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January 15, 2013

Edgar V. Roberts' “Writing about Character: The People in Literature"


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Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 15, 2013 09:07 PM

Readers' Comments:

Colby Johnson and Rannell Smith
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 311 CA05 Writing About Character
16 January 2013

Question:Roberts claim the writers basically "rely on five ways of bringing characters to life." What are they?

Answer: According to the 66th and 67th page of the article, the five ways of bringing characters to life are:"The actions of the characters reveal their qualities","The authors description reveals about the character","What characters say reveals what they are like","what others say tell us about a character", and "the author, speaking as a storyteller as an observer, may present judgement about character."

Posted by: Colby Johnson, Rannell Smith at January 16, 2013 10:00 AM

Alexandra Rivera-Vega
Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
15 January 2013

Question: What are round characters like?

Answer: Round characters are the most memorable and original. The are most often the center of attention. Some basic traits of a round character are, three-dimensional, authentic, and true to life. " It is true, that like all human beings, round characters have inherent qualities that the circumstances of a story bring out, and therefore their full realization as characters is directly connected to the story's in which they live their lives."(Roberts 68) This is what a round character is like.

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at January 16, 2013 10:15 AM

Alison Schucht, Kathryn White
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 CA05
16 January 2013

Question: What are the two major “types” of character that Roberts explain? What are they?

The two major types of characters that Roberts describes are round and flat characters. Simply put, round characters are “three-dimensional and lifelike,” while flat characters are “simple and one-dimensional.” (Roberts 68)

Posted by: Kathryn White at January 16, 2013 10:21 AM

Alison Schucht, Kathryn White
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 CA05
16 January 2013

Question: What are the two major “types” of character that Roberts explain? What are they?

The two major types of characters that Roberts describes are round and flat characters. Simply put, round characters are “three-dimensional and lifelike,” while flat characters are “simple and one-dimensional.” (Roberts 68)

Posted by: Kathryn White at January 16, 2013 10:21 AM

Analisa Johnson
Marie Ryan
DR. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA 08
1/16/2013

Question: What are flat characters like?

Answer: Flat characters are simple and one- dimensional. In chapter three, in the last paragraph of page 68 Roberts says, "Flat characters end pretty much where they begin, for this reason we may think of them as static."

Posted by: Marie Ryan and Analisa Johnson at January 16, 2013 11:33 AM

Brynn Laverdure and Jennifer Evans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
16 January 2013

Question: Does Roberts think that flat characters are worthless in fiction? Why or why not?

Answer: In Writing About Literature, Roberts does not think flat characters are worthless in fiction. He feels that they help to develop the dynamic characters and highlight their changes better. Roberts says "for they highlight the development of the round characters"(Roberts 69).

Posted by: Brynn Laverdure at January 16, 2013 11:48 AM

Adrianna Johnson and Jake Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Edgar V. Roberts' “Writing about Character: The People in Literature"
16 January 2013

Question: Look up Roberts’s definition of traits in Chapter 3. What traits can
you identify in Minnie Wright from Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her
Peers” (the same story as the play “Trifles”)? Point to actual examples
from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer: Minnie Wright was a quiet, subdued, orderly women. When her husband passed she was not moved and according to this quote she clearly did not care: “ ‘ Yes, says she, “but I was on the inside. “Somebody slipped a rope round his neck and strangled him, and you didn’t wake up?’ says Henry. “I didn’t wake up, ‘she said after him.” “I sleep sound” (Glaspell 5). Minnie Wright according to Mrs. Hale was sweet and pretty but kind of timid and fluttery just like a bird, “ She-come to think of it, she was kind of like a bird herself. Real sweet and pretty, but kind of timid and- fluttery. How-she-did-change.” (Glaspell 14). Mrs. Wright was also very orderly, she kept everything in line. This quote explains what Mrs. Hale observed about Mrs. Wright: “ Her eyes made a slow, almost unwilling turn to the bucket of sugar and the half empty bag beside it. Things begun- and not finished.” (Glaspell, 10).

Posted by: Adrianna Johnson at January 16, 2013 01:50 PM

Sade Loiseau and Chris Lavie
Dr Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
16 January 2013

Question: What does verisimilitude mean and what role, according to Roberts, should it play with fictional characters?

Answer: Verisimilitude means that characters should give to the reader the impression to be real (p70; chapter 3).Everything they do should be comparable to what human beings usually do. We can also add that their acts, thoughts or the way they speak must be assimilated to a real environment. This similitude is supposed to bring more credibility to the story and can allow the reader to identify himself to one or several character(s), for example (lines3-7; paragraph 3 of “The Necklace”)

Posted by: Chris Lavie at January 16, 2013 07:00 PM

Jillian Stolzenburg and Anthony Jannetta
Dr Hobbs
Eng 122 CA04
16 January 2013

Question: “Look up Roberts’s definitions of “dynamic” and “static” in his discussion of round characters in Chapter 3. Is the character Mathilde from Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” dynamic or static? Explain. In other words, how does the character “recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances”? Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.”

Answer: We think that Mathilde is a dynamic character. According to Robert’s definition, it means that Mathilde “recognizes, changes with or adjust to circumstances”(Writing about literature, page 68, paragraph 2). Indeed, we notice that Mathilde has an evolution during the story. The first change occurs during the dinner (this change is about the way she dresses). Before the dinner, Mathilde wear cloth that “had not been washed for three days” (page 53, paragraph 4), or also that “she had no decent dresses, no jewels…” (Page 54, paragraph 5). We can deduce here that she didn’t really take care of herself. Whereas during the dinner she was just wonderful: “The day of the party came. Mrs Loisel was a success. She was prettier than anyone else, stylish, graceful…” (Page 56, paragraph 52). And then, after she lost the necklace, another change occurred: a behavior evolution. Indeed before she lost the necklace, Mathilde didn’t work and just thought she was “destined for all delicacies and luxuries” (page 53, paragraph 3). Whereas when she lost the necklace and she had to pay back all the money, she didn’t think about all these things, she just thought about working hard to pay back the money as soon as possible: “She had become strong, hard and rude woman of poor households” (page 59, paragraph 104).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at January 16, 2013 07:10 PM

English Blog Entry


Jazmine Dixon and Marquisa Turner
Dr.Hobbs
English 122 CA05 A Jury of Her Peers
16 Jan 2013

Question: Look up Roberts’s definitions of “dynamic” and “static” in his discussion of round characters in Chapter 3. Is the character Minnie Wright from Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers” (the same story as the play “Trifles”) dynamic or static? Explain. In other words, how does the character “recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances”? Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to
Explain where they are.

Answer: The character Minnie Wright from A Jury of Her Peer is dynamic. This is because Minnie was very active and lively before she allowed her husband’s abuse to consume and change her. At first she was descried as “kind of like a bird herself-real sweet and pretty, but kind of timid and fluttery"(Glaspell 165). Dynamic is described as a character adjusting to their circumstances which is exactly what Minnie did, her husband Mr. Wright was said to be "like a raw wind that gets to the bone." (pg. 164). That’s why Mrs. Hale never wanted to visit to what was said to be a cold and lonely place. Because of the fact Minnie let her husband’s abuse push her to strangling him shows that she adjusted to her circumstances instead of trying to change them.

Posted by: Jazmine Dixon at January 16, 2013 08:47 PM

I discovered your blog using google. I must I am floored by your blog. Keep up the good work.

Posted by: Mignon at January 16, 2013 10:33 PM

Alexia Chambers and Chris Burke
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
January 16, 2013

17. Look up Roberts’s definitions of “stock character” and “stereotype” in his discussion of flat characters in Chapter 3. Who, if any, are the stock/stereotypical characters from Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”? Explain how these characters “do not undergo significant change and development.” Where possible, point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

We said Mr. Loisel is a stock character. A stock character is a “flat minor character”, as the story goes on, he does not develop much as a person. We just know he is willing to please his wife by giving her money to buy fancy clothes for a party and willing to help her repay Ms. Forestier when she loses the necklace. Ms. Forestier is a stereotype character. A stereotype character is also flat but “usually do no more than perform their roles and exhibit conventional un-individual traits”. Ms. Forestier is rich and has a lot of fancy jewelry when Mrs. Loisel brings her the new necklace she responds with “you should have brought it back sooner; I might have needed it.” This makes her sound impatient and a little bit snobby much like the stereotypical rich person.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at January 17, 2013 11:28 AM

Briyana Aiken
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA08 Writing About Character:The People In Litirature
17 January 2013
Question: What are some common examples of stock stereotype characters? Roberts provides many.
Some common examples of stock/stereotype characters are like the insentive father, or the sassy younger sibling. "the insensitive father, the interferring mother, the sassy younger sibling, or the greedy politician,harrassed boss, resourceful cowboy or detective, the overbearing of henpecked husband, the submissive or nagging wife, the absent minded professor, the angry police captain, the loveable drunk, and the town dogooder."(Roberts,69)

Posted by: Briyana A & Jordan M at January 17, 2013 02:18 PM

Angie Fortunak and Jade Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
January 17, 2013

Question: 6) What does Robert mean when he says a character has the complementary quality he calls "dynamic"?

Response: If a character has the dynamic quality it often refers to a round character. As Robert states, "Dynamic characters recognize change with, or adjust to circumstances" (Roberts 68). We can see that a character is dynamic because of his/her actions that are portrayed in a story or movie.In many cases we will see that a dynamic character is a good thing but there are also sometimes that it can portray the character as bad. A dynamic characteristic helps to shape out a round character.

Posted by: Angie Fortunak at January 17, 2013 07:54 PM

Marlie Gonzalez and Jasmine Lowe
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writting II
17 January 2013

Question:What does Roberts mean when he says that flat charecters have a predictable quality called "static"

Answer: When Roberts says a charecter has a predictable quality called static he means that they are charecters that are minor charecters in the story that do not do much in the story. As Robert's states in the article, "Most flat charecters pretty much end up where they begin, and for this reason we may think of them as static, not dynamic."

Posted by: Marlie at January 17, 2013 09:14 PM

Vintoria Hopps and Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
Eng. 122 CA08
16 January 2012

Question: What are “stock” or “stereotype” characters? Are they usually
round or flat?

Answer: "Stock characters are often used to describe characters in repeating situations to the degree that stock characters have many common traits." (Pg. 69) Examples of stock characters are insensitive fathers, interfering mothers (Pg. 69) Stock characters are usually flat because "flat characters are not complex, but simple and one dimensional." (Pg. 68) With the evidence from the text my partner and I concluded that stock characters are flat because stock characters tend to represent a group of people and flat characters are simple and usually have one role to perform.

Posted by: Vintoria Hopps and Allison Knipe at January 17, 2013 09:38 PM

Sarah Hatcher & Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA 05
16 January 2013

3. In chapter 3, Roberts says that in “studying a literary character” students should “try to determine the character’s outstanding traits.”
What, according to Roberts, does the word “trait” mean?

A trait is an action that is not determined by what happens, but what the character does when something happens. An example is in Maupassant's, short story, "The Necklace". When Mrs. Loisel loses the necklace she does not tell her friend but goes and buys her a new one. It is not that she lost the necklace, but her pride would not allow her to tell her friend (Roberts58).

Posted by: Octavia Robinson & Sarah Hatcher at January 17, 2013 09:44 PM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
9 September 2013

Question: Look up Robert’s definition of traits in Chapter 3. What traits can you identity in Minnie Wright from Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers” (the same story as the play “Trifles”)? Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer: According to article, “Writing about Character” of Edgar V. Robert, a trait is a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive ways. Example of this is: never repaying borrowed money, giving moral support to love ones, being a person on whom people always rely, listening to the thoughts and problems of others, avoiding eye contact, taking the biggest portions or always thinking oneself the center of attention. In the story “A Jury of Her Peers” from Susan Glaspell, the major character, Minnie Wright, is farm women that is charged with murder. Inside the story are countless traits about her but all of them we get to learn them through the conversation of Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters. One of the most significant one are the jar of fruits. Seems that Mrs. Wright have the habit of work during the summer to cultivate and collect all the fruits for use in the cold weather. When Mrs. Hale says, “She’ll feel awful bad after all her hard work in the hot weather”, is the perfect way to show how valuable this was to Mrs. Wright. Another trait of Minnie Wright it was her sewing. When Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters were exploring thru Mrs. Wright stuff they found her sewing instruments and some quilt; between the quilts they found one of them that it was not sewing like the other ones. That is when they start wondering if, Mrs. Wright was troubled and that was reflected in her sewing. Later in the story the most important trait shows. Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters found among Mrs. Wright stuff a dead bird. For Minnie Wright more than the motive for kill someone, the bird was a reflection of herself and the young Minnie Foster who according to Mrs. Hale love to sing.

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at September 9, 2013 01:15 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 11, 2013 11:07 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
22 January 2014

Question: What are some common examples of stock/stereotype characters. Roberts provides many.

Answer: The author of this piece of literature describes many examples of types of characters in literature. The definition of a stock/stereotype character according to Literary Terms is a fictional character that relies heavily on cultural types or stereotypes for its personality, manner of speech, and other characteristics. Stock characters are instantly recognizable to members of a given culture. One example of one of these characters the author uses is the men in the Trifles story. The author gives the example "The lawmen in Trifles speak straightforwardly but without much understanding of the women in the story. Their speeches suggest their characters are similarly straightforward, although their constant belittling of the women indicates their inability to understand others."(Roberts 67) This is a common stereotype of men during the time that particular story takes place. Another example the author gives of this is Mathilde in Maupassant's "The Necklace". The author writes "Mathilde...indulges in dreams of unattainable wealth and comfort and is so swept up in her visions that she scorns her comparatively good life with her reliable but dull husband." This shows a cultural stereotype of the time period the story was written. Both these examples are common stock/stereotype examples.

Posted by: sawyer hand at January 23, 2014 07:15 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23 January, 2014

Question #1
According to Edgar V. Roberts, in the study of literature, what does the
word “character” mean?
Answer
The character is a verbal representation of a human being (Roberts 2).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at January 23, 2014 07:18 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23 January 2014

Question #2:
In chapter 3, Roberts says that in "studying a literary character" students should "try to determine the character's outstanding traits." What, according to Roberts, does the word "trait" mean?

Answer:
According to Roberts, a trait "is a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive ways, such as never repaying borrowed money, giving moral support to loved ones, being a person on whom people always rely, listening to the thoughts and problems of others, avoiding eye contact, taking the biggest portions, or always thinking oneself the center of attention," but often "may be a person's primary characteristic" both in fiction and in real life (Edgar 64).

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at January 23, 2014 07:41 PM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23 January 2013

QUESTION #9:
Does Roberts think that flat characters are worthless in fiction? Why or why not?

ANSWER:
Robert does not think flat characters are worthless in fiction. Flat characters maybe simple and one-dimensional with no more than a single role to perform. However, for they highlight the development of the round characters (Robert 69).

In some types of literature sometimes flat characters are prominent, where the focus is less on character than on performance (Robert 69).

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at January 23, 2014 08:34 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
January 23 2014
There are two major “types” of character that Roberts explains. What are they?
According to Roberts, there round characters and flat characters. Round characters are fully developed and important decision makers. Roberts writes, “They are three dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original, and true to life.” (Roberts 68) Flat characters, however, are undeveloped and are usually only part of a story to support the plot. Roberts says, “flat characters are not complex.” (Roberts 68)

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at January 23, 2014 09:25 PM

Bianca T. Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23,January 2014

Question #6: What does Roberts mean when he says a character has the complementary qualities he calls "dynamic"?

Answer: When Roberts says that a character has complementary quality that he calls "dynamic", he means that they "recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances"(Roberts 6). A negative side to this is that it may bring a "dynamic character to ruin" and it can be "shown through actions,the realization of new strength and therefore the affirmation of previous decisions, the acceptance of new conditions and the need for making changes, the discovery of unrecognized truths, or the reconciliation of the character with adverse conditions"(Roberts 6).

Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at January 23, 2014 11:18 PM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
24 January 2014

Question 7:
What are flat characters like?

Answer:
A flat character is a “simple and one-dimensional” (Roberts 6) that performs “no more than a single role” (Roberts 6) within the story. These characters do not have as much value as a round character but they “are not worthless” (Roberts 7). Most of these character are unintelligent and useless do to the small role the character possesses (Roberts 7). An example of a flat character could range from family members to police officers (Roberts 7).

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at January 23, 2014 11:32 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA12
23 January 2013

Question #13:
Look up Robert's definition of traits in chapter 3. what traits can you identify in Mathilde from Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace?" Point actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer:
Robert's definition of a trait is "a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive" (Roberts 64). In the short story "The Necklace", the narrator states that Mathilde "finally settled for a marriage with a minor clerk in the ministry of education" (Maupassant's 53). Mathilde had the mindset of how she was the one suffering and she never gave her husband the time of day. When Mathilde's husband invites her to the huge party that he was cordially invited too, she did not seem to happy. Mathilde was never happy with anything she was given. She was always dreaming about a fancy house with long draped curtains and how she hoped that would be her one day.
When Mathilde came home without the necklace around her neck, that is an example that goes back to Robert's definition of a trait. Since Mathilde borrowed what she thought was an expensive necklace, she should have taken the time to make sure it was secured around her neck at all times.

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at January 24, 2014 12:48 AM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23 January 2014

Question #12:
What does verisimilitude mean and what role, according to Roberts, should it play with fictional characters?

Answer:
The meaning of verisimilitude is of or being true or real. Roberts states that "characters in fiction should be true to life" (Roberts 69). By this he is simply meaning that fictional characters should resemble the actions or behaviors of people in the real world, thus making their stories more plausible and believable. (Roberts 70) As an example, Roberts refers to the story of "The Necklace" and how Mathilde's actions of not being truthful to Mrs. Forrestier, although unwise, are not highly unlikely in the real world due to her guilt and embarrassment of being a low class citizen with no money. (Roberts 70)

Posted by: Berlin Waters at January 24, 2014 02:45 AM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23 Jan. 2014

Question #4:
There are two major “types” of character that Roberts explains. What
are they?

Answer:
The two major "types" of characters that are explained within the article are Round Characters and Flat Character (Roberts 6).

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at January 24, 2014 09:53 AM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
23 January 2014

Question:
What are “stock” or “stereotype” characters? Are they usually
round or flat?

Answer:
A stock character is a fictional character based on a common literary or social stereotype. Stock characters rely heavily on cultural types or names for their personality, manner of speech, and other characteristics. A Stock or stereotype character is usually flat playing the role he or she is expected to play and exhibiting no change or dynamicity. The author says unlike round characters flat characters are usually one-dimensional. They may have no more than a single role to perform in a story, or they may associated with no more than a single dominating idea(Roberts 68). Such as the antagonists hench men or the law abiding sheriff of a town.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at January 24, 2014 10:07 AM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng122 - ACADEMIC WRITING II CA12
January/23/2014


Question # 5 What is a round Character like? “Edgar V. Roberts”

One's understanding of a round character is simple, “some one who is obtuse and slothful,” but after reading Edgar V. Roberts, we have come to understand that being a “round” character has nothing to do with the physical shape of a character.

A round character is a persona that has been developed. One gains a deep understanding of the thoughts and motives of said character (Edgar V. Roberts 68) . Having a round character in the story provides, the reader a direct connection to the story or a medium in which a reader can vicariously experience the story through the rounded character.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at January 24, 2014 10:17 AM

Mickael Dodard & Danielle Kluender
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II: CA07
5 September 2014

Question 1:
According to Edgar V. Roberts, in the study of literature, what does the word” character” mean?

Answer:
“Character is a verbal representation of a human being.” (Roberts 2), meaning that character can be defined as attitude.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at September 5, 2014 02:19 PM

Alyssa Davis, Samantha Witte
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07


QUESTION #6: What does Roberts mean when he says a character has the complementary quality he calls “dynamic?”

ANSWER:
A dynamic character is one that goes through a dramatic change or growth. Most of the time the dynamic character is also the main character that can “recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances” (Roberts 6). This difference can be a good change or bad. They start out having a consistent personality, actions, and thoughts that reflects the character traits of that character. In addition, it is very common that the person goes through the change because of a certain event or situation that produces a challenge to that character. Minnie, the main character in the story Trifles, is a dynamic character. She is a sweet young woman and “a particularly cruel action by her husband so enrages her that she breaks out of her subservient role and commits an act of violence” (Roberts 6). Minnie is the perfect example of a dynamic character that performs an action much different from her normal behavior.

Posted by: Samantha Witte, Alyssa Davis at September 5, 2014 08:17 PM

Trejon Baynham, Shyra Bryant
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
7 September 2014

QUESTION:
There are two major "types" of characters Roberts explains. What are they?

ANSWER:
Round and Flat are the two subsets of characters that Robert explains in the text.

Round characters are three-dimensional and possess the ability to grow/change throughout the story's progression (Roberts 68). Round characters develop with the intention of being “the centers of our attention" (Roberts 68), and as a result, are given the significant roles in a story as either its protagonist, antagonist or somewhere on the spectrum among the two.

Opposite of their more dynamic counterparts, Flat characters are simple, one-dimensional, and static. Although flat characters lack the complexity of rounded characters, they are not "worthless" as they "highlight the development of the round characters" (Roberts 69).

Posted by: Trejon Baynham, Shyra Bryant at September 7, 2014 01:17 PM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA07
7 September 2014

Question
In chapter 3, Roberts says that in “studying a literary character”
students should “try to determine the character’s outstanding traits.”
What, according to Roberts, does the word “trait” mean?

Answer
According to Roberts, “A trait is a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive ways.”
Traits can be expressed as the manners or attitudes people have towards each other.
For example John gives his sister whatever she wants, whereas he forces his brother to do chores for what he wants. The way that john interacts with the people around him is a trait. Traits build character, and the more traits a character has, the better or more expressive the character will be.

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at September 7, 2014 08:04 PM

Zachary Gary, Roslyn Thomas
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
4 September 2014

Question #5:
What are round characters like?

Answer:
According to Roberts the definition of round characters is a three dimensional, memorable character that stand out the most. (Roberts 68) They are the main people that you will see.
“The basic trait of round characters is that we are told enough about them to permit the conclusion that they are three dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original, and true to life.”
They are the center of our attention in most work fiction.”

Posted by: Zachary Gary; Roslyn Thomas at September 7, 2014 09:33 PM

Justine Gonzalez, Gianna Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
07 September 2014

Writing about character

Question #3
Roberts Claims that writers basically "rely on five ways of bring characters?

Answer:
Roberts said the ways of bringing character to life is,
"1) An action or actions
2)realization of new strength & therefore the affirmation of previous decisions
3)The acceptance of new conditions & the need for making changes
4)The discovery of unrecognized truths
5)The reconciliation of the character with adverse condition." (Roberts Chapter 3 page 68).

Posted by: Justine Gonzalez at September 8, 2014 01:35 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at September 15, 2014 04:22 PM

Diego Garcia and Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
January 26 2015

Question: 4. There are two major “types” of character that Roberts explains. What are they?

Answer: We have two types of character. First of them is round and second is a flat. Round character is the center of our attention in most part of the story, he or she is well described, and we know most of his or her background. “The basic trait of round characters is that we are told enough to them to permit conclusion that they are three-dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original and true to life” (Edgar 68). The flat character is a not complex, often it shows a stereotypical features. They represent a class of groups. Such characters are present in the literature since the very beginning of it.,"“Unlike round characters, flat characters are not complex, but very simple and one-dimensional. They. may have no more that a single domination area” (Edgar 69)

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak and Diego Garcia at January 26, 2015 11:13 AM

Emily Buckley and Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 January 2015

Question: What are flat characters like?

Answer: They are simple, but not worthless characters that bring out the development of the round characters. “…they highlight the development of the round characters...” (Roberts 69) Usually flat characters are minor (for example they could be “relatives, acquaintances, functionaries” (Roberts 69)) and even though they only have a single role in the story not all minor characters are flat. (Roberts 69)

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Kaitlin Murphy at January 26, 2015 11:33 AM

Mallory Delay and Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 January 2015

Question 3: Robert claims that writers basically "rely on five ways of bringing characters to life." What are they?

Answer: The five ways of bringing a character to life that Robert talks about are firstly, through the actions of the character. Robert uses the example of the character Minnie from Trifles, stating, "Her actions show her as a dynamic character capable of radical and earthshaking change." (Robert 6) Secondly, the character has a realization of new strength and affirms previous decisions. Thirdly, Robert mentions the character's acceptance of new conditions and the need for making changes. He states, "The ability to grow and develop and adjust to changing circumstances makes characters round and dynamic." (Robert 7) Fourthly, the character goes through the discovery of unrecognized truths. Lastly, there is reconciliation of the character with adverse conditions.

Posted by: Mallory Delay at January 26, 2015 02:04 PM

Kathleen Sholl and Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
26 January 2015

Writing about Character

Question: What are round characters like?

Answer: Round characters have many basic traits. We are told a plethora of information to predict the conclusion. They are “original, true to life, memorable, rounded, three-dimensional, and authentic” (Roberts 68). A significant quality that round characters have is they are often dynamic. Not only do they play a major role such as the protagonist, but are called the “hero or heroine” (Roberts 68). They can adapt to new situations and are central to the action.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl and Selena Hammie at January 26, 2015 03:28 PM

Victoria Markou and Alison Colon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
26 January 2015

Question 1: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in the study of literature, what does the word “character” mean?

Answer: To Roberts, a character evokes emotion, serving the purpose of giving the audience someone to care about. Although the feelings caused by characters can vary from love to hate, “In literature, a character is a verbal representation of a human being” (Roberts 64).

Posted by: Victoria Markou and Alison Colon at January 27, 2015 05:33 PM

Emma Riemer and Charis Lavoie
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 January 2015

Writing about character
Question: What Roberts mean when he says a character has the predictable quality he calls “static”?

Answer:
The absence of the round and dynamic traits make a character flat and static. So, if a character does not have the ability to grow and develop than the character is flat and static. The character is also flat and static if they cannot adjust to changing circumstances (Roberts 69).

Posted by: Emma Riemer and charis lavoie at January 27, 2015 10:14 PM

Rously Paul and Vallinqiue Martin
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 January 2015

Question: In chapter 3, Roberts says that in “studying a literary character” students should “try to determine the character’s outstanding traits.” What, according to Roberts, does the word “trait” mean?
Answer: Robert’s defines a trait as “… a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive ways” (Page 2 paragraph 4): he then goes on to mention that this feature may be a characters’ “primary characteristic not only in fiction but also in life.” (Page 3 paragraph 1) Robert’s uses his own method to pinpoint a character’s features but also identify their nature and qualities; he explains his process as “By similarly analyzing the thoughts, actions, and speeches of the literary characters you encounter, you can also draw conclusions about their nature and qualities.” (Page 3 paragraph 2)

Posted by: Rously Paul and Vallinqiue Martin at January 28, 2015 08:07 AM

Amber Dunlap and Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CAO 12
27 January 2015

Question: #6
What does Roberts mean when he says a character has the complimentary quality he calls dynamic?

Answer:

Dynamic means someone having constant change or progress. Roberts says the characters have many characteristics. He also makes it know that these characters can inherit these different characteristics without even noticing. “Like ordinary human beings, fictional characters do not necessarily understand how they may be changing or why they do the little things they do”. Says Roberts.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at January 28, 2015 10:39 AM

Jorge Braham and Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
January 28 2015
Question: 2. With your group partners, use the “Writing about Character” chapter by Edgar V. Roberts, as your theory, and identify every FLAT character in "Roman Fever" by Edith Wharton. Be ready to explain why they are static, i.e., flat instead of round. In addition to your regular homework question, your group scribe will answer this question on the “Writing about Character” blog entry on the EnglishBlog by the next class meeting.
Answer: One of the flat characters in this story could be Barbara. She is presented only by her mother, Mrs. Ansley. “Well, as a girl she had been exquisite; far more beautiful than her daughter, Barbara, though certainly Babs, according to the new standards at any rate, was more effective—had more edge, as they say.” (Wharton 2) Another flat character is Horace Ansley, husband of the Mrs. Ansley “Horace Ansley was—well, just the duplicate of his wife.” (Wharton 2). Third flat character showed in the story is Delphin Slade. He is mentioned after his death, but he plays some role in the story. “No doubt, Mrs. Slade reflected, she felt her unemployment more than poor Grace ever would. It was a big drop from being the wife of Delphin Slade to being his widow” (Wharton 3)

Posted by: Jorge Braham and Jan Urbaniak at January 28, 2015 11:01 AM

Aderias Ewing and Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
28 Jan. 2015

Question 6: Identify every ROUND character in “La Parure” [“The Necklace”] by Guy de Maupassant. Explain why the characters are dynamic?

Dynamic: Mathilda is a round character because the center of attention evolved round her and her husband is also round character because he went back and retracted their steps looking for the necklace. They’re both put in a situation where they have to adjust their lifestyle to afford to buy a new necklace.

Posted by: aderias ewing and amanda cannon at January 28, 2015 01:27 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 January 15

Writing about Character Discussion Question

Question 9: With your group partners, use the Writing about Character" chapter by Edgar V. Roberts, as your theory, and identify every ROUND character in "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" by Ambrose Bierce. Be ready to explain why they are dynamic, i.e., instead of flat. In addition to your regular homework question, your group scribe will answer this question on the "Writing about Character" blog entry on the English-Blog by the next class meeting.

Answer : In the short story An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, Peyton Farquhar is a round character. A round character is “three-dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original, and true to life” (Roberts 68). He is a round character because he possesses many qualities about himself. Readers are lead to believe that he is bossy and arrogant. Furthermore, there is a gap between who he is, and who he wants to be. Secondly, the Northern scout who was disguised as a Confederate soldier attempts to sabotage Farquhar. The scout says, “it is now dry and would burn like tinder” (Bierce 7). The disguised soldier attempts to see if Farquhar would be tempted to go against the North and interfere with their plans. The reason that the scout is a round character is because he was disguised as a Southerner, but is really from the North side. He develops throughout the story into the person that he truly is. In addition, the reader is on their toes with both Farquhar and the soldier because they never honestly know what is going to happen next. Flat characters do not develop, and just stay static and boring throughout the whole story. Neither Farquhar nor the soldier is a flat character because of their transformation.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl and Amber Dunlap at January 28, 2015 09:39 PM

Selena Hammie And Rachel Addington
Dr. B. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 January 2015

“Writing About Characters”

Question #1: With your group partner, use the “Writing About Character” chapter by Edgar V. Roberts, as your theory, and identify every FLAT character in “ La Parure” [“The Necklace”] by Guy de Maupassant. Be ready to explain why they static, i.e., flat instead of round.

In the story “The Necklace,” Mrs. Forrestier would be considered flat because the only role was to give Madame Loisel the necklace to wear at the dinner her husband invited her to. Mrs. Loisel was having a difficult time finding a piece of jewelry to wear with her dress until her husband tells her to ask her friend Mrs. Forrestier. She does as she was told and sure enough her friend opens up a large jewel box and says to Mrs. Loisel: ”Choose my dear.”(Line 43) Towards the end of the story is when Mrs. Forrestier reenters the story to retrieve her necklace and that’s when she finally tells Mrs. Loisel “Oh my poor Mathilde! But mine was only costume jewelry. At most, it was worth only five hundred francs!” (Lines 125-127). The people at the party were flat because they didn’t have a specific identity. The jeweler was never given a name and was never really mentioned after the Loisel’s made the deal with him to buy the piece of jewelry.

Posted by: Selena Hammie at January 28, 2015 10:02 PM

Mallory Delay and Diego Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
29 January 2015

Question 8: With your group partners, use the "Writing about Character" chapter by Edgar V. Roberts, as your theory, and identify every ROUND character in Trifles["A Jury of Her Peers"] by Susan Glaspell. Be ready to explain why they are dynamic, i.e., round instead of flat.

Answer: The round characters in Trifles are all of the women. The most rounded character out of all of them is Minnie Wright. Robert mentions Minnie shows her "dynamic character capable of radical and earthshaking change." (Robert 6) All her peers once knew Mrs. Wright as a lady that "used to wear pretty clothes and be lively" (Glaspell 5) and even loved to sing. It was when she married her husband that she became shy and reserved. Her actions change significantly, and she shows a realization of new strength, the strength to finally kill her husband, which qualifies her as a dynamic character by Robert's standards. The other women of the story, Mrs. Hale, and Mrs. Peters are also round characters. According to Robert, "dynamic characters recognize, change with or adjust to circumstances." (Robert 6) Both Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters fit those criteria. They discover the truth about their friend and are quick to accept the circumstances of what Minnie did in her environment.

Posted by: Mallory Delay at January 29, 2015 10:45 PM

Vallinique Martin and Rously Paul
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
28 January 2015

Question:

Answer: #4 The flattest characters would be Farquhar’s wife and children. The wife and children are flat because they are only mentioned a few times in the beginning, then throughout the rest of the story only mentioned in his thoughts, “He closed his eyes in order to fix his lasts thoughts upon his wife and children.” (Bierce 4) The sergeant and company are also considered flat characters because they do not have a name and none of their thoughts are mentioned. “He had come to the surface facing down the stream; in a moment the visible world seemed to wheel slowly round, himself the pivotal point, and he saw the bridge, the fort, the soldiers upon the bridge, the captain, the sergeant, the two privates, his executioners.” (Bierce 9) The quote explains that they all had a place in the story but not much character.

Posted by: Vallinique Martin and Rously Paul at January 29, 2015 11:43 PM

Charis Lavoie and Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
30 January 2015

Question 7: With your group partners, use the “Writing about Character” chapter by Edgar V. Roberts, as your theory, and identify every ROUND character in “Roman Fever” by Edith Wharton. Be ready to explain why they are dynamic, i.e., round instead of flat.

Answer: The two characters in Roman Fever that are round characters are Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley. These two characters have known each other since they were little girls, and they each have something to reveal about what happened so many years ago. We get a look inside their minds about what exactly they think of the other.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at January 30, 2015 01:58 AM

Kaitlin Murphy and Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
29 January 2015

Question: With your group partners, use the “Writing about Character” chapter by Edgar V. Roberts, as your theory, and identify every FLAT character in Trifles [“A Jury of Her Peers”] by Susan Glaspell. Be ready to explain why they are static, i.e., flat instead of round.

Answer: We believed the characters in Trifles that were considered to be flat were Mr. Hale, Mr. Wright, the Sheriff, and the Court Attorney. Why we believed them to be flat is because they are all typical stereotypes in this short story, “…flat characters are not complex, but are simple and one-dimensional” (Roberts 68). Mr. Hale was mentioned because the case was investigated around his death but that’s all that was mentioned about him, nothing more. The Sheriff and the Court Attorney are flat because as you would portray them as their characters would be, is how they were portrayed in the story, your typical southern, sexist, and arrogant men. We thought that Mrs. Wright, Mrs. Hale, and Mrs. Peters were the main round characters here because you saw them change the most in the story and you learned way more about Mrs. Wright over the whole story.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at January 30, 2015 10:15 AM

Cannelle Samson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
2 September 2015

Question: Look up Roberts’ definition of traits in chapter three. What traits can you identify in Minni Wright from Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of her Peers”? Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.


Answer: According to Roberts, a trait is “a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive ways…” Roberts gives examples of traits such as “… never repaying money, giving moral support to loved ones…” In the short story “A Jury of her Peers” I have identified Minni Wright to have been calm and straight forward. When Hale went into Minni Wright’s house and asked for Minni’s husband, she is portrayed to have been very calm. Hale asks Minni where her husband can be found, and Minni laughs and replies that her husband is upstairs dead. In “A Jury of her Peers” Hale describes the morning he went into Minni’s house and says, “She didn’t pay much attention. I said, “How do, Mrs. Wright, it’s cold, ain’t it?” And she said, “Is it?”—and went on kind of pleating at her apron” (Glaspell, 2). Hale goes on describing Minni as he as for John and says, “I want to see John.” And then she— laughed. I guess you would call it a laugh. I thought of Harry and the team outside, so I said a little sharp: “Can’t I see John?” “No,” she says, kind o’ dull like. “Ain’t he home?” says I. “Yes,” says she, “he’s home.” “Then why can’t I see him?” I asked her, out of patience. “‘Cause he’s dead…” (Glaspell, 2). Minni did not try to lie or make an excuse of her husband’s death. On the contrary, she proved to be calm, straight-forward, and careless. Another one of Minni’s traits is that she was messy. As the lawyer and multiple other people go to investigate Minni’s house they notice that copious about of dishes are not washed, and that the house is messy. The lawyer says of Minni, “Not much of a housekeeper, would you say, ladies?” (Glaspell, 3). I found Minni’s traits to be calmness, carelessness, messiness, and straight-forwardness.

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at September 2, 2015 02:19 PM

Madison Helms
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
2 September 2015


Question: What are some common examples of stock/stereotype characters? Roberts provides many.
Answer: In the story, the term “stock character is often used to describe characters in these repeating situations” (Roberts 7). An example of a stock character would be, the insensitive father, the interfering mother, the sassy younger sister or brother, etc.

Posted by: Madison Helms at September 2, 2015 04:38 PM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
2 September 2015

Question: In chapter 3, Roberts says that in “studying a literary character” students should “try to determine the character’s outstanding traits.” What, according to Roberts, does the word “trait” mean?

Answer: According to Roberts "a trait is a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive ways" (Roberts 64). Someone's character traits can reflect on how he/she acts or doesn't act. For example, "never repaying borrowed money" or "giving moral support to loved ones" can tell a lot about a person and their traits (Roberts 64).

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at September 2, 2015 07:35 PM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA09
3 September 2015

Question: Look up Roberts’s definition of traits in Chapter 3. What traits can you identify in Mathilde from Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”? Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.
Answer: In Writing about literature, the Roberts says that “a trait is a quality of mind or habitual mode that is evident in active and passive ways, such as never repaying borrowed money, giving moral support, being a person whom people always rely, listening to thoughts and problems of others, avoiding eye contact, taking the biggest portions, or always thinking oneself as the center of attention” (Roberts 64). These traits can connect to Mathilde in “The Necklace” in some ways. One way is when Mathilde cried to her husband making him give up his money that he saved for a gun to her so that she could look nice for the dinner. “Instead of being delighted as her husband had hoped, she threw the invitation spitefully on the table muttering: What do you expect me to do with this?” (Maupassant 54). The actions of Mathilde make her seem selfish and ignorant rather than grateful for the invitation. Also on page 55 Mr. Loisel gives her all the money that he has saved up so that she can buy a dress, and later she cries again because she has no jewelry, and that is when she ends up at Mrs. Forrestier’s house.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 3, 2015 12:31 PM

Alexis Clayton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122- Academic Writing 2 CA3
3 September 2015

Question #24: Look up Roberts’s definitions of “dynamic” and “static” in his discussion of round characters in Chapter 3. Is the character Minnie Wright from Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers” (the same story as the play “Trifles”) dynamic or static? Explain. In other words, how does the character “recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances”? Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.


Answer: In the theory Reading, Writing about a character, by Robert Edgar he explains the different types of characters and definitions to help understand. Some of the definitions were dynamic and static. He compared them to the short story, A Jury of Her Peers, by Susan Glaspell, the main character, Minnie Wright, who had gone through a lot of changes throughout the story. In this story, Minnie Wright is a dynamic character, which means she recognized, or changed, or adjusted to circumstances in the story. These actions could have been shown through action or new strength Robert stated. An example of her changes is when Mrs. Hale, Minnie’s neighbor, says “ I could’ve come. I stayed away because it weren’t cheerful—and that’s why I ought to have come (pg 7)." She is claiming how the house wasn’t a good place to be, and not a place where she would have wanted to spend her time. The characters also tell all about how Minnie used to be cheerful and musical before her marriage to John Wright. Lastly, Minnie never was a violent person until she snapped one day after all the years of torture by her husband. Martha talks about Minnie's young life and mentions how, “ she used to be sweet and pretty.” This proves why I believe that Minnie Wright is a dynamic character from changing from a sweet, shy girl to a murderer.

Posted by: Alexis Clayton at September 3, 2015 02:16 PM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 - Academic Writing II CAO3
September 3, 2015

Question: What are flat characters like?

Answer: Flat characters are not complex at all. They are very simple and one-dimensional characters. Most flat characters have minor roles and no more than a single role in a performance. Most flat characters also most of the time end where they begin in a story (Roberts 6). Flat characters can also be recognized as the stereotype character where almost all the flat characters are the same and have the same purpose in a story (Roberts 7).

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 3, 2015 02:18 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 academic writing II CA03
3 September 2015

Question: Look up Roberts definitions of stock character and stereotype in his discussion of flat characters in chapter 3. Who, if any are the stock/stereotype characters from Susan Glaspell’s “a jury of her peers”? Explain with examples.

Answer: “Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters cover up the clues that reveal Minnie's motive, quietly acquitting Minnie from wrongdoing without their husbands' knowledge.” The two women do not undergo change because they are the major contributors in the story next to Mrs. Wright. The two women will later than be Minnie’s jury in her trail and save Minnie from jail. The men being how they are will never sympathize with the murder.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 3, 2015 06:12 PM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
3 September 2015

Question: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in the study of literature, what does the word "character" mean?

Answer: Character, as stated by Edgar Roberts, is "a verbal representation of a Human being" (Roberts 64). Roberts goes on to explain that authors portray fictional characters as people who are worth caring about, characters that readers will come to love, hate, admire, and envy. A character is not someone who simply appears in literature; they are the literature. It is their actions that evoke reactions in readers, and keep them glued to the book until the very last page. But characters are also a commentary on life. As put by Roberts, "each action or speech is part of a presentation of the complex combination of the inner and outer self that constitutes a human being" (Roberts 64). The actions and feelings of a character, such as the sacrifice of the Loisels in The Necklace, or the sympathy and commentary of the women in Trifles, are relatable to both the situation in the story, and to the reality of the reader.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 3, 2015 06:21 PM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
03 September 2015
Question: There are two major "types" of character that Roberts explains. What are they?
Answer: The two types of characters Roberts explains are round and flat characters. A round character is "three-dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original, and true to life" (Roberts 68). These characters are highly developed and contribute to the plot. The other type of characters are flat characters, which "are not complex, but are simple and one-dimensional" (Roberts 68). These flat characters may not have a huge impact on the plot but still contribute to the story.

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at September 3, 2015 07:13 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
3 September2015

"Flat characters are not worthless in fiction, however, for they highlight the development of the round characters, as with the lawmen in Glaspell’s Trifles and the characters whom Goodman Brown meets in Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown.” Usually, flat characters are minor (e.g., relatives, acquaintances, functionaries), but not all minor characters are necessarily flat. Sometimes flat characters are prominent in certain types of literature, such as cowboy, police, and detective stories, where the focus is less on character than on performance. "

Question: Does Roberts think that flat characters are worthless in fiction? Why or why not?

Answer: Robert does not think flat characters are worthless in fiction because some are prominent in particular types of literature. That is to say where the focus is less on the character than on performance. Flat characters are usually minor but not all of them are flat.

Posted by: Hana Lee at September 3, 2015 07:48 PM

Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA03
3 September 2015

Question: 10.) What are “stock” or “stereotype” characters? Are they usually round or flat?

Answer: Stock or stereotype characters are often used to describe characters in repeating situations such as in a detective story or as a cowboy or lawyer. Stock characters also have many common traits and are representatives are their class or group. Also stock characters are normally portrayed as being a flat character, which means that they play a minor role in the story. This does not mean that the characters are any less or worthless in the story they are just not highlighted as much as the rounded characters which are the main focus of the story and form the point of view in which the story is being told.

Posted by: Jaclyn Taylor at September 3, 2015 08:42 PM

Zach Pottle
Professor Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
3 September 2015

Question:

What are round characters like?

Answer:

Round characters are characters that have just enough description to seem real. According to Roberts in “Writing About Literature”, “The basic trait of round characters is that we are told just enough about them to permit the conclusion that they are three-dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original, and true to life” (Roberts 68). Round characters are typically the main focus of a fictional story. They are often portrayed as dynamic, and change according to circumstances. It is this main focus and dynamic attitude that usually makes a round character a heroic figure in text.

Posted by: Zachary Pottle at September 3, 2015 10:23 PM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
3 September 2015

Question: Look up Robert's discussion and explanation of "protagonist" and "antagonist" in his discussion of reality in chapter 3. Identify the protagonist(s) and antagonist(s) in both Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace" and Susan Glaspell's "A Jury of Her Peers" (same story as the play "Trifles". Explain.
Answer: In "The Necklace" the protagonist is Mathilde because the very beginning of the story is all about her, and she is no doubt the leading character. The antagonist is the necklace because it is the reason for all of the troubles in the story. Mathilde's vanity and materialism are the reason she even wears the necklace, and her pride is why she won't tell Madame Forestier about it. The author describes Mathilde's materialism and vanity by writing, "She had no decent dresses, no jewels, nothing. And she loved nothing but these; she believed herself born only for these" (Maupassant 54). In "Trifles", the protagonist is Minnie Wright. The whole story revolves around her. Even though she doesn't say anything in the story, Mrs. Peters and Mrs. Hale describe Mr. and Mrs. Wright's life the whole time. The antagonist is her dead husband because he repressed her to such a degree that she wanted to kill him. He doesn't say anything either, but the story is about how life with him was and what drove Mrs. Wright to kill him.

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 3, 2015 10:41 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
4 September 2015

Question: What are some common examples of stock/stereotype characters? Robert provides many.

Answer: A stock character also called a flat or stereotype character, is one which is one-dimensional, meaning this character is simple and has no depth (Roberts 68). Stock characters have been constant in literature as far back as the ancient Greeks (Roberts 69). Some common examples of these stock characters include the town do-gooder, the sassy younger sibling, the greedy politician, the caring mother and the resourceful detective (Roberts 69).

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at September 3, 2015 10:45 PM

Luis Bautista
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 – Academic Writing 2
3 September 2015
“Dynamic characters recognize, change with, or adjust to the circumstances.”(Chapter 3: Writing About Literature, page 68, Roberts, Edgar).
Question: What does Roberts mean when he says a character has the complementary quality he calls “dynamic”?
Answer: In the passage of the reading, Roberts refers to the unpredictable changes round character show throughout a story.

Posted by: Luis Bautista at September 3, 2015 11:49 PM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
3 September 2015

Question: Look up Roberts’s definitions of “dynamic” and “static” in his discussion of round characters in Chapter 3. Is the character Mathilde from Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” dynamic or static? Explain. In other words, how does the character “recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances”? Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.


Answer: The character Mathilde from Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” is a dynamic character because she recognizes her problem and changes with the circumstance. At the beginning of the story, the reader learns that Mathilde is an ambitious woman even though she is poor. It is this ambition of possessing luxury that brought her to ruins. All began the night of the party when she lost the expensive-looking, diamond necklace that belonged to her rich friend, Mrs. Forrestier. At this point of the story, the dynamic character recognizes that this problem might cost her friendship and her freedom, for she feared her friend would call the police for stealing the necklace. Therefore, her husband and her borrowed money from banks, friends, and loan sharks that would lend them the money to pay for a similar necklace. After returning the necklace, ten years of hard labor fell upon the poor, ambitious Mathilde. “She learned to do heavy housework, dirty kitchen jobs. She washed the dishes, wearing away her manicured fingernails on the greasy pots and encrusted baking dishes (Roberts 59).” For this reason, the dynamic character of the story changed her manner and styles. No longer was she a delicate flower, but a loud, aged, unkempt woman, who still dreams about a lavish life from time to time.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 3, 2015 11:55 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09

3 September 2015


Question: What are "stock" or "stereotype" characters? Are they usually round or flat?

Answer: Stock characters are characters with the absence of growth throughout the whole story. "The term stock character is often used to describe characters in these repeating situations." (Roberts pg. 69). These characters usually never undergo a change in any complex ways which also means they are flat characters. They are flat characters because this type of character is simple to identify and describe. "Stock characters are usually also flat as long as they do no more than perform their roles and exhibit conventional and unindividual traits." (Roberts pg. 69). These characters are less important than round characters, but they are part of the package that supports the role of the round character's complexity. For example, there is enough information on a round character to compose an essay, but a flat character would not provide enough information to compose an essay.

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayselcuk at September 4, 2015 08:39 AM

Connor Laramie
Dr. Hobbs
9/4/15
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03

8) Question: What does Roberts mean when he says a character has the predictable quality he calls “static”?

Answer: Roberts meaning about the word “static” that a character quality is to predictable is because traits are come naturally to people when they are born and then it is up to them on how they use them and the more that people use those traits the more and more that they become predictable. Which can lead them down the wrong way, but on the other had they can benefit them so they never gain new traits in life so they don’t grow as a person and they will stay stagnant in life.

Posted by: Connor Laramie at September 4, 2015 09:29 AM

Group 1 – Sabrina, Alexis, Tanner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
04 September 2015

Question: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in the study of literature, what does the word “character” mean?

Answer: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in the study of literature, character means a verbal representation of a human being. For instance, Roberts explains how in novels or dramas describing the crucial characters, every action or speech illustrates how a human being may be on the inside and out (Roberts 64). Therefore, this helps the reader understand how a character is through action, speech, and description.

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 4, 2015 10:58 AM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
04 September 2015

Question: Look up Roberts's definitions of "dynamic" and "static" in his discussion of round characters in Chapter 3. Is the character Minnie Wright from Susan Glaspell's "A Jury of Her Peers" (the same story as the play "Trifles") dynamic or static? Explain. In other words, how does the character "recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances"? Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer: According to Robert, a character in a story has to "recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances" to be considered a dynamic character (68). This is what Minnie Wright from Susan Glaspell's "Trifles" story does: she changes with the circumstances in her life. According to her neighbor Mrs. Hale, Mrs. Wright was different before she married John Wright. She "wore a white dress with blue ribbons and stood up there in the choir and sang" before says Mrs. Hale (Glaspell 9). But in the present time, Mrs. Wright seems to have lost her gay attitude and shifted to gloominess like her house. "It never seemed a very cheerful place," notes Mrs. Hale about the Wright's home (Glaspell 4). From looking around the kitchen, Mrs. Peters and Mrs. Hale find a fancy box that has a dead bird inside. The bird must have reminded Minnie Wright of the cheerful attitude she used to have before her marriage. Unfortunately, when Mr. Wright wrung the bird's neck, Mrs. Wright snapped and "choked the life out of him" (Glaspell 9). We can see that Minnie Wright's personality shifted and changed with the circumstances: from happy and carefree to a murderer over the course of her life.

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 4, 2015 11:11 AM

Peyton Farrier
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
04 September 2015

Question: What does Roberts mean when he says a character has the complementary quality he calls "dynamic"?

Answer: That a character can adjust to certain circumstances. Some changes Roberts uses is "1. an action or action; 2. the realization os new strength and therefore the affirmation of previous decisions; 3.the acceptance of new conditions and the need for making changes; 4. the discovery of unrecognized truths; or 5. the reconciliation of the character with the adverse conditions." (Roberts 6)

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at September 4, 2015 12:29 PM

Shania Bienaime
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
04 September 2015

Question: What does Roberts mean when he says a character has the predictable quality he calls “static”?

Answer: static is defined as a lack in movement, action, or change, especially in a way viewed as undesirable or uninteresting. Robert is basically saying that the writer or the person who creates the character to change how their viewers or readers may react. For example, a reader may predict what the character may be like before the plot may even take place based on what is described of him, some may like him and others may not like based on how that character is portrayed.

Posted by: Shania Bienaime at September 4, 2015 03:03 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
4 September 2015

Dynamic or Static Question #15

Question: 15. Look up Roberts’s definitions of “dynamic” and “static” in his discussion of round characters in Chapter 3. Is the character Mathilde from Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” dynamic or static ? Explain. In other words, how does the character “recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances”? Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer: One of the definitions of a dynamic character from the theory text was, “The acceptance of new conditions and the need for making changes,” (Robers 6). At the beginning of the story Mrs. Loisel just dreamed of a more affluent lifestyle and fretted about pretty things. “She suffered constantly, feeling herself destined for all delicacies and luxuries…She daydreamed of large, silent anterooms, decorated with oriental tapestries and lighted by high bronze floor lamps, with two elegant valets in sort culottes dozing in large armchairs under the effects of forced-air heaters,” (Maupassant 2). However by the end of the story, Mrs. Loisel has to do grueling house labor and accepts her financial status. “Mrs. Loisel soon discovered the horrible life of the needy. She did her share, however, completely, heroically…She learned to do the heavy housework, dirty kitchen jobs.” (Maupassant 59). Therefore Mathilde Loisel is a dynamic character.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 4, 2015 03:22 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
4 September 2015

Answer:

Flat characters are the undeveloped characters of the story. In contrast to the round characters who are usually the center of attention flat characters are usually the antagonists who the reader doesn’t gain much knowledge about. Typically these characters are the ones that a reader might not remember from the story and are the characters that usually aren’t as dynamic in nature.

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 4, 2015 03:32 PM

Brittany Cordero and Sidnee Yaeger
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
03 September 2015
Question: What are round characters like?
Answer: A round character is "three-dimensional, rounded, authentic, memorable, original, and true to life," they are also dynamic (Roberts 68). An example would be Mrs. Loisel from Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace" because the story was focused more on her than any other character. She was an original character who is dynamic because a lesson could be learned from the struggles she went through and how she changed because of it. In the beginning she was a selfish character and following the party, she changed. Mrs. Loisel "soon discovered the horrible life of the needy" as she lived her days in debt from losing the necklace (de Maupassant 59).

Posted by: Brittany Cordero and Sidnee Yaeger at September 4, 2015 04:24 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Hana Lee
Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
4 September 2015

Group 9
Question: Does Roberts think that flat characters are worthless in fiction? Why or
why not?

Answer: Roberts basically answers the question himself when he says, “Flat characters are not worthless in fiction, however, for they highlight the development of the round characters” (Roberts 69). Flat characters also hold the potential to become round characters themselves (Roberts 69). Because it would be extremely difficult to have every character in the story be a round character, flat characters are needed to swiftly move along the plot.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 4, 2015 04:42 PM


Group 2
Lois Martinez, Cannelle Samson and Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CAO3
6 September 2015

Question: In chapter 3, Roberts says that in “studying a literary character” students should “try to determine the character’s outstanding traits.” What, according to Roberts, does the word “trait” mean?
Answer: In chapter 3, Roberts helps explain to the reader how all of our traits make us who we are. A trait isn’t just one thing. There’s so much more to it than that. Roberts says, “A trait is a quality of mind or habitual behavior that is evident in active and passive ways…” (Roberts, 64). Your quality of mind could be how you view the world whether that be in a negative or positive light. Some active traits are wild, silly or talkative and some passive traits are shy and bashful. All of a person’s traits help to form their personality not just one. Although the exception is when Roberts describes that, “often a trait may be a person’s primary characteristic” (Roberts, 65). Roberts said when you study a fictional character you need to, “distinguish between circumstance and character, for circumstances have value only if you show that they demonstrate important traits” (Roberts, 65). For example, Minnie, from the story “A Jury of Her Peers”, killed her husband because of her circumstances, but that doesn’t make her an aggressive person altogether. One of Mrs. Peters and Mrs. Hales traits is loyalty. They discover on their own that Minnie probably killed her husband. They end up deciding to protect Minnie over abiding by the law.

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 7, 2015 10:56 AM

Conner Knaresboro, Daniel Wright (Question 11)
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA09
4 September 2015

Question: What are some common examples of stock/stereotype characters? Roberts provides many.
Answer: Common examples of stock and stereotype characters would be “the insensitive father, the interfering mother, the sassy younger sister or brother, greedy politician, the harassed boss, the resourceful cowboy or detective, the overbearing or henpecked husband, the submissive nagging wife, the absent-minded professor, the angry police officer, the loveable drunk, and the town do-gooder” (Robert 69).

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 7, 2015 01:43 PM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing ENG122 CA09
6 September 2015

Question:
Look up Roberts’s definitions of Stock Character and Stereotype in his discussion of flat characters in Chapter 3/ who, if any, are the Stock/Stereotypical character from Guy de Maupassant’s the Necklace? Explain how these Characters do no undergo significant change and development. Where possible, point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer:
Stock Character- refers to characters, they are always flat as long as they do no more than perspective roles and exhibit conventional and individual traits. Examples would be like nagging wife, henpecked husband. Stereotypes – when they possess no attitudes except those of their class. They all seem to have been cast in the same mold. I would say that the Husband is considered a Stock Character he does whatever to get by or to please his wife. Also Mrs. Forrestier is also another form of a Stock/Stereotype character she seems stuck to her character.

Posted by: jorge at September 7, 2015 04:58 PM

Matthew Beebe
Catalina Suarez
Connor Laramie
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 - Academic Writing II CAO3
September 4, 2015

Group 17
Question: Look up Roberts’s definitions of “stock character” and “stereotype” in his discussion of flat characters in Chapter 3. Who, if any, are the stock/stereotypical characters from Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace”? Explain how these characters “do not undergo significant change and development.” Where possible, point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer: A stock character is often used to describe characters that, “might be lively and engaging but do not undergo significant change and development. (Roberts 7).” “They must be strong, tough, and clever enough to perform recurring tasks such as solving a crime, overcoming a villain, or finding a treasure (Roberts 7). “ Stereotype characters can be “flat characters, and they seem to have all the same mold (Roberts 7).” The character that has most of these traits in the story is Madame Foresteir.

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 8, 2015 04:20 PM

Group 3) Jaclyn, Yari, Luis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA03
8 September 2015

Question: 3) Robert claims that writers basically “rely on five ways of bringing characters to life.” What are they?

Answer : The five ways the Robert claims that writers rely on are “1) An action or actions 2) The realization of new strength and therefore the affirmative or previous decision 3) The acceptance of new conditions and the need for making changes 4)The discovery of unrecognized truths 5) The reconciliation of the character with adverse conditions.”

Posted by: Group 3 at September 8, 2015 08:19 PM

Group 12 (Brad, Anayah, Peyton)
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA09
Sept. 4, 2015

Writing About Literature
By: Edgar V. Roberts

Verisimilitude is defined as characteristics that a character has predictable, realistic habits and attitudes. Human beings make mistakes thus being said that a character has predictable habits and actions. This is sort of like a paradox. But verisimilitude focuses on what the character most frequently and most usually do. In the story “The Necklace” Mathilde could be truthful towards the old lady, but her character is to show her pride and not to tell the old lady that she is borrowing money to replace the necklace.


Researcher: Anayah McKenzie
Scribe: Brad McAvoy
Speaker: Peyton Farrier

Posted by: Brad McAvoy at September 9, 2015 12:58 AM

Group 4: Johnny Nguyen & Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA03
4 September 2015


Question: There are two major “types” of character that Robert explains. What are they?

Answer: The two major types of character are “round” and “flat” characters. Round characters are the protagonist and antagonist in the story. They are usually what the story is based around and appear often throughout. Flat characters are simple and one-dimensional. Flat characters usually only have one role and don’t change much throughout the story. They usually are in the story to highlight the development of the round characters. For example, the policeman in the story “trifles”.

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 9, 2015 09:54 AM

Shania Bien, Shyiem Brown, Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
8 September 2015

Question: Look up Roberts’s definitions of “stock character” and “stereotype” in his discussion of flat characters in Chapter 3. Who, if any, are the stock/stereotypical characters from Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers” (the same story as the play “Trifles”)? Explain how these characters “do not undergo significant change and development.” Where possible, point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer: Stock characters are those types of characters who have become conventional or stereotypical through repeated use in particular types of stories. Stock characters are instantly recognizable to readers or audience members (e.g. the mad scientist, the geeky boy with glasses, and the faithful sidekick). Stock characters are normally one-dimensional flat characters. In Trifles, the three prominent men in the story could be considered "stock" or "stereotype" characters. Mr. Hale, the Sheriff, and the County Attorney are all flat characters because they don’t change throughout the story, in other words their roles stay the same and the writer doesn’t have to do much in order for views to understand them. For example, the county attorney naively stumbles upon the box containing the dead canary, which can be used as evidence in the killing of John Wright. But he is too busy scoffing at the women about their findings that aren't dangerous enough for this investigation (page 10). As the woman in the story slowly uncover subtle hints, they slowly change their opinions, and their outlook on the situation. Meanwhile, the men, despite their findings and experiences, remain wholly the same. This is evidenced by their behavior. In the beginning, they look down on the women for paying attention to subtle details, like the differences between Mrs. Wright's two sewing projects (how one is neat and orderly and the other is erratic). Additionally, the women begin to sort through Mrs. Wright's things, finding subtle details that paint a picture of the Wright household leading up to John Wright's death. The men completely ignore the finding of the women and continually mock them, through to the end of the book.

Examples
Page 3
Page 5
Page 8

http://learn.lexiconic.net/characters.htm

Posted by: Shania, shyiem, michael at September 9, 2015 10:35 AM

Group 7: SP Zekeriya Kayaselcuk, SC Necdet Gurkan, R Lawrence Watt

Dr.Hobbs

English 122 Academic Writing II CA 09

4 September 2015


Question: What are flat characters like?

Answer: Flat characters are characters that are static in their roles throughout a story, their roles usually never change. These characters have very little information and background compared to round characters. For example, it is much harder to compose an essay related to a flat character rather than a round character. "Unlike round characters, flat characters are not complex but are simple and one-dimensional. They may have no more than a single role to perform in a story, or they may be associated with no more than a single dominating idea." (Roberts pg. 68). Although flat characters are simple and predictable, it does not mean they are of less importance than round characters. There is a connection between both of these characters. Round characters support flat characters and vice versa. "But when authors bring characters into focus, no matter what roles they perform, the characters emerge from flatness and move into roundness." (Roberts pg. 69).

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 9, 2015 01:37 PM

Group 12 (Brad, Anayah, Peyton)
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA09
Sept. 4, 2015

Writing About Literature
By: Edgar V. Roberts

Verisimilitude is defined as characteristics that a character has predictable, realistic habits and attitudes. Human beings make mistakes thus being said that a character has predictable habits and actions. This is sort of like a paradox. “Characters should be true to life. Therefore their actions, statements, and thoughts must all be what human beings are likely to do say, and think under the conditions presented in the literary work.” (Edgar 70) But verisimilitude focuses on what the character most frequently and most usually do. “You should therefore distinguish between what characters may possibly do and they most frequently or most usually do.” (Edgar 70) In the story “The Necklace” Mathilde could be truthful towards the old lady when she lost the necklace but her character shows her pride and not to tell the old lady that she is borrowing money to replace the necklace.


Researcher: Anayah McKenzie
Scribe: Brad McAvoy
Speaker: Peyton Farrier

Posted by: Brad McAvoy at September 9, 2015 04:09 PM

Shania Bien, Shyiem Brown, Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
8 September 2015

Question: Look up Roberts’s definitions of “stock character” and “stereotype” in his discussion of flat characters in Chapter 3. Who, if any, are the stock/stereotypical characters from Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers” (the same story as the play “Trifles”)? Explain how these characters “do not undergo significant change and development.” Where possible, point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer: Stock characters are those types of characters who have become conventional or stereotypical through repeated use in particular types of stories. Stock characters are instantly recognizable to readers or audience members (e.g. the mad scientist, the geeky boy with glasses, and the faithful sidekick). Stock characters are normally one-dimensional flat characters. In Trifles, the three prominent men in the story could be considered "stock" or "stereotype" characters. Mr. Hale, the Sheriff, and the County Attorney are all flat characters because they don’t change throughout the story, in other words their roles stay the same and the writer doesn’t have to do much in order for views to understand them. For example as Mrs. Hail being the nagging wife complaining about what she does not like (Robert 4) which is usually expected of a wife. For example, the county attorney naively stumbles upon the box containing the dead canary, which can be used as evidence in the killing of John Wright. But he is too busy scoffing at the women about their findings that aren't dangerous enough for this investigation (Robert 10). As the woman in the story slowly uncover subtle hints, they slowly change their opinions, and their outlook on the situation. Meanwhile, the men, despite their findings and experiences, remain wholly the same. This is evidenced by their behavior. In the beginning, they look down on the women for paying attention to subtle details, like the differences between Mrs. Wright's two sewing projects (how one is neat and orderly and the other is erratic). Additionally, the women begin to sort through Mrs. Wright's things, finding subtle details that paint a picture of the Wright household leading up to John Wright's death. The men completely ignore the finding of the women and continually mock them, through to the end of the book.


Posted by: Shania, shyiem, michael group 18 at September 9, 2015 09:29 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210
19 January 2016

Question: Is it believable that Grace told Delphin about her pregnancy? Why or Why not? Explain.

Answer: To say that Grace told Delphin about her pregnancy, would be a very believable statement. This is because, as stated in the short story on page 8 when Mrs Slade says "I'd found out - and I hated you, hated you. I knew you were in love with Delphin." it tells us that Grace had very strong feelings for Delphin, therefore, Grace may have told him about the pregnancy to convince him that she needs a man to look after her and to win him over. As well as this, to Grace's knowledge, Delphin had written her the letter arranging to meet at the coliseum. Therefore in Grace's mind, Delphin was someone she could trust.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at January 19, 2016 08:34 PM

Phillip Moss
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA06
22 January 2016


Question: What are “Stock” or “stereotype” characters? Are they usually
round or flat?

Answer: Stock or Stereotype characters are usually flat in the sense that their roles in the story or play are rather insignificant. This insignificance does not mean that the character can’t be prominent. Flat characters are often characters that have limited traits but may represent a larger group or faction. “The term stock character is often used to describe characters in these repeating situations. To the degree that stock characters have many common traits, they are representing their class or group”(Roberts p.11).

Posted by: Phillip Moss at January 21, 2016 01:54 PM

Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
21 January 2016

Question #13: Look up Robert’s definition of traits in Chapter 3. What traits can you identify in Mathilde from Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace?” Point to actual examples from the text and be ready to explain where they are.

Answer: Edgar Roberts defines trait as, “a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive ways” (Roberts 64). Mathilde has several traits that are readily identifiable in “The Necklace.” She was “pretty and charming” but was unsuccessful in marrying a wealthy man, so she settled for a clerk who she felt was beneath her (de Maupassant 53). Mathilde was a lonely dreamer who wanted all the niceties of life, “she suffered constantly, feeling herself destined for all delicacies and luxuries,” she wanted to live like a queen and flaunt her beauty for all women to be envious (de Maupassant 54). The story somewhat alluded to a Cinderella-like night when she went to the Ministry of Education dinner. All of her dreams come true, immersed in euphoria, “intoxicated with pleasure” and made every woman yearn to be in her place (de Maupassant 56). Once the party ended, she reverted to her wretched, disgraceful life (so she thought), and slowly transition from a relatively decent life to actual poverty, all because of the lost necklace. Her obsession with wealth and beauty, and as Roberts states, “denial of reality,” jeopardized her life (Roberts 65).

Posted by: Heather Hauck at January 21, 2016 03:44 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 06
22 January 2016

Question: 2. In chapter 3, Roberts says that in “studying a literary character” students should “try to determine the character’s outstanding traits.” What, according to Roberts, does the word “trait” mean?

Answer: Robert introduces the reader, a student, to the concepts of literary characters and their traits. And Robert define a trait as “a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active and passive ways” (Robert 64). This definition of a trait allows the reader to understand the concept of traits within literary characters.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at January 21, 2016 05:39 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
21 January 2016

Question: According to Edgar V. Roberts, in the study of literature, what does the word “character” mean?

Answer: According to (Roberts 64), “a character is a verbal representation of a human being”. Therefore, a character portrays similar qualities and traits that a human being portrays. However, characters are fictional because they are created in movies, short stories and novels, where they serve different purposes depending on their roles.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at January 21, 2016 06:38 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
21 January 2016

“Writing About Character: The People in Literature”

Q: What does Roberts mean when he says a character has the complementary quality he calls “dynamic”?

A: When a character is “dynamic”, it means they can,” recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances” (Roberts 68). The text gives an example of a dynamic character through Glaspell’s Minnie. Quiet, sweet and shy Minnie, after years of oppression, becomes enraged with her husband and murders him. Such a dramatic action and change of character classify her as a dynamic character, even though she is never in the play in person.

Posted by: Hannah.Rowe at January 21, 2016 09:26 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
21 January 2016

Question 11) What are some common examples of stock/stereotype characters? Roberts provides many.

Answer 11) The stock character is a 'flat' character which plays a simple but significant role in every play. They are often found in similar situations in each play despite the large variations of sex, gender and character. In the text on page 69 it tells us that "they must be strong, tough and clever enough to perform recurring tasks such as fighting crime, overcoming a villain or finding treasure." What we learn from this is that the stock character is a influential character with a job that contributes to a vital part of the play.

Moving on from this because of their roll in the play, the most common examples of stock characters are the insensitive father, the greedy politician, the harassed boss, the angry police captain, the loveable drunk etc... All of these types of characters are suitable for the influence they are going to have on the play.

Posted by: chloe lelliott at January 21, 2016 09:47 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
21 January 2016

Question: Does Roberts think that flat characters are worthless in fiction? Why or
why not?

Answer: Flat characters are described as “not complex, but are simple and one-dimensional” (Roberts 68). Roberts does not think that flat characters are worthless in fiction; instead, he believes that they are influential to the development of the round characters in a story (69). Flat characters usually appear as relatives and acquaintances.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at January 21, 2016 11:26 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 06 Academic Writing II
21 January 2016


Question: What does Roberts mean when he says a character has the predictable trait of being “static”
Answer: Roberts describes a character that is “static” as someone who does not have the ability to grow or progress as a story unfolds. The character does not change or adjust to the surroundings and events that happen throughout the writing. In other words the character is very dull and does not add too much to the plot of the story. It is almost as if the character is oblivious to their surroundings or possibly just stubborn and refuses to improve as a person. This character would be known as the opposite of dynamic.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at January 21, 2016 11:44 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
21 January 2016

Writing about Character: The People in Literature

Question #3: Roberts claims that writers basically “rely on five ways of bringing characters to life.” What are they?

Answer: Roberts describes five ways to bring a character to life. The first thing Roberts mentions is how “actions of characters reveal their qualities” (Roberts 66). How they behave shows their true character. The second way is through the “author’s descriptions” of the characters. The third way is observing what the characters themselves say. Next is by “what others say” about that character (67). The final way is by the judgments the narrator has toward the characters.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at January 22, 2016 12:52 AM

Allison Cobb

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06

22 January 2016




Question: What are flat characters like?




Answer: The purpose of main characters within a story is to change. Stories themselves are defined by arcs. They go from one point to another by characters going from one point to another. Something about the characters in focus must change for them to be a complex and interesting character. However, this is not the purpose of every character. Stagnant characters, who do not change, can also be called flat characters. They do not change, but they do “highlight the development of the round characters” (Roberts 69) and often “[have a] single role to perform in a story” (Roberts 68). Flat characters are not useless, but they are stagnant. They remain the same, and usually only exist to further the story.

Posted by: Allison Cobb at January 22, 2016 10:05 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122- Academic Writing II CA06
22 January 2016

Question: There are two major “types” of character that Roberts explains. What are they?

Answer: The two major types of character are round and flat. Roberts says that round characters are "three-dimensional and lifelike" (Roberts 68). These characters are in the story enough that the reader will remember them the rest of the story. Flat characters are defined as "simple and one-dimensional" (68). Flat characters usually show up in the story once and do not have any more story told about them.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 22, 2016 10:48 AM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
22 January 2016

Question: 4.) There are two major “types” of character that Roberts explains. What
are they?

Answer: 4.) The two types of characters are round characters and flat characters. A round character is a character that is a involved in some kind of conflict and is changed by it. a flat character is someone is not as big in the story as a round character and does not change or grow throughout the story.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at January 22, 2016 02:14 PM

Travis Farmer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
22 January 2016

Question: 12. What does verisimilitude mean and what role, according to Roberts, should it play with fictional characters?

Answer: Verisimilitude is the appearance of being true or real. According to Roberts, characters in fiction must show some type of being true to life, or else they are unbelievable as characters. He states that even though there may be some people in life who are stranger than fiction, those character traits in writing exudes unbeliavability.

Posted by: Travis Farer at January 22, 2016 02:16 PM

Nastassja Sielchan and Clark De Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
22 January 2016

Question: There are two major “types” of character the Robert explains. What are they?

Answer: The two major character types that Roberts describes are round and flat. A round character is described as “three-dimensional and life like” (Roberts 68). Flat characters are “simple and one-dimensional” (68). Flat characters are put into stories to support the main characters development.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan and Clark De Bullet at January 22, 2016 03:03 PM

Nastassja Sielchan and Clark De Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
22 January 2016

Question: There are two major “types” of character the Robert explains. What are they?

Answer: The two major character types that Roberts describes are round and flat. A round character is described as “three-dimensional and life like” (Roberts 68). Flat characters are “simple and one-dimensional” (68). Flat characters are put into stories to support the main characters development.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan and Clark De Bullet at January 22, 2016 03:03 PM

Matt Scharr, Chloe Lelliott, Hassan Babge
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic writing 2 CA06
22 January 2016

Question 1) What is a character defined as by the author?

Answer 1) In this chapter, Roberts explains that characters can be defined or analyzed by the way in which they behave, such as traits or mannerisms and by the part that they play in the story.

On page 3, he describes a character as "a verbal representation of a human being", which tells us it is not a person but has similar traits to a human. Roberts tells us that we can understand characters through their actions, speech, description and commentary.

Posted by: chloe lelliott at January 22, 2016 03:10 PM

Nastassja Sielchan and Clark De Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
22 January 2016

Question: There are two major “types” of character the Robert explains. What are they?

Answer: The two major character types that Roberts describes are round and flat. A round character is described as “three-dimensional and life like” (Roberts 68). Throughout stories, round characters change and grow. They do not end where they began. Flat characters are “simple and one-dimensional” (68). Flat characters are put into stories to support the main characters development, and they end at the same place at which they started in the story.

Posted by: Revised - Nastassja Sielchan and Clark De Bullet at January 22, 2016 03:16 PM

Hannah Rowe, Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
22 January 2016

Group Discussion “Writing About Character: The People in Literature”

Q: What does Roberts mean when he says a characters has the complementary quality he calls “dynamic”?

A: When a character is “dynamic”, it means they can,” recognize, change with, or adjust to circumstances” (Roberts 68). The text gives an example of a dynamic character through Glaspell’s Minnie. When she was younger, Minnie was an outgoing person who “used to wear pretty clothes and be lively [. . .] singing in the choir“(Glaspell 5). But after years of oppression, she becomes enraged and loses control with her husband and murders him. Such a dramatic action and change of character classify her as a dynamic character, even though she has a passive role in the play.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at January 22, 2016 03:22 PM

Randawnique Coakley, Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
22 January 2016

Question: Roberts claims that writers basically “rely on five ways of bringing characters to life.” What are they?

Answer: The five ways of bringing characters to life that Robert claims are the actions of characters, the authors descriptions, what characters say, what others say tell us about the character, and speaking as a storyteller or an observer. He expands on each of the ways of bringing a character to life. For example, Roberts writes, “What characters do is our clue to understanding what they are (Roberts 66).” This means that actions reveal their traits. Robert continues to say, “Appearance and environment allow the reader to learn more about the characters (66).” Then he continues to go more into depth in the other ways to reveal their qualities.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at January 22, 2016 11:38 PM

Vincia Mitchell and Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
23 January 2016

Question: In chapter 3, Roberts says that in “studying a literary character” students should “try to determine the character’s outstanding traits. “What, according to Roberts, does the word “trait” mean?

Answer: According to (Robert 64), a trait is a quality of mind or habitual mode of behavior that is evident in active or passive ways. Words such as reliable, punctual, intelligent and secretive are often used to describe a person’s personality or features based on their actions. Therefore, if a character is reliable or unreliable, he or she has a trait based on his or her actions.

Posted by: vincia mitchell and justin robinson at January 23, 2016 11:26 PM

Phil Moss, Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
22 January 2016

Question: What are round characters like?

Answer: Round characters have more story told about them. Round characters are "three-dimensional and lifelike" (Roberts 68). They are usually the main characters and are dynamic instead of flat.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 25, 2016 09:04 AM

Randawnique Coakley and Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 06
27 January 2016

Explain how the following quotation/elements from the story is ironic: Alida and grace are describe as “intimate friends …[coming to] a new stage in their intimacy.” Hint: look up the definition of intimacy.” Hint: look up the definition of intimacy.

In the story, "Roman Fever" by Wharton, Alida and Grace are portrayed as "intimate friends"(Wharton 3) who are coming to "a new stage in their intimacy"(3). Intimacy can be defined as having a close bond or having a caring friendship. However, Alida and Grace's relationship is not friendly or close; in fact, they are enemies seemingly hating each other and envying each other possessions. This is why the phrase is ironic and contradictory because the ladies are not intimate or affectionate but rather cold and harsh to each other. An example of where Alida and Grace's behavior contradicts the statement, which states that they are intimate, is when Alida admits that she is envious of Grace because Grace's daughter is dynamic, unlike her daughter – Jenny - who is rather dull(Wharton 4). If Alida and Grace were in an intimate relationship, they would not envy each other but be excited for each other's daughter. Another reason that the statement of Alida and Grace is ironic is because Alida and Grace have a heated argument. Their argument escalated to being heated with Grace crying and Alida boasting, "And I wrote. Yes; I wrote it! But I was the girl he was engaged to. Did you happen to remember that?"(7). They are nasty to each other and not loving. Therefore, this does not support the statement of them being intimate friends but rather contradicts this statement. It is clear that Wharton creates irony, when he writes the statement of the two ladies being "intimate friends"(3).

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley and Vincia Mitchell at January 26, 2016 12:03 AM

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