In a particular section of the novel where the story of El-ahrairah and the Black Rabbit of Inle is told, Dandelion describes, “All the time, Rabscuttle, looked after El-ahrairah, brought him fresh dock leaves and kept the flies from his wounds until they healed” (280). This is an example of how a sidekick would look after his chief. Anytime El-ahrairah was in the process of a mission, rather mischievous or grave in nature, Rabscuttle was right there ready to fight tooth-and-nail for El. Rabscuttle can be compared to many other famous sidekicks in literature and on the big screen. Some that came to mind when I thought of Rabscuttle were Robin and Batman, Kato to the Green Hornet, and Luigi in comparison to Mario. Being a sidekick was one main reason for Rab to be in this novel, but there is one other I would like to touch upon.
Rabscuttle was a voice of reason to El-ahrairah. He would consistently look out for El. This is best stated in Richard Adams’s novel when Rabscuttle says, “That’s saying to much, master. A pity to throw your life away for a cabbage, after all we’ve done together” (398). He also states, “Oh, master, what good can this suffering bring? For the sake of Lord Frith and the green grass, let me take you home” (276). He appears in very few parts of the novel; however he becomes an important part of the story.
Rabscuttle is an important character in Watership Down, because he is the perfect representation of how a good rabbit should act and carry themselves. He is a great friend, who would risk his life for El-ahrairah or any other rabbit in his warren. He strictly follows the orders given by his master and chief, without question, like a good captain of the Owsla is obligated to. He embodies the playful trickster, yet is respectful and stern. Since he is only in a small amount of the chapters, it leaves a few questions to be asked.
If I could ask questions to an all knowing source of information on Watership Down, I would start with the past. Where did Rabscuttle come from, how did he start out, as well as where and how did he come to meet El-ahrairah? After I bombarded this aficionado with questions on the past, the next logical step would be to move to the future. What happens to Rabscuttle in the end? The author states in the epilogue that rabbits only live for a few years. Is he or does he become immortal? Well I believe I can answer that one myself. He might not have lived for ever, but he is immortally placed into the hearts and minds of the rabbits of Watership Down.
In conclusion, I would state that Rabscuttle was important to the novel; and to really know or understand a particular character you must examine them carefully. You must compare him or her to their surroundings and other fellow characters. At a quick glance, important traits could easily be over looked. So if a novel is important to you for any reason, a close reading is necessary.


Works Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Scribner, 2005.


Posted by: Greg Crossland at February 18, 2007 09:51 PM

Lorin Gdula
Professor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003: Humanities Literature
16 February 2007
Pipkin
Characters are what make a story. Without drama and conflict between the characters and the plot all novels would probably be really boring. Watership Down focuses on leadership and a concern for their home, bringing the two themes together. The rabbits come together and realize that cooperation is the key to survival, and they engage in a trust between each other. Pipkin is introduced to us early in the story as a small, timid, rabbit that is talked into leaving the warren with the rest of the rabbits for fear something bad is going to happen.
Pipkin is not one of the main characters in the story but his role plays a large part in the story. Undersized, Pipkin was an easy target for the bigger enemies. He often got injured a lot, and it made the reader wonder why sometimes they just wouldn’t leave him behind. It just always seemed Pipkin slowed the rest of the pack down. There was the instance were he got the thorn in his paw and they had to stop and spend the night there, but the rabbits didn’t seem to mind because while on their journey to the new warren they realized that they need each other, every single one of them. Pipkin and Hazel start to form a bond between each other. “Throughout the bad dream of the night’s journey, Pipkin seemed to always be close beside him. Though each of the others vanished and reappeared like fragments floating round a pool, Pipkin never left him; and his need for encouragement became at last Hazel’s only support against his own weariness” ( Adams 63). They formed a trust, a bond between each other. Hazel can rely on Pipkin because he knows that whatever he would ask Pipkin to do, he would do without questioning. I feel that Pipkin’s main purpose in the story is to aid the others and help them get though the tough times. When Richard Adam’s discusses Pipkin in the book, he always refers to him as small and the other rabbits always look down on him.
I feel that Pipkin is important to the story, if he wasn’t, Richard Adam’s would have never mentioned him. The question is why is he important? Is it the fact that he is loyal to the others or that the other rabbits just feel bad for him because of his size. Pipkin is considered a flat character as well as a static character, not very complex and doesn’t change drastically from beginning to end. He lacks the knowledge about life and nature that the others have which plays a big part in the novel. Living naturally is what these rabbits want, and it is hard for Pipkin to understand that because he is so young and small and not adapted to the whole survival thing yet. Pipkin also applies as a stock character too. I feel he is stereotyped because of his size and that effects how the others look at him and act towards him. The other rabbits really didn’t pay much attention to him. Pipkin and Fiver are similar in those ways. When Fiver runs to tell the rabbits in the warren that Bigwig is caught in a snare the other rabbits really don’t acknowledge the fact of what Fiver had to say. Normally, I would have thought Hazel would have sent Pipkin but, in that situation, Hazel knew he needed to send someone that the others would believe. In that case they trusted Fiver because he always has his visions and so far they have lead him and the others on a right path. It’s not the fact that they wouldn’t trust Pipkin, it’s just that I feel that if Cowslip and the other rabbits wouldn’t come when Fiver said something then they probably wouldn’t have even accepted what Pipkin would have said. I think it would have been hard for Pipkin because he didn’t have much dialog and Adams always referred to him as small. He was never really talked about by the other rabbits, because he really never did anything outstanding to be talked about. I feel that if Adams would have left Pipkin out of the story that the book would have been missing some symbolism.
I don’t think that Pipkin really had any symbolism but, a lot of the rabbits, like Hazel, often called Pipkin, Hlao. Hlao or Hlao-roo, as they often called him, means depression in the grass. Is this what Adams wanted us to think about Pipkin? That he was just a depression in the grass. In a way, Pipkin was like that. He wasn’t really noticed by the other, like a depression in the grass. He was loyal to Hazel but, the other rabbits hardly ever intervened with Pipkin. So, I feel that by the way Adams named Pipkin that he really didn’t want him as a main focus in the book.
Characters made Watership Down an interesting story. They brought the story to life and even though Pipkin wasn’t a major character, he was still needed in the story. A character can have so many meanings behind them and sometimes if you look deep enough you can find interesting things about them that you would have never known.


Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Avon, 1972

Posted by: Lorin Gdula at February 18, 2007 10:10 PM

Jennifer L. Naugle

Instructor Lee Hobbs

English 121.003 Humanities Lit

10 Feb 2007

“Vat you do now, Meester ‘Azel?”

Watership Down by Richard Adams is a story of a journey taken by rabbits who are searching for a new warren. Kehaar is a seagull that the rabbits meet during their travels; he is not a main character, but he plays an important role in the rabbit’s survival. Hazel is the leader of the rabbits, and he quickly finds out that they will not be very successful in this journey with out the assistance of other animals.
“The bird. The bird will go and search for us” (Adams 188). Hazel explains to the other rabbits that a search for does is necessary, and Kehaar is the perfect candidate for such an exploration. Hazel and Bigwig have become very cunning throughout their travels, and instead of asking Kehaar for his help, Bigwig allows Kehaar to assume it is his idea to search the downs for does (Adams 189). Kehaar has told the rabbits about the ocean and other lands that they will never see. Adams states that although the black-headed seagulls are gregarious, when they travel south for breeding season and one gets hurt, they are deserted and left to survive on their own (184-185). Looking at this situation from a psychological approach, I think the rabbits realize Kehaar’s independent disposition, and Bigwig suspected that Kehaar would be much more compliant in searching for does if it seemed like he had thought of the idea himself.
In the Writing About Literature text, Edgar V. Roberts explains that there are different types of characters. There are flat, round, static, dynamic, stock, protagonist, antagonist, and heroic characters (Roberts 67-69). Kehaar is an example of a flat character. Flat characters usually have one role to perform in the story, and Kehaar’s role is to be the additional help the rabbits need to fight the Efrafans. Flat characters are usually minor characters, but they tend to highlight the development of the round characters (Roberts 69). In Watership Down, I believe that Kehaar’s character aids in developing Hazel’s character traits. Hazel has learned during his journey that having compassion for other animals is important. Not only did Hazel want to help the injured seagull, but he had the intelligence that the bird could help them in return. Kehaar’s character allowed Hazel to be an even better leader for the rest of the rabbits.
In the introduction to Watership Down, Richard Adams explains that there is some Arabic influence within the story. Kehaar’s name comes from the Arabic word “Behaar” meaning sea (Adams xiv). Adams also described in the introduction that Kehaar’s personality was based on a Norwegian Resistance fighter whom he had previously met at war (xii). When Kehaar helps the rabbits fight the Efrafans, he performs a surprise attack. It is interesting how Kehaar’s personality came from a person of war, because in the story it seems like he represents the air force in the rabbits’ battle. The Efrafans only had their rabbits on land, and that may be why they failed to be successful against Bigwig and the others.
There is a lesson that Kehaar’s character tells the readers. Not only is he an ally in the war between the rabbits, but Kehaar also proves that every animal in nature has a certain survival trait, and by working together, they can be much more successful. The success the rabbit’s had in the last half of their journey was due to Kehaar’s friendship. Being a bird, Kehaar would usually be a predator to these rabbits, but ironically, it is General Woundwort that was ruining the lives of many rabbits in his own warren. I wonder if the resistance fighter that Richard Adams based Kehaar’s character on was just as altruistic in his life. It makes sense that General Woundwort was oppressed by Kehaar and the other rabbits, because he was ruining the peace in nature that Kehaar, Hazel, Bigwig, Fiver, and the others had worked so hard to create.
Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Scribner, 2005.
Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. 11th ed. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006.

Posted by: Jen Naugle at February 18, 2007 11:12 PM

Rebecca Shenkle
Instructor Lee Hobbs
English 121.003 Humanities Literature
19 February 2007

Reading Response # 1
A Close Reading of the Character “Rabscuttle”
Rabscuttle is a character in the stories that Dandelion and Bluebell told to the other rabbits. Rabscuttle is the captain of Owsla and El-ahrairah’s faithful friend. He is always found with El-ahrairah, usually causing some sort of trouble.
Rabscuttle seems to be a certain kind of stock character that is found in many stories. He is the kind of character that is a follower of another character that is usually more important in the story. In “Watership Down”, that more important character is El-ahrairah. These stock characters also can be servants of these more important characters, which is also what Rabscuttle is.
Rabscuttle’s character seems to be much like the character of Gollum in the story “The Lord of the Rings”. Gollum, during certain parts of the story, was like a little servant to Frodo because he wanted to get the ring. I wouldn’t say that Gollum is a stock character, but I think he is similar to Rabscuttle in some ways because he is like a servant to El-ahrairah in that he seems to do a lot of the dirty work for him.
Another character Rabscuttle can be compared to is Peter Rabbit from “The Tale of Peter Rabbit”. Peter Rabbit was the bunny who was always getting himself into mischief and causing a ruckus. Rabscuttle is very similar to Peter Rabbit in this way because Rabscuttle is also always getting into a lot of trouble and playing tricks on the other rabbits.
Rabscuttle can also be compared to some people. He is the type of person that is someone’s sidekick. He has a leader that he follows and he is willing to do almost anything for that person. These people can be annoying sometimes if you are not their leader. They seem to have low self-esteem because they feel like they need to follow someone else instead of just being their own person.
Compared to some of the other characters in “Watership Down”, I don’t think Rabscuttle is that important. His character did serve a small purpose, but I think the story would not have changed much if Rabscuttle was not involved in it. El-ahrairah probably could have performed his tricks alone and the story would not have suffered without Rabscuttle’s character.
It seemed like Rabscuttle was more talked about in the story than he was involved in it. He didn’t seem to get much dialogue, and characters would just mention his name a lot. This is probably partly because he was a character in the stories that Dandelion and Bluebell told to the other rabbits, and he wasn’t a “live” character during most of the book. Although Rabscuttle wasn’t a “live” character throughout “Watership Down”, and he was mainly talked about more than anything else, this could mean that he really was important.
Rabscuttle’s character is in a way a stock character that is seen in many stories. These characters can be important to stories, but sometimes they aren’t. Sometimes stock characters can seem unimportant, but really are. In Rabscuttle’s case, I don’t think he was that important to the story, and the story still would have been good without him in it. Rabscuttle can be compared to other characters however that were obviously important to the story. Some examples of these characters are Gollum, from “The Lord of the Rings”, and Peter Rabbit from “The Tale of Peter Rabbit”.

Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Scribner, 2005.
Potter, Beatrix. The Tales of Peter Rabbit. 1902. London: Frederick Warne and Co, 2002.
Tolkien, J.R.R. The Lord of the Rings. 1938. New York: Ballantine Books, 1974.


Posted by: Rebecca Shenkle at February 18, 2007 11:12 PM

Jeff Hoover
Professor Lee Hobbs
English 121 College Writing

Ensign Speedwell
I chose the character Speedwell to do my close reading on. Speedwell is a rather dull character with little importance to the plot of Watership Down. He seems like he has the stereotypical filler role, he doesn’t contribute much but is there cause someone has to be there. This was my view of him before reading into his character so I’m looking to answer a few questions about him such as, what is his function in this story? Would this story be much different if he weren’t in it? Did he even affect the opinions of the other characters in this story? Through my research I’ve been able to answer some of my questions.
First off, I stated that Speedwell’s role is similar to someone you would see in a movie who never really contributes much to the scenes but is always in them. I came to this opinion of him because all he seems to do is say one or two lines every fifteen to twenty pages. When he finally does make his appearance, all he says is something small such as “there’s a rabbit coming down from the warren. Look!” (p. 117), and then doesn’t appear again for another twenty pages. Speedwell’s role reminds me most of the role of the nameless ensigns on Star Trek. The ensign’s pop out, give a report, and then disappear for the rest of the show or until it’s their turn to die when the console explodes and they do a front flip over their station. Though Speedwell doesn’t die, he could have been killed off at any time with no damage to the story line just like the ensigns.
The second thing I’d like to know about Speedwell is if he isn’t in the story just for filler, what purpose does he serve? I went through the book and found every appearance of his that I could and tried to figure out what purpose he served in each scene. In every scene Speedwell is in he either talks about being scared or worried about something, notices something coming closer, or is sent off on some errand. His purpose is just to be one of the weaker rabbits who have to do the work that the rabbits who are actually useful don’t want to do, sentry duty, running errands, and being worried about the decisions of the higher-ups. If Speedwell wasn’t around there wouldn’t be much of a difference to the story, someone else would watch out for things and someone else would point things out. Although his role is pretty insignificant, it is a role that needs filling and he just happens to be the lucky guy.
That brings me to my next point, would this story be much different if he weren’t in it? The conclusion I came to is no, it wouldn’t be very different at all. His role is running on errands or pointing stuff out, and if he wasn’t doing it another rabbit would be. When Speedwell’s name appears any time throughout this story mostly you just think “Speedwell...who?,” because he’s insignificant to the plot of the story overall. He’s one of those characters you don’t really care to get to know, or try and figure out their personality or anything of the sort. He’s the stable boy while Fiver, Hazel and Bigwig own the farm, and Watership Down is completely about the owners.
The last thing I wanted to know is sort of on the same lines as the above paragraph, I was wondering if Speedwell had any affect on any of the other characters in the story. For the most part I don’t think he did. His only conflicting moment with another character was on pages 50 and 51 where Speedwell, Hawkbit, and Acorn confronted Hazel about how they thought Fiver was wrong and wanted to go back to the warren. This was the only part where Speedwell could have played some influence on the decisions of important characters, but he was also with two other rabbits. However, we did not get a chance to find out if confronting Hazel had an impact or not because a few pages later they found a new area to settle at.
Ultimately, I’ve concluded that while Speedwell wasn’t exactly useless to the story, he did not play much of a role in the plot or the outcome. I feel my assumption of him from the beginning is correct and he is just a filler whose personality we are never meant to see. His only real function is as an errand boy, his role could have been filled by any of the other rabbits and so the overall plot would not have changed if he weren’t in the story. For the most part he had no affect on the opinions of anybody substantial to the story. Speedwell was pretty much just along for the ride.

Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005.

Posted by: Jeff Hoover at February 18, 2007 11:12 PM

The character I was assigned to name is Threarah ,which means "Lord Rowan Tree" Threarah do not have a lot of speaking parts throughout this story, but he is still a significant character. Threarah is an important character because of his position in the story, he is chief rabbit. He is well respected by many of the rabbits. Threarah received his position by strength in his prime, but also by his level-headiness.
Threarah job was like he was president of the rabbit community. It is made clear that Threarah is an important character in this story because his name was mentioned on numerous occasions by the main characters. Before Fiver and Hazel decided they were going to leave they felt it was their civic duty to warn Threarah that they believed danger was headed to their community. Although, the brothers did not believe that Threarah would believe them or leave the community because of something Fiver believe was going to happen , they did it out of respect for him. Once the brothers warned the Chief rabbit they felt like if something did happen they would not feel guilty because they warned him.
Moreover,I believe that this story was an Economic Determinist| Marxist because of how the community was ran.The rabbits had different types of class. The rabbit society is similiar to the united States Government.

Posted by: melisa Parsons at February 18, 2007 11:37 PM

Katie Kovac
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature
19 February 2007

Bluebell: The Comic Relief

In Robert Adams’s novel Watership Down there are many characters of importance that make the story heroic, but we must not forget about those characters that help make the story a little bit more enjoyable. In this novel the character of Bluebell is one of those small characters there to help make the novel not so serious the whole way through. In most cases that character is known as the “comic relief.” They help to release the tension of the dilemma placed upon the characters of the storyline.
In this case, the character of Bluebell makes the difficult situations in which the rabbits are placed much easier by telling jokes. From the very first moment we meet Bluebell he tells a joke to lift the others minds of the danger they are in. “Captain,” said Bluebell, “do you know what the first blade of grass said to the second blade of grass?” (147). Most of the rabbits are annoyed by the jokes that Bluebell tells, but the character of Holly sees him as a close friend and lets him finish his jokes before moving on. “It said, ‘Look there’s a rabbit! We’re in danger!’” (147). The jokes may not be all that funny, but they are there to make the reader and other rabbits clear their heads a bit before diving back into the dilemma they are in.
In spite of this, we can relate the character of Bluebell to that of a jester in a king’s court. Think of the rabbits in the group as a court in the medieval times, Bluebell is there to entertain much like a jester does in a court. Adams also points this similarity out on page 197 when Holly calls Bluebell his “faithful jester.” If a court had no jester to break the tension a kingdom could fall apart in a minute with the stress from day to day. Likewise, when Bluebell tells a joke he causes the other rabbits to forget about what they were talking about or arguing over. Therefore, if the rabbits were without Bluebell they may all be going their separate ways since each holds their own ideas on how to survive.
Although Bluebell adds comic relief through his jokes, he is made fun of and looked down upon in the novel for being the way he is. It is assumed that whenever Bluebell speaks he is going to make a joke. Such as, on page 168 Bluebell begins to speak, but is the interrupted by Hazel saying, “Don’t make a joke.” The other rabbits dislike how Bluebell makes jokes all the time because it can lead to trouble. For example, Holly wants to take Bluebell on the journey to the large warren to retrieve does, but Blackberry says, “one funny joke at the expense of the Chief Rabbit might ruin everything” (201). Which he is right because an unfamiliar creature to their group, whether it be a rabbit or bird, may not take his joke as a joke, but rather a serious comment. This makes it difficult for Bluebell to be a part of something important in the group. However, Bluebell does contribute a little to the storytelling of El-ahrairah when they rest (172). Yet, when everyone is sad and a joke is much needed Bluebell is yelled at by Hazel (261-262).
Playing the role of comic relief has its burdens, especially when the other characters label them. In this case for Bluebell it is difficult to contribute to decisions because everyone thinks of him as the “joker” or “jester” of the group. The other characters see his one specific trait of adding humor and figure that due to this he can’t contribute all that much. We don’t really see much how this affects the feelings of Bluebell because he plays such a small part making him a very static or unchanging character throughout the novel.
To conclude, the character of Bluebell plays an important role as the comic relief of the novel. He makes the difficult times a bit better by adding a tiny joke, but the addition of a joke doesn’t always make the situation better. Sometime it can lead to the need for a quick escape or the reason for being left out. Yet, overall without the use of a comic relief any story would be dull and boring, like this one. This makes the small character of Bluebell a bit important to the novel Watership Down.

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Avon, 1975.

Posted by: Katie Kovac at February 18, 2007 11:47 PM

Tatiana S. Mack
English121 003
Professor Hobbs
Due: February 19, 2007

El-ahrairah, The Great Folk Hero

Individuals of today sometimes need guidance, direction, and a source of reference. It is said that we are standing on the shoulders of giants, and without those giants, how would we be able to come up with ideas that help us in our everyday situations? How about in the rabbit society? How could the rabbits come up with clever tricks, without the help of El-ahrairah. El-ahrairah is “the rabbit folk hero” (Adams 475). It is also believed that without such a rabbit, rabbits in the proceeding generations would not have the imaginative ability in inventing such solutions for the many situations that rabbits face in their everyday lives. El-ahrairah is a necessity for rabbits in Watership Down, and without him, their thinking process would not be as well developed.
El-ahrairah is a very important figure in Watership Down. He is considered a legend to rabbits of “today”. He is an all around leader who feels that he is obligated to make sure his “people” are out of harms way, and taking care of them at all times. He shows this act of gratitude when his rabbits are in war with King Darzin's rabbit. After the King discovered that El-ahrairah manipulated him into giving away his lettuce, he declared war with El-ahrairah's rabbits (Adams 166). Because of this war, El-ahrairah's rabbits were desperate for food, and El-ahrairah felt that he had to save his rabbits, by giving his life to the Black Rabbit (Adams 268). Other rabbits in Watership Down seem to also look up to El-ahrairah as well. When Dandelion asked Hazel, “...are you-like El-ahrairah?” “Hazel gave him a quick, friendly glance. It was warm praise and cheered him” (Adams 24). They make it a habit to learn about his life, by keeping him alive and telling stories about him, such as, The Story of the Trial of El-ahrairah (Adams 161) and The Story of Rowsby Woof and the Fairy Wogdog (Adams 394). In addition, the rabbits value his cleverness a great deal. For example, Hazel feels that he receives a “message” from El-ahrairah to defeat General Woundwort and his people (Adams 422).
With a creative rabbit, such as El-ahrairah, there is bound to be enemies. In fact,the name El-ahrairah means “Prince with a thousand enemies” (Adams 475). However, someone with as much wit like El-ahrairah is up to the challenge of anything an enemy has in store. Prince Rainbow had motives to finally stop El-ahrairah in his tracks, by giving him obstacles that Prince Rainbow just knew El-ahrairah would fail. In contrast, this motivated El-ahrairah to out-smart Prince Rainbow, and prove that he has the ability to prevail. Due to this, El-ahrairah was able to obtain the lettuce from King Darzin's garden, and have Hufsa (a spy sent to El-ahrairah's warren from Prince Rainbow) made a fool of, and removed from his warren (Adams 177). By accomplishing these task, El-ahrairah and his rabbits were awarded the privilege to go into peoples gardens as they wished.
El-ahrairah is a highly skillful, brilliant, creative, patient, strong-minded, a leader, and an up for any challenge kind of rabbit. When he and his rabbits were put in a bad position, he did not run from his problems. He knew that he had to come up with a plan, and he did this by any means necessary. For example, when he was trying to get Hufsa out of his warren, El-ahrairah asked a hedgehog to sing, and a pheasant to swim (Adams 170). This is obviously rare behavior for these animals. El-ahrairah never rushed his plans, he knew that it will happen when it happens. For instance, when Prince Rainbow challenged El-ahrairah to steal King Darzin's lettuce, the Prince was confident that El-ahrairah had given up when he said, “Well, well, Prince with the Thousand Enemies, where are the lettuce?” El-ahrairah simply stated, with self-admiration, “I am having them delivered, there will be rather too many to carry” (Adams 95).
El-ahrairah is a dynamic and round character in Watership Down. In the beginning of the story, El-ahrairah was care-free, and only worried about himself. El-ahrairah had many women, and had many children. Frith said to El-ahrairah “ if you cannot control your people, I shall find ways to control them”.El-ahrairah did not find this as a warning, and simply brushed this statement off because he felt that “his people were the strongest in the world” (Adams 27). He soon learned his lesson when enemies began killing off his people. Later in the story, El-ahrairah transitions into a more mature rabbit, and does all he can to protect his rabbits. He displays this by turning to the black rabbit, pleading for the black rabbit to take his life for the life of his rabbits. El-ahrairah is definitely memorable and unpredictable with all the tricks he has up his sleeve
In the final analysis, El-ahrairah is a hero and paved the way for many rabbits. From his experiences, he made it alright for rabbits to think outside the box, and be just as creative as he. El-ahrairah is a by far memorialized by all rabbits. His stories will continue to fill every warren at story time, and rabbits will forever idolize El-ahrairah for his bravery, self-satisfaction, and knowledge.


Adams, Richard. Watership Down. Scribner. New York. 2005.

Posted by: Tatiana S. Mack at February 18, 2007 11:49 PM

Lyndsay Krall
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121 Humanities Literature
19 February 2007
Dandelion
For reading response number one, the character which I chose to focus on from the story was the character of Dandelion. In my opinion, I feel that Dandelion was a very important character to the story of Watership Down. The character of Dandelion was a storyteller, in which his main function was to tell stories to the other rabbits during their long journey. If the character of Dandelion would have been omitted from the story altogether, the reader’s understanding would have been altered completely, for Dandelion mainly tells stories of the legendary rabbit hero El-ahrairah. In this paper, I will be discussing the character of Dandelion from the story of Watership Down and how he could be considered as an attribute to the story.
The story of El-ahrairah plays a vital role in the story of Watership Down. Dandelion tells a story in chapter fifteen of a time when El-ahrairah and his people were in desperate need of food. El-ahrairah had made a deal with Prince Rainbow that if he could steal King Darzin’s lettuce to then let his people out of the marshes. Although the king’s lettuce garden was heavily guarded, El-ahrairah had managed to pull off the trick in which rabbits had supposedly mastered the art of trickery from that day forward (93-99). The character of Dandelion would be considered as a flat character. On page 54 of the course packet, it states that a flat character has only one outstanding trait or feature. Although Dandelion is the fastest of the rabbits and is somewhat known for his speed, his storytelling is ultimately his outstanding trait and what he is known for. From the other texts that I’ve read and the films that I’ve seen, the character of Dandelion is in my opinion somewhat similar to the character of Mrs. Potts from The Beauty and the Beast. I see this reflection between the two characters for the simple reason that both are the storytellers of their group. Like Dandelion, Mrs. Potts is the one that everyone turns to tell them stories when everyone is in need of being cheered up. I would say that the character of Dandelion could also be considered as a stock character. A stock character is a stereotyped character, or a character type that is used repeatedly. Although Dandelion’s character may not always be present in all works of literature, there is however usually that one character like that of Dandelion that everyone in the story looks to. Like stated before, the job/function of Dandelion in Watership Down is to give the other rabbits hope by telling them stories. In addition to myself, the other characters, particularly the important ones in Watership Down, react positively to Dandelion. For example, while the rabbits are staying with Cowslip at his warren, Hazel suggests that Dandelion should tell a story so that they can become acquainted with the new rabbits of the warren. Hazel states that they have a good storyteller among them and that they can’t go wrong with Dandelion telling the story of El-ahrairah (92). This to me means that the rabbits think very highly of Dandelion. Although Dandelion’s character did not get as much dialogue as some of the other characters in the story, when he did speak however, everything he spoke about was very important to the story. I think that Richard Adams did it this way just to prove that sometimes the littlest things can be of the most importance.
In conclusion, I felt that although the character of Dandelion was not one of the main characters of the story, that he played a very important role of keeping the story entertaining and a more enjoyable story at that. He would in a sense “liven” the story up when he would tell his stories to the rabbits when they were in very serious situations. He was very descriptive in his storytelling and would make you as the reader feel as though you were there with the other rabbits listening to him.


Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: SCRIBNER, 2005

Posted by: Lyndsay Krall at February 19, 2007 12:18 AM

Professor Hobbs,

Nicole Novak
9 February 2007
Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003


Watership Down by Richard Adams
Chapters 25: The Raid, pages 213, 215-218
and Chapter 42: News at Sunset, pages 410 and 412


Clover

When the rabbits moved to their new warren they wanted to have a good population which made them need does who could have litters of babies. Bigwig, Hazel, Blackberry, Dandelion, Speedwell, and Hawbit went to the farm with a mission to bring back more rabbits. After a run-in with the farm cat, and ripping down the leather hinge to the hutch, the team was able to convince Boxwood and Clover to return to their new warren.
Clover was able to help the rabbits out by having a litter of six kittens with Speedwell. She had three bucks and three does, and all were healthy kittens. Since she was weak after giving birth to the babies she was forced to stay at the warren when some of the rabbits decided to leave in hopes of finding a new home.
Clover did not have a major role in the story but did have an impact on the new warren. She was the first doe to have a litter and a very aggressive female rabbit. She was not afraid to leave her hutch and follow clover and the others, and made a very strong attempt to adapt to the wildlife. I admire the fact that she was able to do so much for the warren that I think even though she had a small part, she had a huge influence and created hope for all the other rabbits.
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Rex Collings Ltd., 2005

Posted by: Nicole Novak at February 19, 2007 08:19 AM

Amber L. Dunmire
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121 Humanities Literature
14 February 2007
Analysis of the Buckthorn
Buckthorn was first introduced into the novel entitled Watership Down, written by Richard Adams, in Chapter 4, on page 27. Hazel was getting ready to go to Blackberry’s burrow, before their departure, when Blackberry came out of his hole with three rabbits. One of the rabbits was Buckthorn. Hazel knew Buckthorn fairly well, and thought to himself, “Well, with him and Bigwig, at least we shan’t be too badly off if we run into any fighting” (Adams, 27). Hazel knew that Buckthorn was a fighter.
Buckthorn seems like a strong character. He is a good fighter and eventually works well with his fellow rabbits to keep them all safe. In chapter 18, the rabbits luck had been good so far, until rats starting attacking them while they were sleeping in a lonely barn. Silver and Buckthorn followed Bigwig’s instructions and fought off the rats until all of the others were outside and safe, with Bigwig’s help of course. After the rabbits got attacked, they took a step back and thought that they would have never been able to fight off the rabbits by themselves. At this point, they need qualities of every single rabbit. For example, Hazel is a good leader through out the novel, Fiver has strange feelings that tell him when something bad is going to happen, and Bigwig is one of the best fighters in the group. “They had come closer together relying on and valuing each others capacities” (Adams, 129). When the rats came in, Buckthorn and Silver actually obeyed Bigwig. This is how they worked together, to fight them off. Teamwork is a great quality that the rabbits can have because teamwork is necessary when in a big group (Adams 128,129).
This reminds me of our military when we are at war. Our soldiers may not always get along with all of their fellow soldiers, but when they are at war, they know they have to work together, so they don’t get hurt or even killed. They realize that they have to trust the person standing next to them, working next to them, driving in a vehicle next to them, whoever it is that is next to them, because they are in it together. Both soldiers are fighting for the same thing.
Buckthorn would be a dependable solider. He would be a solider that I would want next to me if I were at war. It shows that he would fight to keep you safe. He would risk hurting himself to save someone else. This shows that even though Buckthorn is a big, tough, sturdy rabbit on the outside, he is a caring, compassionate rabbit on the inside. This reminds me of Shrek. Shrek is an ogre that is big and scary and ugly on the outside, but when his inner self is shown, he is a loving, gentle ogre that wants someone to love him back.
Many people will argue that people that like to fight aren’t compassionate people. I don’t think this is true that all. Some people, or so to say, rabbits are just good at fighting. So if you are good at something, that would make you want to do it more. I think Buckthorn likes to fight because he knows he is good at it, but he also knows that he can’t do it all by himself. He needs other rabbits there to help him.
Overall, Buckthorn is a good, solid, dependable fighter, but yet he is still a very compassionate and caring rabbit as well.

Work Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1975.

Shrek. Dir. Andrew Adamson. Perf. Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, John Lithogow. DVD. Dreamworks, 2001.

Posted by: Amber Dunmire at February 19, 2007 08:36 AM

Carlos R.Gonzalez
Instructor: Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature
19 February 2007
The Smallest Is the Strongest
Blackberry is the smallest but, perhaps the smartest rabbit of them all. Blackberry is the tiniest rabbit of the gang of runaway rabbits in Richard Adam’s novel, Watership Down. Hiding in the shadow of the two leaders of the gang, Bigwig and Hazel, Blackberry helps his group of companions out on their journey toward a safer place to live. Through out their journey the group of rabbits comes across many obstacles that they must over come. Such as crossing a river, dodging many predators, and finding shelter for several nights. The leaders of the group Bigwig and Hazel have many skills that allow the rest to trust and respect them. Bigwig is a very strong rabbit, he once was a member of the owlsa of their old warren; he is also the oldest on the voyage. Hazel also embodies many traits that a leader has; he is very determined and is quick on his feet. The missing elements that both of these rabbits do not show is the skills of thinking quickly, strategy and a level head in serious situations. This is when the rabbit that seems to be the smallest and one of the weak, Blackberry shines through to help lead his fellow rabbits.
On their journey to a new home away from danger that their warren faces the rabbits encounter a large obstacle. This obstacle is in the form of a body of water, a river. The rabbits leave the woods and come to a point in their adventure where they can either follow the banks of the river as suggested by Bigwig. Or cross the river and follow Fiver’s premonition. The rabbits are torn between two possible ways to continue their journey. A few of the rabbits are exhausted and injured and this is why Bigwig believes that it is a mad man’s idea to try and cross the river. Bigwig does not believe that all of the rabbits will survive the crossing. Hazel depending on his younger brother to give him direction to safety announces to the other rabbits that crossing the river is necessary.
It is suggested that Bigwig crosses the river alone to check if the field across the river was safe to rest in after the rabbits cross the river. Once bigwig crosses the river he notices that there is a dog heading toward where the others awaited his return. He rushes back and warns the others that they must cross the river immediately. Bigwig expressed the need to cross the river and told Hazel that staying there was not an option. Hazel told Bigwig and the others that he was not moving until Fiver and Pipkin are fit to cross. While Hazel and Bigwig decided what was to be done Blackberry was on step a head of them. Blackberry understood the need to cross the river as it was in Fiver’s visions. Fiver’s visions were what forced them all to leave the warren and this just proved to him how important it was to cross the river. Blackberry discovered a wooden plank that was stuck in the gravel at the pool of the river. “It must have drifted down the river. So it floats. We could put Fiver and Pipkin on it and make it float again.” Explained Blackberry (Chapter 8, page37)
No one else understood what Blackberry was trying to get at. It was Blackberry who bullied Pipkin to his feet and to the gravel where the plank of wood was. He placed Pipkin on to the piece of wood. Fiver followed him aboard the piece of wood. “Who’s strong?” said Blackberry. “Bigwig! Silver! Push it out!” No one obeyed him. (chapter8, page 37) They all sat their puzzled and uncertain. Blackberry himself pushed the board out into the pool. “Firth and Inle`!” said Dandelion. “They are sitting on the water! Why don’t they sink?” “They’re sitting on the wood and the wood floats, can’t you see?” said Blackberry. “Now we swim ourselves.” said Blackberry. (Chapter 8, page37)This is when everyone realizes that Blackberry discovered a way to have the weak members of the group cross the river.
If it was not for Blackberry’s quick wit the rabbits would not have been able to escape the danger that Bigwig saw. After this situation that the group of rabbits was in danger Hazel comes to Blackberry for a plans or ideas. Blackberry’s great ideas and quick wit became a great asset to the survival of the rabbits while still on their journey. Many of the other rabbits in their new warren were surprised to see that Blackberry was as smart as he was. Most of the rabbits did not see such a small rabbit as a help in any situation until the complications at the river. Many of the rabbits looked to bigwig and Hazel for direction being that they were two of the largest and strongest. Blackberry is a very important character in this story. If it was not for the Blackberry’s higher understanding of things the rabbits may have been stuck in many places through out their quest to find a better home.
After reading the Novel, Watership Down, I saw a connection to this group of rabbits to Peter Pan and his gang of wild boys. I see some similarities of Peter Pan and the gang of wild boys because Peter Pan utilized all of the boy’s strengths in the group; especially the youngest boy who can see and understand things that most of them do not. Hazel did this very similar thing by using his brother’s premonitions as a map. Hazel also used Bigwig’s strength and experience from the owlsa. But most of all he always looked for Blackberry when ever he needed an idea about something or a plan.
One could say that Blackberry’s job was to help lead his companions on the expedition. The title leader defined by Webster’s New Dictionary is one who leads; a guiding head. I see Blackberry as a leader because the older rabbits on this conquest could not see and understand the things that Blackberry had the ability too. He may have been the smallest but Blackberry was the brightest. Blackberry did not try and put him self in the leadership position because he was the smallest and may have believed that none of the rabbits would have trusted the smallest rabbit’s judgment. And the irony in blackberry’s case is that most of the time the brave rabbits that tried to become the leaders came to him for advice.
In the story of Wateship Down, Blackberry can be seen as the antihero. The reason being is that he does not embody all of the usual traits that a hero would. He has a strong heart and is a very quick thinker but, lacks physical strength. I believe that Richard Adam’s uses Blackberry in his novel to allow the reader to recognize that the person that is the strongest may not always be the best. The old saying of “two heads are better then one” is what the character of Blackberry represents. Hazel needed Blackberry’s help through out their journey. Adam’s is trying to inform the reader that just because a person is small does not mean they are use less. Some times and in the case of Blackberry in the novel Watership Down the smallest can be seen as the strongest.


Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972, New York. Scribner: 2005
Agnes, Michael. Webster’s New World Dictionary.2002, Cleveland. Pocket books: 2003

Posted by: Carlos R. Gonzalez at February 19, 2007 09:38 AM

Erika L. Knox
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 101.003 Humanities Literature
19 February 2007

(Ag) under the Microscope:
A Closer Look at Silver

Dear Professor Hobbs,

As I read Richard Adams’s Watership down, and I was introduced to all of the characters, I couldn’t help but feel that, like the dwarves of the Hobbit, many of these characters were not important to the plot. Instead, many seemed to act simply as another head to count. Silver is a prime example of a non-essential character. In the set-up of his character, Silver was given a fairly decent background with a lot of potential for a well rounded character; he was the Nephew of Threarah, which gives him “Royal” blood; he was ridiculed for his light fur, which gave him a cause to rise above prejudice; he was the only member of the Owsla that Bigwig brought which made him useful muscle in a tight situation, but none of these aspects were focused on and Silver, for the most part, remained, a flat and unfinished character. Although Silver’s character does serve a purpose in the story he is fairly superfluous.

In description Silver does not stand out as extraordinary. He is not the fastest, the smartest, the most organized, or even the most useless character. He is topped in every factor by another character. He is helpful occasionally when the group is called to act, but he doesn’t do anything that another character couldn’t have done just as well if not better. From the very first introduction of Silver, the reader pretty much has gathered all of the information that they will need to know about him: He is new to the Owsla, a bit older than a year, and as described by Hazel, “a quiet, straightforward fellow” (19). He is generic, and to the reader’s disappoint, he remains so.

Silver is spotlighted mainly in ways that are not significant to the story. For example on in chapter nine, on page 41, after the trouble with the dog and the river; everyone in the party is exhausted. In this scene Silver shows that he has sense, and responsibility; “’Not asleep, Silver?’ (Hazel) said ‘It’s too dangerous, Hazel,’ replied Silver. ‘I’d like to sleep as much as anyone, but if we all sleep and something comes who’s going to spot it?’” Then when the group gets moving Silver wakes the others. Adams mentions Silver six times on this page: more than he does on any other. This is Silver’s Spotlight! What happens on this page is not important to the grand scheme of the story, and although Silver has good insight, this section really doesn’t allow the reader to get to know him any better, nor does it significantly progress the story.

Silver is a nearly static character who grows very little through the events of the story. The reader cannot see a clear path of change in Silver’s Character. However, to a certain extent it is undeniable that a change, although be it subtle, must have taken place. At the end of the book Silver serves a great part when the rabbits are trying to escape from Efrafa, and he is mentioned in the success of the Warren. Originally Silver is not much of a leader, but here he does take a place of authority. He seems to have become a little bit more comfortable in a leadership position, but there is no point in the story when the reader can point at and proclaim the moment of evolution, his epiphany. The event is simply not there, and so, one could make a fair argument that Silver cannot be considered a dynamic character.

So, in conclusion I found Silver to be a very flat character who was not particularly exceptional. He did not take any action that significantly progressed the plot, nor did he cause the reader to understand any particular aspect better. Because he is mentioned so prevalently, the fact that he is so unimportant is a bit shocking. From his first introduction I thought that his character was set up to be a pivotal character and that there was a lot of potential for him. But, that potential remained untapped. Like Bifur, Bofur, and Dwalin, three of twelve (practically interchangeable) accompanying dwarves in the Hobbit, Silver was not essential to the story. He was sadly superfluous.


Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Scribner, 2005.

Tolkien, J.R.R.. The Hobbit. 1966. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002.


--Erika Knox

Posted by: Eriak Knox at February 19, 2007 10:05 AM

Sheryll Daugherty
ENGL-121-003
Lee Hobbs
February 15, 2007
El-ahrairah
In Richard Adams novel Watership Down, the character El-ahrairah was important to the stories function. El-ahrairah is a folk hero the characters praised. This is because he was a clever rabbit that oppressed any horrific situation that was dangerous to rabbits. Also, he played a vital part in the creation of the world according to rabbits. Although El-ahrairah is not one of the main rabbits traveling on the profitable journey; his tales and tricks are influential upon the others. The tale, “The story of the Blessing of El-ahraiah” explains how the world became into existence. Also El-ahrairah and his tricks were important in emphasizing his character. This is mostly noticeable in “The Story of the Kings Lettuce”. These stories help exemplify the qualities of El-ahraiah which; are bravery, and being sneaky.
El-ahrairah is vital to the story, this is because he a played a part in the formation of rabbit society. At the beginning of the story, the rabbits are crawling through the woods nervously. To calm everyone down, Hazel tells Dandelion to tell the others a story about El-ahrairah. This is an important, because it presents the idea that El-ahrairah and his tales are emphatically superior in rabbit culture. The tales central focus is that El-ahrairah’s people were multiplying and eating all the grass. As a result, Lord Frith told El-ahrairah that he must control his people. El-ahariah simply replied that his people were the strongest. This gives us a clear view of the morals and personality of El-ahrairahs character, which are the traits of superiority,
and the ability to achieve power
Daugherty 2
He obviously is confident and brave for having the courage to approach Lord Frith in such a manor. As a result of the rabbits multiplying, Lord Frith blesses others with a present. For example he bestowed the gift of claws and teeth for the cat and dog. This made El-ahrairahs “prince of a thousand enemies”. (Adams 34). When Lord Frith blessed El-ahrariahs he gave him the present of strength and the full of tricks. This made El-ahrarishs character more noticeable; due to the fact that the world was is enemy. El-ahrariahs instructed himself with tricks and sneaky plans to be able to survive.
Another characteristic of El-ahrairah is his sneaky ability to get out of sticky situations; a good example of this is “The Story of the Kings Lettuce”. Dandelion tells the story of how El-ahrairah wanted to remove his people from the marshland. To complete this task he had to steal King Darzin lettuce. El-ahrairah and his friend Rabsculltle were able to achieve this task with a clever trick to sneak into the king’s palace. The character El-ahrairah is comparative to Eigo from the movie The Return of Jafar. He played a trick to get into Aladdin castle. The two characters personality corresponds, because if they need to achieve a task they will no any means necessary. The character El-ahrairah can also be compared and exemplified as a Greek God. This is because he is emphasized as a folk hero towards fellow rabbits. His stories are passes on from generations to generation.
The characters in Watership Down idealize the knowledge and never ending games of the great El-ahrairah. They worship the qualities of El-ahrairah; which include his bravery and his superior attitude of curiosity. As well as the means to play tricks to obtain wealth and safety for his people. El-ahrairah is a caring individual and will stand up for risk his life to steal lettuce just to remove his people from the marshlands. This says a lot about his qualities and morals this
Daugherty 3
particular folk hero. Without the character El-ahrairah to story would not have functioned. This is because, the tales are very important to the stories meaning and other characters lives. A Hazel was leading the others they relied on stories of El-aharaih for survival. These stories included the encounter with Keehar and “The story of the king’s lettuce”.

Posted by: Sheryll Daugherty at February 19, 2007 10:08 AM

Thomas Nolf
Instructor Lee Hobbs
English 121 MWF 11:45-12:45
19 February 2007
The Puppet of the Prophet?
With things in place, I mustn’t wait. That is an anecdote I feel that fits my character, Captain Holly, perfectly. With the old warren seeming to have been abolished, Holly joined the rest of the early deportees’ during the making of their own burrow. Holly’s importance to the story comes up more and more as the story goes on. The transition which he makes throughout the story will enable the reader to see why Captain Holly is in retrospecting a vital part of Adams novel.
The beginning of Watership Down we are penetrated with vocabulary which instills a feeling that Captain Holly is a bully, and somewhat miserable character. He seems to be frivolous and bold when we first interact with him and the reader senses that Holly is almost a puppet to the Threarah. As the story unravels we loose touch with Holly for awhile, but he is foreshadowed by the feelings Fiver has that the old rabbits from the warren would be tailing them. His first meaning and functional supplement to the plot is when he joins the rabbits again for the first time and he explains to them, along with Bluebell, the story of what happened at the old warren. (Adams p. 146-48) This twist in the plot depicts to the reader a facet of the dynamic character in which Holly characterizes. Edgar Roberts describes a dynamic character with some similaraties found in the descriptions of Holly.
Dynamic characters recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances… Such changes may be shown in and action, the acceptance of new conditions and the need for making changes. (Roberts p. 68)
This parallels the life of Holly through a large portion of the novel. He was able to go from a well respected elder in the old warren where he sat close with the Threarah, to an ordinary worker when he joins the rest of the surviving rabbits. Regardless of the fact he denied anything Fiver had informed him on at the beginning of the story, Holly survived the demolishment of the warren and accepted his role in the new pack. This transition from Captain to an everyday working soldier showed the resilience which was necessary to survive.
In developing a strong character analysis, I think it is crucial to show the relationships that Holly endured with the rest of the rabbits, and his importance to Adams. From start to finish, Holly is constantly a major character in the novel, with the acceptance of the characters which were not available for analysis. He is, in a sense, a bearer of the good and unfortunate news to the extremist rabbits. He was the one who told them that their old warren was destroyed, which at the same time relinquished some anxiety the remaining rabbits were encountering daily with the thought of what would happen to them if they were caught. Adams portrays Holly firstly, as a juggernaut type figure to the rest of the warren, which is ironic with how he treated Fiver and Hazel when they approached him about Fivers intuition to being helped out of harms way by those same two when he was badly injured.
The irony which keeps arising from the story with connection to Captain Holly is what keeps this character of such importance. His strength as a dynamic character was at first his fatal trait in the story, now is what kept him so important to the survival of the group.


Works Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York; Scribner 2005

Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. 2006. ed. New Jersey; Pearson Education.

Posted by: Thomas Nolf at February 19, 2007 11:01 AM

Gillenberger 1
Erika Gillenberger

Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature
16 February 2007
The Future
The character Speedwell is not a character that appears allot in the story of "Watership Down". Through out the story Speedwell seems to not even be an important character at all. Once you come to the end of the story of “Watership Down" you come to find out why Speedwell was part of the story. You actually end up realizing that Speedwell is one of the most important rabbit's in the group. He is one of the most important rabbit's in this particular story because he brings new life into the burrow.
Speedwell if first introduced at the beginning of the book. When he is first introduced into the story Hazel say's, "He did not recognize the other two rabbits and when Blackberry told him their names-Speedwell and Acorn-he was none the wiser.” (pg 33) This informs the reader that Speedwell is not very well known around the burrow and is an introverted rabbit. As the story continues on, Speedwell stays an introverted rabbit and does not appear often threw out the rest of the book. Speedwell does not stand out and his character development is weak as the story goes on.
So as you see Speedwell seems to be a character of no importance, but on the contraire Speedwell becomes a major character. He becomes a major character when he is the first rabbit to produce offspring insuring the future for all of the other rabbits. Speedwell’s most important rule comes at the end of the story when Speedwell appears

Gillenberger 2
above ground, "He had an excited, triumphant look which attracted everyone's attention immediately. He squatted in front of Hazel and looked around him in silence, to make sure of his effect. "You've finished the hole?" asked Hazel. "Never mind the hole," answers Speedwell. "I didn't come up to say that. Clover's had her litter. All good, healthy kittens. Three bucks and three doe’s, she says." (417) This is Speedwell’s time to shine. This was the moment that defined his character and let the readers know what part Speedwell had within the group.
Speedwell’s existence among the group is to start the future by being fertile and the first rabbit to reproduce offspring. This is a huge part within the journey they took. If the rabbits did not end up producing offspring then their whole journey and everything they did would have been in vain. They left their homes and went on an incredible journey to survive. If they would have just given up and did not try to reproduce after all that they had been through, their story of survival would not have continued on. Without continuing further generations the rabbits would have had no purpose. The rabbits eventually would all have died off as they would have is they stayed at their old burrows.
Speedwells fertility was a huge necessity for the rabbits. Even though the need for his character in the story did not seem important, you find out at the end of the story his importance and what his character represented. Speedwell represented rebirth of a new burrow. There is no doubt that my character was the first to start the legacy of the new burrow and the first one to carry on the burrows future.


Gillenberger 3
Works Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Macmillan, 1996.


Posted by: Erika G. at February 19, 2007 11:02 AM

Jenny Troutman
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature
14 February 2007
Character: Cowslip from Watership Down
“Cowslips are a delicacy among rabbits, and as a rule there are very few left by late May in the neighborhood of even a small warren,” (p.13). With this characteristic of Cowslips, their purpose in this story is that they are all part of the Cowslip (Warren of the Snares). Warren is best described as an area where rabbits breed or live in burrows. Along in the novel, Cowslip assures to Hazel that he and his tribe are really friendly to be with and interact with. Cowslip wasn’t your typical and ideal leader such as Gandhi and Martin Luther King. Cowslip was just a not a good rabbit that welcomes other rabbits like Hazel with open arms because they never knew what they were going to be up against.
With Cowslip and his people didn’t much really like the stories of El-arairah, because as Fiver pointed out to everyone that Cowslip and his people really have forgotten proper ways of rabbitry. Many of the rabbits from Cowslip (Warren of the Snares) have looked up to the humans. The humans have been keeping them well fed, and Cowslip manages to keep Hazel’s followers motivated to be able to make his warren bigger. That was one of the main reasons why most of the rabbits have stayed at the warren because of them being well fed. Cowslip just showed this “good guy” character to everyone and all the rabbits fell for his trap. It seems to me that he thinks he can control them and grab them into his warren and there isn’t anyone to stop him or know what he is up to.
The other rabbits have been appreciating everything that Cowslip has done for them. He has helped provided food, shelter, and Cowslip believes that there is nothing wrong with it. Because he tricks them into believing that he is a true leader and that he is this good rabbit that does nothing wrong. In Chapter 17, The Shining Wire, the other rabbits have been always asking of Cowslip. The rabbits have been trying to escape from the snare and apparently when Fiver tried to tell Cowslip and Strawberry joins in, they completely ignored him. As Fiver was trying to call out on everybody, Silver went up to Cowslip. He asked kindly if Cowslip was leaving with them on their journey, but Cowslip was being rude because he turned his back on Silver. Then Fiver spoke to him quietly but as they were talking, Cowslip replied, “Hills or Inle, it’s all one to me where you go. You hold your tongue,” (p. 121). After the conversation, Cowslip ended up striking at Fiver. As suppose to Bigwig’s stating that Cowslip was trying to get them killed and he wants to kill Cowslip for what he has done. The author was trying to show that people in our lives can have split personalities or that sometimes people in our lives can do wondrous things and then end up doing something devilish.
As the novel goes on, Cowslip has been an interesting character, and I’ve been wondering what ever happen to him. In chapter 22, The Story of the Trial of El-ahrairah on page 172, Hazel explained an idea and that was the end of hearing from Cowslip. It would be interesting to know if his warren survived through all the hardships from the foxes or wondering if he was killed. There are so many ideas and thoughts that go through my head and I keep wondering what comes next but since I didn’t get a chance to watch the video, there are many questions that come to my mind and will always remain in my mind. Since I’ve read the end of Cowslip in Chapter 22, I guess I can watch the video and see what happens or just make up my own conclusion on what happens with Cowslip. But no matter what the video or novel states, the rabbits that traveled that long journey will never forget the Cowslip (Warren of the Snares).


Work Cited:
Richard, Adams. “Watership Down.” New York: Avon Books, 1972.


Posted by: Jenny Troutman at February 19, 2007 11:13 AM

Reading Response # 1
Professor Hobbs English 121
Erin M Rock
February 16, 2007

Silver is a young rabbit who is serving his first month in the Owsla. He is easily recognized because of his fur. He is grey all over with little patches of white. He looks quite different from the other rabbits. He is rather large, strong, and to top it off he also adds experience to the group. Silver acts well under pressure and can make good decisions for the group. He is a good rabbit to have around when times get tough. When Bigwig decides that he wants to leave Owsla, he convinces Silver to join him and the other rabbits.
Right now we are involved in a war that seems like it will never cease. We, as Americans, sit in our homes, watch the news and hope that the brave soldiers over seas are doing their jobs and keeping safe at the same time. Silver reminds me of a soldier in a war. In particular, he reminds me of my good friend, Specialist Corey O’Connor.
Just like Silver, when Corey was asked to leave his home to make a better life for himself and his family by enlisting in the army, he didn’t think twice. Both Silver and Corey know what they want and how to get it. They have a level head and are there to fight and be quick on their feet when they are needed. When the journey gets hard they know their position in the team and know how to get everyone to work together in order to accomplish what they need. When the rabbits are resting in the barn and find themselves suddenly being attacked by rats, Silver and Buckthorn both stand up to fight off the rats. They are successful in doing this. (Adams, 122).
Corey chose to become a part of the infantry. His fellow soldiers can count on him to lead the way and keep everyone behind him safe. Corey is just like Silver in that they are both trusted. Their friends can depend on them to get the job done how it needs to be done. This is a very good quality to have for the rabbit’s journey and for war. In the book, when the rabbits need to go find some does, Hazel has a hard choice to make when deciding who will make the trip. He knows that he cannot go himself so he has to choose rabbits who are strong and can survive the long journey. He needs rabbits who will arrive in good shape to bring back the does. He finally decides on Silver, along with Buckthorn and Strawberry (Adams, 195).
When Corey’s platoon was moving from one army base in Iraq to another, Corey’s Commander chose him, along with a few others, to lead the way in the front Humvee. Corey’s Humvee was hit by an Improvised Explosive Device (IED). Corey was hit by a piece of shrapnel in his neck and has been going through extensive surgeries for the past month.
Both Silver and Corey possess a good quality. They are very protective of their friends. When Fiver tells Bigwig that the warren they are at in chapter 17 is dangerous and that it is too good to be true, Bigwig gets mad that Fiver is just saying that so everyone will follow him and turns back to go to the warren. Bigwig gets caught in a wire that the farmer has set out to catch the rabbits. Bigwig is barely hanging on to life. Eventually the rabbits help Bigwig get out of the wire. When Silver and Hazel are walking away to leave, Strawberry comes up to them to ask if he can come along. Silver is very sharp with Hazel and says “We don’t care for creatures who deceive us” (Adams, 118). Finally, Hazel realizes that Strawberry doesn’t mean any harm and invites him along with them (Adams, 118).
Recently, Corey was presented the Purple Heart award in a very touching ceremony. Some of his friends and fellow soldiers talked about what a great person Corey is. One person told a story about a bitter cold, snowy night in Afghanistan last year. Corey’s commander asked him to spend a few hours of the night on the roof looking out for any suspicious activity. He did as he was asked and when his time was paid and the next person came to take his place, Corey stayed up there with him for the rest of the night just for extra protection in case anything may have happened.
The similarities among Silver and Specialist Corey O’Connor are very interesting. They are both strong courageous men willing to go to the limits to help out their team. They don’t necessarily need to take charge; instead they follow the commands of their leaders to their fullest ability. Corey is a very special person to me and he is a wonderful friend as is Silver to the other rabbits. They are both looked at with great respect. Corey and Silver both encompass great qualities which make them who they are.


Works Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. 1972. New York: Scribner, 2005.

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Erin, thanks for posting this, but you didn't have to. The FINAL draft of reading response #1 will go in a different place on the English-Blog. Your final one will probably look a bit different from this one after it is peer-reviewed.

Posted by: Erin Rock at February 19, 2007 02:35 PM

Jaime Hersh
Professor Hobbs
ENGL 121
19 February 2007

Bluebell the Jokester

In Richard Adam’s, Watership Down, Bluebell is a character who is only mentioned briefly throughout most of the story. He does not have a large role in the story and does not do anything extremely important throughout the duration of the entire story. He enters the story about halfway through when he escapes with Holly from the warren which was about to be destroyed. Bluebell’s main purpose is to entertain the rabbits in the warren.

Bluebell is not extremely important to the story line. I believe his function in the story is to make all the rabbits in the warren laugh, because it takes their minds off of nerve-wracking things. For example at one point in the novel, Holly begins by saying,” If it hadn’t been for Bluebell’s jokes and chatter we’d have stopped running for certain.” Bluebell immediately comes back with a joke saying,”Hraka one end, jokes the other (165).” He also adds numbers to the warren. It would be impossible for the warren to exist with only three or four male rabbits, so I think some rabbits such as Bluebell were added to the story just so the warren realistically had a chance of survival. I do no think the reader’s understanding or enjoyment would be lessened without having Bluebell in the story. Now and then he tells a story or adds a funny line, but his existence in the story is not crucial to the plot or understanding of the story.

I believe that Bluebell is a flat character. His role in the story is not complex and often times I feel he is put in the story just to make Hazel or another round character look better. For instance, if every character in the story had an equally important part the story would not be as interesting and easy to follow. It is important to have some characters whose only purpose is to
lighten the mood.

Bluebell in this story reminds me of Dori in “Finding Nemo.” Dori does play a more popular and important role in “Finding Nemo,” but in some ways the characters remind me of one another. Dori’s main role in that film is to lighten the mood. While Marlin is going completely crazy trying to figure out where his son is, Dori is cracking a joke. She does not know the way to find Nemo or how long it will take, but she comes along for the ride. She follows Marlin to keep him company and to keep him upbeat, so he is able to make it through the entire trip. Bluebell is in many ways similar to Dori. He is not an overwhelmingly funny character nor is he a main character, but he supports the stronger more powerful rabbits in everything they do. Bluebell is able to tell a story to lighten the mood and does not have a stubborn personality so is able just to follow the lead of other more powerful rabbits. For example, Holly tells the story of how he and Bluebell escaped. Bluebell simply chimes in to add to the story, but does not have a role in explaining and educating all of the other rabbits about what happened (160). If all the rabbits in the story had extremely strong personalities, they would all clash and fight all the time.

I would not say my character is a stock character, because he does not fit a particular mold. He has only a few lines, but that is not because he is shy or timid. If Bluebell was a shy character, he would fit the mold and be a stock character. However in this story, I think he is just a character who is not of utmost importance to the overall novel.

Bluebell’s job in the story is to tell stories to take the other rabbits’ minds off from things that are not so pleasant. For instance as soon as Bluebell begins to speak, Hazel tells him not to make a joke (168). Bluebell often makes jokes out of serious things and is therefore very good changing the mood when the rabbits are feeling worried or very tired. He was placed in the story to ensure the survival of Holly. Holly and Bluebell would not have made it to Watership Down
without each other. Holly lead Bluebell and Bluebell kept Holly laughing and able to move on.

In conclusion, Bluebell’s main purpose in the novel is to bring comic relief to the story. Although he is not extremely crucial to the novel, his character makes the novel more enjoyable. I think he definitely adds to the story and makes it easier to read. It is nice to have someone like Bluebell who is not as serious as all of the other characters to break up the monotony.


Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Rex Collings,Ltd., 1972.

Posted by: Jaime H. at February 19, 2007 02:40 PM

NOTE: A hardcopy of this revised version is now due Monday in class. Paper-clipped to this revised hardcopy should be the hardcopy of your version from today with the peer-review sheet stapled to it. This will all count for the paper score. Your paper will be graded according to the same standard as the rubric you used today: a point deducted for each shortcoming (Note: these paper scores will NOT be displayed on the Turnitin.com grade book)

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19 February 2007

Class,

This is where your formal reading response #1 goes (the final, revised version - the one you prepared AFTER correcting/revising the draft you brought in to class today for a peer review). Don't forget that the latest version should ALSO be submitted to Turnitin.com in the folder I've provided.

A few items of news here: (1.) textbooks, (2.) info for those who missed class today (3.) DDS sign-up sheet.

There have been some issues regarding the class texts so I investigated after class today by paying visits to both college bookstores, The College Store and The Co-Op Store. Both looked on their computers and checked the shelves and verified for me that they both do, in fact, have copies of all the required books for ENGL 121.003 still on their shelves. The Co-Op doesn’t ship theirs back until Spring Break so everyone still has a chance to get the books (so, no excuses). If you are waiting for an issue through some other venue, for example the PALCI service at Stapleton Library, you might want to check the return policy of books from the two on-campus stores. Perhaps if you don’t write in them you could return them in a week or so? Don’t take my word for it, call the places for yourselves and check the policies.

Included as attachments in a group e-mail I just sent to the entire class are a copy of the rubric we used in class today and the homework for the weekend (also reprinted below).

NOTE: If you were ABSENT, you’ll NEED this information to do the assignments correctly. You may have someone else do your peer review for you, but you still need to hand in your peer reviewed version along with your finalized version.

Also, if you were absent, you also missed the chance to sign up for a day to present on the DDS readings, which are coming up shortly. You’ll need to sign that list on Monday. See the attachment in that class e-mail I just referred to for the openings still available. I may or may not remind you to sign the sheet Monday depending on what we do: it will be YOUR responsibility to get signed up. This is for one of your participation grades.

Homework:

(Part 1) Read the scheduled Coursepack articles and the beginnings and up to page 74 of The Diary of Dawid Sierakowiak (DDS).

(Part 2) Staple the peer-review sheet that your partner filled in today to the top of your reading response. Correct Reading Response # 1 according to the comments you received during the peer-review session today. Post the corrected/revised version on Turnitin.com AND the English-Blog this weekend. This will count for a class participation score (only).

NOTE: A hardcopy of this revised version is now due Monday in class. Paper-clipped to this revised hardcopy should be the hardcopy of your version from today with the peer-review sheet stapled to it. This will all count for the paper score. Your paper will be graded according to the same standard as the rubric you used today: a point deducted for each shortcoming (Note: these paper scores will NOT be displayed on the Turnitin.com grade book)

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*NOTE* The deadline for this assignment has now passed. Comments are no longer being accepted for this exercise

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at April 4, 2007 05:09 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
24 October 2014

“The Lapine plural suffix ‘il,' rather than the English suffix, 's,' was used to help to emphasize that Lapine was a different language."

(Introduction: Watership Down, page XIV, par. 3)


Question: What is the “Lapine” language? Why did the writer create it?

Answer: The author says, “The rabbit language, ‘Lapine,' was invented word by word in the course of writing” (Adams, XIV). Adams created the language to account for words that rabbits would often use that humans would not. “For example, ‘going above ground to feed’ is a phase hardly needed by human beings. But rabbits would need a single word – a word they quite often needed to use, for example, silflay” (Adams, XIV).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 26, 2014 12:05 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
26 October 2014

“‘Not asleep, Silver?’ he said.”
“‘It’s too dangerous, Hazel,’ replied Silver. I’d like to sleep as much as anyone, but if we all sleep and something comes, who’s going to spot it?’” (Chapter 9: The Crow and the Beanfield, page 41, par. 7-8)

Question: Which character would agree with Silver? Explain your answer in your own words with use of quotes from the novel.

Answer: Fiver would agree with Silver because he at first was careful about this badness coming from the beginning, ever since he first had that dream. In the second chapter, Hazel woke up to Fiver hitting him while Fiver was asleep. Fiver was having a nightmare that something bad was coming to the warren, and he heard Hazel say, “Swim-everybody swim (Adams 9).” Fiver wanted him and his brother Hazel to leave the warren and now that the rumor has spread to other residents in the warren, some are getting cautious as well.


Work Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. Markham, Ont.: Penguin Canada, 1972. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 26, 2014 04:14 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
26 October 2014

“Hazel and his companions had spent the night doing everything that came unnaturally to them, and this is for the first time. They had been moving in a group, or trying to: actually, they had straggled widely at times. They had been trying to maintain a steady pace, between hopping and running, and it had come hard. (Chapter 5, Adams 24-25)”

Question 24-25: Why did Hazel and his companions was moving from place to place? How did Hazel try make the rabbits feel relax?

Answer:
The rabbits were moving from place to place in a “steady pace.” Hazel guides them on a safe journey. The rabbits were under “anxiety,” and they were very exhausted. They were “terrified…so they sit and watch their enemies—weasels or humans—approach to take their lives.” Hazel told Dandelion to tell them a story. (Adams, Pgs. 24-25)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 26, 2014 10:20 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 October 2014

“Oh Hazel, look! The field! It’s covered in blood!”(Chapter 1, pg. 7, par. 5, Adams).

Question: What was Fiver looking at when he said this? Why was he so on edge?

Answer: Fiver was seeing a red sunset. Fiver was on edge because he has a feeling that something bad is coming and they need to leave the warren. This is why he was paranoid and overreacting about a lot of things.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 26, 2014 10:21 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
26 October 2014

“[…] I know we ought to be looking for-a high, lonely place with dry soil, where rabbits can see and hear all round and men hardly ever come. Wouldn’t that be worth the journey?” (Adams 36)

Question: What are the rabbits trying to get away from by going on this journey and finding a new place to live?

Answer: The rabbits are relocating themselves to a different area to live because Fiver and Hazel found a sign in their warren which was saying that a new house development would be built right on top of their warren, making their home no longer their own. “Oh Hazel! This is where it comes from! I know now- something very bad! Some terrible thing-coming closer and closer.’ He began to whimper with fear. ‘What sort of thing-what do you mean? I thought you said there was no danger?’ ‘I don’t know what it is,’ answered Fiver wretchedly. ‘There isn’t any danger here, at this moment. But it’s coming-it’s coming.” (Adams 7)

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at October 26, 2014 10:25 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL JOURNEYS INTO NARRATIVE
27 October 2014

“Quick Hazel don’t wait Come on and bring Pipkin It was Blackberry who bullied the stupefied Pipkin to his feet and forced him to limp the few yards to the gravel spit.” (Chapter 8 Adams 37)
What happened for this Conversation to take place?
Previously “looking around for blackberry he sat that he had left him and was up top of the pool, where the narrow beach tailed away into gravel spit.” (Adams 37)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 27, 2014 12:04 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
27 October 2014

“Hazel moved close to Fiver and quietly edged him away from the others, feeding as he went. When they were a little way off, and half concealed by a patch of reeds, he said, “Are you sure we’ve got to cross the river, Fiver? What about going along the bank one way or the other?” (Chapter 8, page 34, par. 1).

QUESTION: Why did Hazel suggest another way of getting to the other side? What was he concerned about?

ANSWER: Hazel was aware that the others did not want to cross the river even though Fiver told him that they did have to. Blackberry made Bigwig swim across first to make sure it was safe. They all eventually made it across safely. Hazel was just concerned about the others not wanting to cross the river but they did not have any other choice with Fiver.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at October 27, 2014 08:33 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
27 October 2014

“‘Hazel—the danger, the bad thing. It hasn’t gone away. It’s here—all round us. Don’t tell me to forget about it and go to sleep. We’ve got to go away before it’s too late.”
(Chapter 2, pg. 9, par. 2)

Question:
How do the scenes preceding this scene fall into Phase One of the Hero’s Journey?

Answer:
Between Fiver’s vision on in the field and the prophetic dream Fiver encounters that night, Hazel the protagonist and hero of the story goes through his Call to Adventure and Refusal of the Call. Fiver, the herald for change, claims a great danger approaching their warren. “‘But it’s coming—it’s coming. Oh Hazel, look! The field! It’s covered with blood!’” (Adams 7) However, Hazel ignores the danger claiming nonsense to the vision and forces Fiver to return to the warren, refusing the call to adventure Fiver proposed. However, according to Vogler, like in many stories a second call to adventure occurs. After Fiver’s dream, which serves as the second call to adventure, Hazel gives in and takes Fiver to see the Chief Rabbit, somewhat unknowingly accepting his grand call to adventure.

Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 27, 2014 08:34 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27, October 2014

Question: Who persuades the rabbits to come? What does he say they need more of? Who will get mad if actions are found out? (pg15 ch3)

Answer: the person that persuades Bigwig is the Fiver. He has a conversation with the one rabbit to join him on his adventure and told him his reason of needing him. The rabbit pointed out a few bad things in Owsla that he wouldn’t mind leaving. They say they need more rabbits and that with the help of him they can have a group to embark on the journey. Rabbit replies, “I think there are one or two in the owsla who might be worth sounding.”(Adams 15) The two people they fear for finding out is the Threarah and Captain Holly. (Adams 16) They were more worried about Fiver then any of the other guys.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 27, 2014 09:04 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 October 2014

""Fiver found it, Toadfax," said Hazel. "And we'll eat it," replied toadfax"" (Adams 5).

Question- Pages 5-6:
Why were Hazel and Fiver not allowed to enjoy the cowslip that they found?

Answer:
The Owsla takes all of the cowslips in the Warren. "Cowslips are for the Owsla- don't you know that? If you don't, we can easily teach you"(Adams 5).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at October 27, 2014 09:36 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
27 October 2014

“His paws were half buried in the wet gravel and he was nosing at something large and flat on the waterline. It looked like a piece of wood.” (Chapter 8, page 34, para 23)

Question:
As the characters continue on their journey they are faced with an obstacle obstructing their path. (A.) What obstructs there path? (B.) Who comes up with a solution to their problem?

Answer:
The characters come upon a river, which Bigwig swims through with ease. However, most of them are exhausted from their trek, as well as the injured that just cannot make the swim.

Matters only worsen when they realize “a large dog loose in the woods” (Adams 33). The looming terror of the dog causes a rift in the decisions of what to do between Hazel and Bigwig. As Bigwig suggests “those who can swim, swim” (Adams 34). Those who are left “will have to stay here and hope for the best” (Adams 34). On the other hand, Hazel refusing to leave Fiver or Pipkin behind, chooses to stay and wait.

The “cleverest rabbit among them”, Blackberry, comes up with the idea. The plan is to put Pipkin and Fiver on “a piece of flat wood” (Adams 34), that would serve as a raft across the river for them.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 27, 2014 10:08 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
27 October 2014

“Time passed. They crouched in silence while the moon shadows moved northward in the grass.” (Page 18, par 4)

Question: This passage comes from when the rabbits are waiting for Blackberry to arrive. Why do the rabbits seem calm even though the threat of danger is imminent and their friend hasn’t arrived yet?

Answer: Upon preparation for Fiver and Hazel’s journey, they decide to meet at night to embark on their mission. Fiver, Hazel, and their friend Pipkin all arrive at the ditch, but their friend Blackberry has not shown up yet. The reason they do not get tense and upset about their friend’s tardiness is that “rabbits, of course, have no idea of precise time or of punctuality.” (Adams 16). They usually take a while to join together to accomplish things since they never know when exactly they should meet one another. They did not inform the other rabbits of any specific time, just saying “tonight”, so they must wait a while to see if there are any rabbits, like Blackberry, who will arrive later than they did.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 27, 2014 10:13 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
17 October 2014

Question pages 35-36:
When the rabbits stopped at come to stop for a rest from escaping the warren Hazel asked Pipkin to tell a story to the group. Why did Pipkin ask him to do this?

Answer:
Pipkin wanted to keep the other rabbit’s minds of any looming danger. He felt that “if they lay brooding, unable to feed or go underground, all their troubles would come crowding into their hearts, their fears would mount and they might very likely scatter, or even try to return to the warren (Adams 35).” He is trying to keep the group together, and not let them get too distracted or worried about their situation.

Posted by: James Sierra at October 27, 2014 11:40 AM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- Journeys in a Narrative CA01
24 October, 2014

“Do you remember me, Hazel? We were in the same burrow during the snow last winter. Dandelion told me you were going to be leaving the warren tonight. If you are, I’ll come with you” (Adams 17).

Question:
Why did Hazel not want Hawkbit to leave the warren along with the group. Why did he let him join?

Answer:
Hazel believed that he was not a bright rabbit. He quoted in the story that he was a rather slow, stupid rabbit. He let him join the group because he knew he was running out of time and he did not have time to pick and choose who was and wasn't allowed to join.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at October 27, 2014 07:11 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 27 2014


"I know. But what I'm trying to explain is that at night the hrududil have great
lights, brighter than Frith himself. They draw creatures toward them, and if they
shine on you, you can't see or think which way to go. Then the hrududu is quite
likely to crush you. At least, that's what we were taught in the Owsla. I don't
intend to try it."


Question Pg. 48-49:


What is the “Hrududil” that the rabbit is talking about in this quote?


Answer:


The Hrududil in the story is a car, and the rabbits are at a blacktop road that acts as a sort of crossroads for the party. What Bigwig is describing in the quote is how the cars are only dangerous at night when the lights put animals into a trance. The rabbits do not identify the hrududil as an enemy however and cross the road quickly before the sun sets and danger arise.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 27, 2014 10:50 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
27 October 2014

“In a short time one returned with his beak full, and they could hear the nestlings squeaking as he flew out of sight beneath their feet. The bank did not extend far in either direction. Upstream, it sloped down to a grassy path between the trees and the water” (Adams, 33)

QUESTION:
(a.) How did Hazel feel towards the other rabbits? (b.) Why were they trying to cross the river?

ANSWER:
Hazel knows that the other rabbits may not want to cross the river, but Fiver tells them that they must cross the river. The rabbits needed to cross the river to make sure that it was safe enough to go to the other side.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at October 28, 2014 12:02 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
20 October 2014

“The run was broad, smooth and dry. It was obviously a highway, for other runs branched off it in all directions. The rabbits in front went fast and Hazel had little time to sniff about as he followed.” (Chapter 13, page 72, par.2)

QUESTION:
How did they end up in a “highway” and where did they end up afterward?

ANSWER:
While the rabbits were in the field trying to dig holes there was a rabbit observing them. This rabbit was big and his name was Cowslip. Cowslip invited them to his warren; however, he left because it was going to rain. They all eventually decide to go to Cowslip’s warren even though Fiver was iffy about it. Hazel guided them and they eventually ended up in Cowslip’s warren.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at October 28, 2014 02:49 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
29 October 2014

“We’ve been looking for you,” said Hazel. “Where in the world have you been?” (Chapter 18, pg. 128, par 3-4)

Question: What did Hawkbit find when he wandered off? Was it useful?

Answer: Hawkbit found three abandon rabbit holes. They were rough and short, but there was no smell of death or disease, so it’s a good place for their warren to spend the night (Adams 128).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at October 28, 2014 07:44 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
28 October 2014

“What’s your idea, then?” asked Hazel, half interested and half reluctant. Do you want us to try turn these holes into a regular warren?” (Chapter 19, Adams, 132-133)

Question: In this passage, what is the significance of this quote? Did the rabbits dig holes or warren?

Answer: The significance of this quoted is that the rabbits need a place to sleep and to be safe. Hazel feel that the “holes won’t do. It’s easy to see why they’ve been deserted. Only a little way down and you come to this hard white stuff that no can dig.” The rabbits do not know how to dig holes for their habitat. “We ought to do our best to make some holes here.” The rabbits start to dig some holes for their habitat. (Adams, Pgs. 132-133)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 28, 2014 08:09 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
28 October 2014

“‘Blackberry,” said Hazel, ‘what did you think of our visitor and how would you like to go to his warren?’” (Chapter 12: The Stranger in the Field, page 15, par. 66)

Question: How did Blackberry respond to Hazel’s question about the visitor? Does Blackberry sound reasonable? Explain.

Answer:Blackberry responds to Hazel’s question very cautiously. He was very reasonable because he was stating a question to think about for the reader. This situation with Blackberry and trusting someone creates this question, if someone received a reason to believe someone else then why trust him in the beginning? In Blackberry’s words he says, “what I think is this. There’s no way of finding out whether he’s to be trusted except to try it. He seems friendly. But then, if a lot of rabbits were afraid of some newcomers and wanted to deceive them-they’d start-wouldn’t they?-by sending someone who was plausible (Adams 68)?”


Work Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. Markham, Ont.: Penguin Canada, 1972. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 28, 2014 11:22 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
29 October 2014

Pages 140-141

“Send Speedwell up the hill to the others and tell him to make it clear that no one is to come down. They couldn’t help and it would only add to the risk.” (Page 140 par 3)

Question: This quote is from Hazel when Captain Holly arrives and Hazel believes he is a danger to them. Why does Holly pose a threat to the rabbits?

Answer: Hazel knows that it is a huge risk to have this rabbit here because he arrives and smells of blood, which will surely attract predators. Hazel must get him to the top of the down as soon as possible to avoid any threats to them, and it is a tough journey but they are able to get to the top. “It took a long time to climb the hill…Holly was forced to stop several times and Hazel, full of fear, had hard work to suppress his impatience.” (Adams 141)

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 28, 2014 11:36 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation CA02
28 October 2014

“On the pasture nearby Hazel could see scattered, russet-and-orange-colored fragments, some with feathery light green foliage showing up against the darker grass”. (Adams, 85)

QUESTION:
What was being described in this section? What made Hazel and the other rabbits so fascinated?

ANSWER:
They were describing a carrot. Most of the other rabbits had no idea what it was, but Hazel had some sort of idea of the object. “They gave off a pungent, horsy smell, as if freshly cut” (Adams, 85). Hazel described how he has eaten several of carrots before. “Hazel had eaten various roots in his life, but only once before had he tasted carrot, when a cart horse had spilled a nose bag near the home warren. These were old carrots, some half eaten already by mice or fly” (Adams, 85)

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at October 29, 2014 12:35 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
28 October 2014

Question pages 60-61:
After the attack of the crow, the rabbits find shelter. Where did they find a safe place to rest?
Answer:
They found a hollow. They were covered by rows of beans, “securing them against hostile approach, roofing them over and covering their scent (Adams page 60).”

Posted by: James Sierra at October 29, 2014 01:15 AM

Abrar Nooh
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL
28 October 2014

“Bigwig came up. ‘I know it’s not owl time yet,’ he said, ‘but everyone’s so eager to hear you, Holly, that they want to go underground at once. Will that suit you?’” (Chapter 20, page 148)

Question: As Holly was getting ready to tell the story to the other rabbits about how he was able to return, Hazel was called by Speedwell because a visitor wanted to talk to him. Who was this visitor and what did he want to tell Hazel and why?

Answer: When Speedwell was looking or Haze, Speedwell said “’your –er—visitor—your mouse. He wants to speak to you.’” (Adams 149). Then later when Hazel went up the run to look for the mouse, the mouse was waiting for him to tell him “’But a what I like a say. You ‘elp a mouse. One time a mouse ‘elp a you. You want 'im ‘e come.’” (Adams 149). The mouse was just showing his gratitude to Hazel and was offering a payback favor since Hazel had previously saved the mouse’s life from a falcon. Hazel had advised the mouse to come down to one of their holes in order to prevent the mouse to be captured by this falcon. Now, Hazel had earned a favor that he could use in the future, and that would help his group of rabbits.

Posted by: Abrar Nooh at October 29, 2014 01:32 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
29 October 2014

“This is as safe as Fiver said it would be. Nothing can get near us with our knowing: that is as long as we can smell and see and hear?”
(Chapter 19, pg. 131, par. 6)

Question:
Though the rabbits believe that the down is safe, why does Blackberry express apprehensions towards the down to Hazel during their feeding?

Answer:
Though the down allows the rabbits to see far beyond their typical range, allowing them to have clear warning of any approaching enemies, the down lacks shelter. In the exchange between Hazel and Blackberry, admits that the place proves to be safe; however, he notes the place lacks shelter. “Not when we’re asleep: and we can’t see in the dark” (Adams 131). Given their experience between not having any holes for protection at night, facing creatures such as rats, or dealing with inadequate holes against nature, Blackberry remains insecure about feeling completely safe at their new perspective home in the down. In response to try to reassure Blackberry that this new home will stay safe, Hazel states that the holes, which were found, would suffice until other arrangements could be found. For without any protection, even in a seemingly safe environment would leave the rabbits out for easy prey. This reason causes Blackberry to have apprehensions about living in the down and feeling at home in the safe environment.

Work Cited:

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 29, 2014 08:17 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative CA01
29 October 2014

Question: Who or what was calling bigwig by name? How could any living creature in this place know his name? (ch19 pg138)

Answer: the noise that they heard was faint as they got closer they saw it was a rabbit. They could tell that this rabbit was in “its last stages of exhaustion, its back legs trailing behind its flattened rump as though paralyzed. They knew that this rabbit was once healthy like them. “ (Adams 138) As he approached the rabbit to get a closer look the rabbit “suddenly cried and wailed as though entertaining the thousand to come form every quarter to rid it of its misery too terrible to be borne. It was Captain Holly of the Sandleford Owsla.”(Adams 139)

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 29, 2014 08:59 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL JOURNEYS INTO NARRATIVE
29 October 2014

I don’t believe Hazel can fight said pipkin “Although they’re so big, they don’t seem like fighters to me. Not like bigwig and sliver”. Chapter 14 pg Adams 81
To who was hazel speaking with?
Hazel was speaking with Halo, “ you notice a lot don’t you hlao-roo?” ( Adams 81)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at October 29, 2014 09:34 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
29 October 2014

"There's something coming up the line of the hedge. An animal. Making a lot of noise, too"(Adams 136).

Question-Pages 136-137:
What did all of the characters fear was making the noise?

Answer:
They all feared that the Black Rabbit of Inle was making the noises. ""Your mother told you, didn't she?" "No!" cried Dandelion. "No! It's some bird-some rat -wounded-""(Adams 137). "The Black Rabbit of Inle, what else- in a place like this?" (Adams 137).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at October 29, 2014 09:37 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
29 October 2014


“Haven’t they told you? Apparently there’s flayrah to be had down the fields. Most of them go every day.” (Chapter 14: Like Trees in November, page 66, para 31, Watership Down 1972)


Question:
In Chapter 14 “Flayrah” is mentioned by the rabbits. Describe what “Flayrah” is and where the rabbits go to find it within this Chapter.

Answer:
According to the rabbits, flayrah is foods such as “lettuce or carrots” (Adams 66). Most know that rabbits often eat grass, but the idea of lettuce or carrots would drive a rabbit crazy. Usually, most rabbits would “make an expedition or rob a garden” (Adams 66) for flayrah. However, “the flayrah’s were left in the field” (Adams 66) for the rabbit's picking. The rabbits would grip half a carrot in his mouth and carry it, like a dog, across the filled and back to the warren” (Adams 67).

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 29, 2014 09:47 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
October 29 2014

"If Fiver's horrors had kept him above ground all night in the rain, oblivious of cold and prowling elil, then clearly it was not going to be easy to talk him out of them." (Chapter 14, Page 89, Para. 83)

Question: Why is Hazel so intent on not believing Fiver? Could Fiver's fears be legitimate?

Answer: Hazel doesn't want to believe there could be something wrong with this warren, because he wants it to be safe. Whether Fiver's fears are correct or not, Hazel won't listen. There certainly is something quite odd about the rabbits in this new warren, and Fiver's comment that the "Roof of that hall is made with bones" (Adams 89) is quite foreboding of troubles to come.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 29, 2014 10:28 AM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
29 OCT 2014

“ Then Sir Beaumanins… rode all that ever he might ride through marshes and fields and great dales, that many times… he plunged over the head in deep mires, for he knew not the way, but took the gainest way in that woodness. … And at the last him happened to come to a fair green way” (Adams pg.54, paragraph 1)

Question:
(a.) What did Bigwig tell Hawkbit and Speedwell if they did not obey him?
Answer:
He told them that he would scratch them to pieces if they did not obey him and when Hawkbit asked who Chief Rabbit was, and Bigwig bit him. “There’s been a fear full row. Bigwig told Hawkbit and Speedwell that he would scratch them to pieces if they did not obey him. And when Hawkbit said he wanted to know who was Chief Rabbit, Bigwig bit him. It seems a nasty business. (Adams pg.54)

Posted by: redo- Matthew Basin at October 29, 2014 11:11 AM

Leroy Pianka
Claudia Pierre
Bryce Veller
Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
29 October 2014

Group 3
The Refusal of the Call

Answer:
The Hero Archetype in Watership Down is Hazel, who lives in the ordinary world at the Warren. He crosses into the special world, which is outside of his warren, to a new home. He crossed the first threshold after fighting the Owsla and leaving for a new home. The Refusal of the call happens when Hazel tells Fiver to stop crying. “Now stop it,” said Hazel firmly. “Just let me look after you for a bit. Whatever the trouble is, it’s time we got back.”” (Watership Down,7)

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at October 29, 2014 12:09 PM

Peter Bellini, Rebeccah Braun, Matt Basin, Thomas Meseroll
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 10 2014


5. Crossing the [First] Threshold for this Journey: Group Work


In Watership Down we, begin the story with the main character Hazel and his small companion Fiver living peacefully in their burrow at the Sandleford Warren. This peace does not last long as Fiver begins to have violent visions and decides to warn the warren that there is a great danger approaching. Hazel and his prophetic friend are denied and seen as a sham by the chief rabbit and decides against moving out of the warren. The pair remains undeterred as they go about convincing others to join them; this upsets the Owsla captain Holly, who confronts the growing group. Holly and his guards attempt to prevent the rebellious group from leaving the warren, but they are defeated by Bigwig. Now the path is cleared for the rabbits and allows them to leave their Ordinary World and enter the Special World of adventure.

Posted by: Peter Bellini, Rebeccah Braun, Matt Basin, Thomas Meseroll at October 29, 2014 12:43 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 29 2014


“The speed and force of the pounce, not a length away, were terrifying and Hazel leaped backward, knocking Silver off his balance. They picked themselves up in silence. "Like to try standing up to that one?" said Silver, looking round at Bigwig. "Let me know when. I’ll come and watch.” "Hazel," said Bigwig, "I know you're not stupid, but what did we get out of that? Are you going in for protecting every mole and shrew that can't get underground?" The mouse had not moved. It was still crouching a little inside the run, on a level with their heads and outlined against the light. Hazel could see it watching him. "Perhaps hawk not gone," he said. "You stay now. Go later."


Question Pg. 87-88:


What significance does both the rabbit and mouse share in the ecosystem?


Answer:


The mouse in many ways is similar to our rabbits in this story. The mouse is a helpless animal that has only cunning, trickery and burrowing and very much like the rabbits he has a thousand enemies. The Rabbits and Mice are both at the bottom of the food chain. This quote is a great example where we see Hazel reach out to his evolutionary cousin and protect him as he can relate to the mouse’s struggles. This scene in my mind bears some significance as it shows alliances forged between two different animals that are similar in the fact that they are somewhat helpless and rely purely on wit to survive.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at October 29, 2014 01:10 PM

Kendra, Summer, Abby, and Ashley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 22OCL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
29 October 2014

Group 2
CALL TO ADVENTURE
The Call to Adventure happened when Fiver had these premonitions. Fiver was having nightmares that something horrible is going to happen to the warren. Fiver stated, “The field! It’s covered with blood!” Fiver persuades Hazel to talk to the Chief Rabbit and try to convince the Chief to leave the outskirts, but he refuses to take acknowledge of the warning. (Adams, 7)

Posted by: Kendra, Summer, Abby, Ashley at October 29, 2014 09:00 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
29 October 2014

Question: In Chapter twenty-on pages 156-157, who did Holly, see and what did these people destroyed?

Answer: “There was a man with a gun who kept walking everywhere.” Holly saw a man with a gun. The man was filling in the holes and then was putting some poisonous gas into holes where the rabbits stay. Bluebell talks about the terror inside these holes where the rabbits lives. (Adams, 156-157)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at October 29, 2014 09:02 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 October 2014

“...-that’s the rabbit’s way” (Chapter 29: Return and Departure, page 256, par. 46)

Question: What is “the rabbit’s way”? Which character said this and why did he say it?

Answer: The rabbit’s way according to Hazel is “Let’s wait and see wait we decide-that is the rabbit’s way (Adams 256)”. Hazel says this because Bluebell was suggesting to General Woundwort that he should eat the grass, and Hazel got a little impatiently frustrated. Hazel was telling Bluebell forcibly to be quiet and was giving him a hard time. Bluebell replied with an apology if he offended him, but he was just trying to liven everyone up a little. He then threw logic into the mix by saying, “After all, most of us feel frightened at the idea of going to this place, and you can’t blame us, can you? It sounds horribly dangerous (Adams 256).”

Works Cited
Adams, Richard. 2005. Watership Down. New York: First Scribner.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at October 30, 2014 07:08 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
29 October 2014


“Human beings say, ‘It never rains but it pours.’”

(Ch 23. Keharr: Watership Down, page 178, par. 1)

Question: What is the rabbits’ version of this saying? What does it mean?

Answer: “One cloud feels lonely.” The rabbits use this saying because they believe that it “frequently does rain without pouring” (Adams, 178).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at October 30, 2014 07:33 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
30 OCT 2014

“ It drove in between us and the Efrafans like a thousand thunderstorms with lightning. I tell you, I was beyond being afraid. I couldn’t move. I don’t know what happened to the Efrafans.” (Adams pg 241, paragraph 34)

Question:
(a.) What did he think happen to the Efrafans and (b.) what did he mean by “it cut them down”, who is he talking about?

Answer:
He thought that the Efrafans either ran away or it cut them down. I think to what he was referring to the thunderstorms with the lightning cut them down. “ I don’t know what happened to the Efrafans: either they ran away or it cut them down. And suddenly it was gone, and we heard it disappearing” (Adams 241). “It drove in between us and the Efrafans like a thousand thunderstorms with lightning” (Adams 241).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at October 30, 2014 07:50 PM

Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
31 October 2014

“Fiver looked down at the water and twitched his ears. ‘We shall have to cross it,’ he said. ‘But I don't think I can swim, Hazel. I'm worn out, and Pipkin's a good deal worse than I am.’” (Chapter 7, Page 31, Par. 8)

Question: Fiver and Pipkin are in bad shape and most of the rabbit crew are reluctant to cross the river. What forces the rabbits to cross and how do they get Fiver and Pipkin across?

Answer: Bigwig spots a large dog in a large dog in a clearing near where the rabbits were staying. They are forced to cross from fear of being attacked. The rabbits find a piece of wood and Blackberry says, “It must have drifted down the river. So it floats. We could put Fiver and Pipkin on it and make it float again,” (37). The rabbits swim across while Bigwig pushes the piece of wood with Fiver and Pipkin on top.

Posted by: Joanna Ozog at October 31, 2014 12:01 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
30 October 2014
“There was no harm in it…The source must be close by” (Adams 40)
QUESTION:
Hazel is the protagonist of the story. (a) Does he determine what happens in the smaller group of rabbits? (b) To what extent is his leadership viewed as?
ANSWER:
Hazel although the protagonist, he has a very co- dependent relationship with his brother, Fiver, who acts as spiritual aid (a prophet). “Are you sure we need…come” (Adams 34), Fiver instructs Hazel that the group has to cross the river, although this command came from Fiver Hazel executed the act by stating the time at which they were to cross. However, due to complications they had to cross earlier. Illustrating Hazel’s leadership as a democracy that works towards the betterment and sustainability of the group in comparison to the tyranny of the chief rabbit Threarah “A bad danger…bitten off” (Adams 11-12).

Posted by: Ashlee English at October 31, 2014 01:24 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
31 October 2014

“‘I shall never know how I got away with what I did. It was a chance in a thousand.’”
(Chapter 20, pg. 154-155, par. 5)

In the account of Bluebell’s escape, how did he, of all rabbits in the warren, escape the death of the poisonous air?

After nearly escaping out of one of the runs with the bramble machine in it, Bluebell by the guidance of Frith, turned around and went back into the warren. This first decision to turn back into the warren saved his life for Bluebell would have met death in the hands of the men for sure. Now back in the warren, Bluebell escaped down the “Slack Run,” in which besides the dead body of Celandine, faced no major obstacles during the escape. “Hardly a rabbit went down there in [their] lifetime,” meaning the Slack Run did not serve as an escape route for the rabbits. Then encountering Pimpernel, Bluebell and Pimpernel escaped into the cover of woods hidden from man. If not for the guidance of Frith to send Bluebell down into the Slack Run, Bluebell surely would have died in the warren with everyone else. (Adams 155)

Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at October 31, 2014 07:49 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
31 October 2014

Pages 167-168

“But I am afraid I have to tell you, El-ahrairah, that I have strict orders from Lord Frith himelf not to allow you to share a hole with Rabscuttle.” (Page 167, Par 2)

Question: Why does Prince Rainbow not allow El-ahrairah to live in the hole with Rabscuttle?

Answer: Prince Rainbow is aware of El-ahrairah and how he works, so he does not want him to move in with Rabscuttle. Instead, he makes him live with a rabbit named Hufsa, intending to put him back in his place. “This is Hufsa. I want you to be his friend and look after him.” (Adams 167) This quote is from when Prince Rainbow informs El-ahrairah of living with Hufsa, and this is his disguise. Hufsa will actually turn out to inform Prince Rainbow of all of El-ahrairah’s plans without him knowing. Eventually El-ahrairah is able to fool Hufsa and get back at Prince Rainbow by taking his carrots.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at October 31, 2014 10:15 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative CA01
29 October 2014

question: What was not taken for granted by the rabbits that most humans and other animals lack utilizing?(adams165)

Answer: They believed that the moon was powerful and that moonlight can not be taken for granted.(adams165) They compare moonlight to snow falling or the dew on the grass in the early summer morning. They compare the intensity of the day to the night and how it is very low intensity is at night. It gives you a feel that there is something added to the down to make it feel such a way. Moreover a few moments late Silver proclaims, “what a moon!” “Let's enjoy it while its here”(Adams 165)

Posted by: aaron Virelli at October 31, 2014 10:22 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
October 31 2014

"There, Hazel-rah...there's that wood that Holly didn't like." (Chapter 30, Page 263, Par.6)

Q: The fear of forests and woods is a consistent theme throughout this story, why is it so prominent? What might this represent?

A: Forests and woodlands are a scary, unknown place for the rabbits. They are full of dangerous creatures and darkness that could prove fatal. The forest, and the fear of it, could be a representation of change, of unknown things that are strange and scary, but not always bad. There are times in this tale when going through forests has saved the rabbits (Adams 21), just like sometimes attempting new, strange things in life leads to a beneficial outcome.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at October 31, 2014 10:36 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
31 October 2014

“Hazel felt at a loss. What exactly was he to understand from this? Kehaar was not a rabbit. Whatever the Big Water was like, it must be worse than this and Kehaar was used to it.” (Chapter 39: The Bridges, page 252, paragraph 2)


Question:
Although, Kehaar is an ally of Hazel and the other rabbits, why does Hazel hesitate to trust him? Explain Hazel’s reasoning behind this?

Answer:
Hazel lack of trust in Kehaar was because Kehaar despised them for “timid, helpless, stay-at-home creatures who could not fly” (Adams 252). Hazel assumed that Kehaar just wanted them to hurry along as “he was often impatient” (Adams 252), not caring what happened Hazel and the others.
Hazel contemplates whether Kehaar saw “there was slack water immediately below the bridge…where they could get out easily” (Adams 252). Although, Hazel believes that what Kehaar meant was “they had better hurry up and take a chance” (Adams 252). Even if one of them jumped out the boat into the fast current “what would that tell the others, if he did not come back?” (Adams 252). The numerous scenarios ran through Hazel’s mind, which made trusting Kehaar’s words that “Ees goot-you get out fine” (Adams 251) that much harder to accept.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 31, 2014 10:56 AM

Sharrad Forbes, Jacob Gates, Olivia Ago-Stallworth, Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
October 31 2014

Question:
Meeting with the Mentor.

Answer:
Looking at the Departure Stages of the Monomyth’s Act/Phase for Watership Down, by Richard Adams, we notice that Hazel portrays the hero archetype in this story. His ordinary world, is in his warren of Sandleford, with a special world being the outside world or outside of Sandleford Warren. The chapter titled “Departure” most depicts the crossing of the first threshold between the two worlds as its name implies this very departure from Sandleford Warren to the outside world. In a meeting with the Mentor stage we saw that Chief Threarah, the oldest rabbit, best fit this description. Although, Threarah dismissed Hazels’ and Fiver’s warning of the inevitable destruction of the warren, he still served the purpose of the old, wise archetype.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at October 31, 2014 11:01 AM

Jazlynn Rosario, Maria Aguilera, Nuri Salahuddin, and Caitlin Christian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
31 October 2014

Group Question #2: Call to Adventure of this Journey.

Answer: The call to adventure is when Fiver has a dream that bad things are soon going to happen.

Posted by: Jazlynn Rosario at October 31, 2014 11:51 AM

Abrar Nooh

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL

31 October 2014

“’what was this idea you had—about the mouse? You said you’d explain it later. How about trying it out on us now?” (Chapter 22, page 163)

Question: Silver was trying to find out about Hazel’s idea to use the mouse to their advantage. Instead, mentioned that probably the mouse might not provide them much benefit. So, what is the real idea that Hazel wanted to propose and how he proposed to accomplish this?

Answer: In simple words, Hazel said – “the idea is simply that in our situation we can’t afford to waste anything that might do us good. We’re in a strange place we don’t know much about and we need friends” (Adams 163). Hazel meant to say that they could become friends with other creatures that were not their enemies, and they could possibly get some benefit. For example, a bird could provide them with information about the weather and about how to get around in the country. Hazel suggested that the best way to become friends with the other animals was by showing their benevolence to them by extending their help to any animals that were in need of help.

Posted by: abrar nooh at October 31, 2014 01:05 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
October 31, 2014


"Well, if you mean you can see trouble for me and not for any of the others, tell them and I'll leave it to them to decide whether I ought to keep out of it. But that's giving up a lot, Fiver, you know. Even with your word for it, someone's bound to think I'm afraid." "Well, I say it's not worth the risk, Hazel. Why not wait for Holly to come back? That's all we have to do." "I'll be snared if I wait for Holly. Can't you see that the very thing I want is to have these does here when he comes back?” (125-126)


Question Pg. # 249-250:


What significance does this side adventure have to the group of rabbits?


Answer:


Even with Holly setting out to the other rabbit warren for does, Hazel is still at the Honeycomb impatiently contemplating their situation. Earlier they had received news from Kehaar of two populations of rabbits one was the warren Holly, and his group went off to and the other is a farm with a rabbit enclosure. The potential for does and an established warren for generations to come eventually will outweigh the risk of potential death for the group of all-male rabbits. Once Hazel reached the conclusion that this mission was necessary for the greater good he and a small group of rabbits set off to free the farm rabbits.


http://lgdata.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/docs/797/1251540/Adams__Richard_-_Watership_Down.pdf

Posted by: Peter Bellini at November 1, 2014 02:15 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
1 November 2014

Question pages 240:
"Hazel," he asked, "what was this idea you had -- about the mouse? You said you'd explain it later. How about trying it out on us now?" What was the idea Hazel had?
Answer:
Hazel wanted to make friends with the mouse. He felt since the area was new to them, they could get information from the mouse to help them settle in. He states, “I think we ought to do all we can to make these creatures friendly. It might turn out to be well worth the trouble (Adams 240)."

Posted by: James Sierra at November 1, 2014 09:53 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
1 November 2014

Pages 348-350:
“The Council have the best of everything. But the Owsla have to keep very strong and tough. They take it in turn to do what they call Wide Patrol.” What is the purpose of the wide patrols?

Answer:
They do these patrols in order to gather information, and as part of their training to make them tougher and more cunning. While on patrols part of their duty is to bring back any hlessil (stray rabbits). If the hlessil refuse to come with them, they are to kill them “because they may attract the attention of men (Adams 350).”

Posted by: James Sierra at November 1, 2014 10:27 AM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL JOURNEYS INTO NARRATIVE
31 October 2014

Bigwig’s first impulse was to fight Woundwort on the spot. He realized immediately that this would be futile and would only bring the whole place round his ears. There was nothing to do but obey. (Chapter 37 Adams 336)
Question:F rom this quote straight from the passage, give evidence that bigwig is not really too fond of Woundwort too much
Bigwig did not respect bigwig, from this line in the passage here is evidence that he did not like him. “Yes sir replied Bigwig. He still disliked addressing Woundwort as sir but since he was supposed to be Efranfan officer, he could not very do otherwise.” (Adams 337)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at November 1, 2014 02:15 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 November 2014

“He turned away and Pipkin tried to follow him. Hazel remembered that Fiver had said he thought he was injured. Now, as he watched him limping and staggering up the slope, it occurred to him that he might actually be wounded in some way.”

Question: Pg. 38-39

Adams makes it very apparent that the characters within these two pages are having a difficult time struggling to survive. Adams describes injuries, doubt, and fear from the characters journey. Adams seems to ‘break character’ by portraying to the reader what type of setting the characters are in. Using quoted passage and reasoning, gather when Adams seems to show the reader the setting. In what ways may this help the reader be guided through this journey?

Answer:

Adams takes great detail to describe every momentous occasion that occurs for the rabbits. When Fiver is injured Adams understands it is important for the reader to grasp what sort of vulnerable setting the characters may be in. “As the plants moved in the breeze, the sunlight dappled and speckled back and forth over the brown soil, the white pebbles and weeds.” (Adams 38) Even with an injury among them Adams portrays Hazel as being surrounded by a calm environment. Knowing the setting for such a problem sets the mood for the reader’s journey through the many stages.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 1, 2014 10:39 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 November 2014

“After all, you might be afraid that we were coming to take your does or turn you out of your holes.”
Question: Pg. 58-59
Adams continually describes the weather and the setting to the readers. Adams also takes pride in portraying the feelings of all the rabbits. Throughout these two pages Adams describes the difficulties of the rabbit’s territories. From quoted passage show how Adams displays the battle between territories and why it is so important to the rabbits to have a sound territory.
Answer:
Adams shows within these two pages how shelter and a sense of comfort is important for the rabbits. Adams describes the history behind the rabbit’s holes, which make it important for each character, “The heavy work has all been done by countless great-grandmothers and their mates.” (Adams 59) Without this work done the rabbit’s would have no safety. This is mutually understood by each, “not one of Hazel’s rabbits had ever played any part in real digging.” (59) Adams portrays the resentment and need Hazel has towards the rabbits who take shelter for granted.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 1, 2014 10:40 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 November 2014

Question Pg. 230-231

Throughout the book, Adams details each character with roles. These roles seem to display the type of rabbit they are within the group. Within these two pages use quoted passage to defend whom the leaders are. If any other, roles are displayed, defend your argument.

Answer:

Adams seems to display Hazel as the leader within the group of rabbits, “Go, and tell all the others that we’re setting off at daybreak tomorrow.” (Adams 230) During this quote passage Hazel shows her power by sending orders from one rabbit to the next. I would also argue that Holly could be seen as a leader with power, “Holly will be Chief Rabbit here until we get back and Buckthorn, Strawberry, and the farm rabbits are to stay with him.” (231) This order is given from Hazel who can be portrayed as the top leader. Many other leaders within this group fall under Hazel and the controls which make up a sort of hierarchy.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 2, 2014 12:19 AM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 November 2014

Question pgs. 336-337:
Adams helps display fear and doubt in the characters journey by aiding to the readers senses. Throughout these two pages how does Adams use the characters sense to get the time sensitive intensity across. Use quoted passage to display the importance of the journey.
Answer:
“But the segment was so narrow that it was impossible to see exactly what lay on the other side of the bridge. The light was failing.” (Adams 336) Adams uses details to convey the characters five senses and uses suspense to gradually lead up to fear within the journey. “The hard, ringing noise from under the soffit, so much unlike any sound to be heard in an earth tunnel, was disturbing.” (336) Adams conveys the reader’s sense of hearing within this quote. Adams also makes the reader feel as though this journey is not taking the turns that the characters thought they would. This creates a sense of suspense for the readers within these pages.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 2, 2014 12:40 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 October 2014

“...-that’s the rabbit’s way” (Chapter 29: Return and Departure, page 256, par. 46)

Question: What is “the rabbit’s way”? Which character said this and why?


Answer: The rabbit’s way according to Hazel is “Let’s wait and see wait we decide-that is the rabbit’s way (Adams 256)”. Hazel says this because Bluebell was suggesting to General Woundwort that he should eat the grass and Hazel got a little frustrated at the current situation. Hazel was clarifying with Blueberry that they will wait because they have to decide on what their next move is on the mission.


Work Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. Markham, Ont.: Penguin Canada, 1972. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 2, 2014 03:30 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 November 2014

“He knew that Woundwort, with all the advantage of weight, would jump and try to close with him.” (Chapter 38: The Thunder Breaks, page 360, par. 104)

Question: In this part of the story, what does Bigwig rely on to win the fight against Woundwort and why?

Answer: Bigwig relies on his claws because since Woundwort has the weight advantage.


Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. Markham, Ont.: Penguin Canada, 1972. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 2, 2014 07:13 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
31 October 2014

“Oh, you’ve noticed that, too, have you ... out in time.” (Adams 91)

QUESTION:
How has Hazel’s group of rabbits adapt to the lifestyles of the new warren? How is Fiver in particular reacting to the actions of the group? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer

ANSWER:
In the novel, Watership Down by Richard Adams, the protagonist and his followers discover a new warren. Hazel realizing the pending dangers that this adventure would place upon his followers decides to join the newfound warren after Cowslip’s invitation and the almost unanimous agreement. However, this creates tension between Hazel and Fiver, “I think we … of talking?” (Adams 68) As initially, Fiver did not want to go. Contradicting Fiver’s skepticism, the remainder of the group and Hazel enjoyed themselves, and learnt how to ‘carry’, but had the underlying suspicions that something was amiss. Fiver in retaliation to Hazel not trusting his foresight slept above ground, “They found him… great burrow” (Adams 91) wary of impending doom.

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 2, 2014 07:49 PM

Matthew Basin
Eng. 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA 02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
2 Nov 2014

“The piers did not project, but against each lay a little accumulation of flotsam, from which driftweed and sticks continually broke away to be carried through the bridge” (Adams pg. 374 paragraph 26)

Question:
(a.) How does Hazel plan to get upstream and what methods does he try to go upstream by and (b.) what did the group come up with to as getting across the stream?

Answer:
He gets down by the side of the upstream and looks up it trying to figure out a way to get upstream. He saw that it was too far to jump to shore, and the banks were too steep for them. He then looked up at the brickwork but saw that it was not going to be climbable. “Hazel put his forpaws on the low side and looked gingerly over upstream. Immediately below, a shallow ripple spread all along the waterline, where the current met the woodwork. It was too far to jump to the shore, and both banks were steep. He turned and looked upward. The brickwork was sheer; with a projecting, course halfway between hi m and the parapet. There was no scrambling up that” (Adams pg. 374). The only possible way they would make it upstream is if they swam. “Of all the ways we could finish up, I never thought of this. It looks as though we’ll have to swim” (Adams pg. 374)

Posted by: Matthew Basin at November 2, 2014 08:27 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journey of Transformation in Narrative
1 November 2014

“Some people have the idea that rabbits spend a good deal of their time running away from….” (Adams, 282-283)

Question: What is the significance of this quote? Who were the rabbits and what were they running away from?

Answer: The rabbits were running away from foxes. The significance of this quote is that the rabbits “spent a good deal of their time running away from foxes.” The rabbits fear foxes. However, many rabbits go without seeing any rabbits, but a few be a victim to the rabbit. (Adams, 282-283)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at November 2, 2014 09:25 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
31 October 2014

“At last El-ahrairah felt quiet desperate…”

(Ch 31. The Story of El-ahrairah and the Black Rabbit of Inle: Watership Down, page 269, par. 4)

Question:
Why did El-ahrairah become desperate?

Answer:
“King Darzin got to know that he had been made a fool when he delivered his lettuces to the marshes of Kelfazin” (Adams, 268). The King “saw his chance to spite El’ahrairah”, and he captured Rabscuttle as made him his prisoner. “Every day he was brought out and made to work” (Adams, 268-269). However, Rabscuttle burrowed his way to El-ahrairah and they “slipped away” (Adams, 269). The King became furious, and he ordered his soldiers to attack the warden. However, “they couldn’t get down the rabbit holes” because the holes were narrow, yet they “didn’t go away: they sat outside and waited” (Adams, 269). The rabbits found that “all they could do to snatch a mouthful or two of grass – just enough to keep alive” (Adams, 269). El-ahrairah became desperate because his people were beginning to starve and become ill – “The rabbits began to become thin and miserable underground and some of them fell ill” (Adams, 269).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at November 3, 2014 03:07 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative CA01
29 October 2014

Question: why did they franticly run away not settling sooner for rest and food? (Adams 288-289)

Answer: they need to put space between them and Efrafa when they thought they had enough space Hazel said, “Come on, all of you, get down the field into that wood! Yes, you too, Speedwell, unless you want your ears chewed off in Efrafa. Come on, move.”( Adams 289) After, they run over the iron road, they find them self-hiding after a few Kehaar returned with news that Efrafa patrol had turned back.(Adams 289) Once hearing the good news they decide to camp there to get rest for the day to come.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at November 3, 2014 09:38 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 November 2014

"Rabbits are like human beings in many ways" (Adams 161).

Question- Pages 161-162:
Why, according to Mr. Lockley, are rabbits like humans?

Answer:
They possess the ability to withstand disaster and their goal, above any other, is survival. "One of these is certainly their staunch ability to withstand disaster and to let the stream of their life carry them along, past the reaches of terror and loss" (Adams 161). "A foraging wild creature, intent above all upon survival" (Adams 161).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at November 3, 2014 09:38 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
3 November 2014

“They crept beneath the twigs and leaves, settled themselves in the smooth, curved trough—which soon took on some of the warmth of their bodies—and slept at once.” (Chapter 39, page 381, par.2)

QUESTION:
Where were they now? What was it that they went through throughout the day that they were all so exhausted?

ANSWER:
They were now on safe land. They had to cross many bridges in order to be on “safe land” and it was definitely a challenge for them because they had to squeeze through a bridge, and then they had to swim underneath a bridge. They were finally on safe land and Blackavar noticed that they could walk to the other side so they all jump and are safe. They find a place to sleep and they all “slept at once” (Adams 381).

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at November 3, 2014 09:44 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 November 2014

Pages 290-291

“Bigwig woke some time ago and he and silver asked Kehaar to go. They didn’t want to disturb you.” (Pg. 291 par 4)

Question: Why does Hazel get upset that they went without him?

Answer: Hazel was “irritated” (Adams 291) with the two rabbits for not saying they were going. Mostly he felt that they were going and doing something that was dangerous and he would have liked to have been informed that they were going. “It would have been better to be told at once which way to go, rather than to wait while Kehaar looked for patrols.” (291) Now, Hazel has no choice but to anxiously wait for them to return and cannot do anything about it.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at November 3, 2014 09:44 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
3 November 2014

“For the first tune since he had attacked Bartsia he began to feel uncertain and troubled” (Chapter 38: The Thunder Breaks, page 358, par. 19)

Question:
Who is this quote describing? Describe the current situation of the character that makes them feel this way?

Answer:
The quote is from Bigwig during the escape from Efrafan. Bigwig, during the escape, notices that “there was no sign either of Hazel or Kehaar” (Adams 358) causing Bigwig to have doubts about his plan. He begins to think “some disaster had overtaken Hazel and the rest” or “they were dead” (Adams 358). Maybe, he and his group would “wander about the fields until the patrols hunted them down” (Adams 358), meeting the same fate as his friends. However, Bigwig tells himself “No, it shan’t come to that” (Adams 359), instead focusing on leading his group cross the river to safety.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at November 3, 2014 10:39 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
November 3 2014

"He did not feel the wound in his shoulder. The storm was his own. The storm would defeat Efrafa." (Chapter 38, Page 353, Par. 44)

Question: Why does this storm fill Bigwig with such confidence?

Answer: Bigwig sees the storm as an omen of his success. It is a natural entity full of power and destruction, and he feels as though it will instill him and the other rabbits with the strength to "defeat Efrafa" (Adams 353).

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at November 3, 2014 10:44 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
3 November 2014
Question (Page 56-57): What were the four rabbits staring at?
Answer: They were staring at a green field far beyond the gravel track. They finally reached the other side of the common.
Work Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan, 1974. Print.

Posted by: Anet Milian at November 3, 2014 11:51 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
3 November 2014
Question (Page 245-246): How did Kehaar detect the shotgun pellets in Hazel’s side and how did he remove them?
Answer: Kehaar detected the shotgun pellets by smell and removed them as if they were spiders.
Work Cited
Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan, 1974. Print.

Posted by: Anet Milian at November 3, 2014 11:52 AM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
24 October 2014

“I began improvising and started with the first thing that came into my head. “Once upon a time there were two rabbits, called Hazel and Fiver-“ (Introduction: Adams, page Xii).

Question: With reference to the quoted passage, how did Richard Adams obtain all his unique characteristics for each rabbit in the story “Watership Down?”

Answer: Richard Adams gathered many characteristics from various people he knew throughout his lifetime. With this, each rabbit presented in “Watership Down,” there are a combination of characteristics that distinguishes one rabbit from another. Adams says, “For some of the animals in the story, I took characteristics and features from real people I had met over the years, so that each rabbit had a distinct, individual personality” (Adams Xii).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 3, 2014 01:12 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
27 October 2014

“They had crossed more than half a mile of open pasture without a trace of cove, expecting every moment some attack that did not come” (Chapter 18: Adams, page 122).

Text source: “Watership Down,” By Richard Adams

Question: With reference to this passage, where and what were the clan of rabbits running from, what had attacked them that frightened them so much?

Answer: The rabbits were resting in an abandoned barn when rats suddenly attacked them. Buckthorn was bitten in the foreleg, which aroused all the other sleeping rabbits. Adams writes, “They had rested in the straw of a starveall, or lonely barn, and woken to find themselves attacked by rats” (Adams 122).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 3, 2014 01:14 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
29 October 2014

“I believe its starving said Hazel. “We’d better feed it. Bigwig, go and get some worms or something, there’s a good fellow” (Adams 181).

Text source: “Watership Down,” By Richard Adams

Question: According to the passage, what were the rabbits referring to and what did this creature look like?

Answer: The injured animal that the rabbits were going to help was a particular bird that they have never seen before. Adams writes, “The creature in the hollow was a bird- a big bird, nearly a foot long. Neither of them had ever seen bird like it before. The white part of its back, which they had glimpsed through the grass, was in fact only the shoulders and the neck. The lower back was light gray…”(Adams 180).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 3, 2014 01:15 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
31 October 2014

“For he was a rabbit, and yet more powerful than King Darzin a thousand times over” (Adams 270).

Text source: “Watership Down,” By Richard Adams

Question: What rabbit is the folktale referring too in the story told by the rabbits in “Watership Down,” and why did King Darzin fear this particular rabbit?

Answer: The rabbit that is more powerful and feared by King Darzin is the Black Rabbit of Inlé. Adams writes, “Now as you know, the Black Rabbit of Inlé is fear and everlasting darkness. He is a rabbit, but he is that cold, bad dream from which we can only…”(Adams 270). The black Rabbit was also said to bring sickness among other rabbits (Adams 270).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 3, 2014 01:15 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
3 November 2014

“The hole was deep now- deeper than Woundwort had expected and still there was no sign of fall. But all three rabbits could sense that not far below them there lay a hollow space” (Adams 431).

Text source: “Watership Down,” By Richard Adams

Question: With reference to the passage, why were they rabbits digging quickly into the ground and the others hiding around the area?

Answer: Thistle, one of the fellow rabbits sensed that there was an animal in one of their burrows. He believed that whatever was down there was a threat to the other rabbits and that they must prepare for the worst. Adams writes, “I give you my word, sir,” said Thistle querulously, “there’s some animal down there that is not a rabbit” (Adams 430).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 3, 2014 01:17 PM

Abrar Nooh

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL

03 November 2014

“He says there’s a vast place of water, going on and on. You can’t see the other side.” (Chapter 23, page 186)

Question: Bigwig was telling the other rabbits the story about the bird and where he came from. Where did this bird come from and why he was not with his flock? What was the benefit for the rabbits of having met this bird?

Answer: The bird came from the other side of the vast place of water where the world ends. That is the place where it breeds and where all of the birds of its kind spend the summer. Unfortunately, he was not back with the flock because he had been hurt earlier in the spring. Then, when it had gained enough strength to fly back, it encountered a mean cat that also hurt him leaving him incapable of returning to his home place (Adams 186). Having a bird as a friend would provide the rabbits with the benefit of searching the land much faster since the bird could travel faster and longer than the rabbits.

Posted by: abrar nooh at November 3, 2014 01:38 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 November 2014

“Dandelion leaped instinctively from the grass verge. If there had been a hole he would have made for it. For the briefest instant he looked up and down the gravel.” (Chapter 47, Adams 444)

Question: What caught dandelion attention across the field? What happen afterwards in this event?

Answer: “Then the dog was rushing upon him and he turned and made for the raised barn (444).” A dog caught Dandelion attention. He had not expected the dog to be so close behind him (444).” Dandelion takes off hopping as fast as he can while the dog chases behind him. Dandelion catches up with the other rabbits. However, the dog charges after the two rabbits. Woundwort stands his ground; however, wanted the others to do the same and try to fight back.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at November 3, 2014 08:23 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
31 October 2014
“Then I shall have to go alone. But what I’m asking you to do is to come and save Hazel’s life” (Adams 228)
QUESTION:
Is Fiver a dominant character in the story? What purpose does he serve in his role? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.
ANSWER:
Most characters in the novel due to his prophetic nature undermine Fiver. As such, it usually gets them into trouble; the stories of Sandleford warren being destroyed. In addition to characters, not listening to Fiver is his Hazel. Hazel assumes the role of Chief Rabbit believes he is invincible, “Risking your life…to sleep” (Adams 207). Fiver is not thought of a dominant character, however, slowly becomes so in the novel as he advises Hazel on which action are safest for the warren. Moreover, when his decrees are disregarded destruction usually follows, “Fiver…side by side” (Adams 224) as with Hazel.

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 3, 2014 08:38 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
3 November 2014

“Then at last El-ahrairah felt that his strength and courage were gone. He fell to the ground. He tried to move, but his back legs dragged along the rock and he could not get up. He scuffled and then lay still in the silence”
(Chapter 31, pg. 279, par. 4)

Question:
Why does the Black Rabbit finally seem to help El-ahrairah, even though his spirit broke under the pressure of his journey?

Answer:
The Black Rabbit claims states “‘this is a cold warren: a bad place for the living and no place at all for warm hearts and brave spirits.’” (Adams 279) Though El-ahrairah’s spirit broke, the Black Rabbit knew that he would not leave unless he found a way to save his people. Thus proclaiming El-ahrairah as “a nauisance,” he saves his people before El-ahrairah has time to leave the warren. (Adams 279) As part reward for his diligence and brave spirit, and partially to relieve himself of dealing with El-ahrairah, the Black Rabbit finally gives into El-ahrairah’s needs and saves his people for King Darzin.

Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at November 3, 2014 09:08 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 November 2014
“I thought you gave an order…in” (Adams 379)
QUESTION:
Does Hazel fit the criteria of Chief Rabbit? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer
ANSWER:
Based on Hazel’s former social caste in the Sandleford warren on would say that he would not meet the criteria of Chief Rabbit. In addition to this, he begins his adventure due to the prophecy of his brother Fiver. However, Hazel does fit the criteria of Chief Rabbit, as he does not abuse his power (the Threarah) and maintains his composure in times of distress, “Silver…had to do” (Adams 379). Moreover, he learns to listen to his fellow rabbits and friends “Good… trusted him” (Adams 378).

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 3, 2014 09:13 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL: On A Proverbial Road Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 November 2014

“Fiver crept up to the man’s boots and peered into the hole. It was circular, a cylinder of baked earthenware that disappeared vertically into the ground. He called, “Hazel! Hazel!” Far down in the hole, something moved and he was about to call again. Then the man bent down and hit him between his ears”. (Adams, 227)

QUESTION:
Who showed up and surprised Fiver? What was explained to Fiver? Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


ANSWER:
Blackberry showed up and surprised Fiver. Blackberry explained to Fiver that the roof has caved in, and there have been falls all over the warren today. He also explained to Fiver that the noise woke him up from a bad nightmare he seemed to be having. “There’ve been falls all over the warren today- it’s the heat” (Adams, 227).

Posted by: Claudia Piere at November 3, 2014 09:36 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL: On A Proverbial Road Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 November 2014

“He was just going down the new hole when he noticed that some small creature was pattering about in the grass. It was the mouse that he had saved from the kestrel. Pleased to see what he was still safe and sound, Hazel turned back to have a word with him. The mouse recognized him and sat up, washing his face with his front paws and chattering effusively”. (Adams, 407)

QUESTION:
What was the discussion between Hazel and the mouse? Use quoted passages from the text (with MLA parenthetical citations) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


ANSWER:
The discussion was the mouse informing Hazel on new rabbits and a new warren that was going to happen soon. Hazel did not believe anything the mouse was saying and did not appreciate all of the confusion. “I don’t know until you tell me. What did you mean about new rabbits and another warren soon?’ His tone was urgent and inquisitive” (Adams, 408)

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at November 3, 2014 09:57 PM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 October 2014

“El-ahrairah and his children and his children’s children come out of their holes and feed and play in his sight, for they are his friends and he has promised them that they can never be destroyed.”

Question:
The passage above is part of a story being told by dandelion. Why is dandelion telling this story?

ANSWER:
In the previous chapter, Hazel recognized that Pipken was not going to make it any further due to exhaustion. Hazel also realized that if they stayed in one spot without anything for a distraction that the fears would come creeping in naturally. “But if they lay brooding, unable to feed or go underground, all their troubles would come crowding into their hearts, their fears would mount and they might very likely scatter, or even try to return to the warren.”

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at November 4, 2014 05:29 PM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
01 November 2014

“It’s El-ahrairah,” said Strawberry. “A rabbit called Laburnum did it, some time ago now. We have others, but this is the best. Worth a visit, don’t you think?”

Question:
In the passage above, Strawberry has taken Hazel to see something that cause Hazel a great deal of confusion, what was it?

ANSWER:
The stones that create the shape confuse Hazel greatly and the rabbits in the new warren are very surprised that Hazel does not know about them. “It’s what we call a Shape,” explained Strawberry. “Haven’t you seen one before? The stones make the shape of El-ahrairah on the wall. Stealing the King’s lettuce. You know?”

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at November 4, 2014 05:52 PM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
04 November 2014

“‘Noble Fellow, said El-ahrairah. ‘ He has saved his master, Rabscuttle. He has saved us all. Let us go home and sleep sound in our burrow.”

Question: Who is the passage above referring to, and what did he save them from?

ANSWER:
The passage above is referring to Rowsby Woof. He has saved them from a terrible sickness spell. “‘The sickness works by a spell,’ said El-ahrairah. ‘But if a real dog of flesh and blood could run four times round the house, barking as loudly as he could, the spell would be broken…’ ”

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at November 4, 2014 06:06 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
5 November 2014
“The lame rabbit seemed about to reply, but Woundwort had already turned away and was explaining to Campion what he was to do.” (Chapter 43, page 421, par.4)

QUESTION:
What does Woundwort tell Hazel? What is he expecting to happen?

ANSWER:
Hazel told Woundwort about making a warren between Efrafa and the downs that would consist of rabbits from each warren; however, Woundwort was not very convinced by this idea. He considers it to a certain extent but he told Hazel that all the does, Blackavar, and Bigwig better be there waiting when he gets there or else he will kill them. “Since they’ve sent him to ask our terms, he’d better take them back. –Go and tell Thlayli that if the does aren’t waiting outside your warren, with him and Blackavar, by the time I get down there, I’ll tear the throat out of every buck in the place by ni-Frith tomorrow” (Adams 421).

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at November 4, 2014 06:49 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 November 2014

“Suddenly a terrible sound broke from Fiver; a sound at which every rabbit in the warren leaped in dreadful fear; a sound that no rabbit had ever made, that no rabbit had the power to make.”

(Ch 44. A Message from El-ahrairah: Watership Down, page 428, par. 3)


Question:
Why did Fiver make such a terrible sound?

Answer:
Fiver was “lying in a deep stupor” (Adams, 428). We can assume that Fiver went into a deep trance caused by his anxiety and fear as the Efrafans scratched at the Honeycomb. “…Hazel and his rabbits, below in the Honeycomb, heard the first sounds of scratching above” (Adams, 425).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at November 4, 2014 06:51 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
4 November 2014

“Nothing unusual happened the next day. There was a certain amount of talk about Fiver and the rabbits who’d gone with him” (Chapter 21, pg. 150, par. 2).

Question: Was Fivers’ bad feelings about the Sandleford Warren correct? Who returned and told them what happened at the Sandleford Warren?

Answer: Yes, many rabbits from Sandleford Warren were killed by humans. Fiver and his group did the right thing when they listened to Fiver and left the warren. Holly came back and told them what happened. He managed to survive the attack and followed their trail.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at November 4, 2014 07:12 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
4 November 2014

“A rabbit who does not know when a gift has made him safe is poorer than a slug, even though he may think otherwise himself” (Adams 281).

Question- Pages 280-282:
In the story, what gifts are given to El- ahrairah by Lord Frith?

Answer:
Lord Frith gives El- ahrairah a pair of ears, a tail, and some whiskers. “You may find the ears slightly strange at first. I put a little starlight in them, but it is really quite faint: not enough, I am sure, to give away a clever thief like you” (Adams 282).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at November 4, 2014 09:44 PM

Bryce Veller
ENG220CL- Journeys in Narratives
Dr.Hobbs
04 November 14
Fiver," he said, let me get this right. You want us to climb up this place, however far it is, and find shelter on the top. Is that it?" Yes, Hazel." But the top must be very high. I can't even see it from here. It'll be open
and cold. "Not in the ground: and the soil's so light that we shall be able to scratch
some shelter easily when we find the right place." Hazel considered again. It's getting started that bothers me. Here we are, all tired out. (Pg 410, Ph. 7)

Question: When Hazel said “here we are, all tired out” what does he really mean by this saying?
Answer: When Hazel had said that they were all tired out, he meant that they were all feeling the strain of prolonged insecurity and fear. That Rabbits above ground, unless they are in proved, familiar surroundings close to their holes, live in continual fear. If it grows intense enough they can become glazed and paralyzed by it tharn," to use their own word. That they need to find a secure place before the anxiety and paranoia sets in.

Posted by: Bryce Veller at November 4, 2014 09:46 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
4 November 2014

Pages 436-438:
Question:
Hazel was leery of crossing the bridge. What was it about crossing the bridge that worried him?

Answer:
Hazel was leery about crossing the bridge because it left the rabbits exposed. The bridge is described as, “there were only very narrow verges of short grass, offering no cover. His rabbits would be exposed to view and unable to bolt, except along the road (Adams 436).”

Posted by: James Sierra at November 4, 2014 11:12 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
November 4, 2014


“Bigwig’s going to need us as well as Kehaar.” “Well, you won’t be able to dash up to the arch,” said Fiver, “your leg. The best thing you can do is to get on the boat and have the rope gnawed half through by the time we come back. Silver can look after the fighting, if there’s going to be any.” Hazel hesitated. “But some of us are probably going to get hurt. I can’t stay behind.” “Fiver’s right,” said Blackberry. “You will have to wait on the boat, Hazel. We can’t risk your being left to be picked up by the Efrafans. Besides, it’s very important that the rope should be half gnawed–that’s a job for someone sensible. It mustn’t break too soon or we’re all finished.” It took them some time to persuade Hazel. When at last he agreed, he was still reluctant. (237-238 Ch. 38)


Question # 362-363:


What is the significance of Hazel, the chief having to stay back and gnaw the rope as opposed to being in the thick of the breakout?


Answer:


When the rabbits of Watership Down go to breakout, the does of Efrafa Hazel is missing from the breakout party and stays at the boat. Fiver eventually convinces Hazel that his leg is lame, and he would not make it back to the escape boat in time. They come to the conclusion that a “sensible” rabbit would need to stay back and gnaw the rope to ensure their escape. Hazel agrees with his comrades and stays back while they meet and guide Bigwig’s party into the boat where Hazel prepares for their final escape.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at November 4, 2014 11:15 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
November 4, 2014


“Above and underground, the rabbits fell naturally into a quiet, undisturbed rhythm of feeding, digging and sleeping. Several fresh runs and burrows were made. The does, who had never dug in their lives before, enjoyed the work. Both Hyzenthlay and Thethuthinnang told Hazel that they had had no idea how much of their frustration and unhappiness in Efrafa had been due simply to not being allowed to dig. Even Clover and Haystack found that they could manage pretty well and boasted that they would bear the warren’s first litters in burrows that they had dug themselves.” (264 Ch. 41)


Question # 394-396:


How does the natural undisturbed life change the female rabbits of Efrafa?


Answer:


The Efrafa warren was ridiculously overcrowded and provided a strange environment for the rabbits. This unnatural environment resulted in the does to experience miscarriages and their bodies re-absorbed the embryos for a more practical time. When Bigwig breaks out the does and brings them back to the honeycomb they begin to dig and “silflay” at leisure. This natural environment eventually produces in the does what the group of bucks had fought so hard for, kittens.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at November 4, 2014 11:15 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL JOURNEYS INTO NARRATIVE
5 November 2014

Woundwort had won almost every fight of his life by using his weight. Other rabbits could not stop him and once they get down they seldom get back up. He tried to push now, but his legs could get no purchase in the pile loosed, yielding soil behind him. (Chapter 46 Adams 442).
Question:From this excerpt from the story what was happening to woundart?
Woundart was feeling challenge and he was in a fake battle challenge, but he did not fear the challenge though. Woundart stood up. He could feel the blood running down the inside of his rear foreleg. The muscle was wounded. Are you all right sir asked Vervain behind him. Of course I’m all right fool said woundart follow me close.”( Adams 442)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at November 5, 2014 12:22 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 November 2014

“It was not long before they realized that the digging was going on at two points.” (Chapter 44: A Message from El-ahrairah, page 425, par. 11)

Question: What were the two points that came from the digging from above Hazel and his rabbits?

Answer: One of the two points that came from the excavation from above Hazel and his rabbits was “the north end of the Honeycomb (Adams 425).” The other point was near the center of the Honeycomb but coming from the south end, “where the hall broke up into bays and runs with columns of earth between (Adams 425).”

Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. Markham, Ont.: Penguin Canada, 1972. Print.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 5, 2014 02:20 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
5 November 2014

“Bigwig, utterly exhausted, lay where he was. After a few moments he tried to get up, but a faintness came over him and a feeling of turning over and over in a ditch of leaves” (Adams 449).

Question-Pages 449-451:
What part of the ordeal stage is represented in this scene?

Answer:
As Bigwig appears to die the other rabbits begin to mourn, which represents the witness to death section of the ordeal. “You are closer to death than I. You are closer to death than I” (Adams 449). Bigwig is then revived and the story continues. “”The wire!” squealed Bigwig. He jerked himself up and opened his eyes” (Adams 449).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at November 5, 2014 08:29 AM

Matthew Basin
Eng. 220CL- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA 02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
2 Nov 2014

“ And if he was not the chief Rabbit, then somewhere close by there must be another, stronger rabbit who was. A stronger rabbit than Thlayhi. Where was he? What was he doing at this moment?” (Adams pg.451 paragraph 20)

Question:
(a.) “Woundwort became aware that Thistle was no longer behind him”, where did Thistle go and (b.) what was the rabbits mission to do underground?

Answer:
Thistle went on a free run and took a couple of rabbits with him. “ Thistle’s gone up the free run. I thought you had sent him, or I’d have asked him what he was up to. One or two rabbits seem to have gone with him—I don’t know what for, I’m sure” (Adams 451). The rabbit's mission was to dig up the blocked gaps in the wall, so they were open. “ Every rabbit he had brought must be sent underground to dig and every blocked gap in the wall must be open” (Adams 451).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at November 5, 2014 08:48 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL journey in narrative CA01
5 November 2014

Question: The rabbits were waiting for what to pop up in the fields? And what come out in the bushes? (Adams 455) Who did Lucy start to find a liking to? Was this okay with her father?(Adams 457)

Answer: they are waiting for mushrooms to pop up in the field. You can tell how they look at the mushrooms by the first statement “the morning was fine. Would there be any mushrooms yet?”(Adams 455) They ponder on if it is worth the walk to the field to go see. They felt as if it was too dry and hot which wasn’t good mushroom weather. They compared the mushrooms to the blackberries saying that they both wanted some rain before they’d be any good. And on those nice damp mornings there would tend to be spiders big and black with white crosses on their back inhabiting the hedges.(Adams 455) You can tell that there is someone that Lucy has an eye for and that is the doctor I first saw this on page 455, the author wrote and if he had time he would stop and talk to her. This shows the importance to how she sees their relationship. As they were around each other more, she sees that in certain situations he talks to her as he would a grown up person. Although her father wasn’t excited about how Lucy and the doctor got started, but he know, his daughter was a “proper bright kid” The doctor had said a few statements assuring he actually enjoyed her presence. In turn putting, he father at ease.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at November 5, 2014 09:13 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
5 November 2014

“Campion’s suggestion was that they should simply starve the warren out.”
(Chapter 44, pg. 424, par. 1)

Question:
How does the Watership Down warren raid compare to El-ahrairah’s warren raid?

Answer:
Both warrens face grave difficulties and numbers greater than their own to fight against in the battle. General Woundwort, the equivalent of King Darzin, reached the Watership Down warren and seeking revenge for the chaos caused at his warren. “Whenever any of the rabbits tried to silflay they found their enemies ready to jump on them. King Darzin and his soldiers couldn’t watch all the holes—there were too many—but they were quick enough to dash off wherever they saw a rabbit show his nose.” (Adams 269) Like this scenario with King Darzin, in the account of “the Story of El-ahrairah and the Black Rabbit of Inle,” General Woundwort knew that the warren was too vast to siege the warren and reach all the rabbits effectively. Instead General Woundwort has the plan to digs holes into the middle of the warren and on the outskirts, hoping to trap the rabbits in the warren. Hazel and his rabbits, the equivalent of El-ahrairah’s warren, face the necessity to come up with a new trick to escape the Efrafans.

Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at November 5, 2014 10:07 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
5 November 2014

Pages 460-464

“That’s a good idea-let’s go and do it. And if he’ll believe you, Hazel-rah, then I will.” (Page 464 par 2)

Question: Why is bigwig so enticed with Hazel’s plans?

Answer: Bigwig just survived a great attack that nearly kills him. Upon him waking up and talking with Hazel, he asks him if his plan to get rid of the Efrafans has worked, and Hazel informs him that it did. “And you-your plan worked, Hazel-rah, did it?” (Adams 463) Hazel then goes off to tell of his story as to how this plan went down, and Bigwig wants to join him because he knows now that Hazel’s plans usually result in good things. He wants to go along with Hazel to see it come to fruition.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at November 5, 2014 10:13 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
5 November 2014

Crossing the floor in the dark, Hazel found himself beside another rabbit, who was crouching silently on the near side of the new-piled wall. He stopped, sniffing. It was Fiver.” (Chapter 44: A Message from El-ahrairah, pg 428-430, para 7)

Question:
Describe the mood of cave Hazel, Fiver and the rest are in. How does certain key words bring out this mood?

Answer:
The mood in this scene is eerie with the author continually expressing how dark it is. Through darkness you get the idea that there is an ominous presence. Also, Fiver expresses “how-how. How-how cold” (Adams 428) it is, alluding to this ominous presence of death. It is this feeling of impending doom from general Woundwort and the Efrafans that sets this melancholy mood. Expressed through “long silence” (Adams 428) and a “deep and utterly unnatural” (Adams 429) cry that left the rabbits uneasy and afraid.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at November 5, 2014 11:04 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 November 2014
“You weren’t put… no rabbit” (Adams 430)
QUESTION:
Compare General Woundwort’s strategy to that of Hazel-rah for battle preparation, who is the better leader? Why is this so? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.
ANSWER:
General Woundwort had a tragic life story and had the Efrafa to prove for it. Hazel-rah is a small rabbit who rose to greatness by listening to others. The difference between the two leaders is that one choses to rule with fear and the other with compassion respectively. General Woundwort is only using his member to exact revenge of a personal betrayal; therefore, many to his rabbits do not have a stake in the attack, “Why can’t we go home…to leave” (Adams 430-431). Hazel- rah, however, is preparing for the attack to protect his people, which he has a connection with, “Now, Blackberry… It all depends on you” (Adams 432). Hazel-rah reassures Blackberry although weary of the task ahead of him, indicative of what a good leader who is going into battle should do. In conclusion, Hazel-rah although inexperienced in battle makes a better leader than General Woundwort.

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 5, 2014 11:28 AM

Abrar Nooh

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL

05 November 2014


“’Let me alone!’ cried Vervain.‘ Let me go! Let me go!’” (Chapter 47, page 453)


Question: Vervain had received orders from Woundwort to kill the rabbit that they thought was dead, but as Vervain approached the rabbit something happened that destroyed his self-confidence. What events led Vervain to get so scared?


Answer: As Vervain approached the small rabbit, he realized that the rabbit was not scared of him. Instead, the rabbit made no movement whatsoever. Then the two rabbits stared at each other in the dim light and the small rabbit said “’I am sorry for you with all my heart. But you cannot blame us, for you came to kill us if you could’” (Adams 452). At this point, Vervain was totally confused about what was going on. Then the small rabbit continued talking and told Vervain that he was sorry for his death. The two rabbits kept staring at each other, and Vervain got full of fear, he felt unprotected and with a disadvantage even though Vervain was twice as big as the small rabbit. Furthermore, as this situation continued, Vervain started to hear the voices of other dead rabbits. At this point, Vervain begged for mercy and tried to escape as soon as he could (Adams 453).

Posted by: abrar nooh at November 5, 2014 12:52 PM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
06 November 2014


"Well where are we going to sleep?"said Silver. (Chapter 20,p 146)

Question
Where did Hazel and all the other rabbits sleep the night they were talking to BigWig?

Answer:
Hazel and the other rabbits including Silver slept in the Honeycomb, even though it was a rough-dug and not complete. Hazel said "it would probably be as comfortable as the holes under the thorn tree" (pg.146, par. 5).

Posted by: tashanna.harris at November 6, 2014 04:43 PM

Tashanna Harris
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
06 November 2014

"it may seem incredidible that the rabbits had given no thought to so vital a matter" (chapter 23, p 187)

Question:
Why does the author use the analogy that Rabbits are no different from man?

Answer:
The author says rabbits like men live close the death and when death comes closer, thinking of ways to survive leaves no room for them to think about other matters.

Posted by: tashanna harris at November 6, 2014 04:52 PM

Tashanna Harris
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
06 November 2014

"The other day he told me what a river looked like and said he'd seen it in a dream" (Chapter 50, pg 471)

Question:
What did the river represent in this dream?

Answer:
the river represented Fiver's blood according to Vilthuril. When Vilthuril told this to Hazel he was confused and did not understand the meaning. He questioned Vilthuril.

Posted by: tashanna harris at November 6, 2014 05:00 PM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
24 October 14

Question:
Which of the rabbits was/were told, “You’re under arrest.” by Holly? (Adams 20) What was the reason for the arrest/ arrests? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
Bigwig and Silver were told they were under arrest. Bigwig was under arrest for “spreading dissension and inciting mutiny.” (Adams 20) Silver was being apprehended for “failing to report to Toadflax this evening and causing your duty to devolve on a comrade.” (Adams 20)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at November 7, 2014 07:17 AM

Rebeccah Braun

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

26 October 2014


“Pipkin, who was lying on his left side, breathing quickly and heavily, rolled over and stretched out his front paw, underside turned upward” (Watership Down, Chapter 9, page 44, par. 26).

Question: Who is Pipkin showing his paw to and what was observed? What lead Pipkin to show off his paw?


Answer: The bunnies had been attacked by a crow and were running away; however Pipkin had a hard time running. When they got to safety Hazel offered to look at his paw and found a thorn in it. “You’ve got a big thorn in there, Hlao,” he said. “No wonder you couldn’t run. We’ll get it out,” (Adams, pg 44).

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at November 10, 2014 03:46 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
29 October 2014


“But are there any [does] on these hills? How do we find out? The wind never brings the least smell of rabbits” (Watership Down, Chapter 23, page 188, par. 111).

Question: What idea does Hazel come up with in order to find out if there are does in this warren?

Answer: Hazel suggest they use Kehaar, the bird, to search for them. “That bird could find out in a day what we couldn’t discover for ourselves in a thousand,” (Adams, 188). Bigwig is also going to talk to Kehaar, so he understands how important this task is for the bunnies, to make him cooperate and obey.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at November 10, 2014 04:31 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
31 October 2014


“He’s at the food of the hill at this very moment, in that ditch where you were the night Holly and Bluebell arrived,” (Watership Down, Chapter 28, page 244, par. 14).

Question: Who was stuck in a ditch and how were they found?


Answer: Hazel was the one presumed dead and found in a ditch. Fiver had a vision and took Blackberry with him to a land drain near a farm. “He was very weak from loss of blood and he couldn’t get out of the drain by himself” (Adams 244).

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at November 10, 2014 04:49 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 Nov 2014


“It turned out, however, that Blackavar, when not crushed by humiliation and ill-treatment, was a good cut above the ordinary,” (Watership Down, Chapter 40, page 384, par.24).

Question: What made Blackavar “a good cut above ordinary”?

Answer: While Bigwig, Hazel, and the other rabbits were still beaten up from their battle, Blackavar proved his repeatedly. “Hazel came to rely on him as much as on any of his veterans,” (Adams, 384). Blackavar was also the one who suggested they escape when the council denied their request.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at November 10, 2014 05:08 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 Nov 2014

“Most of it’s hard earth that’s never been dug. But in one or two places there are piles of much softer stuff” (Watership Down, Chapter 46, page 439, par. 33).

Question: What is the main problem about this warren, and how does Bigwig get past its weakness


Answer: Holly states that the main problem about the warren is that it was not made to be defended. Bigwig counteracts this problem by developing a plan of attack to hide in the soft part of the dirt. “I’m going to dig myself into the floor of the run just behind this blocked opening. Then you cover me with earth. It won’t be noticed—there’s so much daggering and mess in the place already,” (Adams 440).

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at November 10, 2014 05:23 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
24 October 14

Question:
Which of the rabbits was/were told, “You’re under arrest.” by Holly? (Adams 20) What was the reason for the arrest/ arrests? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
Bigwig and Silver were told they were under arrest. Bigwig was under arrest for “spreading dissension and inciting mutiny.” (Adams 20) Silver was being apprehended for “failing to report to Toadflax this evening and causing your duty to devolve on a comrade.” (Adams 20)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at November 10, 2014 07:25 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
27 October 14

Question:
“It suddenly burst into loud, raucous cries- Yark! Yark! Yark! a tremendous sound at close quarters.” (Chapter 23, page 180, par. 5) What kind of animal was making this awful sounding noise? What was the problem the animal was having and how did the rabbits help to solve this problem on page 182? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
The animal was a large bird “not quite as big as a pheasant” (Adams 181). Hazel and the other rabbits did not understand the bird but saw that it was driving its beak into the ground, and then Hazel said, “We’d better feed it.” (Adams 181) Hazel and Bigwig helped solve the problem by, “finding rotten sticks and horse dung for the bird to scavenge bugs from.”(Adams 182)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at November 10, 2014 07:26 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
29 October 14

Question:
“The rabbits had only gone a short distance through the wood when they sensed they were already near the river.” (Adams 292) What gave the rabbits the idea that they were closing in on the river? What was different about this river from other rivers the group had known? (Chapter 33, page 292, par. 2) Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
They could tell they were close to the river because, “The ground became soft and damp. They could smell sedge and water.” (Adams 292). The sound of the river told the rabbits that it must be bigger than any they had known before; this is similar to how humans can sense the size of a crowd from how loud it is. (Adams 292)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at November 10, 2014 07:27 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
31 October 14

Question:
“Bigwig was right when he said he wasn’t like a rabbit at all.” (Adams 467) If Bigwig wasn’t like a rabbit at all, what was he like? Where do the remaining rabbits think happened to Bigwig? (Chapter 50, page 467, par. 3) Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
Holly said, “He (Bigwig) was a fighting animal—fierce as a rat or a dog. He fought because he actually felt safer fighting than running.” (Adams 467). The group of rabbits believe that Bigwig is still running. “Did you see his body? No. Did anyone? No. Nothing could kill him.” (Adams 467)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at November 10, 2014 07:28 AM

Tyler Sommers, Kyle Vanburen, Bronwen Burke
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
10 November 2014

9. The Reward (Ultimate Boon) for this Journey

Answer

The Reward (Ultimate Boon) for Watership Down is considered to be the new warren that they aspire to find throughout the journey. “The warren prospered and so, in the fullness of time, did the new warren on the Belt, half Watership and half Efrafan”. (Adams pg472) Referencing Volger’s stage nine, The Reward, the reward was in the form of Volger’s, “taking possession” subtitle. The rabbits of the warren took possession of watership down by fighting off villains that were trying to take it from them.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at November 10, 2014 11:45 AM

Claudia Pierre
Bryce Veller
Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 November 2014


QUESTION:
The Refusal of the Return (Reluctant Return) for this Journey (if applicable)


ANSWER:
“Having found bliss and enlightment in the other world, the hero may not want to return to the ordinary world to bestow the boon onto this fellow man”. The Refusal of the Call is when the Hero finds Enlightment in the new world and they do not want to return to the Ordinary World; in the Watership Down novel, there is no Refusal of the Return.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at November 10, 2014 12:35 PM

Ashlee English, Anet Milian,Catlin Christian, James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
10 November 2014

8. Where is ‘The Central Supreme Ordeal’ present in Watership Down by Richard Adams
According to Joseph Campbell, the ordeal is described as the greatest challenge that the hero has to face. He argues that this is the real heart of the matter. In Watership Down by Richard Adams Hazel experiences a ‘death and rebirth’ when he is shot by the farmer and is presumed dead by everyone, however, is found to be alive, “The bloody hole… he’s alive” (Adams 229).

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 10, 2014 12:40 PM

Peter Bellini, Johan Robertson, Jake Gates
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
November 10, 2014


Question # 6:


Tests, Allies and Enemies (Road of Trials) of this Journey (see above)


Answer:


Recalling on our readings from Watership Down we see how Hazel the main character is surrounded by his friendly rabbits on an adventure to find a new and safe warren. Some of the Tests experienced by this group of rabbits can be easily seen in the various warrens that they visit such as the wire-trap warren and Efrafa. The close-knit bond between the main three allies allows them to overcome dangerous tests. Fiver, Hazel and Bigwig are the three main allies who together perceive the danger, find the best route around it or possibly face it head-on. Finally looking at the Enemies of these rabbits we can see the perfect example in the dangerous enviroment they are in that is inhabited by the various "elil". A perfect example of an enemy is General Woundwort, who goes out of his people's best interests to try to anniahilate Watership Down.

Posted by: Peter Bellini, Johan Robertson, Jake Gates at November 10, 2014 11:34 PM

Erin Gaylord, Gabby C., Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
11 November 2014

Question 6:
Tests, Allies, and Enemies (Road of Trials)

Answer:
As soon as the band of rabbits leaves the original warren, the rabbits enter the new world where they encounter, what Vogler calls, the “New Rules.” The New Rules serve as a test for the rabbits to show that they can adapt and survive in the unknown lands, these rules change throughout the story showing the special characteristics of Hazel and his allies along the journey. Hazel’s sidekick along this journey, his closest ally, appears to be Fiver, who originally had the prophetic vision that lead to the start of this journey to the Watership Down. Other major allies within this team of rabbits that provide importance to the story and survival of the team include Bigwig, Silver, Blackberry, and Pipkin. All these allies at some point throughout the story face a test of loyalty to both the group and Hazel, proving their worth. Some of the unique allies encountered along the way, mostly in the fields serving as “Watering Holes” mention in the Vogler texts, are Kehaar, Holly, and Strawberry, who are all turned from enemy to ally as the story progresses. Along the Journey, the band of rabbits encounter certain tests as a group. Beginning with crossing the river to escape Holly, escaping Cowslips’ Warren, retrieving the does from the Nuthanger Farm, and the whole serious of trials with the Efrafan Warren. During these tests, enemies were created and discovered, for the Hazel the enemies include Cowslip, General Woundwort, people, elil, Campion, and Thearah. Specifically for Hazel, “The Rival” enemy takes form in General Woundwort who challenges Hazel as a Chief Rabbit while Hazel attempts to build a warren of his own. For the band of rabbits in general, the elil serve as “The Rival,” causing fear and many obstacles along the way such as rat attacks, or the fox attack, and even the cat at Nuthanger farm. These predators serve as the greatest source of both fear and obstacles as they attempt to retrieve their reward of a new peaceful warren.

Work Cited

Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Scribner, 2005. Print.

Volger, Christopher. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers Third Edition. Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2007. Print

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at November 11, 2014 03:07 PM

Sharrad Forbes, Olivia Ago-Stallworth, Joanna Ozog
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
10 November 2014

Question:
The APPROACH to the Inmost Cave (The Abyss) of this Journey.

Answer:
According to Vogler, the Approach to the Inmost Cave is where the hero “makes the final preparations for the central ordeal of the adventure” (Vogler 143). In Watership Down this takes place in the Honeycomb, here Hazel and the other rabbits make preparations for the final battle with Woundwort and his Efrafan soldiers. Hazel knew they had nothing that “could stop Woundwort”, nothing that “could save them now” (Adams 286). Unless, by some miracle some “tremendous blow were to fall upon the Efrafans from outside” (Adams 286). It was here that Hazel came up with his master plan, the plan that would end this meeting once and for all, the climactic battle of the end.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at November 11, 2014 03:17 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220- Journeys in a Narrative CA01
November 11, 2014

Question:
What threat was around Fiver was unconscious?

Answer:
While Fiver was unconscious, there was a really large dog in the area that could threaten the rabbits. This is proven in the following quote, “In fact, I think you’ll have to. There’s a large dog loose in the woods” (Adams 436).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at November 11, 2014 09:56 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220- Journeys in a Narrative CA01
November 11, 2014

Question:
Who was Fiver referring to when he stated a rabbit smelled like, “ barley rained down and left to rot in the fields”(Adams 115)?

Answer:
During a conversation that Hazel and Fiver were having, they were referring to Silverweed>

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at November 11, 2014 10:05 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220- Journeys in a Narrative CA01
November 11, 2014

Question:
What animal was being a threat around the barn while the rabbits were trying to escape a hutch?

Answer:
There was rabbits lurking around the area. “ Keep watching . If another cat comes, you’ll have to take it on yourselves” (Adams 224).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at November 11, 2014 10:10 PM

Nuri Salahuddin
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
12 November 2014

"The phenomenon of laughter is unknown to animals, though it is possible that dogs and elephants may have some kind of disease."

Question: Why is it that the rabbits in this new warren are accustomed to human like behavior whereas Hazel and his group are not?

Answer: It seems that the rabbits in the new warren have human-like actions such as eating inside and laughing because they are closer to the humans while Hazel and the other rabbits were separated from humans at their old warren.

Posted by: Nuri Salahuddin at November 12, 2014 12:51 AM

Summer Taylor Aaron Virelli, Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
12 November 2014

Question 8: The Central/ Supreme Ordeal:

Answer: The book Watership Downs, follows many of Voglers subtitles under the category of The Central/ Supreme Ordeal. The first Category that Watership Downs follows is Death and Rebirth. This category is when heroes appear to die. This happens several times in the big battle. Bigwig appears to die because of his injuries he sustained while fighting with the General. Fiver also appears to die while in his trance. The invading rabbits even thought Fiver was dead as well. Hazel appears to die or to be mortally wounded from the cat attacking him. The next subtitle Vogler uses is Change. This is when the heroes appear to die and something inside them changes because of this. This happens with Fiver, Bigwig, and Hazel. After his experience in his trance, Fiver becomes more aloof towards the rest of the rabbits, save for his mate. Bigwig changes from always wanting to fight, to saying that he never wants to fight again. Hazel changes more subtly than the rest of the rabbits. Before Fiver had accused him of being a bit of a showoff (such as when he went to go see the hutch rabbits alone). This "appearing to die" scene changes him so that he is no longer a showoff and wants to live his life accordingly. The next Vogler category that Watership Downs follows is The Crisis, Not the Climax. This is when a crisis leads into the main ordeal and the main climax. This crisis can often be mistaken for the main ordeal. The crisis in Watership Downs is first meeting with the General on his own home turf to try to steal does and run away with them. This leads to the main ordeal of the battle. If Hazel and the others had not stolen the does from the General, then there would have never been a battle. The next category that Watership Downs follows is Points of Tension. Points of Tension happen all over the book from when the rabbits first tried to leave their own warren, to meeting Cowslip, to having a run in with a fox. The last Vogler category that Watership Downs follows is the Witness to Sacrifice. This is when other rabbits (or characters) witness a great sacrifice made by another character. An example of this is Bigwigs sacrifice of his body to use as a barrier against the general so he could not get to the other rabbits.

Posted by: summer taylor at November 12, 2014 08:49 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
12 November 2014

"Oh, its only Fiver," said the black tipped rabbit...
(Chapter One: The Notice Board, page 3, par 2)

Question: Why is the one rabbit called Fiver instead of other rabbits referring to him by his real name?

Answer: The other rabbit is called Fiver because he was the runt of a litter of five. He is very small and flighty. "Five in the litter, you know: he was the last -- and the smallest. You'd wonder nothing had got him by now. I always say a man couldn't see him and a fox wouldn't want him. Still, I admit he seems to be able to keep out of harm's way" (Adams 3).

Posted by: summer taylor at November 12, 2014 08:58 AM

re-do Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
12 November 2014

"There was an uncomfortable silence, broken only by shuffling and whispering. Blackberry, dismayed, turned back to Hazel and Bigwig."
(Chapter 13: Hospitality, page 134, par. 3)

Question: Why does Hazel hesitate when asked from the other warren to tell a story?

Answer: Hazel was nervous about having any one of his rabbits telling a story because the other warren was strange to them and they did not want to tell an inappropriate story and offend the much larger warren. "What's the matter?" he asked in a low voice. "Surely there's no harm in that?"
"Wait," replied Hazel quietly. "Let them tell us if they don't like it. They have their own ways here" (Adams 134).

Posted by: summer taylor at November 12, 2014 09:06 AM

re-do Summer taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
12 November 2014

"Well, I can't help it," said Hazel. "Fiver's somewhere out there and I'm going after him. You were right, anyway. It is light -- just"
(Chapter 17: The Shining Wire, page 158, par 6)

Question: Why did Fiver run away without telling any of his friends where he was going?

Answer: Fiver ran away because he did not have a good feeling about the new warren they had met. He thought something was off about them, and none of the other rabbits would listen to him. "I'm going now," he said. "I feel very sad. I'd like to wish you well, Hazel, but there's no good to wish you in this place. So just goodbye."
"But where are you going, Fiver?"
"Away. To the hills, if I can get there."
"By yourself, alone? You can't. You'd die."
"You wouldn't have a hope, old chap," said Bigwig. "Something would get you before ni-Frith."
"No," said Fiver very quietly. "You are closer to death than I" (Adams 160).

Posted by: summer taylor at November 12, 2014 09:13 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
12 November 2014

"It was late one afternoon, with a light north wind blowing and the smell of hay drifting up from the fields of Sydmonton, when Bigwig came hurtling down into the Honeycomb to announce that Kehaar was back."
(Chapter 23: Kehaar, page 284, par. 12)

Question: What news did Kehaar come back with for the rabbits?

Answer: Kehaar came back to the rabbits and told them that he had found other rabbits living not too far away on a farm in a box. "I show you. 'E not far. You see 'im. Und here ees rabbits. Ees rabbits live in box; live vid men. You know?"
"Live with men? Did you say 'live with men'?"
"Ya, ya, live vid men. In shed; rabbits live in box in shed. Men pring food. You know?" (Adams 284)

Posted by: summer taylor at November 12, 2014 09:20 AM

re-do Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
12 November 2014


"Great golden Frith on a hill!" cried Blackberry suddenly. "Great jumping Rabscuttle! That's it! That's it! Bluebell, you shall be a water rabbit!" He began leaping and skipping about on the bank and cuffing Fiver with his front paws.
(Chapter 33: The Great River, page 446, par. 9)

Question: What is the significance of the boat to the rabbits?

Answer: Blackberry gets the idea that the rabbits can use the boat to float down the river with the does that they steal. This is important because they were trying to figure out a way to get the does away and they knew that the rabbits from the other warren were a lot faster and more sophisticated than they were. "Don't you see, Fiver? Don't you see? We bite the rope and off we go: and General Woundwort doesn't know!"
Fiver paused. "Yes, I do see," he replied at length. "You mean on the boat. I must say, Blackberry, you're a clever fellow. I remember now that after we'd crossed that other river you said that that floating trick might come in handy again sometime" (Adams 447).

Posted by: summer taylor at November 12, 2014 09:28 AM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
10 March 2015
Second Half Chapters 1-10

“As Dandelion ended, Acorn, who was on the windward side of the little group, suddenly started and sat back, with ears up and nostrils twitching. The strange, rank smell was stronger than ever and after a few moments they all heard a heavy movement close by (Chapter 7, page 29, par. 1 Adams)

Question: What is the strange scent and sound the rabbits smell and hear before they cross the river?

Answer: Just as the story is finished the rabbits hear and smell a "lendri" (29) or badger. They do not know if this one is dangerous or not, but taking no chances, Bigwig leads them away from the animal at a run. Adams writes, “A lendri,” he muttered as he passed through them. “It may be dangerous and it may not, but I’m taking no chances with it. Let’s get away” (Adams 29). This brings them to the edge of a river; Five says they shall have to cross it, but that he and Pipkin are too tired to swim. Bigwig gets a little sarcastic in asking Hazel if he was expecting the river. Hazel fears that Bigwig is going to be trouble sooner or later, but he maintains peace by thanking the big Owsla rabbit for saving their lives in getting them away from the lendri. Hazel pretends that he would not have known what to do on his own.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 10, 2015 10:46 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
11 March 2015

“We shall have to cross it, “he said. “But I don’t think I can swim, Hazel. I’m worn out, and Pipkin’s a good deal worse than I am.”

Question: what example is given as a description of how worn out they are?

Answer: the proceeding passage that follows gives an example to explain the stamina that is left in them being insufficient to what they need to endure. The following paragraph gives an example of rabbits when he states, “like all wild animals, rabbits can swim if they have to: and some even swim when it suits them.” “But most rabbits avoid swimming, and certainly an exhausted rabbit could not swim the enborne.” (Adams 28) with this example given, the reader understands the exhaustion they are enduring.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at March 11, 2015 01:22 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys to Narrative CA02
10 March 2015

(Ch. 7, second half)

"'Why not just go along the bank?' asked Hawkbit. Hazel suspected that if Fiver felt they ought to cross the river, it might be dangerous not to. But how were the other to be persuaded?" (Adams 28)

Question: Why is it so imperative to cross the river?

Answer: Fiver is insisting on cross the river because there are better fields out on the other side of the river which they have never been to. They want to cross the river so that they may be able to see what is explained in the book as, "A blackbird called one or two deep, slow notes and was followed by a wood pigeon. Soon they were in a gray twilight and could see that the stream bordered the further edge of the wood. On the other side lay open fields" (Adams 28). The description given on the other side of the river indicates that the other side of the river is an unknown yet better place to be, so they must cross the river regardless of how weak they are. They must cross and reach this destination in order to be on the better side of the river which they have yet to discover (Adams 28).

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at March 11, 2015 12:02 PM

Matthew Lemonis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative
11 March 2015

Question: In the novel towards the beginning of chapter six, “ Long ago, frith made the world. He made all the stars, too, and the world is one of the stars. He made them by scattering his droppings over the sky and this is why the grass and the trees grow so thick on the world.” Who said this and what is its significance?

Answer: It is an outside narrator, also referred to what seems to be a person named “El-ahrairah” and the significance being, explaining how these peoples perception of the world became to be.

Posted by: Matthew Lemonis at March 11, 2015 12:40 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys Into Narrative CA09
11 March 2015

“With the beanflower’s boon, And the blackbird’s tune, And May, and June!”

Question: In this chapter Hazel discoveries a beanfield which will provide adequate safety and shelter. What are some hints throughout the chapter that describe Hazel’s leadership ability?

Answer: While most of the others are asleep Hazel goes to find a safer place for them to stay. When the crow attack occurs it is Hazel, Bigwig, and Silver who rush to the defense of Pipkin and Fiver. Hazel’s handling of the crow attack and his efforts to lead to bunch to a safer place demonstrate his leadership ability. In the aftermath of the attack Hazel offers a nurturing attitude to the group when he says “We can sleep here all day. But I suppose one of us ought to stay awake; and if I take the first turn it’ll give me a chance to have a look at your par, Hlao-roo. I think you’ve got something in it.” (Adams, 43) The knowledge, instinct and compassion that Hazel offers is well illustrated in this chapter. The characteristics that Hazel embodies are representative of a leader.

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at March 11, 2015 01:03 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
11 March 2015

“’How can you go back through all that we’ve come through?’ replied Hazel. ‘And probably get killed for wounding an Owsla officer, if you ever go back? Talk sense, for Firth’s sake.’”
- Chapter 10. Page 51, Paragraph 8.

Question: On this page, Hazel mentions that Acorn cannot go back after inuring an Owsla. What is an Owsla and why would their injury lead to a possible death?

Answer: Richard Adams defines and Owsla as, “a group of strong or clever rabbits – second-year or older – surrounding the Chief rabbit and his doe and exercising authority” (5). They are essentially like the police department of the rabbit world and because of their authoritarian status; their intentional injuries will not be looked kindly upon.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at March 11, 2015 01:07 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
11 March 2015

"I don't think Pipkin's got any idea what really happened; but I have. I admit it was a good idea." (Chapter 8, pg 55 eBook)

Question: This passage refers to after everyone crossed the river. What was Fiver referring to when he said this to Blackberry? What might come in handy later that everyone forgot?

Answer: Fiver was referring to the raft idea that Blackberry had. Earlier he recognize the wood from before and knew it floated. He knew that if they got on top of the wood it would float. So not everybody understood what was going on or what Blackberry discovered. But Fiver did. He said, "Let's remember it. It might come in handy again sometime." (Adams pg. 54-55).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at March 11, 2015 01:35 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
10 March 2015

Ch10

It gets worse and worse the further we go," said Acorn. "Where are we going
and how long will it be before some of us stop running for good and all?"
"It's the place that worries you," said Hazel. "I don't like it myself, but it won't
go on forever."

Q:

In this passage, Hazel defends his position of leadership against the dissenting Acorn and Hawkbit. He defuses the situation by temporarily becoming another archetype. What is that archetype?

A:

Hazel temporarily functions as a mentor in order to calm and encourage the other rabbits, who are refusing the call to adventure. Specifically, he acts as a mentor-ally, who is in the same situation as the other rabbits. He is no Gandalf who can come and go as he likes.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at March 11, 2015 01:55 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
11 March 2015

“He pulled out a burnt lead and ate it slowly, concealing his fear as best he could; for all his instincts were warning him of the dangers in the unknown country beyond the warren.”
(Adams, 14)

Question: What is the author’s purpose for having Blackberry being the first one to speak regarding leaving the warren and then react as he did in the paragraph above?

Answer: Adams’ purpose of having Blackberry say “you [Fiver] feel terrified to stay and I feel terrified to go” (14) signifies the call to adventure that Blackberry is being offered. Although Blackberry’s reaction after stating he will go on the adventure shows, he is internally contradicting his “begone dull care!” (14) enthusiasm. While this detail inclusion on the author’s part may prove as foreshadowing for the audience. Meaning there will be danger ahead as the rabbits venture from their warren.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at March 11, 2015 02:12 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 March 2015
Second Half of Chapters 11-20 Watership Down

“Hazel turned his head and looked down the course of the brook. Far away, between the two copses, he could see the cherry tree where two days before he had sat with Blackberry and Fiver in the sunrise. He remembered how Bigwig had chased Hawkbit through the long grass, forgetting the quarrel of the previous night in the joy of their arrival. He could see Hawkbit running toward him now and two or three of the others–Silver, Dandelion and Pipkin. Dandelion, well in front, dashed up to the gap and checked, twitching and staring. “What is it, Hazel? What’s happened?” (Chapter 17, page 84, par. 3 Adams)

Question: When Hazel and Bigwig find Fiver out of the warren in the night, why is Bigwig angry at him, and what happens to Bigwig when he heads back to the warren?

Answer: Once Hazel and Bigwig find Fiver outside of the warren, Bigwig accuses Fiver of thinking only of himself and of expecting everyone else to jump the minute every time he has a feeling of motivation. Adams writes, “You wretched little black beetle,” he said. “You’ve never learned to obey orders, have you? It’s me, me, me all the time. ‘Oh, I’ve got a funny feeling in my toe, so we must all go and stand on our heads!” (Adams 83) Angrily he dashes back toward the warren. On the other side of the hedge however, there is suddenly a fearful commotion. Hazel and Fiver approach the gap to find Bigwig lying on his side with a length of twisted copper wire looped about his neck and pulled tight against a peg that has been driven into the ground. Adams also writes, “Bigwig’s in a wire. Let him alone till Blackberry tells us. Stop the others crowding round” (Adams 84). Bigwig has run into a manmade rabbit snare and about to be choked to death. Hazel remembers hearing about snares but isn’t sure what to do.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 12, 2015 05:50 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
13 March 2015

“I could hear you in the heather, saying ‘not far now and it was annoying me. I thought you were making it up. I should have known better. Frirthrah, you’re what I call a Chief Rabbit!”
-Chapter 11. Page 57, Paragraph 2.

Question: On this page, Blackberry is proclaiming Hazel to be a Chief Rabbit. Who did Hazel originally worry about becoming the chief rabbit once he left the warren?

Answer: Hazel originally worried that Bigwig would becoming the new chief rabbit, saying, “I’m not going to let Bigwig run everything or why bother to go?” (Adams, 15). He did not want to have another Chief Rabbit who let his egocentrism cloud the safety of the other rabbits around him.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at March 13, 2015 12:35 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
13 March 2015

"Those are rabbits down there, trotting along like a lot of squirrels with nuts. How can that be right? (Ch. 14, pg. 230)”

Questions: The following passage explains how there’s a sense of obedience among the animals; Is there a hierarchy when it comes to the animals?


Answers: Among the rabbits, there are those who consider themselves the “leaders” of particular groups that could give off the sense of a hierarchy. Cowslip, one of the rabbits, explains how he “was encouraging and he was determined to keep up his position as the resourceful leader of the newcomers (Adams 226).”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at March 13, 2015 01:02 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys Into Narrative CA09
13 March 2015

“His face was that of one who has undergone a long journey.”

Question: Hazel realizes that the group is in danger. What specifically, in the first half of this chapter, is the trigger for predators?

Answer: Hazel’s instinct is very keen. He has the ability to predict events before they occur. The main concern for Hazel is the blood coming from the injured Holly. In a conversation Holly says “Yes, I can go now. Is it far?” Hazel responds reluctantly “Not too far,” while “thinking it all too likely that Holly would never get there.” (Adams, 141)

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at March 13, 2015 01:13 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
13 March 2015

"Listen, Dandelion. You're fond of stories, aren't you? I'll tell you one--yes one for El-ahrairah to cry at. Once there was a fine warren on the edge of a wood, overlooking the meadows of a farm." (Chapter 17, pg. 115).

Question: This passage refers to the story Fiver tells the group. What was the purpose of the tale? What affect did it have on the group?

Answer: Fiver tells this story to tell the group that they are being deceived by the farmer. They are given food so that farmer
can fatten the rabbits up and then occasionally set up a snare to trap a rabbit or two and use them for their fur and meat. The farmer is smart about it because he gives them the best food and sets up enough snares that doesn't cause the whole group to run away. Bigwig, who has just suffered due to a snare, asks what they should do as a group. Fiver tells them, "Why, go--now." And that is what the group does. (Adams 115-118).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at March 13, 2015 01:27 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
13 March 2015

“Not far now, Hlao-roo, not far now,” he kept muttering, until he realized that what he said had become meaningless, a mere refrain. He was not speaking to Pipkin or even himself. He was talking in his sleep, or something very near it.” (Adams,49)


Question: The title of chapter 11 is “Hard Going.” What does the chapter title and Hazel’s mental state say regarding their journey?


Answer: The chapter title seems to signify that the traveling rabbits may experience some difficulties. Although they have handled a forest, crossing a river, and a crow attack, this chapter may be the opponent of time. Hazel promises to “have you out by sunrise” (49) though he seems to doubt himself. Hazel’s feelings “were like…the mind of a defeated general” (50) until the party reached the green field on the “other side of the common” which is perceived as their sanctuary.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at March 13, 2015 02:02 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
15 March 2015

“‘Efrafa?’ he asked. ‘Are you going to Efrafa?’ “‘If that’s what it’s called,’ I answered. “ ‘Do you know it?’ “‘No,’ I said, ‘we don’t. We want to know where it is.’ “‘Well,’ he said, ‘my advice to you is to run, and quickly.’ “I was just wondering what to make of that, when suddenly three big rabbits came over the bank, just the way I did that night when I came to arrest you, Bigwig; and one of them said, ‘Can I see your marks?’” (Chapter 27, pg. 163, par. 1 Adams)

Question: What is Efrafa? What is the procedure of joining Efrafa that the rabbits are fearful of?

Answer: Efrara is the big warren that is highly organized and tightly controlled. Great care is taken to keep the warren hidden from men, but in return for their safety the rabbits have no freedom. Ruled by a large vicious rabbit names, “Woundwort” (163), the rabbits are marked by a means of biting on some part of their bodies and organized according to those marks. Adams writes, “Efrafa is a big warren–a good deal bigger than the one we came from the Threarah’s, I mean. And the one fear of every rabbit in it is that men are going to find them and infect them with the white blindness. The whole warren is organized to conceal its existence. The holes are all hidden and the Owsla have every rabbit in the place under orders. You can’t call your life your own: and in return you have safety if it’s worth having at the price you pay” (Adams 163). This passage introduces that the rabbits are in danger and must be careful with what they do. They must follow the commands that Woundwort orders his council police enforces or they will pay the price for stepping out of line.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 15, 2015 10:21 PM

REDO T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 March 2015
Second Half Chapters 1-10

“As Dandelion ended, Acorn, who was on the windward side of the little group, suddenly started and sat back, with ears up and nostrils twitching. The strange, rank smell was stronger than ever and after a few moments they all heard a heavy movement close by (Chapter 7, page 29, par. 1 Adams)

Question: What is the strange scent and sound the rabbits smell and hear before they cross the river?

Answer: Just as the story is finished the rabbits hear and smell a "lendri" (29) or badger. They do not know if this one is dangerous or not, but taking no chances, Bigwig leads them away from the animal at a run. Adams writes, “A lendri,” he muttered as he passed through them. “It may be dangerous and it may not, but I’m taking no chances with it. Let’s get away” (Adams 29). This brings them to the edge of a river; Five says they shall have to cross it, but that he and Pipkin are too tired to swim. Bigwig gets a little sarcastic in asking Hazel if he was expecting the river. Hazel fears that Bigwig is going to be trouble sooner or later, but he maintains peace by thanking the big Owsla rabbit for saving their lives in getting them away from the lendri. Hazel pretends that he would not have known what to do on his own.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 15, 2015 10:24 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys Into Narrative CA09
23 March 2015

“He which hath no stomach to this fight, Let him depart, his passport shall be made And crowds for convoy put into his purse. We would not die in that man’s company That fears his fellowship, to die with us.”

Question: In this first half of this chapter Hazel decides to make the journey to Efrafa. The group is astonished at first. Holly criticizes the plan as being extremely dangerous. What concerns does Holly raise.

Answer: Hazel’s decision to journey into Efrafa is initially meet with astonishment, questions and criticism. Holly responds by saying “You all know that I’ve spent my life patrolling and tracking in the open. Well, there are rabbits in the Efrafan Owsla who are better at it than I am – I’m admitting it: and they’ll hunt you down with your does and kill you.” (254) Hazel addresses the concerns by acknowledging the obvious dangers but emphasizes Efrafan as a necessary and important step.

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at March 23, 2015 12:43 AM

Maggie Izquierdo and Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys Into Narrative CA02
23 March 2015

In Watership Down by Richard Adams, it can be recognized that Original World is the original warren they lived in before Fiver foresaw something bad happening to their home. The original warren was going to be built on, so this is their Ordinary World that they leave to go into the Special World. Anywhere outside of the original warren can be considered as the Special World because they've never gone there before.

The rabbits go through multiple tests during their journey to find a new home. They encounter other rabbits on a farm that are very odd. Eventually Bidwig gets caught in a snare. It's her that Fiver understands what's going on. More than enough food was being provided so that the rabbits would stay, but at the same time he wanted to catch them a few at a time so that they would nto be scared off.
Allies are made along Hazel's, the Hero's, journey. Fiver is an obvious ally that Hazel has. He seeks advice from him because Fiver can foresee things. An unsuspected ally Hazel makes was Kehaar, a gull, that they feed and nurse back to health. This ally is the reason the group was able to escape Efrafa. He attacks after the lightning hits, helping out the rabbits trying to escape.
The enemies would be the rabbits they met on the farm that were odd. They did not warn the rabbits of what the farmer was up to. They obviously did this for their advantage hoping to escape the snares. Efrafa also proves to be an enemy to the group. They have to escape them a few times. Hazel gets beat up pretty badly and held prisoner until Fiver comes to get him out.

The Belly of the Whale would be when the group escapes Efrafa. It's raining really bad creating darkness, making it hard for the rabbits to see and stick together. The rabbits almost don't make it out alive. They all just have it in their mind to get to the boat, which is like their light at the end of the tunnel.

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at March 23, 2015 04:27 AM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys Into Narrative CA02
23 March 2015

"The hutch rabbits seemed at once bewildered and fascinated. Clover, the Angora doe--strong, active rabbit--was clearly excited by Hazel's description and asked several questions about the warren and the downs." (Chapter 24, pg 203).

Question: This passage refers to Hazel's conversation with the rabbits in the box he invited to come back to the warren with them to recruit some does. What did Hazel realize about the rabbits in the box after he invited them to come to love with them on the warren?

Answer: Hazel realized that they couldn't leave even if they wanted to. They were trapped in the box. Nor could they act on it; they never had to like Hazel and his group has. He knew that if he wanted them to come back with him, he had to urge them. (Adams 203).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at March 23, 2015 04:43 AM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
23 March 2015

“After a silence, he added, "You can imagine what it means to Bluebell and me
to find ourselves underground, among friends. It wasn't I who tried to arrest you,
Bigwig -- that was another rabbit, long, long ago." (Adams 96 )

Question: As Holly concludes the account of what happened at their warren, what does this show about character development for Holly? How would this change in attitude effect the rabbits who left earlier?


Answer: With rabbits being similar to human beings (96), this Holly that has experienced the horror Fiver predicted earlier has affected him. As Holly watched as the “field was destroyed” (93), he may have experienced a change in regard, driving him to seek the other group of rabbit. The reader can predict Holly to become an ally though one cannot be entirely sure.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at March 23, 2015 12:59 PM

Bobbi Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
23 March 2015

Watership Down

Chapter 12 second half: “Fools attract elil by being easy prey” (Adams ,68).
Q: Why would Bigwig say they are easy prey?
A: Bigwig’s focus lays in the military aspect, so he wants the warren to be able to support and defend instead of digging. “If they do try any tricks, they’ll find I know a few as well.” (Adams,68). Bigwig has the brute attitude so as to not seem weak to the other rabbits of Watership Down. For Bigwig, it is important to always seem in control of both himself and the events, which happen around him.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at March 23, 2015 01:51 PM

Bobbi Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
23 March 2015

Chapter 23 second half: “Clearly, he had missed their attentions and was ready to enjoy being back.” (Adams, 191).

Q: How have the dynamics of the warren changed because of Kehaar and Molly’s presence?

A: Kehaar, in his search response sums up, how odd it would be if neither of them had each other had in their lives. “All dis peeg ‘ill, I go along ‘im, dis vay, dat vay, vere sin come up, vere sun go down.” (Adams, 192). Kehaar and Molly, together as a pair offer comedic relief to the story. While the story may not be so firm and strict, it still does need this relief.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at March 23, 2015 01:52 PM

Hatim Shami
Professor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
24 March 2015

“It was no easy matter to rouse the torpid, bewildered does and make them understand what they had to do.” (Adam 341)

Question: Based on this statement, is this conflict internal or external?

Answer: This conflict seems to be both internal and external because he does not seem to be able to think of a method to help the others comprehend what they must do. The conflict included struggles between his outside surroundings, and internally of how to cope with the struggles of it all.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at March 25, 2015 12:59 AM

Adam Alexander
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220Cl On the Proverbial Road CA01
25 March 2015

“At that instant a dazzling claw of lightening streaked down the length of the sky” (Adams 359)

Question: The title of chapter 38 is “The Thunder Breaks.” How does this relate to what is going on in the story.

Answer: In the second half of chapter 38, Bigwig is up against General Woundwort. Being chased, Bigwig and the other escapees flee while opposition is strong. As they turn to fight, “a dazzling claw of lightening streaked down the length of the sky” (Adams 359). Adams writes, “Immediately upon it came the thunder: a high, tearing noise, as though some huge thing were ripped to pieces close above, which deepened and turned to enormous blows of dissolution” (Adams 359).
After being stunned for a few seconds, Bigwig decides to use the storm to his advantage. Because of the blast, most of the rabbits are stunned, and Bigwig is able to get everyone to retreat to the river to escape on the boat.
The significance of the title “The Thunder Breaks,” is that it shows a changing point in the action going on in the chapter, but also shows Bigwig’s skills at leading and decision making, using everything to his advantage.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at March 25, 2015 01:46 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
25 March 2015

Chapter 34, second half:

"The first thing was to replace the Owsla losses- and preferably with rabbits who knew how to deal ruthlessly with any further signs of dissension." (Adams 277)

Question: Based on this statement, what is their new mindset and motivation pertaining to preparation?

Answer: They have a mentality of training and being wise about their choices in how they must prepare. In the chapter it states, "They would simply have to promote the best they had got, draw their horns in for a time and concentrate on training until things got back to normal (Adams 277)." Based on this statement, it is clear that their main intention is to only stay determined to prepare for what is headed for them.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at March 25, 2015 09:31 AM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
25 March 2015

“Campion and the patrol made off downhill and Hazel, relieved to be rid of them so easily hurried after Silver, with the others close behind.”
- Chapter 40. Page 392, Paragraph 7.

Question: In this paragraph, Hazel has successfully driven off Campion and his minions after they demanded that Hazel give them their doe and flee. How did Hazel manage to drive off Campion without causing conflict?

Answer: When Campion demanded that Hazel give up his doe, Hazel thought that Campion did not have enough followers to defend against Hazel’s group and so Hazel used his group’s power in numbers to intimidate Campion into leaving. This is made clear on page 391 when Hazel says to Campion, “There are a lot of us here and unless you’ve got more rabbits than I can see, we’re too many for you” (Adams).

Posted by: Bryan Hess at March 25, 2015 10:35 AM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 March 2015

"Bigwig spoke without taking his eyes from Woundwort. 'Just a few more moments, Hazel,' he said. 'I'll keep them off. We can't leave Dandelion.'" (Chapter 38: The Thunder Breaks, pg 364).

Question: This passage refers Bigwig talking to Hazel and his rabbits about waiting for Dandelion to get on the boat so they all could escape Woundwort. What was the importance Bigwig played to Dandelion while they were waiting on the boat for Dandelion to get on?

Answer: If it were not for Bigwig, then Dandelion might have been left behind with Woundwort and his rabbits. Hazel and his rabbits were waiting as long as they could, but Woundwort and his rabbits were about to close in. They did not have much time to wait. When Bigwig noticed Dandelion hiding under the bushes he cried out saying "There it is!", referring to Kehaar. Bigwig knew that Woundwort was afraid of the bird, and his cry would give Dandelion enough time to run on the boat. And that's exactly what happened: "Woundwort looked up quickly and leaped back. Dandelion shot out of the bushes, crossed the path in a flash and was on the boat beside Hazel."(Adams 364-365).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at March 25, 2015 10:55 AM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
English COA1 Journey’s Into Narrative
3/22/2015
Question on chapter 37
Big Wig, has been a courageous and noble leader of his party, his actions are calculated and decisive, why, and do you think he and the General have a problem, with each other?
As, a leader Big Wig, is given command over many men and he is used to being in command without subject to inquire, but being in a position with someone in superior standing creates a bit off dissonances as in this brief dialog, “He still disliked addressing Woundwort as "sir," but since he was supposed to be an Efrafan officer, he could not very well do otherwise.” page (208) It is understandable that, being the question is more exhausting then being the one in question and as a leader having follow is not something that you have grown accustom too.

Posted by: Sergio at March 25, 2015 02:05 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
23 March 2015
Chapters 31-41 of Watership Down

“General Woundwort was a singular rabbit. Some three years before, he had been born–the strongest of a litter of five–in a burrow outside a cottage garden near Cole Henley. His father, a happy-go-lucky and reckless buck, had thought nothing of living close to human beings except that he would be able to forage in their garden in the early morning. He had paid dearly for his rashness. After two or three weeks of spoiled lettuces and nibbled cabbage plants, the cottager had lain in wait and shot him as he came through the potato patch at dawn”. (Chapter 34 pg. 208, par. 2 Adams)

Question: How did General Woundwort grow up to be a vicious rabbit?

Answer: General Woundwort had grown to be a vicious rabbit because he had been born in a burrow outside a cottage garden and had lived close to human beings. His father was eventually shot for continuously raiding the garden, and then the cottager tried to dig out Woundwort’s mother and the rest of the litter. Woundwort alone escaped. He was found by a kindly school master, but never grew tame. He soon escaped from his hutch. He found another warren and forced them to accept him. Soon he became the chief rabbit. Eventually he left the warren, taking his followers with him, and developed Efrafa at the crossing point of two bridle paths. Adams writes, “But Woundwort grew up very wild and, like Cowper’s hare, would bite when he could. In a month he was big and strong and had become savage. He nearly killed the schoolmaster’s cat, which had found him at liberty in the kitchen and tried to torment him” (Adams 209). This passage suggests that this is how Woundwort began to create his new warren. He knew that these skills would help him at keeping all his rabbits under control.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 25, 2015 05:16 PM

Adam Alexander

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road CA01

27 March 2015

“You’ve done it, Bigwig… They’ve all run away.” (Adams 463)

Question: When Hazel returns to Bigwig, what does he do and what is Bigwig’s response?

Answer: Hazel returns from the fight to see a hurt Bigwig. Hazel says, “You’ve done it, they’ve all run away,” (Adams 436), signifying defeat of Woundwort and the fleeing of the Erfafans. Hazel, though assisting Bigwig and causing their victory a bit himself, credits it to Bigwig (“You’ve done it”). Bigwig responds, “No more fighting for me, I’ve had enough,” (Adams 463). Now, Bigwig has defeated the fiercest rabbits ever lived and has greatly benefited his kind. Once someone has accomplished something like this and has also been greatly injured by it, it only makes sense that they would want to take a break and enjoy the peace they have created.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at March 27, 2015 01:26 AM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
27 March 2015

“’So after they had swum the river,’ said Vithuril, ‘El-ahrairah led his people on in the dark, through a wild, lonely place.’”
- Chapter 50. Page 470. Paragraph 4.

Question: In this paragraph, Vithuril is telling the story of Hazel and his companion’s trek to the new warren. What was the name of the river that they crossed, and how did they manage to cross it?

Answer: Hazel and his companions managed to cross the River Enborne by pushing the two weaker rabbits onto a piece of driftwood and then pushing the piece of driftwood across the river as a sort of makeshift boat. As Blackberry once said, “They’re sitting on the wood and the wood floats… Now we can swim over ourselves.” (37, Adams).

Posted by: Bryan Hess at March 27, 2015 10:17 AM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys Into Narrative CA09
27 March 2015

“Born and bred in the briar patch, Brer Fox.”

Question: The little girl at the farm, Lucy, discovers Hazel. What does the doctor recommend to the little girl? Where is Hazel released?

Answer: Lucy is persuaded by the doctor to let Hazel run free. Lucy goes into the home and gets a cage. Doctor Adams decides that Hazel’s wounds can heal on their own. Together they ride car to the ridge between Hare Warren Down and Watership Down. Doctor Adams expresses his feelings about the release by saying to Lucy “There’s not a lot of harm he can do here, if you come to think about it.” (Adams, 459)

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at March 27, 2015 11:02 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
27 March 2015

(Second half) Chapter 47

"He stopped, sensing all around him reluctance and fear. He looked at Ragwort, who looked away. Two other rabbits were edging off through the grass." (Adams 270)

Question: Why do the rabbits express a sense of fear to Woundwort? Did something fearful occur?

Answer: The rabbits sense a foreshadowing of something bad that was about to occur because there actually was danger headed for them. In "Watership Down", it states, "Not knowing what he meant or where to run, they turned one way and another. Five bolted down the opened run and a few more into the wood. But almost before they had begun to scatter, into their midst bounded a great black dog, snapping, biting, and chasing hither and thither like a fox in a chicken run" (Adams 271). So as the rabbits had suspected, there was, indeed, danger headed for them as the black terrifying dog was targeting them.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at March 27, 2015 12:20 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
25 March 2015

“Hazel turned at once. “Well, no fox,” he said cheerfully. “It’s gone and we’ll be gone, too. For goodness’ sake keep close together, because if anyone gets lost in the dark we may not find him again. And remember, if we come upon any strange rabbits, you’re to attack them at once and ask questions afterward.” (Adams, 256)

Question: Throughout the rabbits adventure, Hazel has been their leader (no matter how timid he felt about it). In what was does this excerpt show the evolution of Hazel’s leadership? Is he doing well with this new calling?

Answer: Towards the beginning of the adventure, Hazel was hesitant to take on leadership as Bigwig was a prominent figure. Hazel consulted the group when appropriate. For example, when the group received an invitation to visit the other warren (61). Went he is getting better at making quick decisions, such as saving the mouse from the kestrel (130) and investigating the voices crying “Thlayli! O Thlayli!” that belonged to Captain Holly from Sandleford Warren (124).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at March 27, 2015 12:35 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 March 2015

"'I've got a plan,' said Hazel. 'If it works, it'll finish Woundwort for good and all. But I've got no time to explain. Every moment counts now.'" (Chapter 44: A Message from El-ahrairah, pg 429).

Question: This passage refers to Hazel's plan to get the rabbits safe once and for all. After Fiver goes into his trance, what vision does Hazel claim El-ahrairah gave him? In other words, what does Hazel feel the need to do?

Answer: Hazel sees " a little huddle of rabbits on the bank of a stream at dawn, listening to the sound of yelping in the wood above and scolding of a jay" (Adams 429). Hazel feels the need to go to the farm and let the dog loose. According to what Hazel saw, he believes it will help him and the group from Efrafans coming to get them. They might be too scared to come when they hear the dog. Hazel believes it will finish Woundwort for good. So he takes Blackberry and Dandelion with him to the farm to gnaw at the dog's leash. (Adams 428-430).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at March 27, 2015 01:05 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
25 March 2015
“His claws found Woundwort’s leg ripping sideways; but before he could draw back, Woundworts whole weight came down on him and in the next moment his teeth had met his right ear” (443)
How did Woundwort win most of his fights?
Woundwort won most of his fights by putting his wright on top of them. “Woundwort had won almost every fight of his life by using his weight” (442)

Posted by: William Pereira at March 27, 2015 01:21 PM


Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
27 March 2015

“The mouse became nervous and, after the manner of his kind, began to say what he thought the rabbits would like to hear. “Maybe is a no warren. Is a plenty good rabbits ‘ere, is all a my friends. Is a no more rabbits. Not a for want other rabbits” (Adams 366-7).

“But what other rabbits?” persisted Hazel.


Question: What kind of relationship does Hazel have with the mouse? Which archetype does it resemble?


Answer: The mouse in Watership Down resembles the ally archetype as he resembles the helpful servant function within the archetype (Vogler 75) in which the mouse feels that since Hazel “ ‘elp a mouse. One time a mouse ‘elp a you [Hazel]” (Adams 134). Later in chapter 42, Hazel and Bigwig finds news of other rabbits from the mouse. While this a problem, it develops further as “they’ve [the other rabbits] have come for us” (Adams 369) as Holly’s report startles the rabbits.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at March 27, 2015 09:54 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
26 March 2015
Chapters 41-51 of Watership Down

“Although Woundwort had shown himself at the last to be a creature virtually mad, nevertheless what he did proved not altogether futile. There can be little doubt that if he had not done it, more rabbits would have been killed that morning on Watership Down” (Chapter 49 pg. 308, par. 1 Adams).

Question: What happens to General Woundwort and his sentries after chasing the rabbits trying to escape?

Answer: Woundwort is killed by the dog although his efforts to fight it off provide the remaining Efrafan rabbits with a chance to escape. One other sentry is killed by the dog, but the rest head back to Efrafa under the leadership of Campion. Word travels of Woundwort’s defeat and other animals sneak up on them, capturing more rabbits as they travel. Other rabbits, including Vervain, simply disappear and no one sees what happens to them. Adams writes, “Then it sprang forward; and even as they ran, his Owsla could hear the General’s raging, squealing cry, “Come back, you fools! Dogs aren’t dangerous! Come back and fight!” (Adams 303) This passage refers to General Woundwort as soon as he realizes he is in great danger. The dog guarding the farmer’s garden had finally reached its objective; to kill Woundwort.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at March 28, 2015 04:09 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03

Watership Down
Second Half of Chapter 45

“It doesn’t matter if it hears me now,’ thought Hazel. ‘If only I can get the rope bitten through quickly, it doesn’t matter. … He ripped the cord again and sat back for a quick breath looking across the track to where Dandelion was waiting” (Adams 434).

Question: Why did Hazel go to all this trouble, where in the end the cat caught him?

Answer: He did this so that he could free the rabbits from the General Woundwort. The dogs would have helped set them free. They cat at the end did end up catching him because he fell, and laid there on the ground still. It was an easy opportunity for the cat to catch him and hold him there by sitting on him.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at March 29, 2015 11:23 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03

Watership Down
Second Half of Chapter 33

“You went into the farmyard and the shed were the hutch rabbits were. This is much less dangerous. Come on—they’re all watching while we hesitate. Fiver hopped on to the road” (Adams 295).

Question: Why is it that Fiver had to be the one to take the first step?

Answer: In the story, Hazel would represent the hero, and Fiver would be one of the main characters. Since Hazel is the main character, he should be the one to have taken the first step, even if he was scared to do so. He must look and seem confident and strong for the group, because he is the leader. However, it was good that he had his brother there to help him, and guide him across. He gave his brother confidence to cross.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at March 29, 2015 11:24 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03

Watership Down
Second Half of Chapter 45

“It doesn’t matter if it hears me now,’ thought Hazel. ‘If only I can get the rope bitten through quickly, it doesn’t matter. … He ripped the cord again and sat back for a quick breath looking across the track to where Dandelion was waiting” (Adams 434).

Question: Why did Hazel go to all this trouble, where in the end the cat caught him?

Answer: He did this so that he could free the rabbits from the General Woundwort. The dogs would have helped set them free. They cat at the end did end up catching him because he fell, and laid there on the ground still. It was an easy opportunity for the cat to catch him and hold him there by sitting on him.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at March 29, 2015 11:25 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03

Watership Down
Second Half of Chapter 7

“At this moment, as he was still wondering what to say to them, he suddenly realized that something had lightened his spirits.”
Question: Why must Hazel think before he speaks his ideas to the group?

Answer: Hazel must not scare or steer the group in a bad or wrong direction. He must, just as everyone should, think before he speaks; he must have the group trust and listen to him. Since he thinks quickly, he does not have to keep them waiting too long of an answer. He is a good leader not only because he thinks quickly, but also because he will risk himself to protect the others.


Posted by: Hanna Kataria at March 29, 2015 11:26 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys into a Narrative CA03

Watership Down
Second Half of Chapter 16

“Hazel was surprised to realize that Silverweed was a mere youngster” (Adams 102).

Question: Why is it that Hazel thought it was so “surprising” of Silverweed’s age?

Answer: It is so surprising that a “rabbit of his age would” stand in front of a crowd to speak (Adams 102). Most young people would avoid speaking; even most people would avoid speaking. It is a nerve-racking thing to speak in front of many, if it is personal or just facts.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at March 29, 2015 11:27 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys to Narrative CA02
13 March 2015

"For a moment Hazel could hear nothing. Then he caught a distant but clear sound--a kind of wailing or crying, wavering and intermittent. Although it did not sound like any sort of hunting call, it was so unnatural that it filled him with fear." (Chapter 19, 2nd half, pg. 101)

Question: Who ended up being the source of the wailing and crying?

Answer: Once Hazel goes to investigate who may be the person in danger with Dandelion, they realize it is a rabbit, specifically, the notorious Captain Holly of the Sandleford Owsla. This was a shocking discovery to find the captain in that condition, and Hazel and Dandelion could not believe their eyes (Adams 102).

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at March 31, 2015 05:33 PM

Marie Destin

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative

10 March 2015

Second Half of Chapter 9

“Hazel determined then and there to bring the rabbits up to the bean field to shelter and rest until the evening “. “ He ran back and found the others where he had left them (Adams ,par 6, pg 42).

Question: How would the rabbits be without Hazel leadership? Would they look up to BigWhit instead?

The rabbits would have been lost with Hazel leadership because they are quite scattered brained when Hazel is not around to lead.For instance, there was an incident that occurred where the rabbits were about to get attacked by a crow which stated in the text.”Five and Pipkins, limping behind the others, and conspicuously undersized and tired, were being attacked by the crowd.” (Adams 42).During this time of turmoil, none of the rabbits knew what to do they all just panic. However, Hazel was quick on his feet and came up with a solution. That he took on the role of saving his group by doing “By dashing up he distracted its attention, and it turned on him.He swerved past it, stopped and, looking back, saw BigWig come racing in from the opposite side (Adams 42 ).

Posted by: Marie Destin at March 31, 2015 09:54 PM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

12 March 2015

Second Half of Chapter 16

“A rabbit in fear of an enemy will sometimes crouch stock still, either fascinated or else trusting to its natural inconspicuousness to remain unnoticed.”(Adams par pg. 102)

Question: Why is the group of rabbits are upset with Fiver? Why the poem does makes Fiver so intense?

When Fiver was listening to the poem, it became more of a horror story than a poem.That every word that he spoke made Fiver chill with fear. “At one and same time he seemed to accept every word and yet to be stricken with fear (Adams 103). However, no one else in the group paid attention to Fiver behavior when listening to the poem which should give out a signal to others that danger is close. That the rabbits became upset with Fiver because he may have damaged their relationship with the other members such as Cow Slip and other rabbits.

Posted by: Marie Destin at March 31, 2015 09:59 PM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

12 March 2015

Second Half of Chapter 28

“I don’t like this idea of yours at all. I have been to Effrafra and you haven’t .You are making a bad mistake and you might very well get us killed (Adams, par .23, pg . . . 250)

Question: Why does Hazel want everyone to go to Efrafa? What is the trick that need to be done?

As you can see Effrafa is one dangerous location for the rabbits, however, it is their best bet when it comes to a victory of their journey. The trick when comes to getting their home back would be tricking the headmaster of the Warren. It was stated in the text “First, it will have to get the does out of Efrafa and secondly it will have to put paid to the pursuit (Adams 250).

Posted by: Marie Destin at April 1, 2015 03:04 AM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 March 2015
Second Half Chapter 2

"What a shame! What a shame! Poor fellow, perhaps he ought to go home and rest. Yes, you'd better take him along now."(Adams 12)

Question: Why wouldn't Threarah take Fivers warning more seriously?

Answer: Being a strong leader takes many things, and one of them is to be assertive and not show any weaknesses. For the leader to even listen to Fiver may have been a long shot. For him to take him seriously, Fiver would have had to have direct proof that something bad was going to happen; not just a hunch. "What a shame! What a shame! Poor fellow, perhaps he ought to go home and rest. Yes, you'd better take him along now."(Adams 12) Threarah here is making it very clear that he will not play games with the younger rabbits and is eager to move on to more important things.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at April 1, 2015 11:48 AM

Marie Destin

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

16 March 2015

Second Half of Chapter 35

“We can escape from Efrana .The danger is very great, but in that we can succeed. It is beyond that I cannot see (Adams, par 5, pg. 326).

Question: Did Hazel bring the group in to dangerous situation? Does that make him good leader?

Answer:

Hazel brought them into a dangerous and made BigWhit a major piece in the plan .However, Hazel did not think of Big Whit condition or life rather than finishing the mission. Hazel brought them into a program that is not fully complete rather than thoroughly planned out. Hazel makes a good leader but not a great one because he is putting his team in danger. In the text, it states the plan Hazel has “ Sunset will be the best, and the sooner, the better .Hazel, and the others will meet us and fight any patrol that follows (Adams 328).

Posted by: Marie Destin at April 1, 2015 01:18 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 March 2016

"Silver seemed about to speak when suddenly there was a pattering in the undergrowth above and three more rabbits came over the bank from the wood. Their movement as direct and purposeful, quite unlike the earlier, haphazard approach of those who were now gathered in the ditch.” (Chapter 4: The Departure, page 20, par. 3, Adams)

Question: Who are these three rabbits and what character archetype do they fall under?

Answer: The main rabbit out of the three is Holly. A captain of the Owsla. The other two are not named but are on the same mission as Holly. They are there to arrest Bigwig because he was "Spreading dissension and inciting to mutiny." (Adams 20) They were also going to arrest Silver "for failing to report to Toadflax this evening." (Adams 20). These three rabbits are playing the role of the threshold guardian. Fiver and the other rabbits need to go through them to continue their journey. Bigwig, Dandelion, and Buckthorn attacked Holly and the two other guards causing them to flee.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at March 8, 2016 08:22 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
8 March 2016

Watership Down

Chapter 1 “The Notice Board”

Question: Who is the Hero of Watershed Down and what makes him/her different from the others?

Answer: The Hero of Watership Down appears to be Fiver. By his nickname alone, he stands out because it in definition alludes to being “Five in the Litter;” a strange occurrence amongst the rabbit populous. In this world surrounding the lives of rabbits, any number greater than four is referred to as “hrair meaning a lot, or a thousand.” Therefore possessing the pet name such as Fiver makes him a bit peculiar amongst his society (Adams 4,5). Secondly, he was the smallest rabbit within the litter, also describes as being so small that even “ a man could not see him, and a fox wouldn't eat him” a very distinct feature that sets, young Fiver apart from the others.(Adams 5). Based on this aspect of Fiver, Vogler states that “Heros must be unique beings” (Vogler 30) and by this definition Fiver meets the criteria of being the Hero.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at March 8, 2016 07:53 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
08 March 2016
“Hazel suspected that if Fiver felt they ought to cross the river, it might be dangerous not to.”
Question: What part of Hazel and his friends entering?
Answer: They have already crossed the first threshold and have past their first test. They are now entering into the trials and tribulations stage.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at March 8, 2016 09:40 PM

Who, using Vogler's frame, could fit the mentor archetype so far? Why?

Posted by: Burke Tomaselli at March 9, 2016 12:07 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 March 2016

“Hazel led the way down the slope of the run and up toward the bramble curtain. He did not want to believe Fiver, and he was afraid not to.” (Chapter 2: The Chief Rabbit, page 9, par. 8, Richard Adams)

Question: This passage refers to a moment after Hazel and Fiver decide to go tell someone of some terrible feelings Fiver is having. What were Fiver’s feelings? Who were they going to go tell?

Answer: Fiver’s feelings were telling him something bad was going to happen to the warren where the rabbits lived. He told Hazel, “Hazel—the danger, the bad thing. It hasn’t gone away. It’s here—all around us. Don’t tell me to forget about it and go to sleep. We’ve got to go away before it’s too late.” (Adams 9) He felt like the only way to be safe was to leave. Fiver spoke up again and said “Well, I suppose we’d better go and see the Chief Rabbit and you can tell him about it. Or I’ll try to. But I don’t expect he’ll like the idea at all.” (Adams 9) He was going to tell the Chief Rabbit so that he would warn everyone to leave.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at March 9, 2016 09:38 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
9 March 2016

“Bigwig was racing back across the field, looking more agitated than he had at any time since the encounter with Captain Holly. He ran into the water almost headlong and paddled over fast, leaving an arrowhead ripple on the calm brown surface. He was speaking as he jerked himself out on the sandy foreshore (Chapter 8: Watershed Down, 49, par. 3).

Question: What did Bigwig seem so concerned and anxious about as he crossed the river?

Answer: In the Story by Adams, “Watershed Down,”Bigwig had decided to do some exploring but on his journey he came across a dog. Bigwig explained,
I saw the dog crossing a clearing. It was trailing a chain, so it must have broken loose. It may be on the lendri's scent, but the lendri will be underground by now. What do you think will happen when it picks up our scent…” (Adams 49). He was afraid that the dog would pick up their scent, and he wanted to tell the others that they had to leave.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at March 11, 2016 08:57 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
11 March 2016
Watership Down

Chapter 15

Question: Is Rabscuttle a Trickster? Why or why not?

Answer: In the chapter “ The Story of the King’s Lettuce,’ El-ahrairah proved to be a formidable trickster and was forced by Prince Rainbow to live in a place that was not home until he had proven he had become honest (Adam 93). For him to leave this land, he devised another trick one that took cunning and strategy. He promised Prince Rainbow to steal Lettuce from King Darzin a task in with seemed impossible but he was able to accomplish it. He sent in Rabscuttle who infiltrated the land, befriended the king's son, poisoned the food and played the king a fool by influencing him that it was the lettuce that had made him sick so that he would freely give them the lettuce.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at March 11, 2016 09:57 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 March 2016

“‘O El-ahrairah!’ thought Hazel. ‘These are rabbits we’re going to meet. You know them as well as you know us. Let it be the right thing that I’m doing.’” (Chapter 12: The Stranger in the Field, page 70, par. 2, Richard Adams)

Question: This passage refers to a moment when Hazel prays asking that his decision to lead the group into a stranger’s warren for shelter is the right one. He knows that they could be going right into a trap and so do the other rabbits. Which rabbits decide that the new warren is worth a try? Which rabbit is reluctant to go?

Answer: Most of the rabbits decide that it is worth a try. “‘Then we’ll go now’…he watched them as they joined him (Hazel)…Blackberry…Bigwig…Silver…Dandelion…Buckhorn
…Pipkin…Acorn…Hawkbit…Speedwell…and last came Fiver, dejected and reluctant as a sparrow in the frost.” (Adams 70) The only rabbit that did not want to join the warren was Fiver.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at March 11, 2016 10:01 AM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 March 2016

“And while he was resting, over the hill came flying the dark swift, screaming as he went, ‘News! News! News!’ For you know, this is what he has said ever since that day.” (Chapter 6: The Story of the Blessing of El-ahrairah pg. 27 par. 3 Richard Adams)

What archetype does the dark swift play in this story? Who received the news? And what was news?

The dark swift played the archetype role of the Herald by foretelling what was going to happen soon. The “news” was told to El-hrairah, when the dark swift was delivering the news, he said, “I would not be you, El-ahrairah.” (pg 27 Adams) revealing that he was telling the news to El-hrairah. The dark swift begin telling El-ahrairah terrifying news by stating “For Frith has given the fox and weasel cunning hearts and sharp teeth, and to the cat he has given silent feet and eyes that can see in the dark, and they are gone away from Frith’s place to kill and devour all that belongs to El-ahrairah.” (pg 27-28 Adams)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at March 11, 2016 10:40 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL
Journeys into Narrative

Chapter 18
" He would not let Silver and Buckthorn fight alone, but he had felt obligated to leave the worst of it to them. For the first time in his life. Bigwig had found himself driven to moderation and prudence"

Question:
why wouldn't Strawberry let these two fight?

Answer:
He wouldn't let these two fight because he didn't want anything to happen to them or have them arguing over something that wasn't worth arguing over and then end up in a worse situation.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at March 15, 2016 10:28 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 March 2016

“Although he could not see into the hollow, he knew that there was some creature in it—something fairly big… For some moments it stabbed here and there, then gave up, lifted its head and watched them again.” (Chapter 23: Kehaar, page 179-181, par. 2, Richard Adams)

Question: This passage refers to a moment when Big Wig and Silver stumble upon a strange creature like they had never seen. They decide to do something about it. What did they stumble upon? What did they decide to do for it?

Answer: The rabbits found a bird like they had never seen before. The encounter is described as, “The creature in the hollow was a bird—a big bird, nearly a foot long.”(Adams 180) They decide that it is hungry so they decide to feed it. Hazel says “‘I believe it’s starving. We’d better feed it. Bigwig, go and get some worms or something, there’s a good fellow.’” (Adams 181) The rabbits decided to help him.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at March 20, 2016 05:46 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
Watership Down

Chapter 22

Question: How did El-ahrairah prove to Prince Rainbow that he did not clip his claws?

Answer: In the Middle of Chapter 22, Prince Rainbow found a plot of land the he thought perfect to cultivate and grow carrots. When he went out to plant his crop he carried along side him El-ahrairah, Hufsa, and Rabscuttle, and a few other rabbits to the perfect grounds behind the hill to grow these carrots. When he did this, “the whole business infuriated El-ahrairah, because he was certain that Prince Rainbow was doing this to tease him and to show that he felt sure that he had clipped his claws at last.” (Adams 169) Soon after he devised a plan which would prove Prince Rainbow’s sentiments otherwise. Factoring that the prince was using Hufsa to watch over him, he used him to his betterment. El-ahrairah used Hufsa and played him like a fool. First he set a series of events in motion then he told Hufsa about his plan know that he would attempt to tell Prince Rainbow. Later he took him to see a few of his friends, who feed Hufsa lies. Shortly after Hufsa told the prince and the prince arrested El-ahrairah in efforts to influence him to tell him where the carrots were to only banish him from the land, but El-ahrairah tricked him into a trial with a jury of elil. In the end the elil charged Hufsa with being mad and El-ahrairah went free with the carrots he stole as well of riding himself of Hufsa living with him.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at March 20, 2016 08:52 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
Watership Down
20 March 2016

Chapter 22

Question: How did El-ahrairah prove to Prince Rainbow that he did not clip his claws?

Answer: In the Middle of Chapter 22, Prince Rainbow found a plot of land the he thought perfect to cultivate and grow carrots. When he went out to plant his crop he carried along side him El-ahrairah, Hufsa, and Rabscuttle, and a few other rabbits to the perfect grounds behind the hill to grow these carrots. When he did this, “the whole business infuriated El-ahrairah, because he was certain that Prince Rainbow was doing this to tease him and to show that he felt sure that he had clipped his claws at last.” (Adams 169) Soon after he devised a plan which would prove Prince Rainbow’s sentiments otherwise. Factoring that the prince was using Hufsa to watch over him, he used him to his betterment. El-ahrairah used Hufsa and played him like a fool. First he set a series of events in motion then he told Hufsa about his plan know that he would attempt to tell Prince Rainbow. Later he took him to see a few of his friends, who feed Hufsa lies. Shortly after Hufsa told the prince and the prince arrested El-ahrairah in efforts to influence him to tell him where the carrots were to only banish him from the land, but El-ahrairah tricked him into a trial with a jury of elil. In the end the elil charged Hufsa with being mad and El-ahrairah went free with the carrots he stole as well of riding himself of Hufsa living with him.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at March 20, 2016 08:53 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
22 March 2016

"There was an uncomfortable silence, broken only by shuffling and whispering. Blackberry, dismayed, turned back to Hazel and Bigwig. 'What's the matter?' He asked in a low voice. 'Surely there's no harm in that?'" (Chapter 14: Like Trees in November, page 92, par. 3, Adams)

Question: In this passage everyone is starting to get cautious of their surroundings. What is the reasoning behind this?

Answer: They are at the test stage in their journey. This place seems nice on the surface but "Fiver's horrors had kept him above ground all night in the rain, oblivious of cold and prowling elil," (Adams 89) Everything is strange to them here. "Those are rabbits down there, trotting along like a lot of squirrels with nuts. How can that be right?" (Adams 88) To get past this test, they either need to wait it out and see if these other rabbits are enemies or allies, or leave and continue their adventure.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at March 22, 2016 12:33 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
22 March 2016

"'Follow me close and run when I do.' Without waiting to look out through the hinge, he went round the half-open door of the shed and stopped on the threshold." (Chapter 24: Nuthanger Farm, page 204, par. 5, Adams)

Question: In this passage Hazel and Boxwood had an encounter with a shadow archetype character. What was the outcome of the event?


Answer: They came in contact with a cat. "The cat, a tabby with white chest and paws, was at the further end of the little yard, walking slowly and deliberately along the side of a pile of logs." (Adams 204) This was also another test for the rabbits. They could stay and fight or run away. "The cat flung itself across the yard, and the two rabbits leaped into flight with great thrusts of their hind legs." (Adams 205) The made it out of the yard just in time. If the cat were any closer, they would not have made it.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at March 22, 2016 12:34 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
22 March 2016

"'Do you think we can risk it, Fiver?' He asked. 'I can't see why you're bothered,' answered Fiver. 'You went into the farmyard and the shed where the hutch rabbits were. This is much less dangerous. Come on they're all watching while we hesitate.'" (Chapter 33: The Great River, page 295, par. 2, Adams)

Question: In this passage they encounter a threshold. Is it a being or an object? Why is this difficult for the rabbits to get through compared to their previous encounters?

Answer: The threshold guardian they encounter is a river and bridge. It was difficult for them to muster the courage to cross because the river was unknown to them. They had no idea what was inside of it and it reminded them of their fears. More specifically "It reminded Hazel of the cat in the yard." (Adams 296) Next, they saw a fish in the river and Pipkin asked if it would eat him. "'There may be creatures in there that could,' said Hazel. 'How do we know? Come on, let's get across.'" (Adams 296) They all eventually crossed and continued with their adventure.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at March 22, 2016 12:35 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
22 March 2016

“He was about to lead the way up the south side of the combe when suddenly a rabbit shouldered him roughly aside, pushed past Fiver and was gone into the open. Hazel stopped and looked round in amazement.” (Chapter 32: Across the Iron Road, page 284, par. 1, Richard Adams)

Question: This passage refers to a moment when Hazel witnesses one of the rabbits ran out into the open to do something. Who was it? What was he attempting to do?

Answer: Bigwig pushed past the other rabbits and ran out into the open. Hazel asked, “‘Who was that?’ he asked. ‘Bigwig,’ answered Fiver, staring.” (Adams 284) There was a fox, an enemy of rabbits, approaching the comb so Bigwig ran out in attempt to lure it away from everyone else. Blackberry muttered, “‘What’s he up to?’… ‘Trying to draw it off, I suppose,’ replied Fiver. (Adams 284)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at March 22, 2016 04:06 PM

Chapter 34

Using Vogler and Campbell's theories and other texts we have read in class, How does Bigwig's most recent event symbolize the proverbial "belly of the whale?" What can be gained through this journey into said belly?

Posted by: Burke Tomaselli at March 22, 2016 11:25 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
9 March 2016

“Bigwig was racing back across the field, looking more agitated than he had at any time since the encounter with Captain Holly. He ran into the water almost headlong and paddled over fast, leaving an arrowhead ripple on the calm brown surface. He was speaking as he jerked himself out on the sandy foreshore (Chapter 8: Watership Down, 49, par. 3).

Question: Why did Bigwig seem so concerned and anxious as he crossed the river?

Answer: In the Story by Adams, “Watershed Down,”Bigwig had decided to do some exploring but on his journey he came across a dog. Bigwig explained,
“I saw the dog crossing a clearing. It was trailing a chain, so it must have broken loose. It may be on the lendri's scent, but the lendri will be underground by now. What do you think will happen when it picks up our scent…” (Adams 49). Bigwig was afraid that the dog would pick up their scent, and he wanted to tell the others that they had to leave.

Posted by: rev1_Andre Gilbert at March 25, 2016 12:26 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
18 March 2016

“They were all in no doubt that Dandelion had done them credit. Ever since their arrival most of them had felt out of their depth among these magnificent, well-fed strangers, with their detached manners, their Shapes on the wall, their elegance, their adroit evasion of almost all questions” (Chapter 16: Watership Down, 147, par. 3).

Question: What was the difference between the “well-fed strangers,” and Bigwig and his company of rabbits?

Answer: In the story Watershed Down, the rabbits said, “ Our lives have been the same as our fathers' and their fathers' before them. Things are different here. (Adams 148). It was a difference of lineage, where the well-fed strangers were domesticated and Bigwig and his company were wild, but they recognized the difference between their two worlds.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at March 25, 2016 12:27 AM


Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
18 March 2016

“In the Honeycomb, Bigwig and Holly were waiting to begin the second meeting since the loss of Hazel. As the air began to cool, the rabbits woke and first one and then another came down the runs that led from the smaller burrows. All were subdued and doubtful at heart. Like the pain of a bad wound, the effect of a deep shock takes some while to be felt. When a child is told, for the first time in his life, that a person he has known is dead, although he does not disbelieve it, he may well fail to comprehend it and later ask perhaps more than once where the dead person is and when he is coming back” (Chapter 27: Watership Down, 342, par. 2).

Question: In the story Watership by Adams, the rabbits faced ordeals. What was Hazel’s ordeal and could he be a hero?

Answer: Hazel had led a party to release doe rabbits to have them join the group, but men came and shot Hazel as he attempted to escape. Hazel said soon after the men came,
“"But we need this doe. That's what we came for” (Adams 328). When Hazel was shot, he faced death in the special world and inevitably overcame death. It was the hero’s ordeal in the journey that Hazel experienced. Hazel was prepared to sacrifice himself so that he could save his group, he turned to Dandelion,
"Listen," he said, "I'm going to run across the corner of the field, from this ditch to the other one, so that they see me. They'll try to shine that light on me for sure. While they're doing that, you and Haystack climb the bank, get into the lane and run down to the swede shed. You can hide there and I'll join you. Ready?” (Adams 330). The ordeal that Hazel faces is one of many contributing attributes that illuminate him as the hero or central figure of the story.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at March 25, 2016 12:27 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
18 March 2016

“As he went out into the field, he wondered whether he would be spotted by Kehaar. The arrangement had been that Kehaar would find him whenever he might come above ground on the second day.
He need not have worried. Kehaar had been over Efrafa since before dawn. As soon as he saw the Mark come up, he alighted a little way out in the field, halfway between the undergrowth and the sentry line, and began pecking about in the grass. Bigwig nibbled his way slowly toward him and then settled down to feed” (Chapter 36: Watership Down, 495, par. 5).

Question: What role did Kehaar play in the story?

Answer: In chapter thirty-six of Adams’ Watershed down, Kehaar became an ally of the band of rabbits. He agreed to help Bigwig, to guide, protect and fight for the group that Bigwig would free from General Woundwort’s warren. Bigwig explained to Hyzenthlay, “Sunset will be best, and the sooner the better. Hazel and the others will meet us and fight any patrol that follows. But the main thing is that the bird will fight for us. Even Woundwort won't be expecting that” (Adams 489). Without Kehaar’s help, the mission to bring does out of Woundwort’s warren would fail, and with his help it was sure to succeed.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at March 25, 2016 08:25 AM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
18 March 2016


“Even before he heard the roof of the Honeycomb fall in, Bigwig knew that it could be only a matter of time before the Efrafans found the soft places in the south wall and set to work to break through one of them. That would not take long. Then he would have to fight -- probably with Woundwort himself; and if Woundwort closed with him and used his weight, he would have little chance. Somehow he must manage to hurt him at the outset, before he expected it. But how?” (Chapter 46: Watership Down, 654, par. 2).

Question: With Bigwig and his group having to burry themselves in their borrows, would this scenario in the story be considered the belly of the whale and why?

Answer: Bigwig enters the burrows and seeks to seal himself in for an impending fight with Woundwort. Bigwig goes into the depths of the honey holes and faces certain death. It is very similar to the belly of the whale stage, yet, it is also a resurrection or climax stage of the story as well. Bigwig fights with Woundwort, “the sound of his heavy breathing came plainly from the top of the earth pile. Bigwig, the blood oozing from his back and ear, stood his ground and waited. Suddenly he realized that he could see the dark shape of General Woundwort faintly outlined where he crouched above him” (Adams 660).
Bigwig is almost killed before Woundwort ended up going back outside and was destroyed by the dog that Hazel lured to where the burrows were. In fact, “It had occurred to Bigwig that in the narrow run even his dead body would be a considerable obstacle. The Efrafans would either have to get it out or dig round it and this would mean more delay” (Adams 666). It is clear that Bigwig felt that it would be the end of him and his hope had dwindled to accept that if he must sacrifice himself, he would.
Both Hazel and Bigwig emerged from the ordeal, where, both had been faced with very near death scenarios, and come out alive and far better for it. The plan had worked, “So swiftly and silently had the dog come up the hill behind Dandelion and Blackberry that one of Campion's sentries, half asleep under a tussock after the long night, was pulled down and killed in the instant that he turned to bolt. Later -- after it had left Woundwort -- the dog beat up and down the bank and the open grass for some time, barking and dashing at every bush and clump of weeds” (Adams 685).
Speaking of his fight with Woundwort, Bigwig said to Hazel, "I thought he'd killed me," he said. "No more fighting for me -- I've had enough. And you -- your plan worked, Hazel-rah, did it?” (Adams 689). “Professing myself, moreover, convinced that the General's unjust interference, so far from being really injurious to their felicity, was perhaps rather conducive to it, by improving their knowledge of each other, and adding strength to their attachment,” it is clear in this segment of the story that after emerging from the belly of the whale, the ordeal, and virtually being resurrected, we see how the struggles improved and rewarded the heroes.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at March 25, 2016 09:35 AM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
26 March 2016
Watership Down

Chapter 34.

Question: What did witnessing the death of his mother do to Woundwort?

Answer: Witnessing the death of his mother placed a deep-rooted trauma within Woundwort. Due to this experience, there was a change that took place in him upon witnessing the account. According to Volgler, “Heroes don't just visit death and come home. The return changed, and transformed.” (Vogler 156) This transformation is what transpired with Woundwort. He cowered within under the covering of the grass and witness his mother eaten by a weasel and survived this since the weasel did not eat him due to being satisfied following consuming his mother. Soon after he was resurrected by a stranger who saved his life, but “ he became wild” and eventually becoming “strong and savage.” (Adams 305) The ordeal made Woundwort different but better for the environment that he was living. He became a survivor.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at March 26, 2016 02:13 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 March 2016

“Oh Hazel,” said Blackberry, coming up to him round a puddle in the gravel. “I was so tired and confused I actually began to wonder whether you knew where you were going. I could hear you in the heather, saying ‘Not far now’ and it was annoying me. I thought you were making it up. I should have known better. Frithrah, you’re what I call a Chief Rabbit!” “Well done, Hazel!” said Buckthorn. “Well done!” (Chapter 11: Hard Going pg. 57 par. 2)

Question: Why did Buckthorn appreciate Hazel and Blackberry consider Hazel Chief Rabbit?

Answer: Buckthorn appreciated Hazel because Hazel kept his promise and led them to the fields beyond darkness. Blackberry considered Hazel Chief Rabbit for this same reason as Buckthorn appreciating Hazel. In the passage as Hazel turned around described the setting “The gravel track led downhill into a narrow belt of silver birch and rowan. Beyond was a thin hedge; and beyond that, a green field between two copses. They had reached the other side of the common.” ( Adams 57) The quote describes the rabbits finally reaching the fields beyond their terror of the woods.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 3, 2016 12:44 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 April 2016

“At last El-ahrairah felt quite desperate and one night, when he had been risking his life again and again to bring down a few mouthfuls of grass for a doe and her family whose father had been killed the day before, he called out, ‘Lord Frith! I would do anything to save my people! I would drive a bargain with a stoat or a fox—yes, or with the Black Rabbit of Inle!” (Chapter 31: The Story of El-ahrairah and the Black Rabbit of Inle pg. 269/270 par. 4 Richard Adams)

Question: Why did El-ahrairah become so desperate to save his people? What plan did El-ahrairah come up with to give to the Black Rabbit of Inle?

Answer: El-ahrairah became desperate to save his people because “El-ahrariah tried every trick he could think of, but he couldn’t be rid of King Darzin or get his own people away. The rabbits began to become thin and miserable underground and some of them fell ill.” (269 Adams) The plan that El-ahrairah decided that would save his people would be to sacrifice his life to the Black Rabbit for his people so that the Black Rabbit of Inle could destroy King Darzin and his soldiers. (pg. 271 Adams)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 3, 2016 05:01 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 April 2016

“At last El-ahrairah felt quite desperate and one night, when he had been risking his life again and again to bring down a few mouthfuls of grass for a doe and her family whose father had been killed the day before, he called out, ‘Lord Frith! I would do anything to save my people! I would drive a bargain with a stoat or a fox—yes, or with the Black Rabbit of Inle!” (Chapter 31: The Story of El-ahrairah and the Black Rabbit of Inle pg. 269/270 par. 4 Richard Adams)

Question: Why did El-ahrairah become so desperate to save his people? What plan did El-ahrairah come up with to give to the Black Rabbit of Inle?

Answer: El-ahrairah became desperate to save his people because “El-ahrariah tried every trick he could think of, but he couldn’t be rid of King Darzin or get his own people away. The rabbits began to become thin and miserable underground and some of them fell ill.” (269 Adams) The plan that El-ahrairah decided that would save his people would be to sacrifice his life to the Black Rabbit for his people so that the Black Rabbit of Inle could destroy King Darzin and his soldiers. (pg. 271 Adams)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 3, 2016 05:27 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 Apirl 2016

“O Rowsby Woof! said El-ahrairah, crouching on the other side of the fence. ‘Most fortunate, most blessed Rowsby Woof! Your reward is at hand! I bring you the best news in the world!’” (Chapter 41: The Story of Rowsby Woof and the Fairy Wogdog pg 400 par. 4 Richard Adams)

Question: What news did El-ahrairah tell Rowsby Woof? What task did Rowsby Woof have to complete upon receiving the news?

Answer: The news El-ahrairah said to Rowsby Woof was “Your fame as a ratter has come to the ears of the Queen, ‘We know you—and honor you—as the greatest ratter in the world.” (401 Adams) El-ahrairah also told Rowsby that he had to be found worthy in order to be considered to meet the Queen so he gave him a task to complete by saying “Beyong the far end of the garden there lies a long rope of meat. Aye, real meat, Rowsby Woof, for though we are fairy dogs, yet we bring real gifts to noble, brave animals such as you. Go now—find and eat that meat.” (402 Adams)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 3, 2016 05:28 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
2 April 2016

“‘Here, wait a minute,’ said Hazel, pushing past Pipkin and Hawkbit as they came across the grass. ‘Holly, what’s the alarm? Tell us something, instead of stamping the place to pieces. What happened?'” (Chapter 42: News at sunset, page 411, par. 5, Richard Adams)

Question: This passage refers to a moment when the rest of the rabbits watched Holly and Blackavar run frantically into the warren. Hazel tries to ask them what they are so afraid of. What were Holly and Blackavar running from? Who/what, was with them?

Answer: Holly and Blackavar were running from the Efrafa army. Holly said to Hazel, “That combre—it’s full of rabbits from Efrafa.” (Adams 411) Holly goes on to tell them that Campion and Woundwort is with them. “…Campion’s there. We ran right into him and three or four more that Blackavar recognized. I believe Woundwort’s there himself.” (Adams 411)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at April 3, 2016 09:38 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
Watership Down
4 April 2016

Chapter 50

Question: What became the new sense of normal?

Answer: Their new sense of normal was their ability to defend themselves as warriors, a nation of rabbits who “did not scurry away”. This was a result of Woundworth, a rabbit who raised rabbits to “be bigger than they’ve ever been—braver, more skillful, more cunning” (Adams 467). Since this became their new lives, it only became natural to nurture and raised their future in a like manner. As stated by Hazel, he was going direct the new litter in a path of developing a new Warren; therefore perpetuating their new found strength as warriors.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at April 4, 2016 12:38 AM

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