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January 17, 2013

Edgar V. Roberts' “Writing about Setting (in Literature)"


Image Source: http://www.uleth.ca/edu/currlab/handouts/setting.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 17, 2013 02:31 PM

Readers' Comments:

Colby Johnson, Rannell Smith and Kathryn White
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05 Academic Writing 2
30 January 2013

Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting play an “essential and vital” part of
the story in both Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” and Poe’s “The Masque of
the Red Death”?

Answer: According to Roberts on page 111,"The Three Strangers" provides many graphic and also impressionistic details so we can follow almost visually the bizarre action at the story's end. He also goes on to describe Edgar Allen Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death" is so intensely present that it is a virtual participant in the story's outcome.

Posted by: Colby Johnson, Rannell Smith, Kathryn White at January 30, 2013 10:00 AM

Alison Schucht and Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA05
30 January 2013

Question: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 6 of his textbook, what is setting and what are the three basic types (Identify and explain all three)?

Answer: "Setting is the natural, manufactured, political, cultural, and temporal environment, including everything that characters know and own." (Roberts, 109). The three basic types of settings are buildings/possessions, outdoor places/scenery, and historical circumstances/culture. Buildings/possessions illustrate houses and certain objects that are important to a character in a story. Outdoor places/scenery shows the setting outside of any houses/buildings and the characters surroundings. Historical circumstances/cultural has to do with the time period and place.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at January 30, 2013 10:14 AM

Sarah Hatcher and Terrance Browne
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
30 January 2013

Question: Robert's claims that there are seven reasons why "setting" might be important to a work of literature. Identify and explain each of those ways.

Answer: In setting, realism is one example and is one of the major reasons setting is important. It uses the example from "The Necklace," where the location is in Paris, which is a real place and seems like a realistic setting (page 112, Roberts). Atmosphere and mood are also factors that can be important. Just as simple as the color used can symbolize the feeling of the passage (page 111, Roberts). Another would details in a story, which can explain a function and provide a visual outline for the reader (Page 110, Roberts). Other factors are symbol, irony, qualities in characters and framing setting.

Posted by: Sarah Hatcher at January 30, 2013 10:15 AM

Layth Faraj
Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
30 January 2013


Question: Explain how Roberts says that setting details exemplified and highlighted personality traits in the characters of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and Susan Glaspell’s Trifles (In your case, you read “A Jury of Her Peers”—
same story).


Answer: Roberts says that in "The Necklace, the loss of a comfortable home brings out the best major character by forcing her to adjust to her economic reversal." (Roberts pg.109) In Glaspell's Trifles, "the discovery of the quilt in the process of being sewed explains the major character's feelings and actions." "Roberts pg. 109)

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at January 30, 2013 10:21 AM

Vintoria Hopps, Jordan Miller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
30 January 2013

Question: Roberts claims that setting can contribute to “atmosphere and mood” and provides examples of how this can happen in Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death.” Explain how Bradbury used weather to create an atmosphere or mood in “All Summer in a Day.”

Answer: According to Roberts the setting can contribute to atmosphere and mood. In the short story All Summer in a Day the story begins by discussing how it has rained continuously for years. As said on page 1, “ It had been raining for seven years; thousands upon thousands of days compounded and filled from one end to the other with rain, with the drum and gush of water, with the sweet crystal fall of showers and the concussion of storms so heavy they were tidal waves come over the islands. A thousand forests had been crushed under the rain and grown up a thousand times to be crushed again.” The mood of everyone was very dull. Traditionally, younger children are full of energy and fun. However, Bradbury used the weather to contribute to the mood of the story. At the end of the story as the sun comes out everyone is filled with joy and much more energy than in the beginning. “The children lay out, laughing, on the jungle mattress, and heard it sigh and squeak under them, resilient and alive. They ran among the trees, they slipped and fell, they pushed each other, they played hide-and-seek and tag, but most of all they squinted at the sun until the tears ran down their faces” (Page 5) This conveys to the reader how the weather contributes to the mood and atmosphere of the story.

Posted by: Vintoria Hopps and Jordan Miller at January 30, 2013 11:16 AM

Allison and Marlie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
30 January 2013

Question: 6. How, according to Roberts, does the authors’ use of setting “accentuate
qualities of character” in Glaspell’s Trifles (i.e., “A Jury of Her Peers”) and
Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”?

Answer: Setting can accentuate qualities of a character by proving their characteristics. In Glaspell’s Trifles, he uses the lonely, dreary kitchen of hard work, oppression, and promise to explain the loss of Minnie’s brightness and promise. In “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” uses setting to reveal the character’s strength or weakness.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at January 30, 2013 12:01 PM

Adrianna Johnson
Octavio Herrera
Jake Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Writing About Setting
30 January 2013

Question 2: Explain how Roberts says that setting details exemplified and highlighted
personality traits in the characters of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”
and Susan Glaspell’s Trifles (In your case, you read “A Jury of Her Peers”—
same story).

Answer: Roberts exemplifies and highlights personality traits in the characters of “The Necklace” by making Mathilda seem like she was rich when she had the necklace that her friend let her borrow. The loss of her home brought out the best in her forcing her to adjust to her economic lifestyle. In “ A Jury for Peers” the main character was more detached and less apart of the story, where as in “ The Necklace” she was more attached and a main part of the story.

Posted by: Adrianna Johnson at January 30, 2013 12:18 PM

Adrianna Johnson
Octavio Herrera
Jake Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Writing About Setting
30 January 2013

Question 2: Explain how Roberts says that setting details exemplified and highlighted
personality traits in the characters of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”
and Susan Glaspell’s Trifles (In your case, you read “A Jury of Her Peers”—
same story).

Answer: Roberts exemplifies and highlights personality traits in the characters of “The Necklace” by making Mathilda seem like she was rich when she had the necklace that her friend let her borrow. The loss of her home brought out the best in her forcing her to adjust to her economic lifestyle. In “ A Jury for Peers” the main character was more detached and less apart of the story, where as in “ The Necklace” she was more attached and a main part of the story.

Posted by: Adrianna Johnson at January 30, 2013 12:18 PM

Sade, Jane, and Chris
Dr. Hobbs
Eng. 122
30 January 2013

Question: Robert claims that there are seven reasons why “setting” may be important to a work of literature. Identify and explain each of those ways.

Answer: There are seven reasons why setting is an important work to literature, and Robert describes each and one of them by going depth in each subject. Which are the following:

1.Setting is Often Essential and Vital in the Story
-Noticing the important details and then trying to explain the purposes

2.Setting Augments a Work’s Realism and Credibility
-Having the literature events throughout the story, play, and etc. work more believable.
-Verisimilitude
-Realism

3.Setting May Accentuate Qualities of Character
-The way characters respond and adjust to setting can reveal their strength or weakness.

4.Setting Is a Means by Which Authors Structure and Shape Their Works
-Framing
-Enclosing setting
-Authors use setting as one of the means of organization

5.Various Setting May be Symbolic
-When the scenes of setting are highlighted they can be taken as a symbol; which the author express ideas.

6.Setting Contributes to Atmosphere and Mood
-Finding a description of shapes, light and shadow, animals, wind, and etc.

7.Setting May Underscore a Work’s Irony
-Character and theme may establish expectations that are the opposite of what occur.
-Not only in fiction but in plays and poems as well

Posted by: Sade, Chris, Jane at January 30, 2013 12:39 PM

Jillian Stolzenburg and Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA04
1st February 2013

Question: Roberts gives a special name to the technique some writers use when they open a story “with a particular description” and then return to that “same setting at the end.” What IS that kind of setting called and how was it used in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” (Roberts gives an example of how this device was used in Hardy’s “The Three Strangers”)?

Answer: An Enclosing setting is when the author describes a “particular description” in the opening of a story and then returns back to that “same setting at the end”. An example of this is in the story “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” is how the story opens up at the bridge and also ends in the same place. At the beginning we notice that the story takes place on a bridge: “A man stood upon a railroad bridge in northern Alabama, looking down into the swift water twenty feet below” (Bierce, 1). At the end of the story it ends up in the same setting back at the bridge. “Peyton Farquhar was dead; his body, with a broken neck, swung gently from side to side beneath the timbers of Owl Creek bridge” (Bierce, 12).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at January 30, 2013 01:10 PM

Jasmine Lowe, Marie Ryan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122-CA08
30 January 2013
Question: How according to Roberts, does setting establish “realism or verisimilitude” (ethos) in Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace’ and in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”?
Answer: In “The Necklace” is placed in real locations in the late nineteenth-century Paris, and for this reason the story has all the semblance of having actually happened. “The Masque of the Red Death” it includes places and objects from everyday experience.

Posted by: Jasmine Lowe, Marie Ryan at January 30, 2013 01:42 PM

Marquisa Turner/Jose Garcia
ENG 122-CA04 Academic Writing II
Dr. Hobbs
31 January 2013

Question: How, according to Roberts, does the authors’ use of setting “accentuate qualities of character” in Glaspell’s Trifles (i.e., “A Jury of Her Peers”) and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”?

Answer: The author uses the setting to tell the back story or give insight into the character’s life and what they are feeling. Roberts exhibit this with these quotes “This kitchen is a place of such hard work, oppression, and unrelieved joylessness that it explains the loss of Minnies’s early brightness and promise and also helps us understand her angry act” (Roberts 111) and “Peyton’s Farquhars’s scheme to make an escape from his fate, even when it is almost literally hanging before him, suggests his character strength” (Roberts 111).

Posted by: Marqusa T & Jose G at January 31, 2013 11:29 PM

Brynn Laverdure and Briyana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing 2
30 January 2013

Question: Roberts gives a special name to the technique some writers use when they
open a story “with a particular description” and then return to that “same
setting at the end.” What IS that kind of setting called and how was it used
in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” (Roberts gives an
example of how this device was used in Hardy’s “The Three Strangers”)?

Answer: The method or technique is referred to as framing or enclosing setting. In Ambrose Bierce's "An Occurance at Owl Creek Bridge", the first paragraph of the story says “A man stood upon a railroad bridge in northern Alabama, looking down into the swift water twenty feet below”(Bierce 3). The story goes on to end with a similar description of the same wooden bridge the man was standing on at the beginning.

Posted by: Brynn Laverdure at January 31, 2013 11:54 PM

Lauren Irish and Christopher Burke
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
31 January 2013

Question 4. How, according to Roberts, does setting play an “essential and vital” part of
the story in both Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” and Poe’s “The Masque of
the Red Death”?

Answer: The setting in both stories show suspense. In Three Strangers they describe the cottage and how far out it is. In The Masque of the Red Death they show suspense by telling you how the room are set up. Both stories play an essential and vital part in the setting.

Posted by: Lauren Irish at February 1, 2013 12:17 AM

Jazmine Dixon and Habib Balde
Dr.Hobbs
English 122 CA05 Writing about Literature
26 Jan 2013


Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting establish “realism, or verisimilitude” (ethos) in Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”?


Answer: In Guy de Maupassant’s The Necklace and in Edgar Allan Poe’s The Masque of the Red Death the setting establishes realism or verisimilitude. This is because in both stories the authors explain the story in settings that show reality as accurate as they can. Each of the stories shows verisimilitude so that the person who is reading will feel or understand exactly what the author want you too. In The Masque of the Red Death realism is shown in this quote, The “Red Death “had long devastated the country. No pestilence had ever been so fatal, or so hideous, (1) this quote explains how terrible the plague is, therefore making what’s going on seem real.

Posted by: Jazmine Dixon at February 1, 2013 09:33 AM

Alexia Chambers and Abigail Evans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
January 30, 2013
3. Robert claims that there are seven reasons why “setting” may be important to a work of literature. Identify and explain each of those ways.
1. Vital to the story
Depending on the authors purpose the amount of detail used to describe the setting
2. Adds to a works realism and credibility
The descriptions of locations and objects become more real the more details are released about it and therefore become more believable
3. May accentuate qualities of character
Setting may intersect with characters as a means by which authors underscore the influence of place circumstance and time on human growth and change
4. Setting is a means by which authors structure the shape their works
Authors use setting to organize their stories
5. Various settings may be symbolic
In the scene and materials of setting are highlighted or emphasized they also may be taken as a symbols through which the author expresses ideas
6. Contributes to atmosphere and mood
Descriptions of shapes light shadows and animals wind and sounds in the particular setting
7. May underscore a works irony
Setting can establish expectations that are the opposite of what occurs

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at February 1, 2013 11:13 AM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
18 September 2013

Question: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 6 of his textbook, what is setting and what are the three basic types (Identify and explain alll three)?

Answer:
a. setting is the natural, manufactured, political, cultural, and temporal environment, including everything that characters known and own (Roberts 109)

b. 3 types:
1. private homes, public buildings, and various possessions- used to reveal or highlight qualities of character, and to make literature lifelike (Roberts 109)
2. outdoor spaces- the natural world surroundings, living creatures, and the times,seasons, and conditions that things happen can influence and interact with character,motivation, and conduct (Roberts 110)
3. cultural/historical circumstances- influence the character just like physical setting (Roberts 110)

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at September 18, 2013 03:29 PM

Ryan Voss
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA08
9/19/13

Question #7:Roberts gives a special name to the technique some writers use when they
open a story “with a particular description” and then return to that “same
setting at the end.” What IS that kind of setting called and how was it used
in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” (Roberts gives an
example of how this device was used in Hardy’s “The Three Strangers”)?
Answer:"Authors use setting to create meaning,just as painters include back-rounds and objects to render ideas."(Roberts) this is the special technique writers use to open a story and get the reader involved. Ironic settings are often important to help interest the reader. That is the kind of setting.

Posted by: Ryan Voss at September 18, 2013 03:43 PM

Ti’rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
18 September 2013
Question: “Robert claims that there are seven reason why “setting” may be important to a work of literature. Identify and explain each of those ways”
Answer:
1) “Setting is often essential and vital to a story” (110) Setting may be the crux for what some to most stories depend on to convey their message. They choose the setting in their story to be the central idea or even conflict of why their even writing a story or book. For example “The Masque of the Red Death” is written based on the setting of the prince’s castle. We wouldn’t be able to understand the main message Poe was trying to convey by not understanding the atmosphere around them.
2) “Setting augments a story work’s realism and credibility” (111) Authors that paint a picture in the readers mind of buildings or places that actually exist will have an enhanced credibility because of the readers experiencing a realness to the story.
3) “Settings may accentuate qualities of character” (111) The Setting of a story may closely correlate to the feeling of the character or the attributes of a character. Like in All Summer in a Day, it consistently rains outside and this setting could explain the feelings of the characters placed in the story. Their emotions and viewpoint of the world based on the settings of the atmosphere around them.
4) “Setting is by means which authors structure and shape their work” (111) Authors use a change of setting to determine what will happen next in their story. A change in setting may result in a twist in a story because there are more opportunities for something like that to happen.
5) “Various settings may be symbolic” (112) One area of a house in a story may represent a murder or a birth and this setting or room may be symbolic to one of the characters in the story. Like “The Scarlett Letter” the forest was a setting that was symbolic to Hester and Rev. Dimmesdale because this was the only place they could meet and be in love as they wish to be. The setting of the forest is so symbolic to the story, the author, Hawthorne, preserves the forest as a meeting grounds for the couple.
6) “Setting contributes to atmosphere and mood” (112) A surplus of adjectives and descriptions to a story could shape the vision in the mind of the reader to actually feel something the author wants them to feel. This can be accomplished through the setting. As Edgar v Roberts states that “talking a walk in a forest needs just the statement that there are trees. However if you find descriptions of shapes, lights, and shadows, animals, winds, and sounds you may be sure the author is creating an atmosphere or mood.” (112)
7) “Setting may underscore a work’s irony” (112) The setting or atmosphere of a story may be the twist or ironic compilation in the story. The example that Roberts uses is “Hardy in the poem “Channel Firing” when the noise of large guns at sea wakens the skeletons buried in an English Churchyard. The irony is that those engaged in in the gunnery practice, if “red war” gets still redder, will soon join the skeletons in the graveyard.” (113)

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at September 19, 2013 03:09 PM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
19 September 2013

Question #5: "How, according to Roberts, does setting establish "realism, or verisimilitude" (ethos) in Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace and in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"?"

Answer: Roberts says, "As the description of location and objects become particular and detailed, the events of the work become more believable" (Roberts 4). The more real a story seems, the more likely a reader is going to accept it. In "The Necklace", Maupassant uses real-life places from nineteenth century Paris, which makes a reader think that this story could have legitimately happened. In "The Masque of the Red Death", Poe includes everyday environments which makes his poems seem eerily believable. Roberts touches on this subject saying, "Although these works make no pretense to portray everyday realism, their credibility is enhanced because they take place in settings that are based in reality" (Roberts 4). It is easy to see why a reader would believe a story that contains realism. It is much easier to imagine something happening if we know where it's taking place and what that place is like. In short, realism makes a story relate-able and believable.

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 20, 2013 12:17 AM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng. 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
20 September 2013

Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting play an “essential and vital” part of the story in both Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” and Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”?

Answer:
Setting plays an important part to every story whether one is talking about “The Three Strangers” or “The Masque of the Red Death.” In “The Three Strangers,” the story begins and ends in the same place, which is a little cottage in England. This is called an “enclosing setting.” It tends to bring the story full circle for the reader. The setting is important in Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death” because the events are so out of the ordinary and unbelievable that if the setting was made up too, the story would not be believable at all. This allows the reader give themselves to the fantasy, but wonders if it can still be real because of the true setting. Roberts writes, “their credibility is enhanced because they take place in settings that are based in reality” (Roberts 112). This proves the point that implausible situations become a little more plausible with a true setting.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 20, 2013 02:50 AM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
20 September 2013

Question: Explain how Roberts says that setting details exemplified and highlighted
personality traits in the characters of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”
and Susan Glaspell’s Trifles (In your case, you read “A Jury of Her Peers”—
same story).

Answer: Robert says that setting is the temporal environment surrounding the character or characters. He then says that characters may either be helped or hurt by their surroundings. Based on the story "A Jury of Her Peers", the setting basically took place at Minnie Wright's house. Minnie was not happy with the life that she lived in that house while married to Mr. Wright. Living in that house with Mr. Wright has made her depressed, angry, hurt, emotional, lifeless and lonely. That shows how your surroundings can play a role in your personality because she was not always that kind of person, she used to enjoy life before she married her husband. She says, "I thought of Harry and the team outside, so I said, a little sharp, 'Can I see John?' 'No,' says she-- kind of dull like. 'Ain't he home?' says I. Then she looked at me. 'Yes,' says she, 'he's home.' 'Then why can't I see him?' I asked her, out of patience with her now. 'Cause he's dead' says she, just as quiet and dull--and fell to pleatin' her apron. 'Dead?' says, I, like you do when you can't take in what you've heard. "She just nodded her head, not getting a bit excited, but rockin' back and forth. "'Why--where is he?' says I, not knowing what to say. "She just pointed upstairs--like this"--pointing to the room above." This shows how she was just lifeless as if she just didn't care anymore at this point, how living in that house just sucked everything out of her.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at September 20, 2013 10:46 AM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
20 September 2013

Question: How, according to Roberts, does the authors’ use of setting “accentuate qualities of character” in Glaspell’s Trifles (i.e., “A Jury of Her Peers”) and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”?

Answer: According to the reading, “Writing about Setting” from Edgar V. Roberts, the use of the setting can accentuate qualities on the character because the author can use the place, circumstances and time to make the character grow and change. The author give us the example of the story “A Jury of Her Peers” from Glaspell, explaining that the setting in this story is the kitchen which it is a place of, “hard work, oppression and unrelieved joylessness” (Roberts 111) and how this affected in the character of Mrs. Wright that throughout the story lose her early brightness and makes us understand her angry act. The way the author can manipulate the setting of the story can make the character also reveal strength or weakness of character. For explaining this point, Roberts use as an example Peyton Farquhar’s in “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” and suggest the strength of this character when escapes from his fate, even when it was already hanging.

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at September 20, 2013 11:20 AM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
20 September 2013

Question: Roberts claims that setting can contribute to “atmosphere and mood” and provides examples of how this can happen in Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death.” Explain how Bradbury used weather to create an atmosphere or mood in “All Summer in a Day.”

Answer: In All Summer in a Day, Bradbury used weather to create the atmosphere and mood to what is happening on planet Venus. The story explains that it rains every day, and the sun only comes out every 7 years. The atmosphere of Venus is very gloomy, and sad, and a reader can imagine the planet of being very dark, with hardly any light shining through. The mood of the children and teacher also play a role into the story’s setting. Whenever the rain is falling, the children seem to be more in distress, especially one of the main characters, William. He always picks on the round female character, Margot. Margot came from Earth, so her idea of the atmosphere and mood around Venus is different from that of Earth. She always stares out the window, and watches the rain, and separates herself from the other children, and due to what is happening outside, the children pick on her and put her in the closet. However, once the sun does come out, everything changes on planet Venus. The plants start to bloom and have color, which before they did not because the rain would hit them so hard they could not grow. The children are so much happier, and the reader can suspect that the new colors create happiness on the planet, and not sadness like when the story started. However, one person who could not experience this happiness was Margot. She was locked in a closet when the sun came out and changed everything on Venus, so her idea of the atmosphere and her mood was very different than that of the children’s when the actual setting changed in the story.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 20, 2013 01:04 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
20 September 2013
Question #9: In chapter 6, Roberts discusses irony, a concept that we will revisit often in this course. What is it, according to Roberts, and how was it used in Maupassant’s “The Necklace”(there are several instances—identify at least one)?

Answer: Roberts mentions in his article that irony is “the opposite of what occurs”(Bradbury 5). One of the main conflicts in “The Necklace,” written by Guy de Maupassant, exists because of a very ironic situation. When Mrs. Loisel loses a rich friend’s diamond necklace, she and her husband spend ten years of their lives working in order to pay for one they believe is just as valuable as the one she had borrowed. Then, in the end of the story Mrs. Loisel sees her wealthy friend, Mrs. Forrestier, and explains what had happened concerning the necklace and what she had done about the situation(Maupassant 9). Mrs. Forrestier responds to Mrs. Loisel by saying the necklace Mrs. Loisel had borrowed was “only costume jewelry. At most, it was worth only five hundred francs! . . . “(Maupassant 9). Mrs. Loisel, because she had not known the necklace was not an expensive one, had spent ten years of her life working extremely hard in order to buy Mrs. Forrestier a new diamond necklace.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 20, 2013 01:07 PM

Sade Loiseau
Dr. Hobbs
Englsih 122
20 September 2013

Question 1: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 6 of his textbook, what is setting
and what are the three basic types (Identify and explain all three)?

Answer: Setting is the natural, manufactured, political, cultural, and temporal environment, including everything that characters know and own. Three types of setting are on (Roberts 1). First setting is private home, public buildings, and various possessions are important in Literature, as in life to reveal or highlight qualities. Second, Outdoor places are scenes of many literary actions; location for the action of many narratives and plays. Last but not least, cultural and historical circumstances are often prominent in literature, physical setting influences characters.

Posted by: Sade Loiseau at September 20, 2013 01:22 PM

Taina Valcarcel
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
Dr. Hobbs
September 20, 2013

Question: Roberts gives a special name to the technique some writers use when they
open a story “with a particular description” and then return to that “same setting at the end.” What IS that kind of setting called and how was it used in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” (Roberts gives an example of how this device was used in Hardy’s “The Three Strangers”)?

Answer: The term that is used to define when they open the story "with a particular description" is called media res, which is Latin for "in the middle of." In the story, "An Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge," the author starts when they are preparing to hang the convict. An example of this would be the beginning, "A man stood upon a railroad bridge in northern Alabama, looking down into the swift water twenty feet below." The author talks about the setting in the bridge before the hanging.

Posted by: Taina Valcarcel at September 20, 2013 01:26 PM

Tori Thomas
Dr Hobbs.
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
20 September, 2013


Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting play an “essential and vital” part of the story in both Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” and Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”?

Answers: In the Masque of the Red Death the setting takes place in a castle of seven rooms where the ball takes place. The candles in the window give the setting a more subtle mood since the ball takes place at night. Each room had a different color scheme and this is essential to the story because the last room which was all black and scary was know as “The Room of Death”. Setting is important in a story because it sets the tone of the story. In the Three Strangers, they can “feel the rain in their nostrils” because it is constantly raining and gives off a scary feeling. Hardy’s imagery is solid in this story. The hosting of a christening was going on and it was warm inside because this took place during winter time. The setting for this story is essential because it also places the tone and mood for the story just like Roberts said in his theory article.

Posted by: Tori Thomas at September 22, 2013 11:04 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
22 September 2013
Robert claims that there are seven reasons why “setting” may be important
to a work of literature. Identify and explain each of those ways.

Setting is often essential and vital to the story. Setting augments a works realism and credibility. Setting may accentuate qualities of character. Setting is a means by which authors structure and shape their works. Various settings may be symbolic. Setting contributes to atmosphere and mood. Setting may underscore a works irony.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at September 23, 2013 01:46 PM

Ti’rani Rye, Ryan Voss
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
23 September 2013
Question: How, according to Roberts, does the authors’ use of setting “accentuate qualities of character” in Glaspell’s Trifles (i.e., “A Jury of Her Peers”) and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”?
Answer: In “A Jury of Her Peers” from Glaspell’s Trifles the setting closely correlates to the feeling of Minnie for example: “The kitchen is a place of such hard work, oppression, and unrelieved joylessness, that it explains the loss of Minnie’s early brightness and promise and also helps us understand her angry act.” (Roberts, 111) Also in “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” Peyton Farquhar continues to think of a way out of his impending death, this may contribute to his strength as a character. (Roberts, 111)

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at September 23, 2013 01:56 PM

Michael Ossolinski, Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
23 September 2013

Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting play an “essential and vital” part of
the story in both Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” and Poe’s “The Masque of
the Red Death”?

Answer: In "The Masque of the Red Death" it is essential because it provides in detail many graphic and impressionistic details that is easy to follow and help us understand how the story ended (Roberts 3,4)

In "The Three Strangers" the setting is essential because it gives the story its mysterious/suspense mood and tone and it helps determine the outcome of the story (Roberts 4)

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski, Jeffrey Wingfield at September 23, 2013 02:04 PM

Ryan MacCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
23 September 2013


Question: Roberts claims that setting can contribute to “atmosphere and mood” and provides examples of how this can happen in Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death.” Explain how Bradbury used weather to create an atmosphere or mood in “All Summer in a Day.”


Answer: Bradbury uses weather to create atmosphere and mood in “All Summer in a Day” numerous times; he uses mainly rain and sun setting to distinguish the kids’ emotions. When it is raining during the story, the kids are usually down and droopy, as the rain and the forest atmosphere causes the emotions of the kids to be down. However, as the sun comes out, the kids in the story get happy and joyous, as the sun causes them to go outside and play around.

Posted by: Ryan MacCarthy at September 23, 2013 02:12 PM

Maryerie Rojas, Juliann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
23 September 2013

Question 2: Explain how Roberts says that setting details exemplified and highlighted personality traits in the characters of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and Susan Glaspell’s Trifles (In your case, you read “A Jury of Her Peers”—same story).

Answer: Roberts explains that in “The Necklace” the personalities are highlighted by “the loss of a comfortable home brings out the best in the major character by forcing her to adjust to her economic reversal” (109). “The discovery of a quilt in the process if being sewed explains the major character’s feelings and actions” (Roberts 110). The women also describe Mrs.Wright’s caged struggle between “the pathetic and abusive husband-wife relationship in Trifles” (Roberts 110).

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas, Juliann Sauter at September 23, 2013 02:17 PM

Rebecca Liller, Tori Thomas, Madi Owens
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
23 September 2013

Question: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 6 of his textbook, what is setting and what are the three basic types (Identify and explain all three)?

Answer: According to Roberts, setting is defined as “the natural, manufactured, political, cultural, and temporal environment, including everything that characters know and own” (Roberts 1). He also describes the three different basic types of setting which are private homes, public buildings, and various possessions. As well as the outdoor spaces and cultural and historical circumstances. Private homes, both which are interior and exterior, are very common in stories, and such things are trees or things inside the house such as clocks and necklaces. This also goes for public buildings and describing the outdoor spaces, as well as cultural settings and how they influence characters. Outdoor spaces includes the outside world and the character’s surrounding. This includes things such as hills and valleys and also creatures outside like lizards or horses. The seasons are also included in the setting. The story could describe as outside being snowy or it could be raining, and also very bright or dark, depending on if the sun is shining. This all can affect how a character interacts with others and the reader in the story. Time period in a story also helps convey the story, which deals with cultural and historical circumstances. Characters will interpret life a lot differently than others because of the time period. The culture is very different back in the nineteenth century than in present day. This helps convey the story through their perception of the outside world, as well as the other characters around them in the different time periods and historical circumstances.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 24, 2013 12:37 AM

Emma De Rhodo and Kiara Michelle Burgosdia
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA08
25 September 2013
Question #3: Robert claims that there are seven reasons why “setting” may be important to a work of literature. Identify and explain each of those ways.

Answer: Roberts mentions that the setting in a story can be extremely important for seven specific reasons. First, Roberts says, “Setting Is Often Essential and Vital in the Story”(Roberts 3). Setting is necessary in a story because, as one can tell through the description of different scenes’ settings, it relates to the events happening in the story(Roberts 3-4). Also, “Setting Augments a Work’s Realism and Credibility” (Roberts 4). The author’s description of a setting in a story helps the reader almost be able to believe what is going on is actually possible and/or happening(Roberts 4). Next, Roberts mentions, “Setting May Accentuate Qualities of Character”(Roberts 4). The place in which the characters are located and the items they are near can have an influence on their qualities(Roberts 4). Roberts also says, “Setting Is a Means By Which Authors Structure and Shape Their Works”(Roberts 4). A change of setting is needed to keep a story moving, to keep events happening(Roberts 4). Furthermore, the author says, ”Various Settings May Be Symbolic”(Roberts 5). The details about a particular setting, described by the author, may have a meaning that has to do with a part of the story that is important(Roberts 5). Roberts continues by saying, “Setting Contributes to Atmosphere and Mood”(Roberts 5). The different aspects of the setting cause the characters to feel certain ways or emphasize how characters are feeling at that point in the story(Roberts 5). Finally, “Setting May Underscore a Work’s Irony”(Roberts 5). The author of a story may use different settings which make the reader feel as if one situation is existing, but actually, the opposite of this situation is actually happening(Roberts 5).

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 25, 2013 10:56 AM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 February 2013

QUESTION #1:
According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 6 of his textbook, what is setting and what are the three basic types (Identify and explain all three)?

ANSWER:
The description of places, objects, and backgrounds can be known as the setting. "Setting is the natural, manufactured, political, cultural, and temporal environment, including everything that characters know and own" (Roberts 109).

There are three basic types of settings.The first type of setting is privates homes, public buildings, and various possessions which reveals or highlights qualities of a character making them lifelike (Roberts 109). The second type of setting is outdoor places which is noting the natural surrounding including the location, creatures, times, seasons and conditions (Roberts 110). The third type of setting is cultural and historical circumstances which is historical and cultural conditions and assumptions that influence a character (110).

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at February 5, 2014 08:57 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 February 2014

QUESTION #4:
How, according to Roberts, does setting play an "essential and vital" part of the story in both Hardy's "The Three Strangers" and Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"?

ANSWER:
According to Roberts, "Poe provides many graphic and also impressionistic details in 'The Masque of the Red Death,' so that we can follow, almost visually, the bizarre action at the story's end. In some works the setting is so intensely present, like the countryside in Hardy's 'The Three Strangers,' that it is a visual participant in the story's outcome" (Roberts 110-111). In other words, Poe uses details of the setting as visual aide, while Hardy uses the setting as a component of the story's plot.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at February 6, 2014 01:31 PM

Bianca T. Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA12
6 Feb. 2014

Question #5: How, according to Roberts, does setting establish "realism, or verisimilitude" (ethos) in Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace" and in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"?

Answer: In "The Necklace," the setting establishes realism because it takes place in real locations and it would seem like it would have really happened. "In a shop in the Palais-Royal, they found a necklace of diamonds that seemed to them exactly like the one they were looking for" (Maupassant 7). In "The Masque of the Red Death," the setting only establishes verisimilitude. It doesn't establish realism, because the story doesn't portray everyday realism. "But the mummer had gone so far as to assume the type of the Red Death. His vesture was dabbled in blood—and his broad brow, with all the features of the face, was besprinkled with the scarlet horror" (Poe 8). The story is based on reality and is enhanced.


Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at February 6, 2014 03:02 PM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 February 2014

Question #3:
Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why "setting" may be important to a work of literature. Identify and explain each of those ways.

Answer:
Here are the seven reasons why Roberts claims setting plays an important role in literature:
1-Setting is often essential and vital in the story because "in some works the setting is so intensely present, that it is a virtual participant in the story" (Roberts 111).
2-Setting augments a work's realism and credibility. Sometimes when reading literature, "as the description of the location and objects become particular and detailed, the events become more believable" (Roberts 111).
3-Setting may accentuate qualities of character because "the way characters respond and adjust to setting can reveal their strength or weakness" (Roberts 111).
4-Setting is a means by which authors structure and shape their work. Roberts states that "authors often use setting as a means of organizing their stories" (Roberts 111).
5-Various settings may be symbolic especially "if the scene and materials of settings are highlighted or emphasized" because "they may be taken as symbols through which the author expresses ideas" (Roberts 112).
6-Setting contributes to atmosphere and mood. In a story "if you find descriptions of shapes, lights and shadows, animals, wind, and sounds you may be sure that the author is creating an atmosphere or certain mood" (Roberts 112).
7- Setting may underscore a works irony by "establishing expectations that are opposite of what occurs" (Roberts 112).

Posted by: Berlin Waters at February 6, 2014 04:34 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 February 2014

Question #1: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in chapter 6 of his textbook, what is setting and what are the three basic types (identify and explain all three)?

Answer: According to Roberts setting is "the background of place, objects and culture in literature" (Robert 109). The three basic types of setting are: Public/Private spaces, Outdoor spaces and Cultural/ Historical circumstances.
Private and public spaces are important because as Robert says "they revel or highlight the qualities of character and also to make literature lifelike" (Roberts 109), which makes "authors include many details about objects of human manufacture and construction" (Roberts 109).
Outdoor spaces are also very important in setting. Robert states that "nature world is an obvious location for the action of many narratives and plays" (Roberts 110). Robert also states that it is important to note the natural surroundings such as, "mountains, rivers, meadows, fields, lakes, streams" and etc (Roberts 110).
Cultural and historical circumstances is a setting that is used quite a bit in todays world. Roberts refers to a poem called "Rhine Boat Trip"which "brings out the contrast between the beauty of German scenery and mythology" (Roberts 110).

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at February 6, 2014 04:49 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
7 February 2014

Question: Robert claims that there are seven reasons why "setting" may be important to a work of literature. Identify and explain each of those ways.

Answer: The author says there are seven reasons why setting is important to a work of literature. The first of those seven reasons is setting is often essential and vital in the story. Depending on the story the setting can play a huge role or not be important at all. Sometimes the authors describe the setting with great details, other times not so much. Roberts gives the following examples of this, (Poe provides many graphic and also impressionistic details in 'The Masque of the Red Death' , so that we can follow, almost visually, the bizarre action at the story's end. In some works the setting is so intensely present, like the countryside in Hardy's
The Three Strangers,' that it is a virtual participant in the story's outcome" (Roberts 110). The next one Roberts talks about is Setting augment's a work's realism and credibility. He explains this one by saying, "One of the major purposes of literary setting is to establish realism, or verisimilitude" (Roberts 110). The next one he brings up is setting may accentuate qualities of character. He explains this by saying, "setting may intersect with character as a means by which authors underscore the influence of place, circumstance, and time on human growth and change"(Roberts 110). The next one is setting is a means by which authors structure and shape their works. Roberts gives an example of this with the following, "Authors often use setting as one of the means of organizing their stories, as in Maupassant's 'The Necklace'. The story's final scene is believable because Mathilde leaves her impoverished home to take a nostalgic stoll on the Champs-Elysees, the most fashionable street in Paris." (Roberts 110). The fifth of the seven is various settings may be symbolic. He explains this with, "if the scenes and materials of setting are highlighted or emphasized, they also may be taken as symbols through which the author expresses ideas" (Roberts 110). The sixth one is setting contributes to atmosphere and mood. He explains this one with, "Most actions require no more than a functional description of setting. Thus, taking a walk in a forest needs just the statement that there are trees. However, if you find descriptions of shapes, light and shadows, animals, wind, and sounds, you may be sure that the author is creating an atmosphere or mood for the action, as in Howthorne's 'Young Goodman Brown'" (Roberts 110). The last of the seven is setting may underscore a work's irony. He explains this as, "just as setting may reinforce character and theme, so it may establish expectations that are the opposite of what occurs, not only in fiction but also in plays and poems" (Roberts 110).

Posted by: sawyer hand at February 6, 2014 10:03 PM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 February 2014

Question 2:
Explain how Roberts says that setting details exemplified and highlighted personality traits in the characters of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and Susan Glaspell’s “Trifles” (In your case, you read “A jury of the Her Peers”- same story).

Answer:
In A Jury of the Her Peers, the setting took place in a kitchen within the Wright estate (Roberts 111). The kitchen symbolizes a woman’s place of work. And since it was a place for women, they were able to find more clues that answered the question of motive. The women in this story, unlike the men, were thinking logically and rationally towards the evidence they were finding. In The Necklace, Mathilde was a woman of higher taste but unfortunately was married into a poor life style (Roberts 111). She desired a richer life filled with fine clothes and jewelry. Mathilde wanted to live a life filled with parties and wealthy houses. But since she married a man without much riches, Mathilde become ungrateful for what she had because she constantly thought of what she did not own.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at February 7, 2014 12:57 AM

James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
7th February 2014

Question 6 – How, according to Roberts, does the authors’ use of setting “accentuate qualities of character” in Glaspell’s Trifles (i.e., “A Jury of Her Peers”) and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”?

Answer – Writers will often use setting to accentuate qualities of characters in their writing. In the case of Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”, the main character Peyton Farquhar’s “scheme to make an escape from his fate, even when it is almost literally hanging before him, suggests his character’s strength” (Roberts 4). Also, the way in which characters respond and/or adjust to setting can reveal their strength or weaknesses, as well as allowing the reader to paint a picture of past happenings related to a character through the use of their imagination. The setting of a story is one of the most important, without good setting, a good story is near impossible to write.

Posted by: James Jessop at February 7, 2014 01:00 AM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
07 February 2014

Question:
Roberts claims that setting can contribute to “atmosphere and mood” and
provides examples of how this can happen in Poe’s “The Masque of the Red
Death.” Explain how Bradbury used weather to create an atmosphere or
mood in “All Summer in a Day.”

Answer:
Bradbury used weather to create an atmosphere or mood in All Summer in a Day by using very descriptive metaphors and similes. Such as, “all day yesterday they had read in class about the sun about how like a lemon it was, and how hot” (Bradbury 1). Also the first paragraph tells a lot about the weather or atmosphere of the planet how the rain had not ceased. Bradbury sets up the story by saying, it had been raining for seven years; thousands upon thousands of days compounded and filled from one end to the other with rain, with the drum and gush of water, with the sweet crystal fall of showers and the concussion of storms so heavy they were tidal waves come over the islands (Bradbury 1).

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at February 7, 2014 09:55 AM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
7 Feb. 2014

Question #9:
In chapter 6, Roberts discusses irony, a concept that we will revisit often in this course. What is it, according to Roberts, and how was it used in Maupassant’s “The Necklace” (there are several instances—identify at least one)?

Answer:
The irony in "The Necklace" is that she thought that borrowing the necklace would help her social status. Instead of helping her it put her more in debt for trying to replace the necklace she lost. (Roberts 8)

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at February 7, 2014 10:05 AM

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA07
17 September 2014

QUESTION #8:
Summarize and explain what Roberts in his fifth reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

ANSWER:
His fifth reason is that setting can become symbolic, and it can subtly give clues to important new ideas. It is important because it can help to connect the reasoning behind what a character is doing, especially when their thoughts are not given in the text. The setting “may be taken as symbols through which the author expresses new ideas” (Roberts 5). The audience notices these clues and makes connections about the characters themselves. A specific text, which incorporates this skill from this course, is “The Storm” by Kate Chopin. A huge part of the setting is the storm, during which Clixta and Alcee both committed adultery. During the storm, the situation was risky and chaotic, much like the harsh wind and heavy rainfall. After the storm, the sun was shining “and everyone was happy” (Chopin 5). If a storm is not seen and leaves nothing behind, there is no way to tell that it happened, much like the adultery that was committed in secrecy.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at September 17, 2014 05:26 PM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing
20 September 2014

Question In chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V Roberts asserts that there are thre basic types of settings used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the first type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, which one and why?

Answer
The first type of setting Roberts speaks about is that of "Private homes, Public places and Possessions". In my own opinion, this setting is basically to show the financial, social and physical status of any given character. The things they own, places they go and where they live can tell you mostly everything you need to know about a character.

Yes, this setting is relevant to a short fiction we read, "the Necklace" in particular. In the story one character was invited to a formal even where she needed to dress presentable of portray a wealthy look. She used everything her husband had to purchase a new dress, and then borrowed beautiful necklace from a friend. n this case the first setting relates to her possession.

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at September 20, 2014 03:48 PM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
22 September 2014

Question #12:
How, according to Roberts, does setting play an “essential and vital” part of the story in both Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” and Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”?
Answer:
The settings played a very important role in both of the stories. In the Masque, the rooms represented a feeling or way of life. For example, the blue room, it represented the beginning of life and purity. The setting in The Three Strangers is a lonely Cold moor. You can sense this due to it being very rainy and all the strangers finding a place to stay with the Shepherd. These are essential because it pulls you in and it helps you understand the story better.
“I have had some rough times lately, and have been forced to pick up what I can get in the way of wearing, but I must find a suit better fit for working-days when I reach home.”

Posted by: Zachary Gary at September 22, 2014 10:08 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 17, 2014

Question 17:
Roberts claims that setting can contribute to “atmosphere and mood” and provides examples of how this can happen in Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death.” Explain how weather was used weather to create an atmosphere or mood in either Kate Chopin’s “The Storm,” or Ray Bradbury’s “All Summer in a Day.”
Answer:
In Kate Chopin’s “The Storm”, stormy weather was used to set the atmosphere and mood. It was a dark rainy afternoon where the character Calixta lets an old flame into her home to wait out the storm. The weather is what brings the two characters together sort and sets the mood for the two to get intimate. However, “The Storm” was ironic because in the end the storm passes and all the characters are happy.

Posted by: Stephanie Vera at September 24, 2014 12:14 AM

Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
19 September 2014

Question # 7:
In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his fourth reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer:
The fourth reason as to why literature is important is “setting is a means by which authors structure and shape their works.” This means that authors use setting as a way to organize their stories. Also sometimes authors can begin with a particular description and return to the same setting at the end. “An example of this is Hardy’s “The Three Strangers,” which both begins and ends with a description of the lonely English countryside containing a solitary cottage where the main action takes place.” (Roberts 112).

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at September 24, 2014 12:58 PM

Alyssa Davis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 27, 2014

Question #4:
In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his first reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, this far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer:
Edgar V. Roberts states that it is important to first find the important details within the story and then try to explain the functions of why they are important. A short story that would fit best this type of literature work is, “The Masque of the Red Death,” by Edgar Allen Poe. This short fiction fits best because the author provides a variety of graphics and impressionistic details.

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at September 27, 2014 08:04 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at October 1, 2014 09:57 AM

Trejon Baynham
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA 07
7 October 2014

ANSWER:
How, according to Roberts, does the authors’ use of setting “accentuate qualities of character” in Glaspell’s Trifles (i.e., “A Jury of Her Peers”) and Bierce’s “AN Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”?

QUESTION:
In Glaspell’s Trifles, one of the primary locations described in the text is the kitchen. According to Roberts, the kitchen accentuates qualities of Minnie Wright's character by shedding light on her loss of "early brightness and promise" given that the kitchen serves as a symbol towards her husband's opression (Roberts 109). In Bierce's "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," the setting is used to demonstrate a character's helplessness in the story. Roberts articulates this relationship through the detail of Bierce's protagonist's, Peyton Farquhar, fate "literally hanging from him" given that that is how he had been deemed to die (Roberts 109).

Posted by: Trejon Baynham at October 7, 2014 10:37 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
9 February 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his FIRST
reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of
short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Robert’s first reason is “Setting is often essential and vital in the story.” (Roberts 3) Setting allows the reader to follow along in the story visually. It gives the reader an impression of what is going on at the time and how that affects the story. For example, readers can tell from the setting in “The Necklace” that social class was critical. Also, because of the setting readers know that women did not have the ability to change social classes unless they married wealthy, an opportunity Mathilde missed, which ultimately led to the conflict in the story. Setting influences the course, and sometimes the conflict in the story.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 9, 2015 12:18 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
9 February 2015

Question #9: In chapter 6 of this textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his SIXTH reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

In the sixth reason it states that the setting contributes to the atmosphere and mood. By having many descriptions and details of what a room looks like, helps readers know what the mood or atmosphere is for the story. For example, if the colors are bright such as red or orange it sets the mood for happiness. In the short story, “The Masque of the Red Death” invoke gloom or augment hysteria. References to smells and sounds bring the setting life further by additional sensory responses from the reader.” (Roberts page 112)

Posted by: SelenaHammie at February 9, 2015 01:39 PM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
11 February 2015

Writing about Setting

Question #10: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his SEVENTH reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Roberts’s seventh important reason for setting is that it may underscore a work’s irony (Roberts 112). Irony implies the opposite of what is actually happening. This concept can be applied to a few of the short stories we have read. In the Chrysanthemums, the man took an interest in one of Elisa’s flower. Only to find out that he did not care about the flower he cared about the. The title of the short story “The Storm” is ironic as well. It stands for the actual storm and the brief affair that went on between Calixta and Alcee. “The Three Stranger” becomes ironic when the three men were supposed to meet the following day for the execution.

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at February 9, 2015 07:42 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
11 February 2015

Question 3: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the THIRD type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?
Answer: The third basic setting in literature is cultural and historical circumstances (Roberts 10); in certain stories, there needs to be a general knowledge of either the culture or the historical context of the subject.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 10, 2015 04:31 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
10 February 15

Writing about Setting Discussion Question

Question: In chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his FOURTH reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: In chapter 6, Roberts states that the fourth reason that the setting in literature is important is setting is a means by which authors structure and shape their works. The paragraph states, “the structure of the story depends on a normal, natural change of scene (Roberts 4). This means that in order for a story to have the best transition possible, it must have clean movement. Enclosed settings or framing has the author open with a particular description, and then close the setting with the same thing. “Framing completes a formal completeness” (Roberts 5). A reasonable short story example to pair with Roberts’s fourth reason would be “An Occurrence on Owl Creek Bridge.” In that short story, the author describes a man on a railroad bridge looking down at the water, waiting to be hung. At the end of the story, the author takes the readers back to the scene where the man is doing the same thing as before, looking down at the water waiting to be hung.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 10, 2015 06:18 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
10 February 2015

Question 16: In chapter 6, Roberts discusses irony, a concept that we will revisit often in this course. What is it, according to Roberts, and how was it used in Maupassant's "The Necklace" (there are several instances- identify at least one)?

Answer: Roberts states that irony is "expectations that are the opposite of what occurs." (112) In Maupassant's "The Necklace" irony was used when Mathilde was forced to buy a thirty-six thousand-franc necklace when she lost a five hundred franc costume jewelry necklace. She was so afraid to let her friend know that she lost it (58) instead of telling her friend and learning how much it was worth. Mathilde expects to wear and replace an expensive necklace only to have the opposite occur.

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 10, 2015 07:50 PM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
10 February 2015

Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting establish “realism, or verisimilitude” (ethos) in Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”?
Answer: The necklace shows realism because it was set in real life places in the nineteenth century. The Masque of the Red Death portrays verisimilitude “Even futuristic, symbol, and fantastic stories, as well as, ghost stories, seem more believable if they include places and objects from everyday experience.” (Pg.109)

Posted by: rachel addington at February 10, 2015 09:44 PM

Kaitlin Murphy
Professor Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
11 February 2015

Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting play an “essential and vital” part of the story in both
Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” and Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”?

Answer: Edgar V. Roberts describes setting as being an “essential and vital” part of every story. Especially in Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” and Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”. In each short story, the setting for “The Three Strangers” happens to begin and end in the same place. The setting played a enormous importance on the reader in this story. Roberts claims, “In some works the setting is so intensely present, like the countryside in Hardy’s ‘The Three Strangers,’ that it is a virtual participant in the story’s outcome” (Roberts 4). He wants us to visualize the prime importance that the settings in stories gives to us as readers. The setting is also very strong in Poe’s short story “The Masque of the Red Death.” Poe describes the setting giving descriptions of what was happening around in the story. “Poe provides many graphic and also impressionistic details in ‘The Masque of the Red Death,’ so that we can follow, almost visually, the bizarre action at the story’s end” (Poe 3). This is why according to Roberts, setting does play an “essential and vital” part of every story because without the setting the story would just be dull, and the reader would become less interested in reading the rest.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at February 10, 2015 10:56 PM

Emma Riemer
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
10 February 2015

Setting

Question 2: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the SECOND type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer:
The second type of setting Roberts discusses is the natural environment. It is also all the things that happen within the natural outside world such as rain, snow, birds, trees and anything else in the outside environment. It is the seasons that the story takes place. This type of setting is applicable in Thomas Hardy’s The Three Stranger when the speaker describes that it is raining, “The level rainstorm smote walls, slopes, and hedges like the clothyard shafts of Senlac and Crecy. Such sheep and outdoor animals as had no shelter stood with their buttocks to the winds; while the tails of little birds trying to roost on some scraggy thorn were blown inside-out like umbrellas”(Hardy 3). This describes the setting of an outdoor place because there are animals and the condition is raining as discussed by Roberts.

Posted by: Emma Riemer at February 10, 2015 10:56 PM

Diego Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
10 February 2015

Discussion Question

Question: Roberts gives a special name to the technique some writers use when they open a story “with a particular description” and then return to that “same setting at the end.” What IS that kind of setting called and how was it used in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” (Roberts gives an example of how this device was used in Hardy’s “The Three Strangers”)?

Answer: The particular name or technique that Roberts gives is the framing or enclosing setting. (Roberts 5). Ambrose Bierce uses this technique in “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.” Bierce starts with the man about to be hung; then the man about to be hung goes through an entire fantasy; in the end, it goes back to him dying by being hung. That whole fantasy happens seconds before the noose snaps his neck.

Posted by: Diego Garcia at February 10, 2015 11:09 PM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
10 February 2015

Question: How according to Roberts does the authors use of setting “accentuate qualities of character” in Trifles and Occurrence at Owl?

Answer: According to Roberts, the way characters respond to their setting reveals their strength or weaknesses. “Peyton Farquhar scheme to make an escape from his fate, even when it is almost literally hanging before him suggest his character strength.” (Roberts 4) “In Trifles the kitchen is a place of hard work, oppression, joylessness that explains the loss of Minnie’s early brightness and promise and helps us understand her angry act.” (Roberts 4) Roberts is saying that a characters traits builds the setting of the story.

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at February 10, 2015 11:13 PM

Jorge Braham

Dr. Hobbs

Academic Writing II CA12

9 February 2015

Writing about setting

Question:

Explain Roberts’s reasoning, when he claims that the setting details both exemplified and highlighted personality traits in the characters of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and Susan Glaspell’s Trifles (or, “A Jury of Her Peers”—same story)

Answer:

“Glaspell’s setting in trifles is the kitchen of the lonely, dreary Wright farm. This kitchen is a place of such hard work, oppression, and promise and also helps us understand her angry act.(a blending of setting and character as seen in Maupassant’s “the Necklace” is explored in the two drafts of the illustrative essay in chapter 1)

the location of each story gives a little example of each character and example would be in Necklace would be Ms. Loisel was located in France, and it help explain how they were acting on that time frame and area.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at February 10, 2015 11:19 PM

Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
11 February 2015

Question 14: How, according to Roberts, does the authors’ use of setting “accentuate qualities of character” in Glaspell’s Trifles (i.e., “A Jury of Her Peers”) and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”?

Answer: In “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” the opening scene features Farquhar with a noose around his neck and with a plank as his only lifeline. He then falls into the water and continues to actually live, he is faced with another hurdle, escaping the ropes that confine him and threaten to suffocate him, he needs oxygen to live, “he felt his head emerge, his eyes were blinded by the sunlight.” This gives off the “light at the end of the tunnel” effect for him (Bierce 9). After his long, perilous journey and the hell that he has finally escaped, he reaches home and it appears to be “bright and beautiful in the morning sunshine” as he reaches his sanctuary (Bierce 12).
In “Trifles,” the investigation scene opens with Hale asking, “it’s cold, ain’t it?” This gives off a somber and gloomy vibe, it also foreshadows that mystery will unravel to reveal a forbidding secret (Glaspell 2). Mrs. Peters says, “my, it’s cold in here” when she enters the Wright house, maintaining grim feelings throughout the story (Glaspell 5). Mrs. Hale was discussing how life between the couple must have been when she suddenly pauses and shivers with feelings of a “raw wind that gets to the bone,” symbolizes the coldness of Minnie’s husband. (Glaspell 7).

Posted by: Victoria Markou at February 11, 2015 02:22 AM

Rously Paul \
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
11 February 2015


Roberts explains in this chapter that setting is often essential and vital in the story: which means that without some sort of setting the story has no wheels or ground to stand on. Roberts goes on to explain that although setting is relevant to varying degrees it depends on the author how much of an impact on the story the setting has, an example being in “The Three Strangers” the countryside is a “virtual participant in the story’s outcome”(Page 4 Paragraph 1).

Posted by: Rously Paul at February 11, 2015 07:53 AM

Aderias Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
Feb 11, 2015
Question 5: In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his SECOND Reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?
It is important because it establishes realism in literary setting; makes the work more believable in detail of particular location and objections. For example, like “The Necklace” where the location took place in the late nineteenth century in Paris aka the love city.

Posted by: aderias ewing at February 11, 2015 10:14 AM

Emma Duncan
Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
18 September 2015

The setting of the short play "Trifles" by Susan Glaspell takes place in a small country town in the United States during the beginning of the twentieth century. The story takes place in the farmhouse of Mr. and Mrs. John Wright after the murder of the former one. Throughout the scenes, the sheriff, the attorney, and Hale go to different locations in the house such as the upstairs room, the barn, and the kitchen, however, most of the play is performed in the kitchen, and wherever the women go. Therefore, the reader could conclude that the location of the play is occurring mostly in a private space; however, the location can be perceived as a public space because these individuals enter to the household uninvited by the owners for the investigation. As for the time frame, the reader could imply that the story has strong ties to the beginning of the twentieth century because of the chauvinism of the men and their treatment towards their wives. In several occasions, the author makes evident that the husbands of the ladies in the play were acting frivolously around them. One example of the chauvinist mockery is when the County Attorney says, "At least we found out that she was not going to quilt it. She was going to—what is it you call it, ladies (Glaspell 10)!" Thereby, the context of the story was the women suffrage; many men of the epoch thought that the movement was absurd, and as a consequence, many women were often attacked and mocked for it.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 18, 2015 11:59 AM

Group 7: Hana Lee, Lawrence
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
18 September 2015

Question: What’s the setting of “The Masque of the Red Death?”

Answer: Around the mid-medieval time, the setting of “The Masques of the Red Death” took place in Prince Prospero’s castellated abbey, a fancy way of saying it’s an abbey built up with the fortifications of a castle. The abbey is secluded like as if in its world, and the main conflicts took place in the elaborate suite of seven colored rooms within the abbey, where the masquerade ball was held.
I’d say this story is more of a private because of the rural location of the secluded abbey and it almost seems unreal.

Posted by: Hana Lee at September 18, 2015 04:21 PM

Daniel Wright, Conner Knaresboro

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09

18 September 2015

The story "Three Strangers" takes place in England at "a lonely cottage" (Hardy 3), around the 1820s on "The night of March 28, 182-" (Hardy 3). Space would be private, even though three strangers come to it, as they become a part of this private party. This is supported by the fact that they were mostly welcomed even if they were distrusted. Space is real, as there is no evidence of the story being based in anything but reality.

Posted by: Daniel Wright at September 18, 2015 04:21 PM

Michael Mooney/Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
18 September 2015

The play Trifles by Susan Glaspell is set on the Wright Farm in the countryside of an unknown location, supposedly in the United States. The majority of the play takes place in the kitchen of the Wright Farmhouse, which has fallen into despair since the death of John Wright and the arrested of his wife Minnie Wright. “The kitchen in the now abandoned farmhouse of John Wright, a gloomy kitchen, and left without having been put in order—unwashed pans under the sink, a loaf of bread outside the breadbox, a dish towel on the table—other signs of uncompleted work.” (Glaspell 1). The story is possibly set during the winter, as the characters scramble to set up a fire at the stove and enter the play wearing layers of warm clothing. “The Sheriff and Hale are men in middle life, the county Attorney is a young man; all are much bundled up and go at once to the stove.” (Glaspell 1). The story is supposedly set in the early 1900’s (based on the similarities with a real life event that inspired Glaspell to write the play, which occurred in the early 1900’s while she was working for a newspaper). The backdrop of the 1900’s (notably before woman gained the right to vote, as the story was written and produced into a play in 1916) sets an atmosphere where women are looked down upon. This is supported by the constant mockery by the men in the story.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 18, 2015 04:25 PM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
18 September 2015


Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the SECOND type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?


Answer: The most common setting styles that authors often use to write their stories are private places, outdoor places, and cultural and historical circumstances, however, the style most used among them is the second one. "Outdoor places are scene to many literary actions because the natural world is an obvious location for the action of many narratives and plays," Robert says at the beginning of his chapter (110)." Many aspects of nature like its flora (hills, mountains, valleys, rivers, trees) and fauna (dogs, cats, horses, fishes) contribute to the motivation and goals of the characters in the story. Therefore, stories such as "The Chrysanthemums," "An Occurrence at the Owl Creek Bridge," and "A Good Man is Hard to Find" are examples of the outdoor setting because all of them take place in nature. For example, a previously mentioned piece in which the author narrates in detail the outdoor surrounding of the character and how it affects him is "An Occurrence at the Owl Creek Bridge" by Ambrose Bierce; the plot of the story revolves around a bridge that is situated on a river in the forest; moreover, he adds how Farquhar struggles with nature to stay alive.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 18, 2015 06:33 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
18 September 2015

Question 6

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his THIRD reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: The sixth reason in Edgar Roberts’ textbook for why the setting in literature is important is to add atmosphere and mood (Roberts 112). The absence of these two things will make the story both dull and boring. Roberts gives the example of walking through trees (Roberts 112). To just say that Ricky is walking through trees tells you that he’s outside and someplace that supports tree life. He wouldn’t be in the middle of a desert or ocean. However, where’s the pizazz? You need to spice it up a bit and give more clues to what the setting is really like. Mention the color of the leaves, the brightness of the sky, the touch of the wind, or the feeling of the ground beneath your feet. Is the character in a marshy area or a mountainous one? Is it night time or day time? Is the sun beating down on your face, burning your skin, or are you freezing your butt off while rubbing your hands together for warmth. Atmosphere and mood are very important to a story, especially the setting. Really let the reader get a feel for what’s going on, almost as if they are there themselves.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 18, 2015 09:05 PM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
19 September 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his FIFTH reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Roberts claims that the various settings in a story may be symbolic. I agree with him because in Kate Chopin's story, "The Storm", the storm itself was a symbol of lust. For example, Chopin explained the storm as a dark storm with heavy rain and howling winds. Although Calixta did love Bobinot, she fell in lust with Alcee. Therefore, with the way the storm is described, and lusting for another person while married is adultery is an evil thing to do. If adultery was a real thing, I don't think Chopin would describe the storm as dark and mysterious. Furthermore, Roberts states, "If the scenes and materials are setting are highlighted or emphasized, they also may be taken as symbols through which the authors expresses ideas" (Roberts 112). In conclusion, settings in a story could by symbolic.

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 19, 2015 04:11 PM

Luis Bautista
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing
19 September 2015

“The way characters respond and adjust to the setting can reveal their strength or weakness" (Roberts 111).
Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his THIRD reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?
Answer: Roberts claims that there are seven important reasons why the setting is essential in a story. One of them is they way setting emphasize qualifies of the character. In fact, setting for example, in the short story “Storm” the heavy rain plays a major role of accentuates the love and passion between two old lovers that met again after years. The setting reveals us that Calixta unfaithful to her husband and Alcee is unfaithful to her wife. However, this doesn’t stop Calixta to be a good wife and mother and Alcee to be a good husband. “Devoted as she was to her husband, their intimate conjugal life was something, which she was more than willing to forego for a while. So the storm passed, and every one was happy” (Chopin 5).

Posted by: luis Bautista at September 19, 2015 04:11 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
21 September 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his SECOND reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Roberts explains that the setting allows the story to seem realistic, and it adds to the story’s credibility in his second reason. For the reader to feel as if they are inside the story themselves, there needs to be vivid imagery of the particular location. Description of objects in terms of spatial arrangement contributes to verisimilitude. “As the description of location and objects becomes particular and detailed, the events of the work become more believable” (Roberts 111). The story creates the guise that it actually happened when the setting is based on a real location. The reasoning behind Roberts’ claims applies to many of the short stories done so far. “Maupassant places “The Necklace” in real locations in the late 19th century Paris, and, for this reason, the story has all the semblance of having actually happened” (Roberts 111).

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at September 19, 2015 04:32 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
20 September 2015

Question: Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. Summarize and explain in your own words his forth reason. Is it applicable to any of the stories we have read thus far? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Roberts states that setting shapes and organizes an author’s story. In “The Necklace,” if Mathilde did not leave her home to walk the streets of Paris she would have ran into Jeanne Forrestier. A natural change in a story can affect the story in a way where the story makes more sense to the reader.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 20, 2015 12:48 AM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
20 September 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?
Answer: The seventh reason as to why setting in literature is important is that it sets up the irony in the story. "The colorful and orderly garden described in Lowell's Pattern emphasizes the irony of the deeply sad and anguished speaker" (Roberts 112). In "The Masque of the Red Death" by Edgar Allen Poe its Ironic that the red death even gets inside the castle that is supposed to protect everyone in it. Also, it's Ironic that everyone the goes in the black room with red windows die of the red death.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 20, 2015 10:39 AM

Peyton Farrier
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
20 September 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting
used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the FIRST type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: There are three types of settings that authors use. First is public, private, and various possessions. The different settings in the first type means where they go, for example homes, stores, parties, or any other location you can physically go to. Which this type is used in the story "The Necklace" which uses about four different places throughout the story to describe where they went and what happened in each location.

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at September 20, 2015 10:56 AM

Brad McAvoy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG II Academic Writing CA-09
9/20/15

Question #17
Kate Chopin used settings to develop the mood for her story "The Storm". She used many tactile evidence in settings to paint a detailed description of the mood in her story. She uses weather, Louisiana is a cloudy and grey area. The atmosphere makes it feel like lonely, distant, cold and desolate. This is the weather for most part of the story. "She was greatly occupied and did not notice the
approaching storm." (Chopin 1) Not only did it makes things sad but it slowed the time, the storm has been approaching for a while and the time makes people's actions slow down and have a slower pace of life.

Posted by: Brad McAvoy at September 20, 2015 02:13 PM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
20 September 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his FIRST reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: From Edgar V. Roberts’ Setting chapter, he notes that there are seven reasons why the setting is important to a short story. The first of these reasons is that the setting usually plays a major part of in the story’s outcome (Roberts 111). This can be seen in The Three Strangers when the guests at the party realize that the criminal is on the loose, and they suggest to chase him. At the end of the story it is revealed that the arrested man is not the prisoner but his brother. They give up on searching for the actual prisoner since “the night was found to be so far advanced that it was deemed useless to renew the search before the next morning” (Hardy 20-21).

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 20, 2015 02:24 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09
September 20, 2015


Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting play an "essential and vital" part of the story in both Hardy's "The Three Strangers" and Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"?

Answer: According to Roberts, the setting in both Hardy's "The Three Strangers" and Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death" play an essential and vital part of the story. The setting helps the readers to understand what to follow throughout the story whether it is an object, place or impressionistic figure. Roberts claimed the setting in "The Three Strangers to be "intensely present, like the countryside in Hardy's "The The Three Strangers," that it is a visual participant in the story's outcome." (Roberts pg. 111). "The Three Strangers" is set in the countryside, in a small cottage. Most of the story takes place in this particular area, each stranger enters and has a different description of character and accessories. The small cottage is visually present to all readers, everything to follow mostly occurs inside the cottage. Robert also stated "Poe provides many graphic and also impressionistic details in "The Masque of the Red Death," so that we can follow almost visually the bizarre action at the story's end." (Roberts pg. 111). In this short story, Poe uses an impressionistic style of writing to follow the idea that the "Red Death", is the intruder towards the end of the story. "The whole company, indeed, seemed now deeply to feel that in the costume and bearing of the stranger neither wit nor propriety existed." (Poe pg. 8). Also, the prince dies in the black apartment and then help arrives, this color could symbolize death. "Then, summoning the wild courage of despair, a throng of the revellers at once threw themselves into the black apartment." (Poe pg. 10). The six chambers were supposed to isolate the prince and friends from the outside world. Even though the prince tried to escape the outside world and its problems, he could not escape death.

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk at September 20, 2015 08:10 PM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
20 September 2015

Question 1: In chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the FIRST type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Roberts discusses private homes, public buildings, and various possessions as the first type of setting. Authors use homes, decorations, possessions, etc. to help the reader understand characters better, and they’re also used as symbols. This first type of setting applies to the short fiction works we’ve read. In “The Necklace” Roberts writes, “the loss of a comfortable home brings out the best in the major character by forcing her to adjust to her economic reversal” (Roberts, 109). In “Trifles”, Mrs. Peters and Mrs. Hale found the quilt and the bird cage. The quilt was Mrs. Wrights work in progress and the women found it. They noticed how off the sewing was showing Mrs. Wrights feelings and actions. The bird cage was broken and that symbolized the Wrights abusive husband – wife relationship.

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 20, 2015 10:09 PM

Zeida Alvarez and Connor Laramie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
18 September 2015
Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the FIRST type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Roberts says there are three basic types of setting used by authors. The first type of setting in his words is, “Private homes, public buildings, and various possessions are important in literature, as in life” (Roberts, 2). He means that the setting, depending if it is private or public, are important to highlight characters’ qualities. This applies to Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” because of multiple settings throughout the story. Her private home was always a sad place for Mathilde. The jewelry store was public and brought much pressure to the story, with them trying to by a replacement necklace. Lastly, the high society ball was another private place with socialites and the rich that made Mathilde finally happy because she thought that is where she belonged.

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at September 20, 2015 10:38 PM

ENG CA03
Writing about Plot and Structure
15 September 2015
Tannor Berry


Question: If you have been paying attention to the topic of Robert’s article, you will recall that it is focused on both “Plot” and “Structure”. These two concepts, however, are not the same. (a) What makes them different? (b.) Explain some of the “matters” that the study of structure devotes itself to.
Answer: The two concepts which are “Plot” and “Structure” are commonly mistaken for the same concept but are entirely different. “Plot” which is referred to as the events that make up a story, generally: as they relate to one another in a pattern or in a sequence; as they relate to each other through cause and effect; how the reader views the story; or simply by coincidence. In regards to “Structure” the most common type explained is Narrative structure. This includes the most common elements of structure which are setting, plot, and theme. The parts of narrative plot include exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. Structure is all the elements together to make an outcome to a story.

Posted by: Tannor Berry at September 20, 2015 10:53 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
20 September 2015

“Just as physical setting influences characters, so do historical and cultural conditions and assumptions. O’Connor’s “First confession” is written for an audience of readers who understand the role of the Catholic Church in twentieth-century Irish life.

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the THIRD type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: What Roberts means by the third type of setting is the cultural and historical circumstances are often prominent in literature. Physical setting influences characters, it also does the same for historical and cultural conditions and assumptions. For example, “O’Connor’s “First Confession” is written for an audience of readers who understand the role of the Catholic Church in the twentieth-century Irish life. “ (Roberts 110)

Posted by: Hana Lee at September 20, 2015 11:29 PM

Zeida Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
18 September 2015
Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his FIRST reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Roberts states that there are seven reasons why the setting is important to literature. The first reason is, “Setting is often essential and vital in the story” (Roberts, 3, 4). In other words, he means that the setting is a key component in most stories, since it allows us to be able to interpret the story as the author may want the reader to. For example, “The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe gives so many details to the reader to prove the importance of setting. He explains each room of the abbey and the surroundings with immense detail, which makes the reader follow the story visually until the end to be able to be able to understand fully.

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at September 20, 2015 11:43 PM

Catalina Suarez, Matthew Beebe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA05
21 September 2015

“The Tattooer”

The location of the short story is in Japan and in the early 1900s. The space the story takes place it a private place because it is in his tattoo shop and the tattooer chooses who comes in to get a tattoo. The significance of this context is that because this being the tattooer’s private place, he was able to successfully kidnap the girl and give her the tattoo that he so desperately needed to give her because of her perfect skin.

Posted by: Catalina Suarez at September 21, 2015 01:13 AM

Zachary Pottle
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03

Question:

In chapter 6, Roberts discusses irony, a concept that we will revisit often in this course. What is it, according to Roberts, and how was it used in Maupassant’s “The Necklace” (there are several instances—identify at least one)?

Answer:

As Roberts states in "Writing About Setting", irony is something that can "establish expectations that are the opposite of what occurs, not only in fiction but also in plays and poems" (Roberts 122). In Maupassant’s “The Necklace”, there are many examples of irony. One for example, is the fact that Loisels spent years trying to pay off a necklace that ended up being worthless.

Posted by: Zachary Pottle at September 21, 2015 02:53 AM

Group 3 Jaclyn, Madison
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA03
18 September 2015

In the setting the story covers a period of approximately six months during the reign of the red death. The action place in the deep seclusion of one of the castelled abbeys the masque takes place in the imperial suite which is consorted of seven distinct rooms written in the medieval morality play in those time periods

Posted by: Group 3 at September 21, 2015 09:41 AM

Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09
21 September 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the THIRD type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?
Answer: The three types of settings explained by Roberts include private/public spaces, outdoor spaces, and cultural/ historical circumstances. For historical/cultural circumstances, Roberts explains that historical and cultural conditions and assumptions influence characters just as much as a real setting.

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 21, 2015 10:35 AM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
21 September 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his FIFTH reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Roberts's fifth reason setting is important in literature is because "various settings may be symbolic" (Roberts 112). There is not always going to be just one important setting; there may be many which impact the plot of a story. Also, settings can influence characters of a story. One story we have read that this reasoning can be applied to is "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" by Ambrose Bierce. The story begins at Owl Creek Bridge, but the setting where a significant character decision is made would be Peyton Farquhar's home. It is his house where the soldier visits and gives Farquhar the idea to burn the bridge which causes his death.

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at September 21, 2015 11:01 AM

Peyton Farrier, Sidnee Yaeger
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing
21 September 2015

Question: What is the setting of the story "The Necklace"

Answer: The location of the “The Necklace” written by Guy de Maupassant, takes place in France in the early 1800’s. Where the story continues over a ten-year time span, “At the end of ten years, they had paid back everything including the extra charges imposed by loan sharks and the accumulation of compound interest” (De Maupassant 59). It took place in an urban town where she felt the need to hide her class status. There're multiple locations this story took place, the ballroom, the park, the jewelry shop, as well as their home. Besides the home, all the locations were taken place in public settings. The story ends “On Sunday when she had gone for a stroll along the Champs-Elysees to relax from the cares of the week.” (De Maupassant 60).

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at September 21, 2015 11:27 AM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
21 September 2015

Question: How, according to Roberts, does the authors' use of setting "accentuate qualities of character" in Glaspell's Trifles (i.e., "A Jury of Her Peers") and Bierce's "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"?
Answer: The setting of a story tells more than the appearance of the surrounding environment and the items inhabiting it. The setting is often used to reveal traits within characters in the story. In the play Trifles by Glaspell, the kitchen is the main setting of the story. The dismal state of the kitchen, as described during the story's exposition "The kitchen in the now abandoned farmhouse of John Wright, a gloomy kitchen, and left without having been put in order—unwashed pans under the sink, a loaf of bread outside the breadbox, a dish towel on the table—other signs of uncompleted work." (Glaspell 1) reflects the dismal state of the Wrights. The lack of attention to the kitchen points towards Minnie Wright's lack of care and her apathy towards life due to her abusive husband. Outside the kitchen, the women find other proof of Minnie's decaying mental state, such as the tattered quilt. The battered bird cage, however, is the most revealing. The cage is a symbol of Mr. Wright's total lack of care for his wife's feelings, and his abusive tendencies towards her "'Why, look at this door. It's broke. One hinge is pulled apart.' ‘Looks as if someone must have been rough with it.'" (Glaspell 7). In An Occurrence at Owl Creek, Bierce makes a less obvious insinuation about the attitude and strength of Peyton Farquhar. Peyton's scheme to escape within itself shows remarkable strength. It is the fact that setting (that is, the military execution where Peyton is about to be hanged from the bridge) that reveals an unbreakable perseverance in Peyton. He is surrounded by Union Soldiers, bound and ready to be hung. The setting reveals that there is little to no hope for an escape, yet Peyton still believes that he can make it out alive (a determination he holds until his death, as evidenced by his dying dread).

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 21, 2015 01:19 PM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
21 September 2015


Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the SECOND type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: The second type of setting are the outdoors. Roberts states that “the natural world is an obvious location for the action of many narratives and plays” (Roberts 110). Many of the stories we have read so far do have an outdoors setting, one of them being ‘An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge’ by Ambrose Bierce. The setting is outside in the early morning on a railroad bridge in Alabama near the Civil War (Bierce 2). The man was being hung over “water twenty feet below” (Bierce 2). As the day went on it got brighter and warmer. By the end of the story when the man finally made it home it was dark (Bierce 12).

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at September 21, 2015 01:39 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
21 September 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his FOURTH reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Setting is very important in literature. It is just as important as character and plot. The setting is usually the place and scenery of the story or the poem and also its time period. This is the platform or the stage in which the character plays their act. By analyzing the setting, you will know what the author wants to tell their readers. The setting can also affect the plot. You have to recognize this in the story. The setting is an essential part of pushing the plot forward.
The author might present an image that is related to the setting. You just have to focus on the texts. You might question why the author presented this image. There might be a meaning behind that particular text. The time period is also a part of the setting. Analyze the time period of the literature. There are customs, attitudes and places that are different for a specific time period. Sometimes you can see the theme through the description of the setting. The use of imagery, the words and the language will define the story and its theme.

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 21, 2015 02:47 PM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing II CA 09
18 September 2015

Question:
Explain Roberts’s reasoning, when he claims that the setting details both exemplified and highlighted personality traits in the characters of Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and Susan Glaspell’s Trifles (or, “A Jury of Her Peers”—same story).

Answer:
In Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace" the setting is in France where charm and money makes your way around this specific time. As for Trifles the setting took place in the kitchen I would say in the farm house but is left abandoned for quite some time, which gives it that spooky feeling to it. Roberts explains that it gives life to the story. Like a painter with his colors. It brightens the story.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at September 21, 2015 02:57 PM

Brittany Cordero. Brayden McAvoy, Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobbs
English Academic Writing II CA09
September 18, 2015

Answer: “Alcée rode his horse under the shelter of a side projection where the chickens had huddled and there were plows and a harrow piled up in the corner” (Chopin 1) suggests that “The Storm”, a story that took place one afternoon, took place in the late 1800s or early 1900s. It also took place in a rural setting which is drawn from Chopin saying, “Bobinôt was the embodiment of serious solicitude as he strove to remove from his own person and his son's the signs of their tramp over heavy roads and through wet fields” (Chopin 4) Characters from the story hold names of French/Creole which implies that the characters are from those ascendance. Additionally, it can also be inferred that the land was dry due to character sweating and Calixta exclaiming, “"My! what a rain! It's good two years sence it rain' like that," (Chopin 2). Lastly, most of the story took place within Calixta’s house being a private space; however a little piece of the story took place at a store which is a public space.

Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobbs
English Academic Writing II CA03
September 17, 2015

Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting play an “essential and vital” part of the story in both Hardy’s “The Three Strangers” and Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”?

Answer: It setting play an essential and vital part of both stories because it helps the audience to understand and follow the events that happens the story such as “The Masque of the Red Death”. Also, it can provide visual participation like in “The Three Stranger”

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at September 21, 2015 03:12 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk, Necdet Gurkan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09
September 21, 2015

Question: Setting of Chrysanthemums?


Answer: For this story, the setting takes place in the Salinas Valley during the month of December. There is a small ranch in the foothills, owned by Henry Allen. The month is an important factor in the story. Since it is December, Elisa was mostly around her house and garden. “It was a time of quiet and of waiting. The air was cold and tender. A light wind blew up from the southwest so that the farmers were mildly hopeful of a good rain before long; but fog and rain did not go together.” (Steinbeck pg. 1). The beginning of the quote supports the importance of the time of a month. The location is in the southwest that would place the story in a rural setting. There are a few settings in this story, The tinker's wagon on the highway, The Salinas Valley, and the outside world. In the story, Elisa Allen was isolated from the outside world and greatly values the tinker’s lifestyle. The setting of the Tinker, The highway could be a symbol for freedom. Elisa wanted this freedom after conversing with the tinker. “Elisa's voice grew husky. She broke in on him. "I've never lived as you do, but I know what you mean. When the night is dark—why, the stars are sharp-pointed, and there's quiet. Why, you rise up and up! Every pointed star gets driven into your body. It's like that. Hot and sharp and—lovely." (Steinbeck pg. 7). The story also continuously mentions strengths of the woman or what she can or cannot do as a woman. The tinker’s reply to Elisa about his job could be an example of a time of women’s rights. “It ain’t the right kind of a life for a woman.” (Steinbeck pg. 7).

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 21, 2015 03:18 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
21 September 2015

Question: In chapter 6, Roberts discusses irony, a concept that we will revisit often in this course. What is it according to Robert's, and how was it used in de Maupassant's, "The Necklace" (There are several instances- identify atleast one)?

Answer: According to Roberts, irony is the use of language to convey a meaning that is opposite of what it means. Guy de Maupassant used irony in his short story “The Necklace.” One example of irony that is used within this story is when Mrs. Loisel desires to become a wealthy upper-class aristocrat but through her tragic loss of her friends necklace goes into debt and become a poor, hardworking peasant that owes money to many different people. She was well off as she was and then sought to be wealthy and ended up becoming poor.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at September 21, 2015 03:21 PM

Group 6
Shania Bienaime, Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
21 September 2015

Question: How, according to Roberts’, does the authors’ use of setting reveal anything in the story “A Good Man Is Hard to Find”?

Answer: The story “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” takes place in Georgia, Red Sammy’s and the deserted road the family travels on. The author used the foreshadowing techniques as a means of predicting the tragic outcome that would happen to the family by use of the setting. The first hint the author uses was the graves in the middle of the cotton field that the grandmother pointed out. “They passed a large cotton field with five or six graves fenced in the middle of it, like a small island” (O’Connor 2). This fact is ironic because there are six people travelling in the car as well. The vivid description of the road the family travelled on also hints that this is the road that will lead them to their deaths. “The dirt road was hilly and there were sudden washes in it and sharp curves on dangerous embankments” (O’Connor 6). The phrases used in that sentence suggest that the path they are driving on is not safe. O’Connor uses the setting to also pinpoint the theme throughout the story. A feeling of gloom and despair is felt throughout the entire story because of the descriptions of the places where the family travelled.

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at September 21, 2015 03:32 PM

Sabrina and Tanner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
28 September 2015

Question: How according to Roberts, does setting establish "realism, or verisimilitude" (ethos) in Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace" and in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"?

Answer: According to Roberts, realism is established in "The Necklace" because the story was set in late nineteenth century Paris where a lot of poverty happened. "In Maupassant's "The Necklace," the loss of a comfortable home brings out the best in the major character by forcing her to adjust to her economic reversal" (Roberts 109). In other words, once Mathilde stepped out of her comfort zone, sad occurrences happened. In "The Masque of the Red Death," the setting took place during a plague called, "The Red Death". This particular setting establishes realism because Poe illustrated the setting as dark, gloomy, and sad. Also, this story reminds us of the Black Plague that occurred in Europe years ago, and it was said to be a sad and cynical time since people were always dying. "The Mask of the Red Death" states, "The "Red Death" had long devastated the country. No pestilence had ever been so fatal or so hideous" (Poe 3).

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 28, 2015 12:11 PM

Matthew Beebe, Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CAO3
September 28, 2015

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his 1st – 7th reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: 1st the setting is often essential and vital in the story. To study the setting in a narrative, discover the important details and then try to explain their function. 2nd Setting augments a works realism and credibility. This makes the setting more believable. 3rd is the setting may accentuate qualities of character. The setting may intersect with the character and time on human growth and change. 4th the setting is a means by which authors structure and shape their works. The author often uses setting as of the means of organizing their stories. Also, it deals with Framing of Enclosing setting, and that’s when an author opens with a particular description and returns to the same setting at the end. 5th is various settings may by symbolic. If the scenes and materials of the setting are highlighted or emphasized, they also may be taken as symbols through which the author expresses ideas. 6th is the setting contributes to atmosphere and mood. When you find descriptions of shapes, light, shadows, animals, wind, and sounds you may be sure that the author is creating at atmosphere or mood for the action. Finally, 7th is the setting may underscore a work’s irony. This may establish expectations that are the opposite of what occurs, not only in fiction but also in plays and poems.

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 28, 2015 01:20 PM

Lois Martinez
Emma Duncan
Cannelle Samson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
28 September 2015


Question: In chapter 6, Roberts discusses irony, a concept that we will revisit often in this course. What is it, according to Roberts, and how was it used in Maupassant’s “The Necklace” (there are several instances—identify at least one)?


Answer: The two ironies found in Maupassant's "The Necklace" were closely related with the necklace and the main character's qualities. Mathilde hoped to become even more beautiful and wealthy with the expensive stone necklace that she borrowed from Mrs. Forrestier. Ironically, the necklace that was supposed to make her look wealthier also sent her straight to poverty. After losing the expensive stone necklace, which she is not used to wearing, she decides not to tell Mrs. Forrestier about it, and instead, she decides to borrow money from banks and shark loans. As a consequence, she spends ten years working unceasingly to repay the money that she had borrowed. The second irony is related to the character's behavior. The author describes Mathilde as "one of those pretty and charming women, born, as if by an error of destiny, into a family of clerks and copyists (Maupassant 53)." Therefore, the author implies that only wealthy girls possess the qualities of Mathilde.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 28, 2015 11:38 PM

Group 7: Zeida Alvarez and Yaribilisa Colon
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122- Academic Writing – CA03
28 September 2015

Question: Roberts gives a special name to the technique some writers use when they open a story “with a particular description” and then return to that “same setting at the end.” What IS that kind of setting called and how was it used in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” (Roberts gives an example of how this device was used in Hardy’s “The Three Strangers”)?

Answer: The name Roberts gives the technique is framing or enclosing setting. The definition, in Robert’s terms, is, “When an author opens with a particular description and then returns to the same setting at the end” (Roberts, 5). For example, in the short story An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, Bierce uses the technique by opening the story with Peyton Farquhar getting ready to be hanged. Then, Bierce ends the story with Farquhar being hanged.

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at September 30, 2015 12:35 AM

Zach Pottle
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
30 September 2015

Questions: 1-3, Three basic types of setting

Answer:

Roberts categorizes setting into three different types: Private/Public Spaces, Outdoor Spaces, and Cultural/Historical Circumstances. Public and private spaces "reveal or highlight qualities of a character" (Roberts 109). These spaces can include the following: Houses (interior and exterior), and possessions such as garden paths, park benches, necklaces, clocks, etc. Outdoor spaces can hold many different types of action. They can not only include things like hills, valleys, fields, etc; but also they can include the weather. Cultural and historical circumstances "are often prominent in literature" (Roberts 110). The significance of a historical event can play into the story line, as well as the readers perception of a certain character.

Posted by: Zachary Pottle at September 30, 2015 03:32 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
03 February 2016

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his second reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: The second reason in chapter 6, Roberts’s talks about is realism. Realism allows the story to take place during a real time, instead of a time that the author created. This can be significant to the storyline to help it seem realer and seem as if it happened during that time. This can apply to the story “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant because he sets the story in the nineteenth century Paris. This helped add to the realism of the story and to help understand how and where the characters lived.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 1, 2016 05:11 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
1 February 2016

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his SEVENTH reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: The seventh reason that setting in literature is important is because setting may underscore a work’s irony, this means that setting can “establish expectations that are opposite of what occurs” (Roberts 112). I feel like this reason applies to “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant because de Maupassant made us believe that the necklace went missing, and it was valuable when in the end it was just costumed jewelry worth close to nothing.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at February 1, 2016 07:07 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA 06
2 February 2016

Question: 4. In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his FIRST reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: In this article about setting, Roberts describes the importance of setting as it relates to literature. His first reason for the importance of settings is that “setting is often essential and vital in the story (Roberts 110).” This seems like that settings are important because it serves a function, and big role in the narrative and the setting helps move the narrative itself along. This applies to “The Necklace”. This is because when the reader first meets Mathilde, she is a shabby house, making evident that Mathilde is poor. Also, the setting of the fancy ball, which is a contrast between her economic state, shows the reader her willingness to disguise her true identity and reveals a quality of Mathilde, which is her pride. And this ultimately leads to Mathilde feeling to the need to borrow the necklace and leads to her losing the necklace which progresses the plot. Therefore, a setting is important, in this case, because it moves the narrative along.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 1, 2016 10:11 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
1 February 2016

Question: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the SECOND type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: According to (Roberts 110), the second basic type of setting used by authors relates to outdoor places, which are scenes of many literary actions. It is perceived that the natural world is an obvious location for the action of many narratives and plays. This includes hills, fields, lakes, living creatures, and seasons (winter, summer, spring, and fall). This type of setting is evident in the short story “An Occurrence at Owl Greek Bridge” since everything that happened in the story took place on a bridge and once there is a bridge located in an area, the possibility exist that there is a stream flowing under that bridge. Therefore, this story has some connection with natural world since the man that will be hang will die over a flowing stream.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 1, 2016 11:07 PM

Phillip Moss
English 122 Academic writing II CAO6
Dr. Hobbs
2 February 2016

Question: How, according to Roberts, does setting establish “realism, or verisimilitude” (ethos) in Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”?

Answer: In both “the necklace” and “the masque of the red death” the authors do an excellent job of adding realism to their stories by giving them settings in time periods that happened. In Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” the story takes place around the same time as the Slums of modern society. There was a significant divide in the classes, and many people were living in poverty. In Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death” the story takes place in medieval Europe during the black plague all of the events that take place in the story could have happened in real life.

Posted by: Phillip Moss at February 2, 2016 12:06 PM

Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
2 February 2016

Question #1: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the FIRST type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: Roberts’ first type of setting, depictions of a private residence, public places, and personal possessions, are all key factors that identify and describe the character's traits or dreams and show the progression or changes in each character and structure. There were two stories and one play we read which contained this type of setting. For instance, in de Maupassant’s, “The Necklace,” he highlighted her fixation of wealth by describing the details of her private home and her desire for eloquent possessions. “She daydreamed of large, silent anterooms, decorated with oriental tapestries and lighted by high bronze floor lamps, with two elegant valets” (de Maupassant 53). Mathilde’s thoughts clearly paint the picture of wanting a better, richer life, but as we all discover, it taught her a lesson in life. Wharton’s “Roman Fever” began in Rome at a restaurant across from the Colosseum, the place where they initially met and unveiled Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley’s obsession with the sacred letter from Mr. Slade. In Glaspell’s, “Trifles,” she begins with the characters entering Ms. Wright’s neglected home and portrays the emotional and physical turmoil between Mrs. Wright and her husband with the uneven sewed quilt and broken birdcage.

Posted by: Heather Hauck at February 2, 2016 02:12 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
2 February 2016

Question 12) How, according to Roberts, does setting play an "essential and vital" part of the story in both Hardy's "The three strangers" and Poe's "The masque of the red death"?

Answer 12)Robert's says that in "the masque of the red death" the description of the setting "brings it to life". He says that the description of the room's eerie light invokes gloom to the setting and makes the audience want to continue reading. Robert's tells us that setting plays a vital part in "the masque of the red death" and "the three strangers" because the authors provide so many graphic details so that there is a picture in the readers head.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 2, 2016 04:13 PM


Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
2 February 2016

“Writing about Setting”

Q: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his SIXTH reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

A: Robert’s sixth reason is that “Setting contributes to atmosphere and mood”. It is saying that the author will add thing like sounds, colors, lights, shapes, shadows and animals to give the reader a feel for the surroundings (Roberts 112). As in Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death”, The shadows that the fire torches cast give a dark and eerie feel to the story (Poe 5) making readers feel like they are there and experiencing it.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at February 2, 2016 10:17 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
3 February 2016

Setting

Question #3: In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts asserts that there are three basic types of setting used by authors. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts means by the THIRD type of setting he discusses. Is this applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: The third type of setting involves both culture and history. One can tell where or when a story takes place based on how people act, what they say, what they wear, and other cultural clues that pertain to a certain point in history. Roberts uses religion as an example when he says “the speaker assumes an understanding of the religious skepticism that developed in the nineteenth century” (Roberts 110). In “A Good Man is Hard to Find” you can get an idea for the setting by how the grandmother speaks and uses an outdated term (O’Conner 1). Her blatant racism along with modern technology leads one to assume that the grandmother was born in the early 1920’s. Because she is now a grandmother, the time it is currently in the story would be around the 1990’s.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 3, 2016 01:02 AM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
2 February 2016

Question: How, according to Roberts, does the authors’ use of setting “accentuate qualities of character” in Glaspell’s Trifles (i.e., “A Jury of Her Peers”) and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”?

Answer: In Glaspell’s, the kitchen is described as the lonely, dreary Wright farm. It explains the loss of Minnie’s brightness and promise, it also explains her angry act. In Bierce’s, Peyton Farquhar try’s to escape his fate, it suggests his strength.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at February 3, 2016 12:45 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 06 Academic Writing II
3 February 2016
Question: Describe the fourth reason why setting is so important according to Roberts.
Answer: Robert’s fourth reason why setting is so important is that it is a means for the author to structure their story. It gives the reader the mental imagery of where the author wants to take them into the story world. One example of structuring setting is a term known as, “Enclosing Setting”. This happens when an author starts a story in one place, takes the reader to another, and then at the very end the reader ends up at the original time and place. Roberts really makes it evident that setting is one of the most important aspects of a short story and can be the reason a reader is interested or not.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at February 3, 2016 01:59 PM

Travis Farmer


Dr. Hobbs


ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06


2 February 2016


Question: 8. In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his FIFTH reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?


Answer: Roberts states that setting may be symbolic to the story. Meaning, if there is a story where one of the themes is desolation or loneliness, then the setting of a desert may be appropriate. However, I don't think this applies to any of the stories we have read.

Posted by: Travis Farmer at February 3, 2016 02:20 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
3, February 2016

Question: 6.) In Chapter 6 of his textbook, Edgar V. Roberts claims that there are seven reasons why the setting in literature is important. In your own words, summarize and explain what Roberts in his THIRD reason that the setting in literature is important. Is this reason applicable to any of the works of short fiction we have read, thus far, in this course? If so, which one, and why?

Answer: 6.) Roberts’s third reason that the setting in literature is important is because, sometimes in a story the setting isn't just where the story takes place, rather the setting is also shaping the character, and his or her actions. As Roberts said, “The way characters respond and adjust to setting can reveal their strength or weakness,” he's also saying, he setting is able to show the characteristics of the characters better and make them more prominent. In my opinion this this reason is applicable to one of the works of short fiction, which would be An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge. This is because Peyton Farquhar’s, was put into the setting where he was hanging over the river about to face his death, but out of everything that was happening he was trying to escape. Him being able to try and plan to escape from his death even though it was right before him, shows his characters strength. So like Roberts said “The way characters respond and adjust to setting can reveal their strength or weakness,” is exactly what Peyton Farquhar was doing, he was responding to his setting which showed his characters strength.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at February 3, 2016 02:27 PM

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