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January 17, 2013

Edgar V. Roberts' “Writing about Point of View"


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Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 17, 2013 02:28 PM

Readers' Comments:

Colby Johnson and Peter Mercadante
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 311 CA05 Writing About Point of View

Question: Explain Roberts analogy of comparing what a writer does with the narrative voice to what a painter does whens/he paints a particular subjective.

Answer: According to Roberts on the bottom of page 77,"It may be compared to perspectives utilized by painters". I argue that this means that a author wants you to read the same way a painter wants you to see. The narrator wants you to see his point of view just as a painter would.

Posted by: Colby Johnson, Peter Mercadante at January 21, 2013 09:52 AM

Terrance Browne
Rannell Smith
Ryan Nowotny
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA-05
21 January 2013

Question: According to Edgar V. Roberts, what is "point of view"
Answer: In Roberts eye view he says that the point of view is when the speaker or narrator is trying to present an argument and shows the reader their own "expressive attitudes and judgements"(Roberts,77). He is also saying how point of view is the "speaker's social, political, and mental circumstances affect the narrative"(Roberts,77).

Posted by: Terrance Browne at January 21, 2013 09:55 AM

Alexandra Rivera-Vega
Alison Schucht
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05
21 January 2013

Question: What does Roberts mean when he says that "point of view may also be considered as the centralizing or guiding intelligence in a work"?

Answer: When Roberts says, "point of view may also be considered as the centralizing or guiding intelligence in a work", he describes that the author's point of view is based on what is important to him/her to illustrate the point of the story to his/her readers. "The mind that filters the fictional experiece and presents only the most important details to create maximum impact." (Roberts 77)

Posted by: Alexandra Rivera-Vega at January 21, 2013 10:18 AM

Sarah Hatcher and Layth Faraj
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
21 January 2013

Question 5: In Robert's anecdote of the automobile accident, what term does he used to describe the roles of "Alice" and "Bill"? What does he mean by this term and what re they likely to do?

Answer: The term Roberts used is major mover. This term means that they both will believe it is not their fault and blame each other, even though both were major parts to the accident (79).

Posted by: Sarah Hatcher at January 21, 2013 10:21 AM

Jordan Miller, Vintoria Hopps
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
21 Jan 2012

Question 13: Which point of view is the least common of the points of view and what two major possibilities does it offer?
Answer: According to Roberts, the second point of view is the hardest, and also the hardest for the author to manage (Roberts, 82). The two major possibilities are that the narrator is telling the listener what he or she has done in the past and that the actions can be misinterpreted and disputed. Also another situation can occur when an angry person accuses the listener of a betrayal or some other wrong (Roberts, 82).

Posted by: Jordan Miller at January 21, 2013 10:50 AM

Marie Ryan
Analisa Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Ca 08
January 21, 2013

Question: Explain what the limited omniscient point of view is and how it is
different from the other forms of third person.

Answer: On page 84, in the first paragraph Roberts says, "the author concentrates on or limits the narration to the actions and thoughts of a major character." This quote shows the main character has some knowledge but isn't all knowing, like an omniscient third person is. Also the limited omniscient point of view is not dramatic or objective.

Posted by: Marie Ryan and Analisa Johnson at January 21, 2013 10:56 AM

Allison and Chris
Dr Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
21 January 2013

Question: How do the reader know if the speaker is using the third-person
point of view and what are the three possible variations of third-person?

Answer: The reader knows that the speaker is using third person, point of view because their use of the words “he”, “she”, “it”, and “they”. The three variations of the third-person point of view are: dramatic or objective, omniscient, and limited omniscient. The dramatic presentation is limited only to what is said and what happens.’’ The third-person point of view is omniscient (all-knowing) when the speaker not only presents action and dialogue but also reports the thoughts and reactions of the characters.”(p.83). Limited-omniscient is when the author concentrates in narration to the actions and thoughts of a major character.

Posted by: Chris Lavie at January 21, 2013 10:57 AM

Alexia Chambers and Adrie Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
January 21, 2013
19. What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.
The point of view used in Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” in third person limited-omniscient. The narrator knows all about and describes Mrs. Loisel’s life the narrator explains how she feels in the first few paragraphs. “She suffered constantly, feeling by herself destined for all delicacies and luxuries” the narrator knows she wants to have more in her life than just her small apartment and ugly furniture.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at January 21, 2013 12:20 PM

Octavio Herrera, Ana DeMaio
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CAO4
21 January 2013

Question: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.

Answer: The Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge is told in limited omniscient third person, “To be hanged and drowned” he thought “that is not so bad; but I do not wish to be shot. No; I will not be shot; that is not fair.” (Ambrose 8) Everything that the character feels and thinks we are shown through the limited omniscient third person point of view in the story.

Posted by: Octavio Herrera, Ana DeMaio at January 21, 2013 12:20 PM

Jacob Gates Jazmine Dixon
Dr.Hobbs
English 122 CA05 An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge
21 Jan 2013

Question: Explain why it would be impossible for Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” to be told in the first-person point of view?

Answer: It would be impossible for the story to be told in first person point of view because this quote from the story is expressed in third person point of view, “As he is about to clasp her [His Wife] he feels a stunning blow upon the back of the neck; a blinding white light blazes all about him with a sound like the shock of a cannon then all is darkness and silence!” The ending would not have the same finality as it did if the story was written in first person point of view.

Posted by: Jazmine Dixon at January 21, 2013 01:52 PM

Chris Burke and Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA 04
23 January 2013

Question:” Although we have discussed the concept of character for the short stories of de Maupassant and Glaspell, we have not done so for Poe’s “A Tell-Tale Heart.” Identify which of Poe’s characters are flat and which are round. Of those that are round, which are static (do not change) and of those that are round, which are dynamic (evolve in some way)?”
Answer: According to the page 68 of Writing about character, a round character is defined as “a trait of a character that we are told enough about them to permit the conclusion that they are three-dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original, and true of life”. According to the same page, flat characters are defined as ”simple and one dimensional”. According to these two definition, we can say that the main character is a round character because we know what he feels, and how he is going to proceed with the old man. We know that he is “nervous—very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am” (page 3, The Tell Tale Heart), we know how he proceeded before committed the crime “And every night, about midnight, I turned the latch of his door and opened it—oh, so gently!” (page 3, The Tell Tale Heart). We also know that he was very mad before killing the old man : ” It was the beating of the old man’s heart. It increased my fury…” (page 6 , The Tell Tale Heart). There is also the old man, in our mind, the old man is a flat character. Indeed, we don’t know a lot of things about him “I loved the old man…” (page 3, The Tell Tale Heart) , we also know that “One of his eyes resembled that of a vulture—a pale blue eye, with a film over it.” (page 3, The Tell Tale Heart). And to finish, there are the officers. We think that they are flat, but more described than the old man but not enough to be round. All the descriptions of the officers come from the main character, so we can ask ourselves if the descriptions are right or wrong… According to the main character, the officers are Cheerful, easily ”satisfied “(p.7, The Tell Tale Heart) , hypocrites “I could bear those hypocritical smiles no longer” (p.8, The Tell Tale Heart).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at January 22, 2013 05:04 PM

Jade Lowe, Brynn Laverdure, Angie Fortunak
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II Sect.CA08
22 January 2013

Question 12: What, according to Robert's is the difference between a reliable first person speaker and a unreliable first person speaker? How does one know if a first person speaker is reliable or unreliable?

Reliable and unreliable people exist in society and is used as a description as a person, we also see it in writing and this description of a person can help us see the truth about a person. Robert's tells us that "Most first-person speakers describing their own experiences are to be accepted as reliable and authoritative. But sometimes first-person speakers are unreliable because they may have interests or limitations that lead them to mislead, distort, or even lie" (Robert 81). Robert's gives us a good idea of what a reliable and unreliable person is. As a reader it is harder to tell if one is reliable or unreliable, but if the author gives us a good understanding and gives us other details of what the character is like, as a reader one can pick up what type of first person the character is. For example, if the author tells us that Sue was running late for the party, but this was common as she normally is late for everything. As a reader it can be assumed that she was unreliable rather than if the author told us that no matter what the event was Sue was always early. Supporting details from the author help us determine whether one is reliable or not.

Posted by: Angie Fortunak at January 22, 2013 08:27 PM

Cathryn White
Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 128 CA 05

Question:“In chapter 4, Roberts says that authors “try not only to make their
works interesting but also bring their presentations alive.” How do
writers accomplish this in fictional works?

Answer:In Roberts article "Writing About Point of View", he states that; " Authors may also vary points of views to sustain interest, create suspense or put the burden of response entirely upon readers(Roberts84). The author uses point of view to make a fictional story, become life like by creating suspense to sustain the readers interest. The better the author at involving the reader at an emotional level. The more life like the work will become.

Posted by: Octavia Robinson & Cathryn White at January 22, 2013 08:28 PM

Lauren Irish and Stolzenburg
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
22 January 2013

Question:" What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Susan
Glaspell’s “Jury of her Peers”? If first person, you must say if the narrator
is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations
is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text."

Answer: Third Person Limited, the narrator says " Martha Hale had a moment of feeling she could not cross that threshold" the quotes are all from Martha's perpective.

Posted by: Lauren Irish and Jill Stolzenburg at January 22, 2013 08:39 PM

Jasmine Lowe, Marlie Gonzalez
Dr.Hobbs
Eng-122 CA08
22 January 2013

Question: Explain what the omniscient point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third person.
Answer: “Omniscient view is when the speaker knows all, sees all, reports all, and when necessary, reveals the inner workings of the minds of any or all characters.” (page 83, paragraph 4). It is different from the other forms of third person because the other forms are limited to the amount of knowledge known about the other characters.

Posted by: Jasmine Lowe, Marlie Gonzalez at January 23, 2013 01:26 AM

Briyana & Jennifer
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Writing About Point Of View
23 January 2013
Question: Explain what the dramatic or objective point of view is and how it is differnt from the other forms of third person?
"Its the basic method of rendering action and speech that all point of views share (Edgar, 83)

Posted by: Briyana at January 23, 2013 10:15 AM


Habib Balde/ Jose Garcia
Academic Writing 122
Edgar Allen Poe

Question 21: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart”? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.
Answer: I believe that the point of view of Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Tell-Tale heart” is in first person view. First person view is when the story is being narrated by the main character usually the protagonists. Throughout the whole story the main character is plotting to murder this elder man and contemplates it in his mind so that we the readers knows what is going on. For example the main character explains “When I had waited a long time, very patiently, without hearing him lie down, I resolved to open a little—a very, very little crevice in the lantern. So I opened it—you cannot imagine how stealthily, stealthily—until, at length, a single dim ray, like the thread of the spider, shot from out the crevice and full upon the vulture eye.”(Poe5). The character makes the reader understand the things going through his head as if we were inside his head.

Posted by: Habib Balde/ Jose Garcia at January 23, 2013 11:30 AM

Ti’rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
9 September 2013
Question: “Explain what the dramatic or objective point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third person?”
Answer: The dramatic or objective point of view is one that simply narrates “only to what is said and what happens” (83 Edgar) in the story or incident. This point of view is different because not only is it just a “fly on a wall” (83 Edgar) type of narrator but it does not state opinions or influential, loaded statements but allows the reader to draw their own conclusions on ethical situations.

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at September 9, 2013 02:49 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
10 September 2013

“What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Susan
Glaspell’s “Jury of her Peers”? If first person, you must say if the narrator
is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations
is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.”

The primary point of view of Glaspell’s “Jury of her Peers” is third person. The narration is dramatic, not drawing any conclusions, but not omniscient, limited to just what Martha Hale observes and experiences. The reader knows what she thinks and feels, “Mrs. Hale, still leaning against the door, had that sinking feeling of the mother whose child is about
to speak a piece.” (Glaspell 2).

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at September 10, 2013 06:28 PM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
10 September 2013

Question #11: "How does the reader know if the voice of a work is in first person? Roberts says that first-person "speakers report events as though they have acquired the knowledge in a number of ways." Identify all five of these "ways" and explain which of them is the most reliable and which of them is the least reliable.

Answer: In this theory article we read, "If the voice of the work is an "I", the author is using the first-person point of view" (Roberts 81). So we, as readers, know that that voice of a work is in first person if the narrator refers to himself as "I". Roberts writes that the five ways a speaker acquires their knowledge are, "what they themselves have done, said, heard, and thought (firsthand experience), what they have observed others doing and saying (firsthand witness), what others have said to them or otherwise communicated to them (secondhand testimony and hearsay), what they are able to infer or deduce from the information they have discovered (inferential information), and what they are able to conjecture about how a character or characters might think and act, given their knowledge of a situation (conjectural, imaginative, or intuitive information)" (Roberts 81). The most reliable way would be when a speaker reports an instance based on knowledge that they themselves heard, did, said, or thought. You would assume in these situations that the speaker was at the event, or personally involved in the event, that they are speaking of. Therefore, the firsthand experience would be the most reliable because the speaker would know exactly what happened. The least reliable would be the hearsay method. Anyone can say anything to convince you that an event went a certain way. Whether or not they tell the truth, or completely exaggerate, it's hard to prove that their actions or words are true to the actual occurrence. It's hard to speak of a situation honestly when you've only heard it "through the grapevine", for lack of a better phrase.

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 10, 2013 09:51 PM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
11 September 2013

Question: What, according to Roberts, is the difference between a reliable first-person speaker and an unreliable first-person speaker? How does one know if a first-person speaker is reliable or unreliable?
Answer:
The difference between a reliable and an unreliable first-person speaker depends on what the person is talking about. Generally speaking, if the narrator is talking about himself and an instance that has happened to him, it is a reliable source. However, it is important to know when the speaker is unreliable. In regard to an unreliable firs-person speaker, Roberts states, “they may have interests or limitations that lead them to mislead, distort, or even lie” (Roberts 81). The best way to tell if the speaker is reliable or not is to take into consideration what they are talking about and who they are in relation to the situation.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 10, 2013 10:10 PM

Maryerie Rojas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
10 September 2013

Question 12: What, according to Roberts, is the difference between a reliable first person speaker and an unreliable first-person speaker? How does one know if a first-person speaker is reliable or unreliable?

Answer: Roberts explains that a first person speaker that describes their experience is authoritative and reliable (Roberts 81). An unreliable first person “may have interests or limitations that lead them to mislead, distort, or even lie” (Roberts 81). There are three criteria that describe a possible reliable and truthful first person: narrators which “(1) have complete understanding; (2) partial or incorrect understanding; (3) no understanding at all” (Roberts 85). The criteria that fits the unreliable first person narrator is if they have “complete understanding with a motive to mislead or lie” (Roberts 85).

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas at September 10, 2013 10:39 PM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
10 September 2013

Question: Which point of view is the least common of the points of view and what two major possibilities does it offer?

Answer: When we read we find the grammatical voice in the reading; either first, second or third person. Likewise as we read we can also find the author's point of view, similar to the grammatical voice. According to the reading, "Writing about Point of View" from Edgar V. Roberts, the least common point of view is the second-person point of view, and it is also the most difficult for the author to manage. This point of view offers two major possibilities. First of all, a narrator tells a listener what he or she has done and said at a past time. For example, when a parent tells a child something about the child did during infancy or when a doctor tells a patient with amnesia about events before the causative injury. The second is a more complex possibility because are addressing a "you" but instead referring mainly to themselves and to listener only tangentially in preference to an "I". Some other narrators follow the usage not uncommon in colloquial speech of the indefinite "you", referring not to a specific listener but rather anyone at all; avoiding the use of words as one, a person or people.

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at September 10, 2013 11:30 PM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
10 September 2013

Question: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.

Answer: The primary point of view in “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” is on the main character, Peyton. Peyton’s story is told in the third person, because the narrator refers to Peyton as the man, and Peyton never speaks himself about his experience and dream he has in the story. With the story being told in third person, out of the three variations that are shown in the story is that Peyton would be considered a character who is of limited omniscient. This is because the story is focused on Peyton only, and the reader does not get any background on any other characters that are featured in the story. Peyton’s dream is focused on just himself, and as well, the reader does not get any insight on anyone who has actually impacted Peyton’s life, like his family. When Peyton is having his dream before he is hanged, he falls into a river. An officer is shooting at Peyton, but the reader is only focused on the main character, and not on the actual officer and his story. The author explains this further by giving the reader an idea of what is going through Peyton’s head during the time that the shooting is happening; “He unclosed his eyes and saw again the water below him. If I could free my hands, he thought, I might throw off the noose and spring into the stream. By diving I could evade the bullets and, swimming vigorously, reach the bank, take the woods and get away home.” (Pierce 5) This quote is focusing on Peyton’s feelings and emotions as well as his thoughts only, and not what is going on with the other people and sergeants around him. Peyton would be considered an unreliable character in this story, because he does leave the reader confused if his dream is real or not, and the reader does not get a real sense that this is a dream, because it is not mentioned at all in the story. The reader has to guess on if these events that unfolded actually happened, or if it was all made up in Peyton’s head, which makes Peyton, overall, a character that cannot be fully trusted.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 10, 2013 11:37 PM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
11 September 2013

Question: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Guy
de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”? If first person, you must say if the
narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three
variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.

Answer: The primary point of view used in "The Necklace" is third person omniscient because the thoughts of every character is open to me, the reader. He says, Instead of being delighted, as her husband had hoped, she threw the invitation spitefully on the table, muttering: "What do you expect me to do with this?" "But honey, I thought you'd be glad. You never get to go out, and this is a special occasion! I had a lot of trouble getting the invitation. Everyone wants one. The demand is high and not many clerks get invited. Everyone important will be there (De Maupassant 3)." This quote shows both the wife's and the husband's thoughts about the invitation which is clear to see that the wife was unhappy with the invitation and the husband was saddened by her reaction. It also shows the point of view of the story. Although the "I" word is used in this quote, it is only to show the thoughts of both characters, but really it is the narrator who is speaking and telling the story.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at September 11, 2013 09:10 AM

Taina Valcarcel
September, 11 2013
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
Dr. Hobbs

Question: Explain what the omniscient point of view is and how it is different
from the other forms of third person.

Answer: The omniscient point of view is the all knowing narrator that tells you the thoughts, actions, feelings, and plans of all the characters. Compared to the other narrators, omniscient point of view tells you about every characters thoughts and actions so as to give an idea to the reader why they act the way they do. In the article, the author explains this point of view perfectly, "Authors use it freely but judiciously to explain responses, thoughts, feelings, and plans- an additional dimension that aids in the development of character" "Roberts,83). The author gives us an insight on the characters and explain their thought process so as to give us a overall look at all the characters.

Posted by: Taina Valcarcel at September 11, 2013 09:22 AM

Luis Martinez
Dr Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA08
11 September 2013

Q27- . On page 86, Roberts discusses a writer’s use of verb tense (past, present, future, etc.) for telling story. In some cases, the tense is consistent and in others it is mixed. His examples are from Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.”Identify and explain what tense or tenses are used in Poe’s “A Tell-Tale Heart” If they are mixed, which tense is the dominant one?

A- "A Tell-Tale Heart" opens up in first person, we know this because the narrator says "I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad?" on page three. As Edgar V. Roberts describes on page 81 of "Writing About Literature" this is an unreliable first person view, how can we trust a man saying he was mad, but who are you to judge him. The better part of the first half of the story is this man explaining that he is not mad, it's not him, its the eye. This unreliable first person tense stays strong throughout the story.

Posted by: Luis Martinez at September 11, 2013 09:47 AM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
11 September 2013

Question:Explain what the limited omniscient point of view is and how it is
different from the other forms of third person.

Answer: limited omniscient is when the author concentrates on or limits the narration to the actions and thoughts of a major character; it is different because it may explore the mentality of the major character either lightly or in depth depending on whether it focuses on the characters actions or motivations

Proof: A. (p.9,paragraph 1,lines 4-5)
B. (p.9,paragraph 1,lines 8-10)

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at September 11, 2013 10:15 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
11 September 2013

Question #23: Explain why it would be impossible for Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” to be told in the first-person point of view.

Answer: It would be impossible for “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” to be told in first- person point of view because it becomes clear that Peyton Farquhar, who is the point-of-view character, dies almost instantly after he is hung in the beginning of the story(Roberts 9). As Bierce notes at the end of the story, Farquhar travels upon a “white walk”; white images and bright ones are usually associated with moments people experience right before they die or as they are dying(Bierce 12). Also, the narrator makes a comment about Farquhar at the end of the story; the narrator says, “his body, with a broken neck, swung gently from side to side beneath the timbers of the Owl Creek Bridge,” proving that Farquhar’s rope did not really break off nor did he escape(Bierce 12). Bierce’s type of third-person point of view changes at specific times in the story though, so he is not always describing the personal thoughts of Farquhar(Roberts 9). At the beginning of the story and also at the story’s end, the author is describing the background of Peyton Farquhar, so the author is taking on the objective third-person point of view(Roberts 9). However, throughout the story of Peyton’s unreal escape, the author gives certain personal thoughts of Farquhar and explains exactly what he is doing. These are the moments in which the author is telling the story in limited-omniscient third-person point-of-view(Roberts 9).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 11, 2013 12:42 PM

Ryan MacCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
11 September 2013


Question: On page 86, Roberts discusses a writer’s use of verb tense (past, present, future, etc.) for telling story. In some cases, the tense is consistent and in others it is mixed. His examples are from Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.” Identify and explain what tense or tenses are used in Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers.” If they are mixed, which tense is the dominant one


Answer: In Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers,” the dominant tense is past. While in the short story, there is some present tense due to the conversations and quotes, it is still dominantly past. When the narrator of the story is talking, it is all past tense. The opening paragraph is the narrator speaking and it is all in past tense, for example, “When Martha Hale opened the storm-door and got a cut of the north wind, she ran back for her big woolen scarf” (1). The opening sentence is all past tense, with the majority of the short story, being like this, it is dominantly in past tense.

Posted by: Ryan MacCarthy at September 11, 2013 01:20 PM

Tori Thomas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA08
11 September, 2013

Question: How do the reader know if the speaker is using the third-person point of view and what are the three possible variations of third-person?

Answer: When using third person, the author emphasizes the actions of others rather than their-selves.

Posted by: Tori Thomas at September 11, 2013 01:40 PM

Rebecca Liller, Alex Koufas, Ti’rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
10 September 2013

Group 3

Question: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.

Answer: The primary point of view in “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” is on the main character, Peyton. Peyton’s story is told in the third person, because the narrator refers to Peyton as the man, and Peyton never speaks himself about his experience and dream he has in the story. With the story being told in third person, out of the three variations that are shown in the story is that Peyton would be considered a character who is of limited omniscient. This is because the story is focused on Peyton only, and the reader does not get any background on any other characters that are featured in the story. Peyton’s dream is focused on just himself, and as well, the reader does not get any insight on anyone who has actually impacted Peyton’s life, like his family. When Peyton is having his dream before he is hanged, he falls into a river. An officer is shooting at Peyton, but the reader is only focused on the main character, and not on the actual officer and his story. The author explains this further by giving the reader an idea of what is going through Peyton’s head during the time that the shooting is happening; “He unclosed his eyes and saw again the water below him. If I could free my hands, he thought, I might throw off the noose and spring into the stream. By diving I could evade the bullets and, swimming vigorously, reach the bank, take the woods and get away home.” (Pierce 5) This quote is focusing on Peyton’s feelings and emotions as well as his thoughts only, and not what is going on with the other people and sergeants around him. Peyton would be considered an unreliable character in this story, because he does leave the reader confused if his dream is real or not, and the reader does not get a real sense that this is a dream, because it is not mentioned at all in the story. The reader has to guess on if these events that unfolded actually happened, or if it was all made up in Peyton’s head, which makes Peyton, overall, a character that cannot be fully trusted.

Posted by: Alex Koufas at September 11, 2013 01:55 PM

Maryerie Rojas, Mike Ossolinski, Ryan McCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
11 September 2013

Question 21: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart”? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.

Answer: The point of view of “The Tell-Tale Heart” is a written in a first person because the first sentence of the story has the word I (Poe 3). The narrator is a major mover because he is telling his own story and experiences (Roberts 85). The narrator is assumed to be reliable and truthful, but he has limited or incorrect understanding of the events surrounding the old man’s death (Roberts 85). The narrator states he has a disease and believes that his senses had been heightened, when in fact they could have been deteriorated (Poe 3). His disease could cause him to retell his story with laps in memory, causing the incorrect understanding of what has occurred.

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas at September 11, 2013 02:14 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 11, 2013 11:04 PM

Julieann Sauter, Tori Thomas, Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
13 September 2013

Question: Discuss the accident characters in Roberts- who is reliable, if anyone? Who is not reliable? Why?

Answer: In the picture of the accident, none of the characters are totally reliable. Both Alice and Bill are biased parties because they are involved in the accident. Frank is best friends with Bill, therefore his perception of the accident can potentially be very skewed. Mary did not see the accident happen. If Mary tries to testify about the accident, her statements will be false because she only saw the events after the crash happened. When speaking of reliable witnesses, the author wrote, “Most likely your account as an impartial reporter will be the most reliable and objective of all, because your major interest is to learn all the details and to report the truth accurately, with no concern about the personal interests of either Alice or Bill” (Roberts 79). When an incident such as an accident occurs, it is hard to get the unbiased truth unless there is use of security cameras, or other mechanisms.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 13, 2013 09:08 AM

Madison Owens (Group 4)
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
12 September 2013

Question #20: “What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Susan Glaspell’s “Jury of her Peers”? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.”

Answer: “Jury of her Peers” was written in limited third person through Mrs. Martha Hale’s point of view. Glaspell writes, “Even after she had her foot on the door-step, her hand on the knob, Martha Hale had a moment of feeling she could not cross that threshold” (Glaspell 1). We see here that Glaspell has concentrated on the actions and thoughts of Mrs. Hale as a major character in the passage, which is the exact definition that Edgar V. Roberts uses to describe limited third person.

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 13, 2013 09:44 AM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz, Victoria Varcarcel, Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
12 September 2013

Question: Explain why it would be impossible for Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” to be told in the first-person point of view.

Answer: According to the reading, "Writing about Point of View" from Edgar V. Roberts, in the first-person point of view the voice of the work is an "I". This means the first person speaker report the events as though they have acquired their knowledge. Examples of first person speakers are the one firsthand experiences and the firsthand witness. In the story "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" from Ambrose Bierce, the narrator is in third person because he is telling us the story of Peyton Farquhar, a man who are about to die for committing a crime. When the narrator describes, "From this state I was awakened later ages, it seems, to him by the pain of a sharp pressure upon his throat, followed by a sense of suffocation" (Bierce 8). The narrator is talking about the protagonist and not as narrator's experience. Although we emphasize that the point of view is not from a first-person point of view, within the story changes; in the beginning of the story provides a generalized view of how the preparations are in the military when someone is about to die even so is in a execution, but at the end of the same part of the story the narrator mentions, ["if I could free my hands," I thought, "I might throw off the noose and spring into the stream."] (Bierce 5), as if he understand and be inside the protagonist's mind. This gives us the feeling though the narrator is telling the story, it can also give us more of one perspective and tells the story from a subjective point. Regardless of this fact the story is told from third-person point of view and not from the first one.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at September 13, 2013 12:26 PM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
29 January 2013

QUESTION #1:
According to Edgar V. Roberts, what is "point of view"?

ANSWER:
Point of view refers to the speaker, narrator, persona, or voice created by authors to tell stories, present arguments, and express attitudes and judgements (Roberts 77).

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at January 27, 2014 02:48 PM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
28 January 2014

Question:
How does the reader know if the voice of a work is in first person?
Roberts says that first-person “speakers report events as though they have
acquired their knowledge in a number of ways.” Identify all five of these
“ways” and explain which of them is the most reliable and which of
them is the least reliable?

Answer:
When you tell a story through a viewpoint character using me or us, you are using first person point of view. The five ways in which Edgar v. Roberts says the narrator gains information are
1. What they themselves have done, said, heard, and thought.
2. What they have observed others doing and saying.
3. What others have said to them or otherwise communicated to them.
4. What they are able to deduce from the information they have discovered.
5. What they are able to conjecture about how a character or characters might think and act given there knowledge about the situation (Roberts 6)
The method that is most reliable and seen as authoritative is the first person plural point of view (Roberts 6).
The method of information that is seen as least reliable is depending on the situation does the character in first person have anything to gain or lose from the encounter (Roberts 6-7).

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at January 28, 2014 11:54 AM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 January 2014

QUESTION #4:
Explain Robert's analogy of comparing what a writer does with the narrative voice to what a painter does when s/he paints a particular subject.

ANSWER:
Robert's analogy comparing the use of narrative to that of a painting is that through each of these two forms of expression, presentation is what effects our perception and understanding. Roberts says that, "(A narrative voice) may be compared to the perspectives utilized by painters: The way we understand reality presented in painted pictures-the point of view or guiding intelligence presented by the painter-determines our perceptions and understanding of the painter's ideas. Similarly, the point of view or guiding intelligence created by the author of a literary work determines how we read, understand and respond" (Roberts 77). Thus, in other words, a narration is much like a painting in the sense that those who create the piece decide what direction to steer our interpretations in.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at January 28, 2014 01:58 PM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 January 2014

Question #5:
In Roberts anecdote of the automobile accident, what term does he use to describe the roles of "Alice" and "Bill"? What does he mean by this term and what are they likely to do?

Answer:
In the article Roberts describes the Alice and Bill as "major movers" because they are the ones directly involved with the accident (Roberts 78).. Because each individual has something to lose if responsible for the car crash, both points of view are going to be bias and Alice and Bill are most likely to "arrange their words to make themselves seem blameless" in order to have the results go in their favor. (Roberts 78).

Posted by: Berlin Water at January 28, 2014 03:01 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 January, 2014

Question #2:
“In chapter 4, Roberts says that authors “try not only to make their works interesting but also bring their presentations alive.” How do writers accomplish this in fictional works?
Answer:
The way that writers accomplish this in fictional works is by “not only impersonating characters who do the talking but by creating them” (Roberts 2), in the sense that they make them seem realistic. They give them a certain role in the story and make the character come to life.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at January 28, 2014 07:14 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
29 January 2014

Question: How does the reader know if the speaker is using the third-person point of view and what are the three possible variations of third-person?

Answer: Authors often use different points of view in literature. Three common examples of this is first person point of view, second person point of view and third person point of view. This particular article says "If events are described in the third person (he, she, it, they), the author is using the third-person point of view." (Roberts 83). There are also three different types of third-person point of views. The following tells of these "There are three variants of third-person point of view: dramatic or objective, omniscient, and limited omniscient." (Roberts 83).

Posted by: sawyer hand at January 28, 2014 09:12 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 January 2014

Question #12: What, according to Roberts, is the difference between reliable first person and an unreliable first person speaker? How does one know if a first person speaker is reliable or unreliable?

Answer: Robert states: "Most first person speakers descrbing their own experiences are to be accepted as reliable and authoritative, but sometimes first person speakers are unreliable because they have interests or limitations that lead them to mislead, distort or even lie" (Roberts 81). Robert says that the only way to know if a first person speaker is reliable or unreliable is to "study the story closely" (Roberts 85).


Posted by: Makenzie Holler at January 28, 2014 11:12 PM

Bianca T. Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
28 Jan. 2014

Question #9: Roberts says that point of view depends on two major factors. What are they and what do they mean?

Answers: Since point of view depends on two major factors, the first major factor that Roberts talked about was the physical situation of the narrator, or speaker, as an observer. "How close to the action is the speaker? Is the speaker a major mover or major participant or no more than a witness, either close or distant? How much is he or she privileged to know? How accurate and complete are his or her reports? How do the speaker's characteristics emerge from the narration? What are his or her qualifications or limitations as an observer?"(Roberts 4).This describes what the characters roles are and their different point of views. The second major factor that Roberts discussed that the speaker's intellectual and emotional position. "How might the speaker gain or lose from what takes place in the story? Are the speaker's observations and words colored by these interests? Does he or she have any persuasive purpose beyond being a straightforward recorder or observer? What values does the speaker impose upon the action?"(Roberts 4). This shows how the characters would act and how their actions would affect what they do and their point of views.

Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at January 28, 2014 11:54 PM

James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
January 28, 2014

Question 7:
In Robert’s anecdote of the automobile accident, what term does he use to describe the roles of `Alice` and `Bill`? What does he mean by this term and what are they likely to do?

Answer:
In the anecdote Roberts describes Bill and Alice and “both deeply involved” (Roberts 79), but also states that it was an “auto accident” (Roberts 78) which to me gives of the impression that both parties were equally responsible for the incident, and there was no intent from either person involved. Obviously the outcome of whose fault the situation was depends on the points of view of post witnesses and the people involved. Each person will argue their innocence, and they “may be truthful to the best of their abilities, but their reports will not be reliable because they both have something to gain” (Roberts 79). Each report will have “hidden agendas” simply down to the fact that nobody in that situation wants to take the blame. They would most likely get statements from those around, who at the time were “Frank, who is Bill’s best friend” and Mary who “knows neither Bill nor Alice” (Roberts 79). The two statements will most likely differ, but Mary’s statement would be the most believable one down to her being impartial to the two involved, but at the same time Frank’s side of the story should not be simply discounted.

Posted by: James Jessop at January 29, 2014 12:07 AM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
29 January 2014

Question 3:
What does Roberts mean when he says that “point of view may also be considered as centralizing or guiding intelligence in a work?”

Answer:
Roberts describes the point of view as a narrator that is centralizing or guiding intelligence within the story. The point of view of the narrative voice expresses the “fictional experience and presents only the most important details to create the maximum impact” (Robert 77) for the reader. The point of view also “determines how we read, understand, and respond” (Roberts 77) to the story that the author is trying to tell us.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at January 29, 2014 12:37 AM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
29 Jan. 2014

Question #8:
In Roberts’s anecdote of the automobile accident, Mary was a witness to
the event. She knows neither Alice nor Bill so she is able to be
“impartial.” Nonetheless, according to Roberts’s hypothesis, Mary could
be an unreliable source for what really happened. Why?

Answer:
Mary could be an unreliable source because she could make the audience believe her report over the victims because the victims because " their reports will not be reliable because they both have something to gain from avoiding avoiding responsibility for the accident (Roberts 4)."

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at January 29, 2014 10:19 AM

Jeffrey Wingfield Hubert Reuter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
29 January 2014
Explain what the omniscient point of view is and how it is different
from the other forms of third person.
The third person omniscient point of view has insight into the minds of all characters and has knowledge of all actions. The narrator’s knowledge has no limits. Roberts writes, “The narrator of the omniscient point of view can see all, know all, and potentially disclose all.” (Roberts 8) Other forms of third person have limits on what they can potentially know.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield Hubert Reuter at January 29, 2014 10:54 AM

Gabriela Caminero, Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
29 January 2014

Question #18:
Is it possible for authors, in some works, to mingle the various points of view together? According to Roberts, what are four reasons why some writers do this?

Answer:
Authors mingle points of views in order to imitate reality (Roberts 9). The four reasons why writers do this are to sustain interest, create suspense, or put the burden of response entirely upon readers (Roberts 9).


Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at January 29, 2014 11:19 AM

Bianca T. Smith and Sergio Velasquez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
29 Jan. 2014

Question #19: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Guy
de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”? If first person, you must say if the
narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three
variations is the best fit.

Answer: In the story,"The Necklace," the primary point of view is third person. "She looked at him angrily and stated" (Maupassant 3).

Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at January 29, 2014 11:20 AM

Traneisha Cunningham, Sarah Ellis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
29 January 2013

QUESTION #17:
Explain what the limited omniscient point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third person?

ANSWER:
Limited omniscient is where the focus is on the actions, responses, thoughts, and feelings of a single major character. Although the narration may concentrate on the character’s actions, it may simultaneously probe deep within the consciousness of the character (Edgar 85). It is different from the other forms of third person because the author concentrates on or limits the narration to the actions and thoughts of the major character (Edgar 84).

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at January 29, 2014 01:04 PM

Maxx Howarth & Jeffery Wingfield
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2014

QUESTION #15:
Explain what the dramatic or objective point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third person.

ANSWER:
The dramatic/objective point of view is the most basic and limited third person point of view. "Presentation is limited only to what is said and what happens," much like a "fly on the wall" (Roberts 83). Thus, with dramatic/objective point of view, there are no emotion and/or thoughts conveyed; what you see is what you get.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at January 30, 2014 01:08 PM

Makenzie & James
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
31 January 2013

Question #20: What is the primary Point of View used in Susan Glaspell's "Jury of her Peers"? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.

Answer:
The Point of View in "Jury of her Peers" is third person limited. We do not know what everyone is thinking. We learn what Minnie is thinking mainly through what Mrs. Hale says.

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at January 31, 2014 01:03 AM

Berlin and Sawyer
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
31 January 2014

Question #21:
What is the primary point of view (or points of view) in Edgar Allen Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart"? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable.

Answer:
The point of view in Poe's story of "The tell-Tale Heart" is in first person as the narrator describes to us his very detailed story of how he brutally murders the old man with the vulture-like eye. He thinks he has a convincing argument as to why he did this, but it is easy to tell that he is in fact "mad" in which he claims not to be. He begins with telling us "How then am I mad?" (Poe 3). He then tells us how he can hear the heart beat of the man he had just murdered and is so paranoid that he fears the police officers might hear it as well (Poe 8). By the end of the story it is clear that he is an unreliable source based on the sanity of his own mind.

Posted by: Berlin Waters at January 31, 2014 02:24 AM

Shyra Bryant
Danielle Kluender
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA07
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
10 September 2014

In the short story, Robert says on page 2 “ the way we understand the reality presented in painted pictures—the point of view or guiding intelligence presented by the painter—determined perceptions and understanding of the painters ideas.” Roberts is initiating that the point of view can also paint an image of the topic, and give the reader the main idea of the story. The guiding intelligence determines how we read, understand, and respond.

Posted by: Shyra. B Danielle. K at September 10, 2014 01:57 PM

Mickael Dodard & Alyssa Davis
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
10 September 2014

Question 6:
In Roberts’s anecdote of the automobile accident, both Alice and Bill are not witness to the event; they were actually in it while it happened. Nonetheless, according to Robert’s hypothesis, both Alice and Bill are unreliable sources of what really happened (if we listen to one of them recall the event). Why?

Answer:
“Their reports will not be reliable because they both have something to gain from avoiding responsibility for the accident.” This means that they didn’t to be responsible for the accident.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at September 10, 2014 02:01 PM

Elizabeth Brown, Roslyn Thomas
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
10 September 2014

Question #7:
In Robert’s anecdote of the automobile accident, Frank was a witness to the event. Nonetheless, according to Robert’s hypothesis, Frank could be an unreliable source for what really happened. Why?

Answer:
Frank could be considered an unreliable source, because there is no proof he was actually looking at the accident when it happened. He probably looked afterwards due to the loud noise and commotion. Robert’s hypothesis inquires that Frank is also Bill’s friend and could be judging the accident from a point of view that benefits his Bill. Frank’s location during the accident may also have prevented him from seeing the whole thing.

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at September 10, 2014 02:04 PM

Trejon Baynham, Samantha Witte
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 04
10 September 2014

QUESTION:
In Robert’s anecdote of the automobile accident, both Alice and Bill are not only witnesses to the event; they were actually in it while it happened. Nonetheless, according to Robert’s hypothesis, both Alice and Bill are unreliable sources for what really happened. Why?

ANSWER:
Bill and Alice were the drivers behind the vehicles that crashed. Robert’s uses the term major movers – those that “will likely arrange their words to make themselves seem blameless” -- to describe the scenario and the diffusion of responsibility depending on the emotional state and level of involvement of those pertaining to it. (Roberts 79)

Posted by: Trejon Baynham, Samantha Witte at September 10, 2014 02:17 PM

Stephanie Vera
John Crane
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 10, 2014

Question 4:
Explain Robert’s analogy of comparing what a writer does with the narrative voice to what a painter does when s/he paints a particular subject.
Answer:
The painter determines the way that we understand and perceive painted pictures. Similarly, the way that we read, understand, and perceive the author controls literature. S/he will write in a way they want us to understand a character.

Posted by: Stephanie at September 11, 2014 02:17 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at September 15, 2014 04:15 PM

Amber Dunlap and Selena Hammie
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2015

Question: #6
In Robert’s anecdote of the automobile accident, both Alice and bill are not only witnesses to the event; they were actually in it while it happened. Nonetheless, according to Roberts’s hypothesis, both Alice and Bill are unreliable sources for what really happened. Why?
Answer:
Both characters played a roll throughout the accident, although they did try to avoid the situation they both had their own hidden agenda. “Their reports will not be reliable because they both have something to gain from avoiding responsibility for the accident.” (Pg. 79)

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at January 30, 2015 11:02 AM

Jorge Braham, Alison Colon, Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2015
Question:
1. “In chapter 4, Roberts says that authors “try not only to make their works interesting but also bring their presentations alive.” How do writers accomplish this in fictional works?

Answer

“In Fictional works, not only do authors impersonate characters who do the talking, but also they create these characters.” (Roberts 77) They try to become the character that they are representing.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at January 30, 2015 11:07 AM

Kathleen Sholl and Diego Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 15

Writing about Point of View Discussion Questions

Question #5: In Robert’s anecdote of the automobile accident, what term does he used to describe the roles of “Alice” and “Bill”? What does he mean by this term and what are they likely to do?

Answer: The term that Robert uses to describe the roles of “Alice” and “Bill” is a major mover. This term is used to “arrange someone’s words to make themselves seem blameless” (Robert 79). The main way to do this is by organizing stories to pin the blame on someone else. Both people on each side of the story have hidden agendas. As a result, both parties’ accounts are not reliable because they are avoiding responsibility for their actions.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl and Diego Garcia at January 30, 2015 11:16 AM

Aderias Ewing & Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
30 January 2015
Group work Question 3: What does Robert mean when he says that “point of view,” may also be considered as the centralizing or guiding intelligence in a work?
Our minds fixate on experiences that present most of the important details for maximum impact that happens all around us. It’s our perceptions and understanding on someone else’s ideas for example like teachers, what do they do; they teach.

Posted by: Aderias Ewing & Vallinique Martin at January 30, 2015 11:49 AM

Emily Buckley and Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2015

Question #7: In Roberts's anecdote of the automobile accident, Frank was a witness to
the event. Nonetheless, according to Roberts's hypothesis, Frank could
be an unreliable source for what actually happened. Why?

Answer: Frank would be an unreliable source for what happened because he is friends with one of the drivers involved in the car accident. His view of the accident would be biased and would try to "report things to Bill's advantage." (Roberts 79) "Also, Frank may be questionable as a witness because he is Bill's friend and may report things to Bill's advantage." (Roberts 79)

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Rachel Addington at January 30, 2015 11:55 AM

Mallory Delay and Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
1 February 2015

Question 4: Explain Robert's analogy of comparing what a writer does with the narrative voice to what a painter does when s/he paints a particular subject.

Answer: Robert's analogy of comparing a painter to a writer shows that both are centralizing and guiding intelligence in a work. Point of view leads you to important details the same way a painter does in his/her artwork. Robert mentions that it is because of point of view in literary works that "determines how we read, understand, and respond." (Roberts 2) The same is said of painters. The point of view that they use determines our perceptions and understanding of the artist is trying to express. (Roberts 2)

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 1, 2015 12:14 PM

Charis Lavoie and Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 February 2015

Question 7: In Roberts’s anecdote of the automobile accident, Mary was a witness to the event. She knows neither Alice nor Bill so she is able to be “impartial.” Nonetheless, according to Roberts’s hypothesis, Mary could be an unreliable source for what really happened. Why?

Answer: Mary is considered an unreliable source because she was not aware of an accident about to take place and as a result was not paying any attention when the accident happened. The only view she would have on the situation would be an assumption on her part as to who hit whom first.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 1, 2015 05:07 PM

Emma Riemer and Victoria Markou
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
1 February 2015

Writing about point of view

Question 9: Roberts says that point of view depends on two major factors. What are they and what do they mean?

Answer: “The first factor is the physical situation of the narrator, or speaker, as an observer. The second factor is the speaker’s intellectual and emotional positions” (Roberts 79). The first factor means the character is there to see the situation, is observing what is going on. In addition, it is whether the speaker is a key person in the event or just a witness. The second factor is how the character is feeling and how the speaker/character reacts to what is happening.

Posted by: Emma Riemer and victoria Markou at February 1, 2015 05:56 PM

Diego Garcia and Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing CA 12
2 February 2015

Question: #4
With your group partners use the “ Writing about Point of View” chapter by Edgar V. Roberts as your theory, and identify what point of views are used in “An Occurrence at Owl Creek” y Ambrose Bierce.

Answer:
There are two different perspectives on this short story “An Occurrence at Owl Creek.” The two main perspectives are a third and a first person. The third person perspective is based on how it is written. The author is speaking about the characters without him being a character himself. For example, “The man who was engaged in being handed apparently about thirty-five years of age” (Bierce 3). In addition, the first person perspective is how the characters speak of themselves, by using “I” for example. Another example of first person would be “I might throw off the noose and spring into the stream.” (Bierce 5).

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 2, 2015 11:16 AM

Emily Buckley and Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 February 2015

Question:
With your group partners, use the “Writing about Point-of-View” chapter by Edgar V. Roberts as your theory, and identify which point of view/s is/are used in Trifles [“A Jury of Her Peers”] by
Susan Glaspell. Your opinion is not enough; you need hard evidence from the text to prove your case.
(a.) If it is the first person perspective, be ready to explain if the narrator is reliable or unreliable,
and why; consult the chapter for more information.
(b.) If it is the third person perspective, be ready to explain if it is objective, omniscient, or limited omniscient, and why. In addition to your regular homework question, your group scribe will
answer this question on the “Writing about Point-of-View” blog entry on the English-Blog by the
next class meeting.

Answer:
Susan Glaspell's "Trifles" is written in the third person perspective. It is objective because you cannot see into the character's minds, and the reader has no knowledge of what is to come. The reader can draw their own conclusions about what is going to happen. “The dramatic presentation is limited only to what is said and what happens. The writer does not overly draw conclusions or make interpretations, because the premise of the dramatic point of view is that readers, like a jury can form their own judgments if they are shown the right evidence.” (Roberts 8) “We, the readers, draw a number of conclusions about the situation…” (Roberts 8)

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Mallory Delay at February 2, 2015 11:20 AM

Kathleen Sholl and Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
2 February 15

The Chrysanthemums/Writing about Point-Of-View Discussion Question

Question 5: With your group partners, use the “Writing about Point-Of-View” chapter by Edgar V. Roberts as your theory, and identify which point of view/s is/are used in The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck. If it is in third person, be ready to explain if it is objective, omniscient, or limited omniscient and why.

Answer: In The Chrysanthemums, the point of view that John Steinbeck used was third person omniscient. For example, “she took off a glove and put her strong fingers down into the forest” (Steinbeck 2). When John Steinbeck states, “she took off,” that is the writer speaking in third person. In addition, the omniscient point of view is used as well, which means, “the speaker not only presents action and dialogue but also reports the thoughts and reactions of the characters” (Roberts 8). The writer, John Steinbeck presents the omniscient point of view by saying, “Elisa started at the sound of her husband’s voice” (Steinbeck 2).

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl and Selena Hammie at February 2, 2015 05:18 PM

Emma Riemer and Rachel Addington
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 February 2015

Point of view

Question 6: what is the point of view used in “shisei” [“the tattooer”] by Jun’ichiro Tanizaki?

Answer:
This story is written in third person because the speaker uses pronouns when speaking about the tattooer. It is also limited-omniscient because the speaker knows the tattooer’s desires and thoughts of wanting to create a masterpiece on a beautiful woman (Tanizaki 138). Limited-omniscient is when the thoughts and desires are limited to one character. The speaker says, “He thought that he would never tire of contemplating her serene masklike face” (Tanizaki 141). These are Seikichi’s thoughts that no one else except Seikichi would know unless he says them, which he has not.

Posted by: Emma Riemer and rachel addington at February 3, 2015 06:50 PM

Kaitlin Murphy and Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 February 2015

Question: (A.) If it is the first person perspective be ready to explain if the narrator is reliable or unreliable, and why: consult the chapter for more information. (B.) If it is the third person perspective, be ready to explain if it is objective, omniscient, or limited omniscient, and why.

Answer: We believe that in “The Three Strangers”, it is written in third person objective. Third person objective can be described as being an anonymous person in whom writes down everything they have watched in their surroundings. Such as here, “The guests had arrived before the rain began to fall, and they were all now assembled in the chief or living room of the dwelling” (Hardy 4). This is telling us that the person themselves is not included in the story but simply watching from afar.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphyand Charis Lavoie at February 3, 2015 08:09 PM

Jorge Braham, Amanda Cannon, and Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 February 2015

Writing about Point-of-View

Question # 1: With your group partners, use the “Writing about Point-of-View” chapter by Edgar V. Roberts as your theory, and identify which point of view/s is/are used in “La Parure” [“The Necklace”] by Guy de Maupassant. Your opinion is not enough; you need hard evidence from the text to prove your case.

Answer: Guy de Maupassant’s “La Parure” is written in the third person limited omniscient perspective. We can determine this because the author’s focus is the thoughts and actions of the main characters. “Suddenly she found a superb diamond necklace in a black satin box, and her heart throbbed with desire for it” (Maupassant 47), is an example of one of Mathilde’s thought. An example of Mr. Loisel’s thought would be “ He risked his signature without knowing whether he would be able to honor it; and terrified by anguish over the future…” (Maupassant 58).

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at February 3, 2015 09:38 PM

Rously Paul and Vallinqiue Martin
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 February 2015

Question: Use the “Writing about Point-of-View” chapter by Edgar V. Roberts as your theory, and identify which point of view/s is/are used in “Roman Fever” by Edith Wharton. Your opinion is not enough; you need hard evidence from the text to prove your case.


Answer: In Roman Fever, the story is through a third person limited omniscient view. The narrator has limited omniscient as they can reveal only the main character’s thoughts and can relay them to the audience, an example of this being where Babs reminisced on Grace Ansley”: Grace Ansley was always old-fashioned, “she thought; and added aloud, with a retrospective smile.” The narrator has access to the thoughts of the focus of the story and provides them without bias entirely separate from the stories’ events.

Posted by: Rously Paul and Vallinqiue Martin at February 4, 2015 08:59 AM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
4 September 2015

Question 5: What are round characters like?

Answer: According to Roberts round characters are “Three-dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original, and true to life” (Roberts 68). Roberts says that round characters are like this because they are the characters in the story that are developed the most. Not all characters in a story are equally developed and therefore the reader may get to know a certain character better than another. In comparison to its opposite, the flat character, round characters are traditionally the center of attention in most stories. Round characters have specific traits of being dynamic, the protagonist in the story, and have the ability to easily adapt to new circumstances (Roberts 68). Based off this information about round characters from Roberts one can tell that round characters are often the main characters in a story and the characters one will still remember well after reading the story.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at September 4, 2015 02:55 PM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 September 2015

Question: What, according to Roberts, is the difference between a reliable first-person speaker and an unreliable first-person speaker? How does one know if a first-person speaker is reliable or unreliable?

Answer: According to Roberts, “Most first-person speakers describing their experiences are to be accepted at reliable and authoritative” (81). An unreliable first-person speaker is a speaker who may “mislead, distort, or even lies.” (Roberts 81). One knows if a first-person speaker is reliable or unreliable by their position, ability, self-interest, and judgement of their readers (Roberts 81).

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at September 9, 2015 05:21 PM

Peyton Farrier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
09 September 2015

Question: Explain what the omniscient point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third person.

Answer: "The narrator of the omniscient point of view can see all, know all, and potentially disclose all" (Roberts 8). In the third person, the speaker doesn't only speak about the action and dialogue but also speaks about the thoughts and reactions of the characters in the book. However, in the real world we can't read what people are thinking. " In 'The Necklace' the speaker takes an omniscient stance to explain responses and thoughts of the major character and also to a certain extent, her husband. However in an omniscient point of view story, the little description is devoted to the thoughts of the characters". (Roberts 8) So omniscient meaning all knowing is only all knowing to a certain point, we can't read what other people are thinking. However in third person they can describe the thoughts of others.

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at September 9, 2015 09:03 PM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
9 September 2015


Question: Explain what the Limited Omniscient point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third person.

Answer: Limited-omniscient third person exists when an "author concentrates on or limits the narration to the actions and thoughts of a major character (Roberts 84)." Examples the use of this point of views are used in Bierce's "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" (1890). In the first section of the story, the author writes more in depth about the surroundings than the character, whom he narrates about lightly.
The Limited-omniscient person is different from other third points of views in its purpose. This third person point of view bestows the power of the omniscience some major characters, and through their experience the readers may know what the character hears, thinks, touches, says, and sees. On the other hand, the other third person point of views are only described by an omniscient author, which is the case of the omniscient point of view. Also the Limited-omniscient point of view differentiates from the objective or dramatic because the latter one revolves more around actions and dialogues, moreover, "its narrator is an unidentified speaker who reports in a way that is analogous to a hovering or tracking video camera (Roberts 84)."

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 9, 2015 11:17 PM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
10 September 2015

Question: In Roberts's anecdote of the automobile accident, Frank was a witness to the event. Nonetheless, according to Roberts's hypothesis, unreliable source for what really happened. Why?

Answer: According to Roberts's hypothesis, Frank would be an unreliable source for what happened because Frank is Bill's best friend. In any aspects of life, it is known that a best friend has your back and is in favor for you no matter what. So, in this case, Frank would be biased in testifying on Bill's behave that he wasn't the one who is at fault in the accident between Alice and Bill. Furthermore, the story states, "Also, Frank may be questionable as a witness because he is Bill's best friend and may report things to Bill's advantage" (Roberts 79). Therefore, Frank could be an unreliable source because he would be in favor for his friend.

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 10, 2015 10:35 AM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
10 September 2015

Question: According to Roberts, when we are discussing literature, it is important to remember what point of view actually means (80). How can the popular understanding of point of view as “ideas, opinions, or beliefs) complicate Roberts’s instructions? What legitimate roles do opinions play in a work’s “mode of narration”?

Answer: The popular understanding of the point of view of “ideas, opinions, or beliefs” complicates Roberts’s instructions (Roberts 80). He says, “Point of view refers to a work’s mode of narration, compromising narrator, language, audience, and perceptions of events and characters…” (Roberts 80). This complicates things because Roberts also says, “opinions and beliefs…may or may not have anything to do with a narration,” therefore he feels that the common understanding is not sufficient for point of view (Roberts 80). Opinions “affect how people view reality” and cannot create a reliable narrator (Roberts 80).

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at September 10, 2015 10:39 AM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 - Academic Writing II CAO3
September 10, 2015

Question: On page 86, Roberts discusses a writer’s use of verb tense (past, present, future, etc.) for telling story. In some cases, the tense is consistent and in others it is mixed. His examples are from Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.” Identify and explain what tense or tenses are used in Poe’s “A Tell-Tale Heart” If they are mixed, which tense is the dominant one?

Answer: I believe the tense that is portrayed in “A Tell-Tale Heart” by Poe is past tense and present tense. Past tense is tense found in “The Necklace” and “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.” But “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” switch to present tense when he blow to his neck. The reasons I believe its past tense it’s because the story is about murder and he’s continuing thinking about it. Then it can switch to present tense because he thinks about his current situation.

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 10, 2015 02:35 PM

Alexis Clayton
Doctor Hobbs
ENG 122- CA3 Academic Writing 2
10 September 2015

Question: Explain what the dramatic or objective point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third-person?


Answer: In Writing about Literature, by Edgar V. Roberts, piece of work explains his stance on the writing about point of view for the narrator speaker. One of the categories Roberts’s talks about is the point of view in the third-person in different forms. Roberts goes on to saying there are three forms of third-person, which are dramatic or objective, omniscient, and limited omniscient. Robert talks about on page 83 that the dramatic or objective point of view is the most basic method of narration and is the direct presentation of action. It is very limited by can only say what was said or what happened. This is different form the other forms by limited omniscient and omniscient is all knowing through anything. For example, can be through thoughts or reactions of the characters. Dramatic or objective you cannot get inside there minds like the other two forms.

Posted by: Alexis Clayton at September 10, 2015 04:50 PM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA03
10 September 2015

Question: How does the reader know if the voice of a work is in first person? Roberts says that first-person “speakers report events as though they have acquired their knowledge in a number of ways.” Identify all five of those “ways” and explain which of them is the most reliable and which of them is the least reliable.

Answer: The reader knows if the voice of a work is in first-person if the voice is an “I”. There are five ways Roberts explained in chapter four. There is firsthand experience, firsthand witness, secondhand testimony and hearsay, inferential information and conjectural, imaginative, or intuitive information. Clearly, the most reliable is the firsthand experience because it is what “they themselves have done, said, heard, and thought” (Roberts, 6). The information is coming straight from the source, and that is as reliable as it could get. The least reliable is conjectural, imaginative, or intuitive information because Roberts describes it as, “What they are able to conjecture about how a character or characters might think and act, given their knowledge of a situation” (Roberts, 6). The person is just taking a guess based on their knowledge from past experiences to help them decipher what they think someone else would do in this new situation presented to them. Guessing is not a good option, so that is why this is the least reliable.

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 10, 2015 05:26 PM

Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic writing 11 CA03
9 September 2015

Question: 9) Roberts says that point of view depends on two major factors. What are they and what to they mean?

Answer: As Roberts writes there are two major factors when it comes to point of view. The first factor is the “physical situation of the narrator, or speaker, as an observer.” Which means how close is the action is to the speaker, or if the speaker is a major mover or a major participant or no more than a witness, either close or distant. Should also know how much he or she is privileged to know. Also how accurate or complete his or her reports are. The second major factor that Roberts talks about is the speaker’s intellectual and emotional position. For example it goes onto to say “How might the speaker gain or lose from what takes place on the story?” Also goes to explain that the speaker’s observations and words are colored by these interests. Going on Roberts says that “he or she have any persuasive purpose beyond being straightforward recorder or observer and what values does the speaker impose.” Those are the two major factors that Roberts explains that come from point view.

Posted by: Jaclyn Taylor at September 10, 2015 08:14 PM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
10 September 2015

Question: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Susan Glaspell's "Jury of her Peers"? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.
Answer: The play Trifles, or a "Jury of her Peers" is written in the Limited Omniscient Third Person Point of View. The play prominently features two characters, Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters. Throughout the play the narrator presents the dialogue spoken by the two characters and describes the environment that they are in. However, the narrator does not probe the minds of the two characters. At no point during the play are we given the thoughts of Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters, however, we are given insight into their thought process through their actions. One such instance is when Mrs. Hale is in the kitchen, talking about the state of the Wright house "Makes a move as if to finish work, then turns and looks at loaf of bread outside the breadbox. Drops towel. In that voice of coming back to familiar things." (Glaspel 5), and suddenly changes to commenting on Mrs. Wright's unfair incarceration. Another instance is when the women are examining Mrs. Wright's sewing projects and they notice the sloppy work on the second quilt, through the narrator's descriptions "After she has said this, they look at each other, then start to glance back at the door. After an instant Mrs. Hale has pulled at a knot and ripped the sewing" (Glaspel 6) it is revealed that Mrs. Hale suddenly decided to start tearing apart the sewing, almost as if something she was thinking about caused her to do it. Being a limited point of view, we never know the inner workings of Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters' minds. However, it is through their actions and dialogue that we learn their standpoint and their opinions on the Wright murder.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 10, 2015 08:38 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 September 2015

Question: In chapter 4, Robert says that authors “try not only to make their works interesting but also bring their presentations alive.” How do writers accomplish this in their fictional works?

Answer: An author will tell a story from a particular point of view. This point of view is guided by a speaker, whose circumstances, mental and social attributes affect how the reader will perceive the narrative (Roberts 77). The speaker comes to life as a character in the story. In fictional works, not only do authors impersonate the characters who do the talking, but they also create these characters” (Roberts 77).

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at September 10, 2015 09:45 PM

Zach Pottle
Professor Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
11 September 2015

Question:

Explain why it would be impossible for Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” to be told in the first-person point of view.

Answer:

The short story “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”, written by Ambrose Bierce, is a fictional story written in the third person narrative. In the story the reader follows Farquhar, the main character, to Owl Creek Bridge, where he is hanged. In the process of being hanged, the rope “snaps” and the reader thinks that Farquhar has gotten away as he falls into the creek. As he is walking home he collapses to the ground and awakens in front of his home. Farquhar is greeted by his wife, and just before he goes to hug; her the reader learns that he died while being hanged. It would be impossible for this story to be written in the first person narrative simply because Farquhar was dead the entire time the reader thought he was escaping. As Edgar Roberts states in his Writing in Literature “First-person speakers report events as though they have acquired their knowledge in a number of ways” (Roberts 81). This story is written in the third person narrative because, without it, it would be impossible.

Posted by: Zachary Pottle at September 10, 2015 09:47 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 academic writing II CA03
10 September 2015


“The way we understand reality presented in painted pictures […] the point of view determines how we understand and respond to the unnamed narrator.”

Question: explain Robert’s analogy of comparing what a writer does with the narrative voice to what a painter does when s/he paints a particular subject.

Answer: each stroke of paint and each color and shape tell a story within a story from the painter’s eye. A narrator’s point of view acts in that same way but uses punctuation, words, and phrases to tell you a story from his eye. A story resembles a painting in many ways. Each reader or person see it differently depending on how well they understand what they are looking at.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 10, 2015 10:31 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09

10 September 2015


Question: Although we have discussed the concept of character for the short stories of de Maupassant and Glaspell, we have not done so for Bierce's "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge." Identify which of Bierce's characters are flat and which are round. Of those that are round, which are static (do not change) and of those that are round, which are dynamic (evolve in some way)?

Answer: Peyton Farquhar is a round character because he loves his family but would still put himself in danger by burning Owl Creek Bridge, and serving his country. The proof that he is a family man is the thought of his wife and children just as he was being prepared for the plank walk. "He closed his eyes in order to fix his last thoughts upon his wife and children." (Ambrose pg.4). Peyton is also a dynamic character, his actions, thoughts, and his focus had changed toward the end of the story. Peyton's wife, on the other hand, is a flat and static character. The reason behind this is because she was mostly part of Peyton's thoughts and does not change in any way. As for the rest of the characters, they are all flat and static, the soldiers and sergeant did not change in any way. Their focus was to kill Farquhar, and they succeeded in the end.

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayselcuk at September 10, 2015 10:39 PM

Tannor Berry
ENG 122 CA03
Robert’s
“Writing about point of view”


Question: Which point of view is the least common of the points of view and what two major possibilities does it offer?

Answer: The least common point of views is second person point of view. The first possibility is the “you” which is commonly mistaken as a direct word; the word “you” in second person mainly directs to a specific reader. Another major possibility it offers is what an author has done and said in the past time. This is more difficult for the author to recite, in second person events could be retold as what has been done or said.

Posted by: Tannor Berry at September 10, 2015 10:43 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 September 2015

“If events in the work are described in the third person (he, she, it, they), the author is using the third-person point of view. It is not always easy to characterize the voice in this point of view. Sometimes the speaker uses an “I,” as in Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death,” and may seemingly be identical with the author, but at other times the author creates a distinct authorial voice, as in Mansfield’s “Miss Brill.” (There are three variants of the third-person point of view: dramatic or objective, omniscient, and limited omniscient).”


Question: How do the reader know if the speaker is using the third person point of view and what are the three possible variations of third-person?

Answer: The reader will know if the speaker is using a third person point of view if they are describing them as he, she, it, or they. It is never easy to characterize the voice for this point of view.
The three possible variations of third-person are dramatic or objective, omniscient, and limited omniscient.

Posted by: Hana at September 10, 2015 11:34 PM

Group 14; Lady Hernandez and Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 academic writing II CA03
11 September 2015

Question: How do the reader know if the speaker is using third-person point of view and what are the three possible variations of third-person?

Answer: The author creates a distinct authorial voice. The three variations are dramatic or objective, omniscient, and limited omniscient. The dramatic point of view is the most basic method of narration also called third-person. The speaker reports things that is analogous to a hovering camera or a “fly on the wall.” Omniscient is when the speaker not only presents actions and dialogue but also reports thoughts and reactions if character. Limited omniscient is when the author concentrates on or limits the narration to the actions and thoughts of a major character.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 11, 2015 10:01 AM

Alexis clayton, Tanner, Sabrina
Doctor Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
11 September 2015

#16 Question: Explain what the omniscient point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third person.

Answer: The third person omniscient is the point of view where the narrator knows all the thoughts, actions, and feelings of all characters. The author could move from character to character to show how each one contributes to the plot. “Omniscient is when the speaker not only presents action and dialogue but also reports the thoughts and actions (Roberts pg 83).” Another form of third-person is dramatic or objective perspective, and that is what is said or done and not through thoughts. Therefore, that’s how it differs from the omniscient form of third-person.


Posted by: Alexis Clayton at September 11, 2015 10:16 AM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA09
11 September 2015

Question: On page 86, Roberts discusses a writer’s use of verb tense (past, present, future, etc.) for telling story. In some cases, the tense is consistent and others it is mixed. His examples are from Maupassant’s “The Necklace” and Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.” Identify and explain what tense or tenses are used in Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers.” If they are mixed, which tense is the dominant one?

Answer: In “A Jury of Her Peers” by Susan Glaspell, I found that the tense is mixed: it has past and present. When the story begins it is in the past tense, for example “when Martha Hale opened the storm-door... she ran back for her big woolen scarf” (Glaspell 1). Up until Mr. Hale finishes describing what he saw yesterday morning, the tense stays in the past, but after that, it switches to present. An example of this is a line that says, “’But I’m awful glad you came with me, Mrs. Hale.’ Mrs. Peters put the bird-cage on the table and sat down” (Glaspell 13). The majority of the tense, however, is in the past tense. Even at the end of the story, the tense stays in the past as we can see where it says, “Mrs. Hale’s hand was against the pocket of her coat. ‘We call it—knot it, Mr. Henderson” (Glaspell 19).

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 11, 2015 02:37 PM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA09
10 September 2015

Question: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Ambrose Bierce's "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"? If the first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if the third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.
Answer: In “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” the story is told in both first and third person by the author Ambrose Bierce. For example at the beginning of the story he says, "A man stood upon a railroad bridge in northern Alabama, looking down into the swift water twenty feet below. The man's hands were behind his back, the wrists bound with a cord” (Bierce). Which would be the third person but by the second section it is all that Peyton Farquhar is imagining what is happening and the author makes it seem as if the reader is experiencing the same thing as him. By the third section though the story goes back to the third person. "Peyton Farquhar was dead; his body, with a broken neck, swung gently from side to side beneath the timbers of the Owl Creek bridge” (Bierce). The story is told in third person omniscient because the author moves in and out of a character and it contributes to the plot of the story.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 11, 2015 02:46 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 September 2015

In the Roberts’ anecdote of the car crash Mary could still be considered an unreliable source according to Robert’s hypothesis simply because of her position. Mary is the only impartial witness in the accident, meaning that she was the only person there when it happened that was not directly involved and doesn't have anything to gain from reporting in the favor of either side. Even though Mary is impartial she could still be considered unreliable due to her positioning at the crash site and the fact that she might not have seen the whole event but yet might have just looked up to see two mangled cars after she heard the crash. Now when asked about the crash Mary may not have seen everything but according to Roberts she will want to seem “honest, objective, intelligent, impartial, and thorough” (Roberts 79). She has nothing to gain from siding with either person, and she can be as honest, objective, thorough, and intelligent sounding as she wants, but it does not make a difference because if she did not see the whole accident then she is just as an unreliable source as any of the other witnesses.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at September 11, 2015 03:15 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 September 2015

Question #24

Question: Although we have discussed the concept of character for the short
stories of de Maupassant and Glaspell, we have not done so for Poe’s “A
Tell-Tale Heart.” Identify which of Poe’s characters are flat and which
are round. Of those that are round, which are static (do not change) and
of those that are round, which are dynamic (evolve in some way)?

Answer: As described in “Writing about Characters”, Roberts describes a round character as “three-dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original, and true to life” (Roberts 68). The main character of Edgar Allen Poe’s “A Tell-Tale Heart” is most if not all of these things. The main character, who narrates the story, says, “How, then, am I mad? Hearken! and observe how healthily—how calmly I can tell you the whole story” (Poe 3) and then proceeds to tell you about how he killed a man. He’s in denial of being crazy and goes on to justify the killing by blaming it on the man’s blind eye (Poe 3). Throughout the course of the story the main character exhibits nervousness (Poe 3), shows that he can pretend to be someone’s he’s not (Poe 3), pride in how he went about with the murder (Poe 3), terror (Poe 4), and insanity that was especially apparent at the end of the story when he thinks he still hears the old man’s beating heart (Poe 8). The character is also dynamic because as the story goes on he become crazier and crazier. As far as static characters go, they would be the police officers (Poe 7). They never changed and their personalities never delved into. They were merely there for the development of the main character.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 11, 2015 03:20 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 September 2015

Answer: Reliabilism is a general approach to epistemology that emphasizes the truth-conduciveness of a belief-forming process, method, or other epistemologically relevant factor. “Point of view involves was not only the speaker’s physical position as an observer and recorder, but also the ways in which the speaker’s social, political, and mental circumstances affect the narrative.” (pp.1). They are unreliable sources because they do not want to have responsibility of accident.

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 11, 2015 03:22 PM

Group 7
Brittany and Lawrence
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 September 2015

Question: In Roberts’s anecdote of the automobile accident, Frank was a witness to the event. Nonetheless, according to Roberts’s hypothesis, Frank could be an unreliable source for what really happened. Why?

Answer: Frank is an unreliable source “because he is Bill’s best friend, will report things in Bill’s favor” (Roberts 79). He will have a bias opinion on the accident because he would not want his best friend to get into trouble. When the reporter asks Frank to recount the accident, he will recount it in a way that will make Alice out to be the cause of the crash because he does not have a relationship with her.

Posted by: Brittany and Lawrence at September 11, 2015 03:47 PM

Group 9: Maria Gonzalez, Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA09
11 September 2015

Question: Roberts says that point of view depends on two major factors. What are they and what do they mean?

Answer: According to Roberts, point-of-view depends on two major factors: “the physical situation of the narrator as an observer” and “the speaker’s intellectual and emotional position” (Roberts 79). The physical situation of the narrator refers to how close the narrator is to the action that takes place in the story. For example, he or she could be a major character in the action or just a witness of the action that’s taking place (Roberts 79). On the other hand, the speaker’s intellectual and emotional position refers to their belief systems, interests and biases based on their cultural background and relationships (Roberts 79). The speaker might be biased in favor or against the character(s) within the story.

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 11, 2015 03:59 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Brayden McAvoy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 September 2015

Group 13

Question: Which point of view is the least common of the points of view and what two major possibilities does it offer?

Answer: The point of view which is the least common of the points of view is second person (Roberts 82). Others find it hard to manage so second person point of view is not the preferred choice of many writers. There are two major possibilities that this point of view can bring. The first one is described as this, “a narrator tells a listener what he or she has done and said at a past time” (Roberts 82). The second, the narrator may be saying you but mean themselves or reference no one in particular at all (Roberts 82).

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 11, 2015 04:03 PM

Jorge, Mike
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 September 2015
Group 3
Question:
What does Roberts mean when he says that “point of view may also be considered as the centralizing or guiding intelligence in a work”?
Answer:
Roberts is saying that the narrator job is to explain it to the reader, if there is any anything that the reader cant understand such as a house or etc. he is too explain about it. In essence Roberts is trying to make it easier for the reader to understand the story. Roberts says "Authors try not to only to make their works interesting but also to bring their presentation alive." (Roberts 77).

Posted by: Jorge Braham at September 11, 2015 04:19 PM

Group 15 Sidnee Yaeger, Peyton Farrier, Hana Lee
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
11 September 2015

Question: Explain what the dramatic or objective point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third person?

Answer: Dramatic or objective point of view is also called third person objective. “It is the basic method of rendering action and speech that all the points of view share” (Roberts 83). Which also means that the narrator is telling us what is happening and what is being said. The difference between dramatic or objective and omniscient point of view is that the omniscient view not only tells what is happening and what is being said but also provides the thoughts and reactions of the characters (Roberts 83).

Posted by: Group 15 Sidnee Yaeger, Peyton Farrier, Hana Lee at September 12, 2015 10:36 AM

Emma Duncan and Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
12 September 2015

Question 12: What, according to Roberts, is the difference between a reliable first-person speaker and an unreliable first-person speaker? How does one know if a first-person speaker is reliable or unreliable?

Answer: A reliable first-person speaker is one who is, “describing their own experiences” (Roberts, 81). When a first-person speaker is describing their own experiences, it is reliable because all of the information is coming straight from the source. An unreliable first-person speaker, “may have interests or limitations that lead them to mislead, distort, or even lie” (Roberts, 81). To know if a first-person speaker is reliable, or unreliable Roberts suggests to, “find out narrator’s position and ability, prejudices or self-interest and judgement of his or her readers or listeners” (Roberts, 82). For the most part, unreliability is pretty easy to spot unless the first-person speaker is good at tricking people with his/her stories.

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 12, 2015 02:19 PM

Luis Bautista and Zack
Dr. Hobbs
ENG – 122 Academic Reading
13 September 2015

He closed his eyes in order to fix his last thoughts upon his wife and children. (Bierce 4).
Question 25; although we have discussed the concept of character for the short stories of de Maupassant and Glaspell, we have not done so for Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.” Identify which of Bierce’s characters are flat and which are round. Of those that are round, which are static (do not change) and of those that are round, which are dynamic (evolve in some way)?
Answer; In the short story Old Creek Bridge Farquhar is the most rounded character because at the beginning of the story we can notice how, before being hanged, he focuses all his thoughts on his wife and kids. However, when the “time” gets closer, he starts appreciating more his life and focusing on all his senses and his surroundings. “He was now in full possession o his physical senses. They were in deed, preternaturally keen and alert”. (Bierce 9) Even though Farquhar was thinking about his wife and kids, the story makes us understand that his wife is a flat character. Though she doesn’t appear much in the story, the fact that she doesn’t do anything for her husband and is not even in the crowd while her husband is being hanged shows in her no change, and therefore, a flat character. Other flat characters are the officers and prosecutors. During the story, they don’t show any kind of sympathy for the convicted. They only follow their role, prosecute the convicted.

Posted by: Luis Bautista at September 13, 2015 06:04 PM

Conner Knaresboro, Daniel Wright
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
11 September 2015

Question: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”? If first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.
Answer: In Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” the story is told in third person limited omniscient. Third person limited omniscient can be defined as “the focus is on action, responses, thoughts, and feelings, of a single major character. Although the narrator may concentrate on the characters actions, it may simultaneously probe deep within the consciousness of the character” (Roberts). For example, “She looked at him angrily and stated impatiently” (Maupassant). This quote from the story shows Mrs. Lionel’s emotion about how she felt about the invitation to the party.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 13, 2015 06:21 PM

Cannelle Samson and Lois
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
13 September 2015


Point of View


Question: Is it possible for authors, in some words, to mingle the various points of view together? According to Roberts, what are four ways some writers do this?

Answer: It is very much possible for authors to mingle the various point of view together. According to Roberts, some authors do this in four different ways. In “Writing about Literature” Roberts’s states the first way that authors mingle points of views together, “In some works, authors mingle points of view in order to imitate reality” (Roberts, 84). This means that authors want their audience to be able to relate to their story. For example, many first person narrators use various types of third person point of views during their narration to keep their audience interested. Roberts goes on to explain the three other ways authors mingle points of views, he states “Authors may also vary points of view to sustain interest, create suspense, or put the burden of response entirely upon reader” (Roberts, 84). A great example of an author mingling with different points of view is Bierce. In Bierce’s short story “An Occurrence on Owl Creek Bridge”, readers are able to experience various points of view. A few of the points of view Bierce uses are omniscient point of view and limited-omniscient third person. Bierce uses omniscient point of view during most of the story. In “Writing about Literature” Roberts states that omniscient point of view means that “… the narrator of omniscient point of view can see all, know all, and potentially disclose all” (Roberts, 83). In the short story “An Occurrence on Owl Creek Bridge” the narrator is all-knowing. He knows what going on in the minds of characters, he describes the surroundings as if he were there, and he is able to disclose the story. An example of this is that he knows the thoughts of the characters. In “An Occurrence on Owl Creek Bridge” it states, “to be hanged and drowned”, he thought, “that is not so bad; but I do not wish to be shot” (Bierce, 8). The narrator is able to look inside the character head and know what he is thinking. Another point of view seen in this short story is limited-omniscient third person which means from Roberts’ “Writing about Literature” that “… the author concentrates on or limits narration to the actions and thoughts of a major character” (Roberts, 84).In “An Occurrence on Owl Creek Bridge” the thoughts and actions of the main character are demonstrated; however, they are also limited. In part two of “An Occurrence on Owl Creek Bridge” the main characters thoughts are not shown. The narrator describes the main character’s meeting with a man on a horse. However, in the third part of the short story all of the main character’s thoughts are exposed.

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at September 13, 2015 08:27 PM

Anayah McKenzie, Shania Bienaime
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
11 September 2015

Question: In Roberts’s anecdote of the automobile accident, what term does he used to describe the roles of “Alice” and “Bill”? What does he mean by this term and what are they likely to do?

Answer: “Bill” and “Alice” were referred to as the major mover. Major mover was the term used because both of them were directly involved (major characters) in the incident and will try to make it seems like they are not in charge of the damage caused. Because of this, both of them will try to make it seem like they’re the victim, like they both are not in the wrong because they will have something to gain from avoiding responsibility.

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at September 13, 2015 10:40 PM

Group 22: Matthew Beebe, Catalina Suarez
Dr. Hobb
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
11 September 2015

Question: What is the primary point of view (or, points of view) used in Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”? If the first person, you must say if the narrator is reliable or unreliable and, if third person, which of the three variations is the best fit. Prove your answer with examples from the text.

Answer: The primary point of view in Ambrose Bierce’s An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge is the third person. The reason I believe the primary point of view is the third person is because there’s a narrator telling us what is happening at the bridge. The story does switch to first person and shows the story from his point of view when Farquhar was escaping from the gunfire. At the very end of the story, it switches back to the third person, and Farquhar died. An example of that is “Peyton Farquhar was dead; his body, with a broken neck, swung gently from side to side beneath the timbers of the Owl Creek bridge” (Bierce 12).

Posted by: Catalina Suarez at September 13, 2015 11:58 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
25 January 2016

Question: What according to Roberts is the difference between a reliable and an unreliable first person speaker? How does one know if a first person is a reliable or unreliable?

Answer: According to (Roberts 81), a reliable first-person speaker usual describe their own experience. An unreliable first-person speaker, on the other hand, may have interests or limitations that lead him/her to mislead, distort, or even lie. In order to determine if a narrator is reliable, one could check to see if the narrator has a complete understanding, partial or incorrect understanding, or no understanding of the situation at all. However, if a narrator has a full understanding of a situation with the motive to mislead or lie, that narrator is unreliable.



Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at January 25, 2016 11:22 PM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA06
26 January 2016

Question: In chapter 4, Roberts says that “Authors try not only to make their works interesting but also bring their presentations alive.” How do writers accomplish this in fictional works?

Answer: The authors usually create the character, so basically they are the characters that do the talking. “In fictional works, not only do authors impersonate characters who do the talking, but also create these characters (Roberts 77).” That is how the writers bring out their presentations alive.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at January 26, 2016 02:51 PM

Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
26 January 2016

Question #6: In Roberts’s anecdote of the automobile accident, both Alice and Bill are not only witnesses to the event, they were actually in it while it happened. Nonetheless, according to Roberts’s hypothesis, both Alice and Bill are unreliable sources for what really happened (if we listen to one of them recall the event). Why?

Answer: Alice and Bill are major participants because they were both involved in the accident. Therefore, in their point of view, neither one will accept responsibility for the damage caused due to recklessness or mere stupidity. Both parties will portray themselves as the innocent bystander who obeys the laws and as the narrative states, “each person’s report will have the ‘hidden agenda’” and “their reports will not be reliable because they both have something to gain from avoiding responsibility for the accident” (Roberts 79). It will be difficult determining who is at fault or which statement is the truth.

Posted by: Heather Hauck at January 26, 2016 03:02 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic writing 2 CA06
26 January 2016

Question 4) Explain Robert's analogy of comparing what a writer does with a narrative voice to what a painter does when s/he paints a particular subject.

Answer 4) Roberts uses the comparison of painting and writing to inform us how the perception of the one creating it can be shown through their work. For example, the way in which the audience understands the painting is the same as the way the audience understands the writing or play. What the text tells us is that when we are focusing on a painting or reading the play we are understanding the "point of view or guiding intelligence" of the artist or author, it states this on page 77.

This allows us to have an incite to their opinions and views of life, giving us the ability to understand them and gain a perception on their ideas and theories.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at January 26, 2016 05:33 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA 06
January 26th, 2016

Question: 9. Roberts says that point of view depends on two major factors. What are they and what do they mean?

Answer: In the “Writing about Point of View: The Position or Stance of the Work’s Narrator or Speaker”, by Edgar V. Roberts, Roberts writes about the two major factors that affect point of view. The factor that Robert first introduces is “the physical situation of the narrator, or speaker, or an observer (Roberts 79).” This essentially means that how close to the event the speaker is or what position the speaker is in related to the event can affect the point of view. The other factor is “the speaker’s intellectual and emotional position (79).” Therefore, the point of view can be affected if the speaker or narrator’s observations are biased because the speaker can lose or gain something or because of their values.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at January 26, 2016 10:33 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
27 January 2016

Writing about Point of View

Question #7: In Roberts’s anecdote of the automobile accident, Frank was a witness to the event. Nonetheless, according to Roberts’s hypothesis, Frank could be an unreliable source for what really happened. Why?

Answer: As Roberts says, “Frank may be a questionable as a witness because he is Bill’s friend and may report things to Bill’s advantage” (Roberts 79). Alice and Bill are both described as a “major mover” because they are integral in the happenings of the event. Neither wish to be at fault so both will try to appear to be innocent in the matter. Frank has his loyalties divided into telling the truth and helping out his friend. We can’t trust him, because we simply don’t know which choice he makes. You have to find someone completely removed from the situation that has no chance of bias, to have an accurate account of what happened.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at January 27, 2016 02:32 AM

Phillip Moss
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing CA06
27 January 2016

Question: Explain what the omniscient point of view is and how it is different from the other forms of third person

Answer: Omniscient point of view allows the narrator to know the thoughts and actions of all characters in the story. Although this is like third person perspective in the sense that the story gets told from an unrelated source, however in the omniscient point of view there is nothing the narrator doesn’t know. “The narrator of the Omniscient can see all know all and potentially disclose all”(Roberts 8).

Posted by: Phillip Moss at January 27, 2016 10:43 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
27 January 2016

Question: In Roberts’s anecdote of the automobile accident, what term does he used to describe the roles of “Alice” and “Bill”? What does he mean by this term and what are they likely to do?

Answer: The roles Roberts’ use of “Alice” and “Bill” is a major mover. The word is defined as “they will likely arrange their words to make themselves seem blameless” (Roberts 79). He says they are “deeply involved” (79) they will try to protect themselves from the repercussions in the future.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 27, 2016 10:56 AM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA06 Academic Writing II
27 January 2016

Question 14.) How does the reader know that the author is using the third person point of view and what are three possible variations of third person point of view?

Answer: A reader can identify when a narrator is using third person point of view when they are not using pronouns such as, “I, me, my, etc.” The three variations of third person point of view are “omniscient, limited, and dramatic” points of view. Omniscient is when the narrator presents action and dialogue along with the reaction of those affected. Limited point of view is when the speaker limits the narration to just one major character. Finally, dramatic point of view is, “limited only to what is said and what happens.”

Posted by: Matt Scharr at January 27, 2016 02:04 PM

Justin Robinson
DR. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
27 January 2016

Question: 1.) According to Edgar V. Roberts, what is “point of view”?

Answer: 1.) According to Edgar V. Roberts point of view refers to the speaker, narrator, persona, or voice that is created by the author to tell the story, which includes presenting arguments and express attitudes and judgements. It involves the ways the speakers social, political and mental circumstances affect the story as well as the speakers physical position as an observer and recorder. Roberts says, “For this reason, point of view is one of the more complex and subtle aspects of literary study”

Posted by: Justin Robinson at January 27, 2016 02:13 PM

Phillip Moss Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing CA06
27 January 2016

Question: According to Roberts, when we are discussing literature, it is important to remember what point of view means (80).How can the popular understanding of the point of view as “ideas, opinions, or beliefs) complicate Roberts’s instructions? What legitimate roles do opinions play in a work’s “mode of narration”?

Answer: Point of view is defined as the narrator's position in the story being told. “Point of view refers to a works mode of narration comprising narrator, language, audience and perceptions of events and characters whereas opinions and beliefs are thoughts and ideas that may or may not have anything to do with narration”(Roberts 80). Opinions are relevant to the mode of narration because the narrator needs a voice/opinion. Although the narrator is the one telling the story that voice is not infallible and, in the end, is a character itself.

Posted by: Phillip Moss at January 27, 2016 03:16 PM

Clark de Bullet, Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122- Academic Writing II CA06
27 January 2016

Question: Roberts says that point of view depends on two major factors. What are they and what do they mean?

Answer: The two major factors in point of view are physical and emotional. Physical as what Roberts describes as “how close to the action is the speaker?” or “how do the speaker’s characteristics emerge” (Roberts 79). He is saying that when the reader is physical in the story, they want to be involved in what is happening. Roberts also describes emotional as a point of view by saying what “the speaker gain or lose from what takes place in the story” and “does the speaker impose upon the action” (79). When the reader is emotional in a story, they want to gain something from the story that might affect them.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 27, 2016 03:16 PM

Travis Farmer and Allison Cobb

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210

27 January 2016



Third person point of view can be recognized when the speaker is "outside the action" (Roberts 10) and "mainly a reporter of actions and speeches" (Roberts 10).




There are 3 possible ways to write in 3rd person POV. First is dramatic or objective, where you don't get inside any of the character's heads. The only things the reader gets to know is "only what can be seen and heard" (Roberts 10).




The second is omniscient, where the narrator knows everything happening in the story. They are not limited to just themselves. The narrator "knows all, sees all, reports all, and when necessary reveals the inner workings of any or all characters" (Roberts 10).




The third is limited or limited omniscient, which is where "the focus is on the actions, responses, thoughts and feelings of one single major character" (Roberts 10). The reader is limited to this one character and does not know the thoughts of other characters.

Posted by: Travis Farmer and Allison Cobb at January 27, 2016 03:20 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
27 January 2016


Question: According to Roberts, when we are discussing literature, it is important to remember what point of view actually means (80). How can the popular understanding of point of view as “ideas, opinions, or beliefs” complicate Robert’s instructions? What legitimate roles do opinions play in a work’s “mode of narration”?


Answer: Point of view is defined by Roberts as “the speaker, narrator, persona, or voice created by authors to tell stories, present arguments, and express attitudes and judgements” (Roberts 77). The popular understanding of point of view as being ideas, opinions, or beliefs does not fit Robert’s definition because according to Roberts the point of view refers to the speaker, or narrator, and his/her views. The mode of narration is the theme of the narration and how it is portrayed out in literature.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at January 27, 2016 03:59 PM

Chloe Lelliott, Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
27 January 2016

Question: Which point of view is the least common of the points of view and what two major possibilities does it offer?

Answer: The second-person point of view is the least common of the point of view because it’s the most difficult for authors to manage. “The second-person point of view, the least common of points of view, and the most difficult for authors to manage, offers to major possibilities (Roberts 82).” The first possibility is that a narrator tells their listeners what he or she has done. The second possibility is that narrators are addressing someone that’s you but mainly referring to themselves.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at January 29, 2016 02:30 AM

Vincia Mitchell and Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
25 January 2016

Question: Explain what the dramatic or objective point of view is and how is it different from the other forms of third person?

Answer: The dramatic or objective point of view is the most basic method of narration (Roberts 83). The narrator is usually an unidentified speaker who reports what is said and what happens. The narrator of the omniscient point of view, on the other hand, can see all and potentially disclose all (83). The narrator is able to disclose the thoughts and actions of the characters. While the limited or limited omniscient point of view focuses only on the thoughts and actions of the major character (83).


Posted by: vincia mitchell at January 29, 2016 10:32 AM

Justin Robinson, Matthew Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: 16.) Explain what the omniscient point of view is and how it is different
from the other forms of third person.

Answer: 16.) When the speaker not only presents actions and dialogue but also reports the thoughts and reactions of the characters. It’s different from dramatic because dramatic is limited to only speak about what has happened. Limited does not make conclusions or interpret what a character is thinking and finally it is different from limited third person in terms of limited is where the author focuses on actions from one major character.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at January 29, 2016 02:13 PM

Justin Robinson, Matthew Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
29 January 2016

Question: 16.) Explain what the omniscient point of view is and how it is different
from the other forms of third person.

Answer: 16.) When the speaker not only presents actions and dialogue but also reports the thoughts and reactions of the characters. It’s different from dramatic because dramatic is limited to only speak about what has happened. Limited does not make conclusions or interpret what a character is thinking and finally it is different from limited third person in terms of limited is where the author focuses on actions from one major character.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at January 29, 2016 02:13 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
31 January 2016

“Point-of-View”

Q: What does Roberts mean when he says that the “point of view may also be considered the centralizing or guiding intelligence in the work”?

A: The point of view may be considered the centralizing or guiding intelligence in the work because it is essentially the voice of the narrator them self, and this is conveyed through the characters and how the story unfolds. Like Roberts explains, “Authors try not only to make their works interesting, but also to bring their presentations alive” (Roberts 4). Therefore, by doing this, the author’s mind is the guiding and centralizing force of the story. This outside guidance helps us, readers; understand the story and the important “take-away” points from it.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at January 31, 2016 05:50 PM

Chloe Lelliott, Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
01 February 2016

Questions: Who is the roundest character? Why? Who is the flattest character? Why? What exactly is the point of view? Is there more than one? Which?

Answer: The roundest character is Seikichi. Seikichi is the roundest because he has more background about him in the story. The narrator talks about how is looking for the perfect person to tattoo, “Seikichi had cherished the desire to create a masterpiece on the skin of a beautiful woman” (Tanizaki 138). This was his lifetime goal to achieve until he met a girl from the geisha house. The girl is the flattest character because we do not learn about what her goals are in the story. We only know that she works at a geisha house. The narrator states her feelings after the tattoo process, “Despite the pain that was coursing through her body, she smiled” (143). The point of view of the story is limited omniscient. Limited omniscient is “limited only to what is said and what happens” (Roberts 83). Usually limited omniscient only knows the thoughts, feelings, and actions of one character. There is only point of view in the entire story. The story only talks about one to two people and only the thoughts of one person.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 31, 2016 06:08 PM

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