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January 13, 2013

Unbearable Boors in Chekhov's _Medved_ [ _The Bear_]


Image Source: https://julianbarratt.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/540-chekhov-6_medium.jpg?w=604

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 13, 2013 06:33 PM

Readers' Comments:

Bearing the Load of an Extra Credit Assignment

14 March 2007

Students,

To those of you who attended the optional meeting on Friday, March 9th:

The first part of your extra-credit assignment (Due Monday, March 19) was to read the short play, "The Bear," by Anton Chekhov. You can find this work in the appendix of Roberts' WAL textbook (page 261).

Then, from Chapter 5 of WAL, "Writing about Plot and Structure," please answer question #2 (on page 108) with the following modifications. Only use the short story "The Necklace," by Guy de Maupaussant, "The Bear," a play by Anton Chekhov, and Rod Serling's"The Eye of the Beholder," a cinematic text screened in class earlier.

Note: See the previous post HERE to see the film again.
Click HERE to read "The Bear" online.
There is a link in the middle of the post HERE that will take you to a full-text online of Maupassant's "The Necklace."

The extra-credit assignment problem reads as follows: Consider the surprises in these three narratives. Then answer the following two sub-questions: (A) How much preparation is made for the surprises? and (B) In retrospect, to what degree are the surprises not surprises at all, but rather are necessary outcomes of the preceding parts of the works?

Go back and re-read parts of chapter 5 if you find you need help answering the questions in this assignment. If you do the assignment, I will take away one zero from your class participation score.

Those who attended class Friday, signed the attendance sheet, and submitted a paper indicating which missed day they'd like forgiven, will get an absence removed from their record.

Have a great Spring Recess,

Dr. Hobbs

------------------------------------------------

Andy H.
Instructor Lee Hobbs
ENGL 121.003
14 March 2007

“The Necklace”, “The Eye of the Beholder”, and The Bear

In reading “The Necklace, “The Eye of the Beholder”, and The Bear, I found that each text features a surprise at the end. Each text made necessary preparation to make it a good surprise. In all three cases, pretty much the entire text up until the end is leading the reader in a specific direction to guide their thoughts. Then at the end of the story, the authors hit you with the unexpected. In both “The Necklace” and “The Eye of the Beholder”, the preparations worked perfectly, and the end surprise was what made me like the story. I was already expecting a surprise before reading The Bear.

I think these surprises at the end of the story are quite necessary. I believe the surprises at the end of the three stories are both surprises and necessary outcomes of the preceding parts. On one hand, a surprise is something that comes unexpected and that holds true in two out of three stories. It would have been true in The Bear had I not read the question before reading the text. On the other hand, I think the surprises are necessary to the preceding parts because it makes the story interesting. If it wasn’t for the surprise, you would know exactly what was going on the whole time which would make these particular stories simple tragedies.

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 14, 2007 04:32 PM

Professor Hobbs,
The suprise in the short play "The Bear" is one that had a great amount of preporation for. The preporation is this case was not allowing the reader to know what was going to happen or foreshadowing. The preporation was building up the character's personalities in away that the readers begin to predict what was coming next.
I never thought that the ending of the story would be as so. I thought that the creditor was such a crazy, angry man that he would have fought the widow and killed her. I never thought that he would fall in love with her. This is how the author prepared the suprise.
Thanks,
Carlos Gonzalez
ENGL.121.003
Extra Credit Assignment

Posted by: Carlos R. Gonzalez at March 18, 2007 12:23 PM

P. 108 #2

After viewing/reading the works “The Bear”, “The Necklace”, and “Eye of the Beholder” we are held with surprises as a viewer/reader. Much preparation is made in each in order to give the surprise a full effect. In “The Bear” the characters of Mrs. Popov and Smirnov have an absolute hate for each other causing the reader to believe that they would never fall in love, but surprisingly their anger turns into passion. In “The Necklace” the reader expects that this necklace was truly real and expensive, but to the reader’s surprise it is a fake. In “Eye of the Beholder” the viewer believes that the woman under the bandages is so ugly it’s unbearable to the eyes of anyone, but surprisingly she is extremely beautiful. Preparation is key in making these stories as surprising as they are, without the preparation leading to the ultimate surprise the surprise would be nothing.
Yet, as the viewer/reader looks back on the previous events leading to the surprise there are reasons to believe that the surprise really wasn’t all that of a surprise. In “The Bear” Smirnov and Mrs. Popov hate each other so much that they are about to kill on another, but stories don’t end that way. Killing each other would just ruin the story, but for them to fall in love that is just a surprise, but obvious outcome of the story. In “The Necklace” Mrs. Liosel loses a diamond necklace she borrows from her wealthy friend Mrs. Forrestier. Why would someone lend an expensive diamond necklace to someone? If the diamonds were truly real I’m sure the owner wouldn’t lend them to someone even a friend. Due to this question the surprise that the necklace is a fake isn’t much of a surprise after all. In “Eye of the Beholder” the viewer never sees the faces of the others in the show causing the viewer to believe something is not right. This causes the surprise that she is beautiful and everyone else is ugly to not be much of a surprise after all.

Katie Kovac
English 121.003

Posted by: Katie Kovac at March 18, 2007 03:00 PM

Professor Hobbs,

Thanks for the opportunity to do extra credit!

Surprises are everywhere, particularly in literature. They allow the writer a power to ensnare the reader’s interest, forcing them to happily follow the story in order to reach the climax surprise at the end. Authors are able to choose how much or how little preparation they use in setting up the surprise as well as just how much of a shock they want their surprise to be. In looking at Anton Chekhov’s “The Bear”, Mausappant’s “The Necklace” and the Twilight Zone production “Eye of the Beholder”, the reader (or viewer) gets a range of authorial decisions about surprises.
“The Eye of the Beholder” offers quite a bit of preparation while building to the climax. The viewer is introduced to a main character in bandages, as well as her situation (the hospital) and some of the people she interacts with. Her story is slowly unwound, each little bit of interaction she has with the other characters building steadily towards the surprise climax when the bandages fall away and she is revealed to be a beautiful woman. The producer made this steady climb on purpose in order to reveal little bits and pieces of the mystery to the viewer so they could make inferences as to the next occurrence. However, due to this steady flow towards the surprise ending, the ‘surprise’ ending is really not so surprising. Tricky camera angles that miss the doctor’s and nurses’ faces, as well as other subtleties lead the viewer to be suspicious. Thus, when the viewer couples this suspicion with the title of the production, the surprise is expected and needed for the skit to feel complete. The woman needs to be beautiful and the other characters need to be pig-like in appearance. If the ‘surprise’ did not occur, the skit would lack closure and the entire moral basis of the play would be lost.
In likely fashion is Maupassant’s “The Necklace”. Maupassant builds his short story steadily to increase flow. Each event has to occur in order to create the conflict (the losing of the necklace) and thus to procure the necessary ending. Due to our modern culture, the reader expects a moral to be dissected from the story. Though “The Necklace” does not offer bits and pieces to build its mystery, it follows what could be considered to the modern reader the typical moral story fiber. Thus, when we learn at the end that the necklace is fake, the reader barely bats and eyelash. There is no surprise in it for the reader could guesstimate that something was strange about the situation and that the main character has to learn a valuable and necessary lesson (tell the truth) or punishment (all those hard years of work to pay for a ‘fake’ necklace replacement).
Lastly but not least is Chekhov’s “The Bear”. Though out of the three “The Bear” had the least amount of preparation for its surprise ending, its ending was the most shocking. Only a short few pages make up “The Bear” and with the added speed the heated argument between the two characters seems to create, the story rapidly moves towards its climax. There seems to be hardly any preparation before suddenly the woman hating Smirnov is confessing his love for a woman he barely knows. The ending comes as a complete and utter surprise like a punch to the face from a dark hallway. However, unlike “The Eye of the Beholder” and “The Necklace” the ending found in “The Bear” is not necessary to the story. The two people could have gone away still hating each other or perhaps, Smirnov would have gotten his money and left peaceably. The conclusion that Chekhov chooses to write gives a sense of completeness for the reader, but is entirely unnecessary as compared to the expected and needed endings to the two moral tales, “Eye of the Beholder” and “The Necklace”.
Surprises do exist in much of literature as a way to grab the reader’s attention. The author may choose to put a lot of preparation as in “Eye of the Beholder” or “The Necklace” with moral not-very-surprising endings or very little preparation (“The Bear”) with a shocking ending. Until the story is read however, every ending is a surprise.


Erin Knisley
18 March 2007
ENGL 121.003 MWF

Posted by: Erin K. at March 18, 2007 06:03 PM

The Bear
Question #2 on pg 108

Surprises in stories often happen and usually are built up throughout the story to make a huge surprise at the end. In this case, this story had a lot of preparation for this surprise at the end. The author made you feel that they truly hated each other and it made you think about what could happen with these two people by the end of the story. But, in all reality, if you thought about it you could almost predict what was going to happen. By reading it, I pretty much knew that they were going to show some feelings for each other by the end. There are many symbols throughout the story that you can pin-point that will lead you to the conclusion, which makes some surprises not really as big as you thought they would be.

Take The Necklace for example, all that time you’re thinking that she lost this women’s real diamond necklace and wondering how she is going to come up with the money to pay for a new one. But, at the same time you’re thinking that why wouldn’t she just ask her about the necklace at least to see if it’s worth throwing your whole life away to pay for it. I feel that The Necklace was harder to determine the surprise at the end but, still if you used symbols and clues throughout the story you could come up with some understanding and base your own conclusion on those.

Also, The Twilight Zone, was also another good example because it was opposite of The Bear and The Necklace because you knew that there was going to be some type of surprise at the end but it was hard to tell what if could be because the symbols were so vague. For one, the characters faces were never showed to the end so that built up the surprise. As you’re watching this short film you’re expecting her to be some ugly, inhuman person and she turns out to be normal and as a viewer you are defiantly not expecting this because you could have never known that being inhumane was the norm in this story because there were just not enough clues given. So in some degree the surprises can be really big surprises and in other cases you can predict the surprise before it even occurs.

Lorin Gdula

Posted by: Lorin Gdula at March 18, 2007 09:57 PM

Dear Lee Hobbs,

The short story, “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant, “The Bear”, a play by Anton Chekhov and Rob Serling’s and “The Eye of the Beholder”, a short TV show; all three of these pieces of work have surprises that are noticeable at the end of the story. All do not preparation for their endings, which hold the surprises. For example, in the short story “The Necklace” readers are stunned to find out that the Necklace was only costume jewelry. This was vital for the stories ending, because without it Mathidle would not have learned her lesson on what is truly valuable.
In the play ‘The Bear” by Anton Chekhov the surprise is at the end when we find out that Mrs. Popov falls and Smirnov fall in love. The stories central focus is how sorrowful and lonely Mrs. Popov is since she lost her husband. During the story we meet Smirnov who comes across as angry hateful man that could never love women. While reading I thought that one was going to end up killing the other on the call out. The endings surprise was important because is emphasized on two very different people can fall in love.
Another surprise at the end of the story includes the short film clip, “The Eye of the Beholder”. A woman’s face wrapped in bandages and hopes to become normal looking like the rest of society. We figure the woman must look horrible looking and the events leading up to the unwrapping of the bandages are tense. However, viewers are surprised that the girl is beautiful. However in the society she lived in her looks were deviant and went against the social norms. The surprise ending is important because it helps emphasis that statement that, “Beauty is in the eye of the Beholder”.

Posted by: Sheryll Daugherty at March 18, 2007 10:05 PM

In the story "The Bear " I was very shocked to find out that Mrs. Popov stayed in the house grieving for who dead husband who mistreated her What I expected is that this married couple had the perfect marriage , but they did not her husband mistreated her and was unfaithful and she stayed in the house after his death. The eye of the beholder was very ironic as well beause I thought Ms. Taylor was in a normal hosptial and I believe that she looked like a total freak instead it was the exact opposite. Everyone who worked at the hosptial was very ugly and she was very pretty.I was very suprised in both stories.

Posted by: Melisa Parsons at March 18, 2007 10:45 PM

Professor Hobbs,

Throughout all three of the short stories there is preparatiom throughout the whole story to hear the “punchline” in the end. I feel as though all three of the stories endings didn’t necessarily have surprising outcomes. With “The Necklace” I had a feeling that the diamond couldn’t have been real, although it was a sad ending that she and her husband had worked so long to pay it off. In the “Eye of the Beholder” by not being able to see the woman’s face, the viewer was able to come to some sort of conclusion that her face was either horribly distorted or perfect. In the last story “Bear” the viewers were wondering why they were fighting about what the woman needed to pay, talking about how the man and woman hated each other, and in the end, sharing a kiss and “falling in love” over giving Oats to a Horse in a barn.
In all of these stories, the way the plot had been presented made it easier for the reader to predict the outcome.


Sincerely,
Tina W

Posted by: Tina W at March 18, 2007 10:58 PM

Lauren E. Wozniak
ENGL 121
Instructor Lee Hobbs
March 19, 2007

Extra Credit

#2 (A) How much preparation is made for the surprises?

In “The Necklace”, “The Bear”, and finally “The Eye of the Beholder” all of the authors of these plays and short stories made their plot leading up the surprise very interesting and suspenseful. The authors try to get the readers to believe something different from the actual out coming by foreshadowing events that throw you off.

(B) In retrospect, to what degree are the surprises not surprises at all, but rather are necessary outcomes of the preceding parts of the works?

In “The Necklace”, the surprise was that the necklace was not real, but indeed fake. This surprise was necessary for the story, because the irony of the outcome was that Mythilde had to work long and hard ten years to pay off the necklace that she lost. If she had known from the beginning that the necklace was not real she wouldn’t have learned what hard work was. In “The Eye of the Beholder”, the surprise and shock of the movie was that the nurses and doctors and everyone else in that community were deformed and odd looking and that the patient was the only normal looking one, and was not deformed at all. The bandages on her face foreshadowed that something was going to be wrong with her, but to our surprise she was the only normal looking one. In “The Bear”, the surprise of the play was that the widow and the tax collector fell in love. This was shocking to the audience, because the tax collector had intruded in her life and wanted to collect the debts that her late husband owed. This was necessary for the story because it showed Mrs. Popov how to love again after the death of her late husband.

Posted by: Lauren Wozniak at March 19, 2007 01:16 AM

English 121
3/19/07
Professor Hobbs,
Extra credit: Suprises

The stories The Bear, The Necklace, and The Eye of the Beholder all have one thing in common, these stories all have a surprise ending. These stories all build up to the surprise so you sort of see it coming.
At the start of the story The Bear, the woman has locked herself away from the world for months and refuses to go out into the world to meet new people, despite her footman’s efforts to get her to go out. Then suddenly a military man arrives which makes us think that by the end of this story she will probably be hooking up with this guy, but we’re not sure because the story could go in any direction at this point. Later he refuses to leave which adds for more build up to this ending and eventually he says he likes her and then that he loves her. When I got to the end of this I wasn’t surprised at all by the ending because there was enough build up to know how this would end.
In The Necklace I don’t think there was much build up for the surprise ending. Her friend was very rich so we assume that the necklace is real, it didn’t even cross my mind that it was fake at the start. After the necklace is lost the rest of their time is spent working up money to pay their debts off, and the whole time she’s thinking about how she shouldn’t have borrowed that necklace. It’s this looking back on the situation that adds for the only bit of build up, but it’s not much build up at all. This just made the thought pass through my head that it would be pretty ironic if it turned out to be a fake. I don’t think there was enough build up to say the story had to end this way, but I wasn’t surprised by the ending either.
The Eye of the Beholder had the most obvious build up I think, but this was also a movie which makes it easier to pick up on these things. Throughout this whole movie this woman’s face is covered in bandages and all the doctors and nurses talk about how ugly she is, anybody paying attention however would notice that we’re not seeing anybody else’s face either. Also knowing that this is a twilight zone episode lets us know that something is probably wrong with everybody else’s face while the woman might look normal. I wasn’t surprised at all by the ending, even when I first saw this when I was 10 or 11 years old. After all the build up this had it was necessary for the story to end by showing us that the woman looks normal, from our perspective, and everyone else is hideous.

Sincerely,
Jeff Hoover

Posted by: Jeff Hoover at March 19, 2007 10:39 AM

Jenny Troutman
ENGL 121.003 Humanities Literature
Extra Credit Assisgnment
3/9/07

Dear Professor Hobbs,

In Maupassant's piece, The Necklace, I do believe there was preparation for the surprise. Mathilde never knew the jewelry that she had borrowed from her friend was costume jewerly. So Mathilde and her husband spent 10 years in debt trying to pay this necklace off so she could return it to her friend and act like she never lost it. Near to the ending when Mathilde return the necklace, her friend just laughed because it was only costume jewelry and there was no need of paying all that money for the expensive necklace that Mathidle and her husband slaved over.

The Bear had some preparation in the story. It was a big surprise to me because I never knew that Smirnov was going to fall in love with Mrs. Popov. As the story goes on, Smirnov irritates Mrs. Popov and he just won't leave her alone and she gets so angry. As Smirnov sees Mrs. Popov's reactions to him, he starts to fall in love but Mrs. Popov denies everything about falling in love with him. She claims hatred but then falls in love with Smirnov.

Posted by: Jenny Troutman at March 19, 2007 10:51 AM

--------------------------------------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this assignment has now passed. Comments are no longer being accepted for this exercise

~Lee

Posted by: Lee Hobbs at March 21, 2007 09:26 AM

Josh Green
Professor Hobbs
Eng 122 CA17
1/26/09

Chekhov, Anton. “The Bear: A Joke in Act One.” Writing about Literature by Edgar V. Roberts. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River. NJ: Pearson, 2006. 261-69.

For this writing assignment I did a little close reading on a short play by Anton Chekhov called The Bear. I decided to focus my close reading on the opening and closing dialog of the play, which I believe best describes the development of Mrs. Popov’s character throughout the play.
In the opening scene Mrs. Popov clearly recalls her days with her husband enjoying their time on a certain horse named Toby. “Oh, how he loved Toby! He always used to ride on him to visit the Korchagins or the Vlasovs. How wonderfully he rode! How graceful he was when he pulled at the reins with all his strength! Do you remember? Toby, Toby! Tell them to give him an extra bag of oats today.”(Chekhov 262) I think that in this quote, Mrs. Popov is still holding on to Mr. Popov’s memory in any way she can, even if she has to relate his memory with the horse Toby. After her meeting with Smirnov, I saw a drastic change in Mrs. Popov’s gloomy outlook. When he started telling her how he really felt, she had no choice but to give in because deep inside she knew she needed to. After the slightly comical arguments back and forth between the two, they engaged in a kiss and that was the turning point for Mrs. Popov. [Lowering her eyes.] ”Luka, tell them in the stable not to give Toby any oats today.”(269) I believe that not giving Toby the oats, was symbolizing Mrs. Popov letting go of Mr. Popov’s memory all together. She no longer worried about the things he loved but rather the man she would grow to love. Basically I saw the quotes as Mrs. Popov’s defining transformation after meeting Smirnov.

Posted by: Josh Green at January 26, 2009 11:16 PM

Sonia Perez
Dr. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing 2 Eng 122 CA16
10 March 2009

“The Bear”: Unexpected Love
According to Edgar V. Roberts, “In form, an allegory is a complete self-sufficient
narrative, but it also signifies another series of conditions or events” (131). In “The Bear” by
Anton Chekhov, two strangers, a man and a woman, are in a heated argument. They are going to
duel with rifles and share a passionate kiss. The meaning in this play is unexpected love. There are many odds from both sides for these strangers to fall in love; Mrs. Popov’s husband is dead,and she wants to remain faithful to him. Furthermore, Smirnov hates women and their arguments.
Mrs. Popov is a young widow who has been in mourning for seven months. “Yes I know, it’s no mystery to you that he was often mean to me, cruel…and even unfaithful, but I shall remain true to the grave and show him I know how to love” (Chekhov 261). Mr. Popov mistreated his wife and cheated on her, yet she will be true to him to prove that she is a good woman. Mrs. Popov will always love her husband.
Smirnov arrives at the estate of Mrs. Popov to collect the money that her deceased
husband owns him. Since Mrs. Popov cannot give Smirnov the money, he decides to stay
there. Smirnov is upset because he is not receiving the money and finds it annoying that she is being emotional. “…ran through half my fortune as a result of my tender feelings; but now, if you excuse me, I’m on to your ways! I’ve had enough!” (Chekhov 265). This quote shows that
Smirnov wastes his money on women, and is affected by Mrs. Popov and wants nothing to do
with her.
Mrs. Popov and Smirnov are having an argument since Smirnov believes that men are faithful, but Mrs. Popov thinks otherwise since her husband cheated on her with other women.
When she is getting the rifles, Smirnov starts to reflect on how she is a real woman since she
wants to duel with him. He realizes that he never met a woman like her before and finds out that he is in love with her. She comes back into the room and Smirnov offers his hand to marry
her. “Get away from me! get your hands away! I… hate you! I… challenge you!” (Chekov 269). Mrs. Popov did not want Smirnov to kiss her, yet in this quote, she is hesitant about him kissing
her. The argument leads to Mrs. Popov and Smirnov to fall in love with each other.
Chekhov’s “The Bear”, is a great allegory story; he presents political side in this short play. Mrs. Popov and Smirnov are supposed to engage in a duel; however, back in the 1800s women did not participate in these events. Mrs. Popov speaks her mind in the story, and women were not allowed to do that. These reasons are why Smirnov fell in love with her. Also, Mrs. Popov is faithful to her dead husband, Smirnov hates women, and their heated argument causes both of them to share a kiss. All these factors show unexpected love between two people.

Works Citied
Chekhov, Anton. “The Bear”. Writing About Literature by Edgar V. Roberts. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2006. 261-269.

Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2006. 131.

Posted by: Sonia P. at March 9, 2009 10:48 AM

Chris Lavie
Dr Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
3 February 2013


QUESTION 19: Smirnov reveals in a conversation with Mrs. Popov that he has been involved in what number of love affairs?

ANSWER: Smirnov has been involved in twenty-one love affairs, page27:” I have walked out on twelve ladies, and nine ladies have walked out on me!”

Posted by: Chris Lavie at February 3, 2013 11:17 PM

Terrance Browne
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122
3,February 2013

Question :What did Popova think of her late husband?

Answer: Popova loved her late husband so much, she was so obsessed with him that on the seven month anniversary of her husband's death she locked herself in her house while her friends begged her to try and get out of her house "I shall never leave this house. Why should I? My life is over,he's dead and buried, and so am I"(Chekhov, pg 1).

Posted by: Terrance Browne at February 4, 2013 12:03 AM


Christopher Burke

The hostility between Luka and Smirnoff is demonstrated in connection with the ordering of refreshments.When Smirnoff is upset at the woman and decides to sit and wait at the womans house he continually orders more drinks from Luka. When luka is dieing from what looks to be a heart attack or stroke he also asks Smirnoff to fetch him water.

Posted by: Christopher Burke at February 4, 2013 08:50 AM

Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
2 February 2013

Question: This play criticizes the hypocritical attitude of upper class. Discuss this assertion.

Answer: The upper class acquaintance of Smirnoff is Popova, who owes Smirnoff money. she is extreemly rich and the casuaty of her husbands death is her excuse for not paying back Smirnoff. Usually she is a charcter who you would think can pay back someone but instead she and a few others keep giving him excuses. They keep saying and telling everyone how it’s important to pay someone back and yet they don’t even pay Smirnoff back. Some would call it cheap but hypocrites suffice just the same. Popova just keeps giving him excuses and not the money she owes him.

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at February 4, 2013 11:31 AM

Alexandra Rivera-Vega
Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05
2 Feb 2013

Question: What were Smirnov’s views about ladies?

Answer: Smirnov's views about ladies were that he hated them. He states that they are liars and unfaithful to every man they come across, he has a very stong opinion about them. "Present company excepted, of course, but all women are pretentious, affected, gossipy, hatteful, liars to the marrow of their bones, vain, petty, merciless, they can't think straight..." (Chekhov 27)

Posted by: Alexandra Rivera-Vega at February 4, 2013 01:00 PM

Jose Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA04 Academic writing II
4th, February 2013

Question:
8. Draw a character sketch of Smirnov; characterize Smirnov.
9. Draw a character sketch of Popova; characterize Popova.

Answer:
8. Smirnov is a sarcastic man who has come to reclaim an owed debt. He is a man with wit and intellect, especially when proving a point to Popova. He is a land owner with much to offer. He has had bad experiences with women which influences his side of the argument with Popova. He believes men are faithful while women are cold, and untrue. The argument exposes the traits desired by each character, and transitions into a new found love. The hatred Popova has for him results in the challenge of a dual; however, Smirnov could not go through with it out of love for Popova, he realized he was not able to hurt her.

9. Popova is a widowed wife with dimples and a debt carried over from her late husband. She is a stubborn woman; because, she vows to stay faithful to a dead man who did not treat her well. She is not an elderly woman as character refer to Popova as being too good to remain home, and faithful. Since it is the seven month anniversary of her husband’s death, she is very emotional which impacts her experience with Smirnov. This also influences her argument with Smirnov on which gender is more faithful. The argument fuels Popova’s hatred for Smirnov while exposing the both characters traits and desired traits. Through the argument their differences draw them together. Popova was not convinced of her feelings until she was kissed; Smirnov’s kiss set her free from her “burial,” and bereavement.

Posted by: Jose Garcia at February 4, 2013 01:03 PM

Today's News: His Majesty the King Cuong V Truong created a character name Actor Tom Truong for his upcoming real life scary movie Jesus Christ reborn: The Second Coming of Christ. It's a real life movie about the son of God using Knights created by fate to help 7+ Billion slaves to fight the devil worshipers cult illuminati aka (the Bilderberg Group).

Posted by: Carmelita Mccullum at February 4, 2013 03:14 PM

Analisa Johnson
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122-CA 08
5 February 2013

Question: What is the name of Mr. Popova favorite horse?

Answer: Toby is the name of Mr. Popova favorite horse. He would" ride all over the neighborhood on him" (Chekhov, 22).

Posted by: Analisa Johnson at February 5, 2013 05:50 PM

Jade Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA 08
5 February 2013

Question: Later in the play, what is the reason that Smirnov stops by the Popov's home?

Answer: Later in the play, Smirnov stops by the Popov's home because he gave her husband a couple loads of oats- the total came to 1200 rubles. He needed the money that day because he has a mortgage payment due the next day.(page 23)

Posted by: Jade Lowe at February 5, 2013 07:57 PM

Brynn Laverdure
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
February 5, 2013

Question:Identify the MAIN example of sound effects in Chekhov’s play?

Answer: The only real examples of sound effects I found were when the author describes a chair cracking and someone smacking their head. On page 27 Anton writes "Pure crocodile.(Grabs the back of a chair;the chair cracks and breaks)"(Chekhov 27).

Posted by: Brynn Laverdure at February 5, 2013 10:26 PM

Kathryn White
Dr. Hobbs
CA05
February 4, 2013
6. What happens at the end of the play? Discuss the implications of the ending

At the end of this short story, Popova and Smirnoff ended up kissing and realizing their love for each other. This action caused confusion and question between Popova, Smirnoff, as well as Popova’s house helpers. The newly found “couple” laughs about the situation, even though Popova still owed Smirnoff money and he wouldn’t be able to pay his mortgage.

Posted by: Kathryn White at February 5, 2013 10:39 PM

Question: What do Smirnov and Mrs. Popov have a heated argument about?
Answer: Mrs.Popov is not able to pay him 12 hundred rubles for a couple of loads of oats that her late husband bought from him. He is mad because he needs the money for his mortgage.

Posted by: Jasmine Lowe at February 5, 2013 11:47 PM

Question: What do Smirnov and Mrs.Popov have a heated argument about?
Answer: Mrs.Popov is not capable of paying Smirnov 12 hundred rubles for a couple of loads of oats that her late husband bought from him. He needs the money to pay his mortgage (page 23).

Posted by: Jasmine Lowe at February 6, 2013 12:15 AM

Marquisa Turner
ENG 122-CA04 Academic Writing II
Dr. Hobbs
5 February 2013

Question: What is the symbolism of that sound effect (answer to question above)?

Answer: The main sound effect is the sound/action that the character is supposed to make. The symbolism of this sound effect is to show emotions that the character is feeling. “(Sighs) You haven’t seen your neighbors in months, you don’t go out, and you tell us not to let anybody in. (Chekhov 1)” this quote shows that sound produced is a sigh and sighs typically mean showing disappointment and sadness .

Posted by: Marquisa Turner at February 6, 2013 12:23 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA02 Academic Writing II
2nd of February 2013

Question: “Explain/describe (another) place in the narrative where an example of nonverbal ‘language of action’ happens.”

Answer: In “The Bear” by Anton Chekhov, the playwright uses many different techniques to create well rounded characters in a very short period of time, monologues and Soliloquies all serve to create depth in the characters and more importantly, to provide context for the story’s ending. But it is Chekhov’s focus on non verbal communication that truly holds a real glimpse into the psyche of characters. For example, when Smirnoff sits down in the play, such as on page 29, it can be seen as a foreshadowing as to Smirnoff’s unspoken desire to fall in love once again. The moment where Smirnoff realizes his love for Popova is also the most crucial moment in establishing their attraction to one another. On page 31, the dialogue becomes much slower and more delicate as Smirnoff attempts to teach Popova how to handle the dueling pistols. Chekhov relies on the actors’ actions to communicate the romance of the scene rather than his own writing.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at February 6, 2013 12:56 AM

Ryan Nowotny
Dr.Hobbs
Eng-122 ca05
6 February, 2013

Question: What is the significance of the plays title?

Answer: The significance of the plays title "The bear" is very significant. The title suggest that the main character is like a bear in that he is rude, bad mannered, and has a bad temper. Throughout the story is rude to women and even challenges one to a duel.

Posted by: Ryan Nowotny at February 6, 2013 08:05 AM

Lauren Irish
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122 CA04
6 February 2013

Question: 13. Identify the MAIN example of sound effects in Chekhov’s play

Answer: The acting and sound effects displayed a sense of tragedy and suspense thoughout the short story.

Posted by: Lauren Irish at February 6, 2013 09:44 AM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
23 September 2013

Question: What were Smirov's view about ladies?

Answer: he believes the only honest and faithful women are either old or ugly (Smirnoff 27)

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at September 23, 2013 04:28 PM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
24 September 2013

Question #3: "Why did Smirnov come to Popova's house?"

Answer: Smirnov makes a visit to Popova's house because her husband that has passed away owes him money. Smirnov introduces himself adding, "I had the pleasure of knowing your late husband, and as it happens, he left me two IOUs" (Chekhov 23).

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 24, 2013 10:33 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
25 September 2013

Question #19: Smirnov reveals in a conversation with Mrs. Popov that he has been involved in what number of love affairs?

Answer: When trying to prove that he does actually know how to compose himself in front of women, Smirnov mentions to Mrs. Popov, “I have fought three duels because of ladies, I have walked out on twelve ladies, and nine ladies have walked out on me!”(Chekhov 9). Therefore, Smirnov reveals that he has been involved with twenty-four women in his life so far. Smirnov then goes into detail to name different actions he took for the women he had loved(Chekhov 9). He goes on to say, “I spent half my life hanging around women”(Chekhov 9).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 25, 2013 10:13 AM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
25 September 2013

Question: The hostility between Luka and Smirnov is demonstrated in connection with the ordering of ________?

Answer: The hostility between Luka and Smirnov starts off with Luka telling Smirnov that he needs to leave because the woman is sick. Smirnov does not listen, and proceeds to enter into the house anyway. This makes Luka angry, and then Smirnov starts ordering Luka to get him a glass of water, but then changes his mind and tells him he wants a beer instead, but then he ends up getting water anyways. Luka is very annoyed at this point with the man here, because he has asked him to leave several times. When Luka comes back, Smirnov and the woman are in an argument and Smirnov orders Luka to get him some vodka. When Luka comes back, Smirnov is being rude to him and treating him horribly. This is when Luka says, “You take too many liberties you know that…?” (Chekov 8) When Luka then hears of the battle, he practically passes out and cannot function and wants either the woman or Smirnov to get him water, but they are too busy fighting. He begs Smirnov to not go through with this, but he will not listen to Luka. This is when Luka gets angry and tells him he is going to go off and get other people like the gardener to come break up this situation because he cannot handle it himself. Smirnov overall treats Luka like a slave and Luka does not appreciate this even though Smirnov is of higher class, which sets up the character vs. character conflict that is present throughout the whole play between these two people.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 26, 2013 12:52 AM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
25 September 2013

Question: The hostility between Luka and Smirnov is demonstrated in connection with the ordering of ________?

Answer: The hostility between Luka and Smirnov starts off with Luka telling Smirnov that he needs to leave because the woman is sick. Smirnov does not listen, and proceeds to enter into the house anyway. This makes Luka angry, and then Smirnov starts ordering Luka to get him a glass of water, but then changes his mind and tells him he wants a beer instead, but then he ends up getting water anyways. Luka is very annoyed at this point with the man here, because he has asked him to leave several times. When Luka comes back, Smirnov and the woman are in an argument and Smirnov orders Luka to get him some vodka. When Luka comes back, Smirnov is being rude to him and treating him horribly. This is when Luka says, “You take too many liberties you know that…?” (Chekov 8) When Luka then hears of the battle, he practically passes out and cannot function and wants either the woman or Smirnov to get him water, but they are too busy fighting. He begs Smirnov to not go through with this, but he will not listen to Luka. This is when Luka gets angry and tells him he is going to go off and get other people like the gardener to come break up this situation because he cannot handle it himself. Smirnov overall treats Luka like a slave and Luka does not appreciate this even though Smirnov is of higher class, which sets up the character vs. character conflict that is present throughout the whole play between these two people.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 26, 2013 12:52 AM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng. 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
26 September 2013

Question: What did Popova think of her late husband?

Answer:
In the story “The Bear,” Popova is depicted as being an extremely loyal wife. She loves her late husband more than anything. The interesting part of it though, is that her husband was not a very good husband. He would always cheat and leave her for long periods of time. Chekhov writes, “Oh, I know he treated me badly- I don’t have to tell you about it. He was mean and… and even unfaithful. But I intend to be faithful to the grave to show him what real love is” (Chekhov 21-22). This quote shows us how much of a true person Popova really is. She is good looking young woman but still chooses to stay loyal to her horrible late husband.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 26, 2013 01:56 AM

Ti’rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
23 September 2013
Question: This play criticizes the hypocritical attitude of upper class. Discuss this assertion.
Answer: The man at the beginning of the story said that she had grieved enough, it was okay to go out and enjoy life and she still wanted to stay loyal to her husband. By the end of the story they were criticizing her for kissing the man she just met when they were advocating for her to do that in the first place.

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at September 27, 2013 11:06 AM

Ryan MacCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
27 September 2013


Question: Later in the play, what is the reason that Smirnov stops by the Popovs’ home?


Answer: The reason Smirnov stops by the Popovs’ home later in the play is that he wanted his debts to be paid. Smirnov does not want to leave the estate until his debts are paid off, even if that means it last until the next day. This ends up getting into an argument with the two as they argue on if he should pay the debts or not.

Posted by: Ryan MacCarthy at September 27, 2013 12:13 PM

Ryan Voss
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic writing
9/27/13

Question: What is the name of Popova's favorite horse?
Answer: The name of the favorite horse is "Toby".
"Toby!, He used to love Toby so! and me!" (Chekhov)

Posted by: Ryan Voss at September 27, 2013 01:30 PM

Ryan Voss
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic writing
9/27/13

Question: What is the name of Popova's favorite horse?
Answer: The name of the favorite horse is "Toby".
"Toby!, He used to love Toby so! and me!" (Chekhov)

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Ryan Voss at September 27, 2013 01:34 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
7 February 2014

QUESTION #4:
What did Popova think of her late husband?

ANSWER:
Popova says in regard to her late husband, "Oh, I know he treated me badly-I don't have to tell you about it. He was mean ... and even unfaithful" (Chekhov 21-22). However, Popova goes on to say, "But I intend to be faithful to the grave and show him what real love means" (Chekhov 22). In other words, despite how her husband treated her, she stays determined (even after his death) to teach him a lesson, in a sense, on how he should've treated her. She's holding on to a sense of hope that there's still time for him to change, even with the situation being what it is.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at February 7, 2014 11:03 AM

Bianca T. Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA12
9 Feb. 2014

Question #19: Smirnov reveals in a conversation with Mrs. Popov that he has been involved in
what number of love affairs?

Answer: Smirnov has had 21 love affairs. "I have walked out on twelve ladies, and nine ladies walked out on me!" (Chekhov 9). If you add both numbers, you get a total of 21 love affairs.


Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at February 9, 2014 12:46 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
9 February 2014

Question #1:
What is the significance of the play’s title?

Answer: The significance of the play’s title is it reflects Smirnov’s attitude because people who are referred to as bears are often rude and bad tempered. For example, when he challenged Popova to a duel he said, “Ill shot her like a sitting duck! I’m not a school boy anymore, I’m no sentimental puppy-I don’t care if she is the weaker sex!” (Chekhov 30). This shows how he has no care that she is a woman because people don’t duel woman. Also, the way that he was talking about her throughout the story shows how he has the attitude of a “Bear”.

Posted by: gabriela caminero at February 9, 2014 06:05 PM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
10 February 2014

Question 5:
What were Smirnov’s views about ladies?

Answer:
Smirnov thinks women should not argue with a man and should not think on their own. He says that women “are pretentious, affected, gossipy, hateful, liars, vain, petty, and merciless” (Chekhov 27). According to him, the tender emotion of love is the worse part because it is hard to love a women when she loves everything else more than her husband (Chekhov 27). Also women are not faithful and loving unlike men (Chekhov 27).

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at February 9, 2014 07:10 PM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
7 February 2013

QUESTION #3:
Why did Smirnov come to Popova's house?

ANSWER:
Smirnov came to Popova's house because he needed to pay his mortgage. Yet Smirnov didn't have the money to pay it so he came to collect his IOU that Popova's husband owed him (Chekhov 23). He came to collect twelve hundred rubles from the IOU expect Popova could not pay him that day but on the day after his mortgage payment was due.

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at February 9, 2014 07:56 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
10 February 2014

Question 15 What does the opening dialogue between Luka and Mrs. Popova have to do with?

Answer: The opening dialogue in Chekhov’s “The Bear” is about the effect the death of Popova’s husband has had on her. Her servant Luka thinks she has grieved for too long and needs to now start to live her life again. Luka’s opinion on the matter is clear in lines such as, “ Your husband’s dead. Well, God rest him, he’s not coming back. You mourned him good and proper; now it’s time to move on” (Chekhov 21). Popova’s view on the matter is shown in lines such as, “I shall never leave this house. Why should I? MY life is over. He’s dead and buried, and so am I, buried here within these four walls. We’re both dead” (Chekhov 21).

Posted by: sawyer hand at February 9, 2014 10:54 PM

James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
9th February 2014

Question 5 – What were Smirnoff’s views about ladies?

Answer – The character of Smirnoff in Checkov’s “The Bear” lets the reader know his view on ladies from the outset. “This is why I don’t like women” (Checkov 25) is a quote from early on at a time when he is frustrated about not receiving his money on time. He later goes on to say that he would ‘rather light a campfire on a powder keg than talk to a woman” and “all I have to do is see one of those romantic creatures coming, my leg muscles start cramping up” again showing his strong dislike and clear sexist views towards the female gender.

Posted by: James Jessop at February 10, 2014 01:13 AM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 February 2013
What is the name of Mr. Popov’s favorite horse?
His favorite horse was called Toby. Popov says, “He was so fond of Toby!” (Chekhov 1)

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at February 10, 2014 09:37 AM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
10 Feb. 2014

Question #11:
Explain/describe ANOTHER place in the narrative where an example of nonverbal “language of action” happens

Answer:
Another example of nonverbal language of action hat takes place is when Papova "throws the pistol on the floor" (Chekhov 14). It expresses how she feels, her emotions.

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at February 10, 2014 10:11 AM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
10 February 2014

Question:
What do Smirnov and Mrs. Popov have a heated argument about?
Answer:

Smirnnov and Mrs. Popova have a heated argument over her now deceased husbands IOUs (Checkov 5). He had left the IOUs to Smirnov for some oat and he needs it to pay off his mortgage on his house or it will be foreclosed on. Mrs. Popova states that she cannot pay him today but will pay him the day after tomarrow but Smirnov needs the money today (Checkov 6).

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at February 10, 2014 10:25 AM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
12 February 2014

Question #21:
What is the name of Mr. Popov's favorite horse?

Answer: The late Mr. Popov's favorite horse was named Toby

Posted by: Berlin Water at February 12, 2014 01:15 AM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 12, 2014 07:20 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
11 February 2015

Question: Why did Smirnov come to Popova’s
house?

Answer: Smirnov came to Popova’s house to collect the money her late husband owed to Smirnov. Smirnov needed the money to pay for his mortgage that was due the next day.
“Popóva: What can I do for you?
Smirnoff: I had the pleasure of knowing your late husband, and it happens, he left me two IOUs—the total comes to twelve hundred rubles. Now I have a mortgage payment due tomorrow, so I have to ask you, madam, to pay up. And I’m afraid I need the money today.” (Chekhov 23)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 11, 2015 11:49 AM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
11 February 2015

“The Bear”

Question #7: This play criticizes the hypocritical attitude of upper class. Discuss this assertion.

The upper-class people are seen be classy and sometimes act “stuck up.” In this play, the act very foolish towards each other like lower class people would behave. Smirnoff gets so mad he challenges Popova to a duel, this act is more expected from people in a lower class who have nothing to lose. Popova agrees to the duel and “you have no idea what a pleasure it will be for me to put a bullet through your thick head.” (Chekhov page 30)

Posted by: Selena Hammie at February 11, 2015 02:42 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
11 February 15

“The Bear” Discussion Question

Question: Explain/describe a place in the narrative where an example of nonverbal “language of action” happens.

Answer: In this narrative titled “The Bear,” an example of nonverbal language of action occurs when Popova says, “snorting with anger; you dare sit down” (Chekhov 11)? She is angrily speaking to Smirnoff asking him to leave. Popova does not explicitly say that she is furious with Smirnoff; however, by her body language as well as help from the words in the text, the reader can conclude about her emotions towards the man. Another example of how nonverbal language of action occurs in this short story is when Smirnoff says, “slaps his forehead; well excuse my frankness” (Chekhov 9). The reader can conclude from this line of the text that Smirnoff is frustrated with the situation he is in with Popova.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 11, 2015 07:48 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
12 February 2015

Question 4: What did Popova think of her late husband?

Answer: Popova thinks her husband was a cruel, unfaithful man that "cheated on me every chance he got" (Chekhov 28) and "he'd leave me alone for weeks on end." (Chekhov 28) She hated him everything he did to her yet "despite everything, I loved him and I will be faithful to his memory." (Chekhov 28)

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 12, 2015 08:25 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
13 February 2015

Question 5: What were Smirnov’s views about ladies?
Answer: Smirnov does not like women; he would rather “..light a campfire on a powder keg than talk to a woman (Chekhov 25).” He tells Popova that they are “pretentious, affected, gossipy, hateful, liars to the marrow of their bones, vain, petty, merciless….,” he also state that they have not got a brain (Chekhov 27).

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 12, 2015 09:17 PM

Alison Colon
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA02
12 February 2015

Question 1. What is the significance of the play’s title? Discuss

Answer: The title “The bear” refers to one of the main characters , Smirnov. Throughout the play they reference Smirnov’s harsh attitude and mean manner in comparison to a bear. The term bear is used to describe someone who is very vulgar, ill mannered, and down right rude (Chekhov 29). Throughout the play we see that Smirnov has a way of aggregating people and insulting them; For instance when he said, “All women are pretentious, affected, gossipy, hateful, liars to the marrow of their bones” (Chekhov 27) he was very disrespectful and rude towards Popova. When Smirnov made that harsh statement towards Popova she then retaliated by calling him a “vulgar bear”(Chekhov 29). At that point Smirnov had been labeled and further addressed as “ the bear” which he takes highly offensive (Chekhov 30). The significance of the title “The Bear “ is that the play revolves around Smirnov who is the main character and who is labeled as “ a bear” thus why the play is titled as such because Smirnov as well as his actions are what the play is basically focusing on .

Posted by: Alison Colon at February 12, 2015 11:24 PM

Amber Dunlap
Dr.Hobbs
ENG. Academic Writing II CA 12
13 February 2015

Question:
What do smirnov and mrs.popov have an intense argument about?
Answer:
Smirnov and Mrs. Popov have an intense argument about money, which leads them to absolutely hate each other, but towards the end of the story, they fall in love.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 12, 2015 11:33 PM

Aderias Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
12 February 2015

Question 6: What happens at the end of the play? Discuss the implications of the end.

That see that both Smirnov and Popova have revolvers in their hands. They are going to fight a duel and to kill each other but suddenly they decide to marry. Some of the implications could be that the reason of Popova’s change of mind was that Popova had been mourning the death of her husband for the last seven months. Inwardly, she wanted some change in her life. She did not want to continue this mourning any more. The second reason may be the advice of Luka, her servant. He shocked her by telling her that in ten years’ time, she would not be beautiful anymore and no man would look at her. The third reason was that Popova had a very romantic nature. When Smirnov assured her of his love, she was greatly moved. It was all according to her romantic nature.

Posted by: aderias ewing at February 12, 2015 11:33 PM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
12 February 2015

Question: What does Luka tell Popova? Or, what is Luka trying to tell Popova?

Answer: Luka gives Popova the advice "My lady! You’re young and beautiful, with roses in your cheek — if you only took a little pleasure. Beauty won’t last long, you know. In ten years’ time, you’ll want to be a pea-hen yourself among the officers, but they won’t look at you, it will be too late." (Pg.1) So he's trying to tell her that she has mourned long enough for her husband and it is time to move on while she can still get another man. This is possibly a reason she decides to marry Smirnov at the end of the play.

Posted by: Rachel Addington at February 13, 2015 01:59 AM

Emma Riemer
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2
13 February 2015

The bear

Question 16: Later in the play, what is the reason that Smirnov stops by Popova’s home?

Answer: The reason Smirnov stops by Popova’s home is that her dead husband owed Smirnov money. Smirnov says to Popova, “I had the pleasure of knowing your late husband, and as it happens, he left me two IOUs—the total comes to twelve hundred rubles. Now, I have a mortgage payment due tomorrow, so I have to ask you, madam, to pay up. And I’m afraid I need the money today” (Chekov 23). This is explains why Smirnov stops by Popova’s home.

Posted by: Emma Riemer at February 13, 2015 02:25 AM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
12 February 2015

Question: Explain a prop in the narrative that exemplifies nonverbal “language of action”

Answer: An example would be when Mrs. Popov makes some type of gesture toward the photograph of her dead husband. Mrs. Popov's gestures with the photo prop of her husband emphasizes to readers Mrs. Popov's obsessive feelings she had with her deceased husband.
“POPOVA
[To the photograph]
You will see what real love means, Nicky, My love will lasts as long as I do right to my last hear beat. And I hope your ashamed of yourself! You see what a good girl I am, what a faithful wife? I locked myself up here and will be faithful to you till the day I die…” (Chekhov 4)

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at February 13, 2015 02:50 AM

Rously Paul
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
13 February 2015

Question: . In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” define the narrator’s feelings for Mangan’s sister. To what extent is she the cause of those feelings? What, as they say, does he see in her?

The narrators’ love for Mangan’s sister is that of a love for the variety of the bazaars of Arabia his sense of adventure and wanderlust has taken over his attractions; this shows true when the narrator has an epiphany about the source of his feelings and realizes he only covets her as a trophy rather than legitimate romance. When the narrator says: “Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity, and my eyes burned with anguish and fear.” His vanity becomes apparent to even himself and chooses to pursue no longer.

Posted by: Rously Paul at February 13, 2015 09:18 AM

Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing 2 CA12
13 February 2015
Question: 21. What is the name of Mr. Popov’s favorite horse?
Answer: Mr. Popov’s favorite horse name is Toby. “go out to the stable and tell them Toby doesn’t get extra oats anymore.

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak at February 13, 2015 09:47 AM

Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
13 February 2015

Question 9: Draw a character sketch of Popova; characterize Popova.

Answer: Popova is a young, romantic, and sentimental woman, “when my husband died, life lost all meaning for me” (Chekhov 21). “I intend to be faithful to the grave to show him what real love means,” she intends to remain faithful to her unfaithful husband (Chekhov 22). She is under an unrealistic romantic illusion, “buried within these four walls,” she has confined herself to her house. (Chekhov 21). She seems impractical and childish. Smirnov disturbs the peace, threatening to stay forever until he is repaid, she calls Smirnov “bear” (Chekhov 29). They get into arguments until he challenged her to a “duel” (Chekhov 30). She is thick-headed and accepts without even knowing how to use a weapon and asks “ will you please show me how to use the damn things?” (Chekhov 31). Tables turn after he confesses his love, she reacts by saying “get away from me! Get your hands off me! I…I hate you! I want to fight the d-d-duel!” (Chekhov 33). They kiss and she proves that he is another “bear,” she is unable to hold back her basic instincts for a relationship.

Posted by: Victoria Markou at February 13, 2015 10:16 AM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
23 September 2015

Question: What does the opening dialogue between Luka and Mrs. Popov have to do with?

Answer: The opening dialogue between Luka and Mrs. Popov has to do with the death of Mrs. Popov’s husband. Mrs. Popov sits in her living room dressed in black, mourning the death of her beloved husband. Luka, her old servant, tries to convince her that she must move on and stop wasting her youthful years inside the walls of her home. “It’s just not right missus. You’re letting yourself fall into pieces.” “You listen to what I’m saying, now! It’s been a whole year since you left the house” (Chekhov 21).

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at September 23, 2015 07:36 PM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
24 September 2015

Question: Explain/describe a PROP in the narrative that exemplifies nonverbal "language of action".
Answer: The chair breaking would be Popova breaking and flipping out on everyone because she is angry about the recent death of her husband. With the nagging of Smirnov (The Bear) for the money, he is owed, and her accountant is not there, so he has to wait makes her snap. Also, Smirnov is in love with Popova, and she is trying to stay faithful to her husband who sets her on the edge. "Oh, I'm so mad! Stay away from me! Stay away from me!" (Chekhov 33).

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 24, 2015 05:52 PM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
24 September 2015

Question: What were Smirnov’s views about ladies?

Answer: Smirnov could be defined as a “Male Chauvinist” based on his various rants about women. Smirnov, at least according to his rants, has been hurt by women many times and has developed an extremely negative view of them. “Present company excepted, of course, but all women are pretentious, affected, gossipy, hateful liars to the marrow of their bones, vain, petty, merciless, they can’t think straight….” (Chekov 9). Smirnov even states that women, when in a relationship, don’t actually love their men but control them. “…and the worst part is, this crocodile thinks she has a monopoly on the tender emotion of love! She’s in love, all she can do is snivel and whine!” (Chekov 9). Smirnov, however, is not as convicted in his views as he would seem in the beginning, based on how quickly he falls in love with Popova after criticizing her behavior.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 24, 2015 08:34 PM

Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobbs
English Academic Writing CA09
September 24, 2015

Question: Later in the play, what is the reason that Smirnov stops by the Popovs’ home?

Answer: Smirnov stopped by later in the play because Popovs’ late husband owe him money. Therefore, he went to collect the money from Popovs’.

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at September 24, 2015 09:30 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II

September 24, 2015


Question: Identify the MAIN example of sound effects in Chekhov’s play

Answer: The main example of sound effects in Chekhov’s play was the continuous breakage of chairs. The symbolism behind this is the growing frustration of Smirnoff as he was insulted by Popova. Also, Smirnoff began to like Popova; he grew greater attention for her. This attraction could be another example of this symbolism. “Well goddamn it, is it my fault I like you? (Grabs a chair behind his back; the chair cracks and breaks) Why do you have such fragile furniture! I like you! You understand? I…I think I’m in love with you!” (Chekov pg. 32). This quote is possibly the best quote for understanding the symbolism, the chair is fragile, it is meant to break. Both Smirnoff and Popova had their hearts broken by their partners. They each had related experiences with their love lives. In the end, Smirnoff and Popova ended up kissing.

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk at September 24, 2015 10:10 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
24 September 2015


“Popova: (Makes a fist and stamps her foot) you peasant! You bear! You vulgar bear! Monster! You… radical!”
“Smirnoff: (moves toward her) and just who said you could insult me like that?”
“Popova: You’re right, I am insulting you! What about it? You think I’m afraid of you?”

Question: What is the significance of the play’s title? Discuss.

Answer: The significance of the play’s title is that it is much related to the story of the play. The play is about making it clear that Smirnoff, the hero of the play, has been branded as “The Bear.” Therefore the title given to this play is rightly justified and is according to the story of the play.

Posted by: Hana Lee at September 24, 2015 10:14 PM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
25 September 2015

Question: Why did Smirnov come to Popova's house?

Answer: Smirnov came to Popova's house because her "late husband...he left me [Smirnov] two IOU's..." (Chekhov 23). Popova's husband owed Smirnov "twelve hundred rubles" and he needed to pay his mortgage (Chekhov 23).

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at September 25, 2015 10:51 AM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
25 September 2015

Question: This play criticizes the hypocritical attitude of upper class. Discuss this assertion.

Answer: After reading “The Bear” by Anton Chekhov, there are examples of the upper class being hypocritical. The hypocrisy is shown when Grigory Smirnoff, the landowner who comes to collect his money due, says that none of those who owe him are willing to pay up. The upper class obviously has money to pay their debts, but each one gives Smirnoff a different excuse. “He’s not home”, “he hides,” “we get into a fight,” “he’s sick” he exclaims (Chekhov 24). And then there’s the matter of Smirnoff with Yelena Popova. Popova states, “I locked myself up here and will be faithful to you till the day I die” about her deceased husband (Chekhov 21). Smirnoff said he “spent half [his] life hanging around women, but not anymore” (Chekhov 27). Unfortunately, they both end up liking each other and break both of those beliefs they had.

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 25, 2015 11:03 AM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
25 September 2015

Question: What does Luka tell Popova? Or, what is Luka trying to tell Popova?

Answer: Luka is trying to tell Popova that since her husband passed away, she has been stuck in the house for almost a year. She is letting herself “fall to pieces” (23 Chekhov). Luka is telling Popova that she needs to go out and enjoy the fresh air and sunshine. Also, to meet a new guy while she is still young because he tells her that in “ten years from now you’re going to want to go swanning after those officers, and it’ll be too late.” (23 Chekhov).

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at September 25, 2015 01:37 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
25 September 2015

Question: What is the symbolism of that sound effects in Chekhov play?

Answer: In order to understand how different phonemes are appropriate to mimic particular non-linguistic phenomena, we need to explore the phonetic characteristics of the various phonemes and how they are produced in the mouth; They will ignore special pronunciation effects like the deliberate lengthening and deepening in the 'big man' example above, and concentrate instead on 'normal pronunciation' - what will be common to most people's pronunciation, independent of 'special performance' effects. The main example of sound effects in Chekhov’s play was the continuous breakage of chairs. “Well goddamn it, is it my fault I like you? (Grabs a chair behind his back; the chair cracks and breaks) Why do you have such fragile furniture! I like you! You understand? I…I think I’m in love with you!” (Chekov pg. 32).

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 25, 2015 02:15 PM

Peyton Farrier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
25 September 2015

Question: What did Popova think of her late husband?

Answer: Even though her husband wasn't the best man to be with she still loved him very much and wanted to show him that she did. "When my husband died life lost all meaning for me. I know he treated me badly. He was mean and even unfaithful. But I intend to be faithful to the grave and show him what real love means" (Chekhov 21). She knew he was a bad man to her but she was so deeply in love with him she didn't care. She wanted to show him what it felt like to ne loved.

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at September 25, 2015 03:03 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
25 September 2015

Question 8

Question: Draw a character sketch of Smirnov; characterize Smirnov.

Answer: Smirnov is a very gruff man. Throughout the duration of the story he is yelling and even breaking chairs with his bare hands (Chekhov 27). He’s a hardworking man; he comes onto the scene dirty and unkempt from his farm (Chekhov 25). He is a man of good fortune as he tells Popova, “I own a lot of land, I’m from a good family, I’ve got an income of ten thousand a year” (Chekhov 32). However, he can’t pay his mortgage. The only reasonable explanation would be that he over leant money. He describes himself as a “soft touch”, a “sucker for a hard-luck story”, and “too nice for my own good” when lamenting about lending money. He is ex-military: retired Field Artillery (Chekhov 23). Smirnov has been in a relationship with at least 21 women that he’ll admit to (Chekhov 27). He is very against falling in love again, his last love being six years ago (Chekhov 32). His lack of a successful relationship probably attributes to his opinion of women which he views as deceitful, vain, and stupid, “a sparrow has ten times more brains than any philosopher in skirts” (Chekhov 27). Smirnov is passionate. When he hates, he hates; when he loves, he loves (Chekhov 32). All of his feelings are strong and raw, much like Mrs. Popova.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 25, 2015 03:18 PM


Shania Bienaime
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
23 September 2015

Question: What happens at the end of the play? Discuss the implications of the ending.
Answer: At the ending of the play Popova and Smirnoff both end up falling for each other. After Smirnoff expressed his love to her she was hesitant on whether to believe him or not.(Anton 14-15) But soon after they both locked in each other lips with a passionate kiss.

Posted by: Shania Bienaime at September 25, 2015 03:19 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
25 September 2015

Question: Explain/describe a place in the narrative where an example of non verbal "language of action" happens.

Answer: A place in the narrative where nonverbal “language of action” occurs is when Popóva and Smírnoff are having a conversation about paying a debt and Popóva refuses to pay Smírnoff the money because she says she does not have it at the moment, and she then storms out of the room. “My dear sir, I will not have such language in my house, nor will I tolerate that tone of voice! I refuse to listen to any more of this! (Storms out)”(Chekhov 24). Her storming out of the room is an example of nonverbal “language of action” as she did not say anything but by her storming out of the room it signified that she was utterly annoyed, upset and did not want to continue the conversation any further.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at September 25, 2015 03:23 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II Ca09
11 October 2015

Question: 3 main differences between the film and the text of “the Bear” by Chekhov.

Answer: The first thing I noticed as a difference would be that Smirnoff never broke any chairs (Chekhov 27). I think the reason for it being cut was that it was a bit too comical and painfully awkward to try and fit into the story. It always seemed out of place in the text so there’s no point of adding such a thing to the reenactment. The next thing I noticed was at the end of the story in the film, only Luka came to the rescue. In the text, it was Luka and at least four other people all rushed in to help (Chekhov 33). The last thing I noticed was that the pace was faster in the film than in the text. I suppose it depends on who’s reading it, but in my mind there was a deliberate slowness to it. In the film, the text was given much faster than I had thought. However, this does change the tone of the story. In the text, where it’s slower and more drawn out, it leaves more room for reader to question and build suspense. When the pace was quickened, it gave the play an even more comical feel. The hurriedness of the dialogue was amusing.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at October 11, 2015 01:18 AM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 October 2015

Question: State the top three key differences between the text and adaptation of Chekhov’s “The Bear.” E.g. Point-of-view? Setting? Tone? Mood? Characters? Etc. Explain in detail.

Answer: Between the text and adaptation of Chekhov’s “The Bear” there are quite a few minor differences. However, there are three key differences that stand out. The first one is Luka’s age difference. In the text, he is “an elderly servant,” but only appears to be in the late-thirties or early-forties in the adaptation (Chekhov 21). This age difference in Luka takes away credibility when Luka fakes a heart attack and receives no response because Smirnoff and Popova are arguing (Chekhov 30). Another difference is the mood, in the text it easy to see its purpose is to cause humor. A great example would be when Smirnoff and Popova kiss at the end of the text (Chekhov 33). However, this is more apparent in the adaptation because one can see the facial expressions and gestures of the actors and interpret them accordingly. To illustrate this, consider the kiss. In the play is say that the two kiss, but in the adaptation, one can see that there really is love between them. The third and last example is of the missing broken chair in the adaptation. Chekhov’s text reveals that Smirnoff “grabs a chair behind his back” and the “chair breaks and cracks” (32). This is missing from the adaptation, and so is the example of how much frustration Smirnoff has of ending up liking the woman who won’t pay her late-husband’s debt to him.

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at October 11, 2015 01:11 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
10 October 2015


Question: Compare and Contrast the short story and video.


Answer: The setting took place in Popova’s room. It did not change at all during the entire drama. There were a lot of antiques and some old pictures, including pictures of her dead husband. I started to actually get into the mood of liking this story. “The Bear” when I saw the video. It actually got me intrigued and entertained. I sensed a lot of arguments and sarcasm in the tones of the characters while watching the video. The video and short story were also word by word except for a few sentences here and there. There was a lot of sarcasm though compared to the argument they were having.

Posted by: Hana Lee at October 11, 2015 05:59 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II

October 11, 2015


Question: Compare the reading to the movie.


Answer: There are a few differences between the text and adaptation. In the adaptation, the characters are British, using a different style of language that is not in the text. The text was a translation from the Russian language to the English language. The characters create a different mood in the adaptation; Popova does not seem to mourn her husband as much as she was in the text. She seems to hate even his guts rather than love him. Smirnoff is not as gruesome and heated as he was in the text. After reading the text, the reader could visualize and maybe even relate him to an actual bear, but in the adaptation it is merely a tease to irritate Smirnoff. Smirnoff was a mad man continually breaking chairs in the text. In the adaptation, Popova and Smirnoff had a rather normal argument. The change of emotion was too quick in the adaptation; there was no depth of emotion. For example, in the text, Popova is much more emotional for an extended time throughout the story, and Smirnoff displayed his anger and love with much more emotion. The characters lacked depth for their emotional scenes.

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk at October 11, 2015 10:16 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 October 2015

Question: Name the top three differences between the text and the adaptation and explain in detail.

Answer: In the character descriptions of the text it explains that Luka is an elderly servant. The adaptation, however, presents Luka as a man in his late 40s. “Luka, an elderly servant” (Chekhov). “(Luka, her elderly servant, tries to talk sense to her)” (Chekhov 21).
The adaptation alters the language used in the script by changing the diction of some of the words. For instance, when Mrs. Popova was explaining to Luka how much she loved her dead husband. The text from the script reads, “He’ll see how much I loved him” (Chekhov 21), whereas Mrs. Popova says “He’ll see what real love means” in the adaptation. Also, Smirnoff says, “What a bunch of deadbeats” (Chekhov 24), in the text, whereas he says “What a bunch of parasites” in the adaptation.
The stage direction in the text says that Smirnoff sits in a chair but in the adaptation he did not sit in a chair at this particular point. “Luka goes out; Smirnoff falls into a chair and looks himself out” (Chekhov 25). Towards the end of the play the stage direction in the text says that Smirnoff breaks this chair behind him, whereas there is no mention of this piece of furniture in the adaptation. “(Grabs a chair behind his back; the chair cracks and breaks)”, “Why do you have such fragile furniture!” (Chekhov 32).

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at October 11, 2015 11:52 PM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 October 2015

Question: Identify the 3 Differences between the text and the Cinematic Adaptation in the short story Bear?

Answer:
The big three differences that I had noticed were that, Smirnoff storms into the house all rough and angry and also anxious. He wants his money and doesn’t care how he gets it, he just wants his money but as soon as he sees that lady he pays her his respect but she doesn’t by not extending her hand as a sign of courtesy. Another key thing I had noticed was that when Smirnoff was talking to Popova the story talks about how he broke the chair I really never noticed that in the Movie, he is aggressive but never did he break any chair. Lastly when Popova and Smirnoff are talking about dueling one of the servants goes back to get something to break it up but in the story it says that he came back with another servant but in the movie he came back with a pitch fork.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at October 12, 2015 10:54 AM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

Question: Identify the three most distinctive differences between the text and the cinematic adaptation of Chekhov's "The Bear."

Answer: In the short film of "The Bear," Luka is very sarcastic and amusing, whereas in the play, his tone is not as sarcastic. Also, Smirnoff has an angrier tone in the play, he even "grabs the back of a chair; the chair cracks and breaks" but in the film, he is much calmer (Chekhov 27). In Chekhov's play, at the very end Luka, the gardener, the coachman, and some farmworkers enter to interfere with the duel, but in the film only Luka enters to stop the duel (Chekhov 33).

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at October 12, 2015 11:52 AM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015
Question: Identify the three most distinct differences between the film adaption of Chekov’s The Bear, and the play adaption we read in class.
Answer: Being that the Bear is a foreign language play (originally written in Russian), the most prevalent difference are the differences in translation. Because there are differences between syntax and grammar in the English and Russian languages, there are varying translations of the play available each with differences in dialogue, narration, and scenery. This is also seen in the film adaption versus the written adaption, while most of the dialogue is the same there are minute differences in the lines spoken by the actors. Some of the symbolism of the scenery is lost in the film adaption. There are also differences in symbolism. Most of the symbolism of the film adaption is through spoken dialogue and certain actions performed by the actors, while in the written adaption it is spread through the dialogue, actions, and through Chekov’s descriptions of the scenery (while the scenery is mostly the same in the film adaption Chekov’s narrations draw more attention to it). The general tone of the adaption is different as well. While the play focuses on the irrational nature of love, the film adaption more or less focuses on the comedic aspects while retaining only shreds of the original tone.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at October 12, 2015 01:08 PM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

Question What are the top three differences between text and adaptation? e.g. point-of-view, setting, tone, mood, characters, etc. Explain in detail.

Answer: Three of the difference between the text and adaptation is the difference between the text. Part of the text in the text is missing from adaptation. For example, when Smirnoff is down on one knee asking Popova to marry him, in the film he says “look at me, I’m a mess, I’m down on my knees like a fool” (about 8:40). In the text he says “My mind has turned to jelly, my joints have turned to sugar, I’m on my knees like a dope” (32). A second difference between the two is the tone. There were a few scenes in the movie that I thought would be said in a different tone. For example, in the scene where she asks him to teach her how to shoot a gun. In the text I felt more of an angry tone, in the adaptation it was more of a humorous tone. A third difference is the mood. The mood of the text seemed to me to be serious and intense, the adaptation was also serious and intense but also funny.

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at October 12, 2015 01:29 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

Questions: What are the top three differences between the text and the adaption?

Answer: The top three differences between the text and the film of Chekov’s “The Bear,” are the setting, the tone, and the characters. In the text the setting takes place in Russia where the author is from as compared to in the film it is in England. This change in locations creates a lot of differences between the text and the film as in the film since it take place in England all of the actors have a British accent and often use British terms and words as compared to the text. Also another key difference is the change in tone from the text to the film. In the text the tone seemed to be more upbeat and serious especially when Smirnoff was arguing with Popova. Though in the film it seemed much more laid-back and not as heated of an argument that took place in the text. In addition another fundamental difference are the difference in the characters from text to film. In the film it seemed like Luca’s character was much more round and played more of a role than in the text. Also to go along with what seemed like a tone change in the story, Smirnoff’s character was much more calm in the film than what seemed to be like a very aggressive and possibly violent man in the text.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at October 12, 2015 01:58 PM

Peyton Farrier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
12 October 2015

Question: Identify the three most distinctive differences between the text and the movie. Use the theory, character, setting, point of view, tone, mood, irony, theme, etc.

Answer: The three differences found from the text and the show was in the text Smirnoff says "I'd rather light a campfire on a powder keg than talk to a woman" (Chekhov 25) but in the show that reference isn't said. Toward the end also when Popva and Smirnoff are arguing they use extra lines in the show than what is written in the text. And Luka walking in at the very end with a shovel not a rake like it is said in the text. Throughout the story you can tell the tone and mood because it is said, but in the show you can understand it through the tone of their voice and how their face looks. The setting throughout the two never changed, you always knew where everybody was as well as the theme and point of view.

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at October 12, 2015 02:35 PM

In the text and the movie of "The Bear" are different in many ways. I thought that the movie short clip will change around the text of the written story, but after reading the text it turns out to be very close to parallel. The actions of the movie are different because the audience gets to see the build up from the aggression levels, which makes the mood stronger for the audience. When Smirnoff entered the room he was irritated but at the end of the short clip he lost all of his patience with towards Povac and the butler. The moods are more distinct in the film because you actually get to see the aggressive actions instead of reading the drama and it's thoroughly dramatic throughout, so it stays at a stagnant level of drama. In the written story the reader couldn't distinguish where the characters are sitting/ positioned on the stage/ scene. When reading reader's cant't tell where the characters are positioned; it gives off a miscommunication. But in the movie the reader sees that Povac is sitting in the chair while speaking to Smirnoff and as Smirnoff says something off-kiltered then Povac will stand up in a quick pace to show off her aggression. This adds to character as well as setting. Then the mood of the written story is dramatic and doesn't readers do not catch a break from the drama and suspense. While as the audience who are watching "The Bear" can tell that there is a build up of the suspense and they can also see them thinking, admiring, or hesitating but when readers read, they assume that there are probably some facial actions/reactions that the characters are doing in the mean time.This gives the audience a way to empathize towards the actors. But do not get it wrong with tone- tone is defined as how the author/ director makes the scene. Mood is how the audience perceives the story. The tone of the story is a constant level of drama, while as the movie it has different spikes left and right of drama- even though it is always suspenseful. The reader can distinguish a little by assuming what the character is saying, and the movie, they get to see their actions bring forth the drama as well as how they are pronouncing their words. The author used tone for the movie by making the actors very in-touch with the characters from the story therefore to bring forth the integrity of the story. The author would need to choose their words carefully as well as have some small actions for the characters. The three biggest distinctive differences between text and video are: tone, mood, and setting/ character.

Posted by: Brad McAvoy at October 12, 2015 02:55 PM

Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobbs
English Academic Writing CA09
October 12, 2015

Question: What are three key differences between the text and the adaptation of “The Bear” by Anton Chekhov?

Three key differences between the text and the adaptation, in the written play “The Bear”, Smirnoff seems to be more aggressive, loud and annoyed than in the adaption of the play. In both the text and the adaptation, they made reference to his dress saying that Smirnoff’s clothes was dirty and his hair was not fixed. However, in the adaptation though he said he was dirty and his hair was not fixed, the opposite was observed. Lastly, the adaptation edited the chair breaking scene out when Smirnoff was arguing with Popova about how to treat a lady.

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at October 12, 2015 02:59 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
12 October 2015

Question: In your words explain how Professor L. Kip Wheeler defines the “epiphany” in the excerpt from Literary Term and Definitions. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Wheeler’s understanding of it, manifested in Chekhov’s The Bear. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from text.
Answer: There are a several differences between the text and version. In the characters are British, using a unlike style of linguistic in the text. The text is a translation from the Russian to the English language. The characters create a dissimilar mood in the version; Popova does not seem to grieve her man as much as she was in the text. She appears to hate even his guts rather than love him. Smirnoff is not as horrible and heated as he was. After reading the text, the reader could imagine and perhaps even tell him to an actual bear, but in the adaptation it is just a joker to annoy Smirnoff. Smirnoff was a mad man continually breaking chairs in the text. In the adaptation, Popova and Smirnoff had a rather normal argument. The alteration of emotion was too quick in the adaptation; there was no depth of emotion. For example, Popova is much more emotional for a protracted time throughout the story, and Smirnoff showed his anger and love with much more emotion. The characters lacked depth for their emotional scenes.

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at October 12, 2015 03:16 PM

Freddie Williams
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CAO9
October 12, 2015

Identify the three most distinctive differences between the text and the cinematic adaptation


There are a few differences compared to the adaptation and the text. To start off, the characters differed in their actions and emotions. For example in the text Smirnoff is excessively more violent, but in the adaptation he is rather more calm. “Oh, I’m mad! I am so mad! Mad enough to blow up the world! Made enough to get nasty!”(Chekhov p26).Wife doesn’t value her husband as much as she did in the text. There was a lack of emotion in the adaptation. In the story the characters portrayed deeper emotions that the actors didn’t portray as well. The last difference is the point the view because in the film the characters talk to the audience and in the short story it is third person objective the characters talk amongst themselves.

Posted by: Freddie Williams at October 12, 2015 03:27 PM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
11 October 2015

Question: What are the 3 key differences between the film and the short reading “The Bear” by Anton Chekhov?
Answer: One key difference is the characters used in the short reading is that there are more flat characters that are involved rather than in the film. The butler in the house Luka is the only butler we see in the whole story, but in the short reading there are 2 others that come and help Luka to try and stop the dual. ”A long kiss. Enter Luka, with a shovel, the gardener with a rake, the coachman with a pitchfork, some farmworkers with sticks” (Chekhov 33).
The tone of the film was angrier than the story. In the film there was an angry feel from the opening scene when Luka was almost like yelling at Popova rather than giving her advice which is in the short story. “It’s just not right missis. You’re letting yourself fall to pieces” (Chekhov 21).
The Point of View that the stories are both third person but in the film the actors look at the crowd for support where as in the short story it is just third person objective.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at October 12, 2015 03:29 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA 06
9 January 2016

Question: 8. Draw a character sketch of Smirnov; characterize Smirnov.

Answer: In this play, "The Bears" by Chekhov, Smirnoff is introduced, and his first characteristic is revealed before he appears and before his name is even mentioned. It is revealed that Smirnov is wild through Luka, when Luka says to Popova "he's kind of a wild man – he started shouting and pushed his way into the house. He's in the dining room right now" (Chekhov 22). This shows that before Smirnov appears on stage, Chekhov reveals through Luka's description that Smirnov is aggressive and impatient. Smirnoff is also disrespectful, and this is revealed when he calls Luka, a "dingbat"(23). This is a sign of disrespect that Smirnoff utters allows the audience to view him as disrespectful and vulgar. At first, Smirnoff is being rude to Luka, and it can be assumed that he is rude to Luka because Luka is a servant, and this is implied when Smirnoff repeatedly says to Luka, "Who do you think you're talking to (29)?" His choice of words he directs to Luka implies that Luka has no right to take to Smirnoff, who seems of a higher class than Luka, and this suggests that Smirnoff is initially being rude to Luka because Luka is a servant of lower status. Although he seems polite to Popova when he request for the money, when he appears "suddenly very dignified" in front of Popova, and he seems regretful for asking for the money (23), he is revealed to rude in general and not just those of lower class. In fact, as Popova tells that she can't give the money today, this touch of courtesy disappears completely when Smirnoff says to himself, "I don't believe this! "it's seven months today my husband died, and I'm in a sad mood…." What's that got to do with me? I have to make a mortgage payment! Fine, your husband's dead, you manager's gone to town, you're in a mood or whatever, what do you expect me out do (24)?" Here, Chekhov portrays Smirnoff to be extremely frustrated, offensive, and rude. The use of exclamation marks suggests Smirnoff is yelling, and he completely disregards Popova's sadness and focuses on his own problems. This suggests he is selfish and vulgar, as well.
Smirnoff also seems very stubborn and determined. He lists the different people he went to for money(25), and he mentions that if Popova would if she stays in her mood, "I'll just stay right here until I get my money, that's all. She stays sick for a week, I stay here for a week. She's sick for a year, I stay here for a year. I want my money, lady (25)!" This repetition of "I'll stay here" emphasizes his strong desire to obtain the money needed for his mortgage. This shows that he will not take no for an answer, and here he is characterized as stubborn and determined.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 9, 2016 07:36 PM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
10 February 2016

Question: What does Luka tell Popova? Or, what is Luka trying to tell Popova?

Answer: Luka tells Popova that she needs to leave the house. Popova has not left her home in over a year. Luka states that “it’s time to move on. You can’t just sit here wearing black and crying for the rest of your life” (Chekhov 21). Popova spent the past year in her home just mourning the loss of her husband and refuses to leave. She also says " my life is over" (21). Popova believes that she is dead along with her husband. Luka tells her she is still young and needs to go out to find someone new. Luka says “you’re still beautiful, you can go out and enjoy life” (21). Luka tells her that there are young officers who are looking for a beautiful young woman to date.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 9, 2016 08:13 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
8 February 2016
Question: Later in the play, what is the reason that Smirnov stops by the Popov’s home?

Answer: In the play “Medved (The Bear)”, Smirnoff enters Popova’s home demanding that she pays him the money that her late husband owes him so he could pay off his mortgage (Chekhov 23). However, after a series of disagreement between Smirnov and Popova, Smirnoff openly admits that he is in love with Popova before they proceed with their duel (31). Even though Smirnoff needs the money to pay off his mortgage, his actions later on in the play arouse curiosity in the reader’s mind. The reader now wonders if Smirnoff went to Popova’s home for his money or to confess his love for her. Therefore, the possibility exists that Smirnoff stopped by Popova’s home to confess his love for her while using his mortgage situation as a cover up to profess his love.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 9, 2016 09:04 PM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
9 February 2016

Question: What did Popova think of her late husband?
Answer: Popova’s husband treated her badly, he was mean and unfaithful. But she didn’t care because she intended to be faithful to the grave and show him real love. She believes that since her husband died, she shouldn’t be alive. “When my husband died, life lost all meaning for me. You know that. I may look like I’m alive, but I’m not. I swore I’d wear black and shut myself up here until the day I die, didn’t I? And I will (Chekhov 21).” Luka tries to cheer her up, but she isn’t taking it.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at February 10, 2016 12:07 AM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
10 February 2016

The Bear

Question #5: What were Smirnov’s views about ladies?

Answer: Smirnov has a very negative outlook on women due to the hurt he has suffered in the past, specially due to the fact that he has “walked out on twelve ladies and nine have walked out on” him (27). Smirnov thinks “women are pretentious, affected, gossipy, hateful, liars to the marrow of their bones, vain, petty, merciless, they can’t think straight, and as for this part here (slaps his forehead)…well—excuse my frankness—a sparrow has ten times more brains than any philosopher in skirts” (27). He holds this outlook very much till the end of the story where Popova wears away on that chip on his shoulder and he puts aside all his prejudice and animosity for the love of this woman (32-33).

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 10, 2016 03:19 AM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
10 February 2016

“The Bear”

Q: In what ways does Smirnov exemplify the proverbial “houseguest from hell”?

A: From the moment he enters, Smirnov is nothing but aggravating, rude, loud, and obnoxious. He demands drinks of beer and vodka from poor Luka and summons him only by a loud “Hey, you!” (Chekov 24). He breaks Popova’s furniture because he is gripping it too hard (32) and refuses to leave until he is paid. Popova repeatedly asks him to leave but instead he sits on her furniture (the ones he has not broken) with mud on his boots and straw falling out of his pockets (25). Smirnov is everything no one would want in a houseguest, making him perfectly exemplify the proverbial “houseguest from hell”.

Posted by: Hanna Rowe at February 10, 2016 09:41 AM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
9 February 2016

Question: Why did Smirnoff come to Popova’s house?

Answer: Smirnoff came into Popova’s house because her late husband owed him money. Smirnoff had a mortgage payment due and wanted Popova to give him his money that day, but she is unable to because she does not have cash on her at the moment. When he enters, Smirnoff explains, “I had the pleasure of knowing your late husband, and as it happens, he left me two IOU’s – the total comes to twelve hundred rubles” (Chekhov 23).

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at February 10, 2016 09:50 AM

Phillip Moss
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
Dr. Hobbs
10 February 2016

Question: What happens at the end of the play? Discuss the implications at the end.

Answer: Popova wishes to fight Smirnoff in a duel, but Smirnoff professes his love to her and eventually grabs Popova and kisses her as several people enter to break up the “duel”. “POPOVA: Get away from me! Get your hands off of me!... I hate you I want to fight the d-d-duel!”( Chekhov 33) the significance of this is Popova tries so desperately to honor her unfaithful dead husband but Smirnoff (the bear) forces himself upon her, and she gives in.

Posted by: Phillip Moss at February 10, 2016 12:50 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
10 February 2016

Question: 21.) What is the name of Mr. Popov's favorite horse?

Answer: 21.) The name of MR. Popov's favorite horse is Toby. In the play Mr. Popov says, "Remember how grand he looked in the saddle" (Chekhov, 22). Him saying this shows that he not only loves the horse but he loves to look at him as well because of his beauty. He also is his favorite because once he's done admiring him he says, "make sure he gets extra oats" (Chekhov, 22).

Posted by: Justin Robinson at February 10, 2016 01:50 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA06 Academic Writing II
Question 13.) Identify the main examples of sound effects in the play
Answer: The main sound effects that are used in this play are actions that are being done by the characters. Sound effects such as doorbells, or remarks that are said under a character’s breathe. You can tell it is a sound effect because the writer puts them in parentheses next to the event happening. Also in the story when someone says something or makes a remark it will tell us to the side how he or she said it, for example Popova says, “Dasha, where’s Dasha?” (Screams). Pg.)29. The writer is giving us an extra sense of how Popova is speaking.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at February 10, 2016 02:12 PM

Allison Cobb

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 CA06

10 February 2016



Question: This play criticizes the hypocritical attitude of upper class. Discuss this assertion.




Answer: This play written by Chekhov spends a lot of its time talking about a gender conflict. The character Smirnoff, and likely many other men within the world, believed that women were less than men. Smirnoff goes off on a long rant, saying “but all women are pretentious, affect, gossipy, hateful, liars to the marrow of their bones, vain, petty, merciless, they can’t think straight” (Chekhov 9). Popova retorts with a long speech about how she has been faithful to her husband for years and years and years, even after his death, while he lied to her and cheated on her. She argued that men were less faithful than women, and women were not nearly as bad. It becomes humorous when Smirnoff says all these things, argues with Popova the entire story, and then at the end, decides he is in love with her. This is poking fun at the hypocrisy of the upper classes attitude, and is essential to the play. Without this, it would have no point. It’s a light play, and the assertion only holds weight if the readers take it that way.

Posted by: Allison Cobb at February 10, 2016 03:21 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
11 February 2016

Question 12) Explain/ describe a prop in the narrative that exemplifies nonverbal "language of action".

Answer 12) On page 22 of "the bear", Popova and Luka are talking about the death of Popova's husband. She has been mourning extremely hard ever since the day he died. She will not leave the house and will wear black until the day she died. During the text, Luka is trying to encourage Popova to leave the house, then the prop says Popova 'bursts into hysterical tears' and this moves the story along by showing us how devastated she is about the death of her husband and shows us how mentally weak she is without him.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 11, 2016 11:38 AM

Allison Cobb, Matt Scharr

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 CA06

19 February 2016





Question: Identify a cultural symbol in the story. Identify a contextual symbol in the story. Is this narrative allegorical, mythological, parable-like, or fable-like? Why or why not? Identify a metaphor or a simile, or both in the story.




Answer: A cultural symbol in The Bear by Chekhov could be when Luka gives a speech to Popova, who is mourning her husband and says “ten years from now you’ll want to go swanning after those officers, and it’ll be too late”. In the olden and upper class world, having a husband was essential and needed to be accomplished young. There was no finding a husband when you were older, and that was a cultural thing.

A contextual symbol could be the small part where Luka asks Smirnoff what he wants and Smirnoff says “A shot of vodka” (Chekhov 7). This is only symbolic in the context of the story where the character’s name makes it ironic.

The story seems to have an allegorical narrative because the events are straight-forward. Popova is distressed about the death of her husband, wants to remain faithful regardless of what he had done, and gives extra oats to her horse in honor of her faithfulness towards him. When she is convinced otherwise by a character that has debts to collect from her dead husband, she stops giving those extra oats. All of these events can be taken literally, but can also be taken symbolically. Symbolically, Popova ceasing to give extra oats to her horse is her letting go of her desire to remain faithful to her dead husband, as she falls in love with Smirnoff.

Posted by: Allison Cob at February 19, 2016 03:13 PM

Allison Cobb, Matt Scharr

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 CA06

19 February 2016





Question: Identify a cultural symbol in the story. Identify a contextual symbol in the story. Is this narrative allegorical, mythological, parable-like, or fable-like? Why or why not? Identify a metaphor or a simile, or both in the story.




Answer: A cultural symbol in The Bear by Chekhov could be when Luka gives a speech to Popova, who is mourning her husband and says “ten years from now you’ll want to go swanning after those officers, and it’ll be too late”. In the olden and upper class world, having a husband was essential and needed to be accomplished young. There was no finding a husband when you were older, and that was a cultural thing.

A contextual symbol could be the small part where Luka asks Smirnoff what he wants and Smirnoff says “A shot of vodka” (Chekhov 7). This is only symbolic in the context of the story where the character’s name makes it ironic.

The story seems to have an allegorical narrative because the events are straight-forward. Popova is distressed about the death of her husband, wants to remain faithful regardless of what he had done, and gives extra oats to her horse in honor of her faithfulness towards him. When she is convinced otherwise by a character that has debts to collect from her dead husband, she stops giving those extra oats. All of these events can be taken literally, but can also be taken symbolically. Symbolically, Popova ceasing to give extra oats to her horse is her letting go of her desire to remain faithful to her dead husband, as she falls in love with Smirnoff.

Posted by: Allison Cob at February 19, 2016 03:13 PM

Hussam - Vincie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic writing

Q: what is the stage of "epiphany" in the play "The Bear" by Anton Chekhov?

Answer: in the play "the bear" by Anton Chekhov the character experienced epiphany is Smirnoff. It was before their duel that Smirnoff realizes that he understands Popova and quickly admits that he admires her (Chekhov 30). " Smirnoff : Now that's a woman i understand! That's a real woman ... " [P.30]

Posted by: hussam babge at February 29, 2016 03:29 PM

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