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January 17, 2013

Edgar V. Roberts' “Writing about an Idea or Theme (Meanings/Messages)"


Image Source:http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-esLukHnhw7k/T5Ta0wTDB5I/AAAAAAAAAZY/zTvgSqEjKd0/s1600/theme+(2).jpg

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 17, 2013 02:32 PM

Readers' Comments:

Sarah Hatcher
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
4 February, 2013

Question 7: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.

Answer: First-person narraters usually "express ideas along with their depiction of actions," (page 122) and also make statements throughout the story. Whether they be wrong or right, the story line of the first person can fill you in on information that you may not have understood in the passage.

Posted by: Sarah Hatcher at February 4, 2013 11:20 AM

Chris Lavie
Dr Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
4 February 2013


Question 11: .Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering
one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts
suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for
further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work
itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain what this means.

Answer: Edgar V. Roberts gives an interesting example with paint. Like paint, a text can be taken with different views. A work can also represent human concepts or emotions. The reader has to go beyond the text and try to understand what the true intention of the author is, page 123: “ the various parts collectively can embody major ideas, as in the third section on Bierce’s “ An occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”, which is based on the idea that under great stress the human mind operates with lightning speed”

Posted by: Chris Lavie at February 4, 2013 04:39 PM

Christopher Burke
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II

Question: Most literary works have many of them. When one of them recurs "over and over again throughout a work" it is called a

Answer: Theme is a recurring idea.

Posted by: Christopher Burke at February 5, 2013 10:59 PM

Alexandra Rivera-Vega
Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05
4 Feb 2013

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study how characters represent ideas .” Explain what this means.

Answer: Studying how characters represent ideas basically means that by the way that character acts represents something realist, they equate each other. "For example, Mathlide, in Maupassant's "The Necklace," represents the idea that unrealizable dreams can damage the real world." (Roberts 123)

Posted by: Alexandra Rivera-Vega at February 5, 2013 11:19 PM

Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA05
6 February 2013

Question 6.Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering
one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the authorial voice.” Explain what this means.

Answer:Robert's feels that the author will voice his or hers opinion and ideas by either what the characters say or by adding a passage telling you their ideas. The passage, "One author might prefer an indirect way though a character's speech, where as another may prefer direct statements (Roberts122)". The author incorporates their voice into the work by ether direct or indirect use.

Posted by: Octavia Robinson at February 5, 2013 11:21 PM

Terrance Browne
Dr.Hobbs
ENG122
5/January/2013

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering
one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts
suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for
further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work
itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain what this means

Answers: What this technique means is that it is trying to express the writers ideas and whats going on in the writers mind onto paper, this is basicly like when a writer is trying to paint a picture in words so that you can understand in full detail whats going on in the story. In "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (paragraphs 18-36), which is based on the idea that under great stress the human mind operates with lightning speed" (Roberts,126).

Posted by: Terrance Browne at February 6, 2013 08:45 AM

Colby Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05 Academic Writing 2
2 February 2013

Question:Roberts makes the claim that literature “embodies values along with ideas.”
I’m sure you can think of many values. You have your own and our
institution even has Core Values that we are expected to embrace while here.
Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly, does he
apply it to one of the works we’ve read and studied for this course? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title.

Answer: According to the top of page 120 of Robert's "Writing About Literature", the two values he provides as examples are democracy and justice. He claims "democracy refers to our political system, but it is also a complex idea of representative government we esteem so highly." I argue that in the short story "The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allen Poe,the author's use of the word mad is an example. In the very opening quote of "TRUE!—nervous—very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad?", Poe uses the word mad in a more complex way. When someone says "I am mad" they are usually referring to anger, but in this quote it is used as a synonym of crazy, so the reader knows the character is already insane and a lunatic.

Posted by: Colby Johnson at February 6, 2013 08:58 AM

Jordan Miller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
06 Feb 2013

Question 02: “Most stories,” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns, “up over and over again throughout a work”?
Answer: According to Roberts an idea that appears over and over again, is a theme or a major idea (Roberts, 119). The theme in my opinion is the central message that’s being told or shared throughout the story. There can be more than one theme, but the theme itself is just trying to instill these values in you, or even showing you what values you should not have. Some stories themes can but are not limited to; love, justice, equality, freedom, etc. The theme is extraordinarily important to a reading, and is always needed.

Posted by: Jordan Miller at February 6, 2013 11:09 AM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
6 February 2013


12.FILL-IN-THE-BLANKS
a.) According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 7, “the result or results of
general abstract thinking” is called a/an IDEA. Hint:
“Synonymous words are concept, thought, opinion, and principle.
b.) In reference to the word above, most literary works have many of them.
When one of them recurs “over and over again throughout a work,” it is
called a THEME.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at February 6, 2013 11:10 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA 08
Feb. 6, 2013

Q: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worth writing a formal paper is another. Roberts suggests "making a number of formulations" before "selecting on for further development." One formulation technique is to "study the authorial voice." Explain what this means.

A: The authorial voice is the ideas presented by the author, whether these remain true throughout the story or are used to prove a point is up to the author. On page 122 in the second paragraph Roberts uses "The Necklace" as an example, he says, "the authorial voice presents the idea that women have no more than charm and beauty to get on in the world. Ironically, Maupassant uses the story to show that for the major character Mathilde, nothing is effective for her charm cannot prevent disaster."

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 6, 2013 12:06 PM

Ana DeMaio,
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2 CA04 in Crawford Hall, Room #6
4 February 2013
Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as
this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you
should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations.” Explain why.
Answer: For in class discussions or formal writing assignments Roberts says that you should not confuse ideas with situations because, situations are not ideas. Situations are what bring out your ideas. The idea are what happen when a character is trying to get out of a situation. Roberts says, “Her plight is not an idea, but a situation that brings out ideas, such as that future plans may be destroyed by uncontrollable circumstances, or that fate strikes the fortunate as well as the unfortunate, or that human institutions often seem arbitrary, capricious, and cruel”(Edgar 121). He also advises that if you are able to distinguish between an author’s situations from their ideas that you will be bettering your own mind.

Posted by: Ana DeMaio at February 6, 2013 12:19 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
January 6, 2013
11.Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain what this means.
He described the way an author expresses ideas like a painting a painting has line colour form and many things that make the painting interesting. Therefore, instead of just paying attention to what a single character says and does, you should pay attention to everything the thoughts the setting and even side characters. Moreover, think about the things you see in different points of view of the characters.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at February 6, 2013 07:33 PM

Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
6 February 2013


Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as
this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.

Answer: Roberts states this because his claim is that the action doesn't connect or express the main theme or idea of the story and that the action can often obstruct the reader from the understanding of the story.

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at February 6, 2013 10:14 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
6 February 2013

Question: if your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with "situations". Explain why.

Answer: "If you are able in such ways to distinguish a work's various situations from the writer's major idea or ideas, you will be able to focus on ideas and therefore sharpen your own thinking." (Roberts, 121). Reading about situations brings out the ideas of a character, the actual situation is not the idea.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 6, 2013 10:41 PM

Angie Fortunak
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
7 February 2013

Question 13: In this chapter, Roberts says "Literature embodies values along with ideas." Although value "commonly refers to the price of something," in "the realm of ideas and principles, "value also signifies what?

Answer: I see value as what one lives by, what one sees happening. St. Leo University has six core values that they hope the students live their day to day lives by. According to Roberts,value is not just referring to the price of items. but "a standard of what is desired, sought, esteemed, and treasured" (120). Roberts also tells us that we have to very important values which are democracy and justice. It signifies an idea in literature.

Posted by: Angie Fortunak at February 7, 2013 02:56 PM

Marquisa Turner
ENG 122-CA04 Academic Writing II
Dr. Hobbs
7 February 2013

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study how characters represent ideas.” Explain what this means.

Answer: This means to notice and identify what ideas the character is making obvious and not so obvious through their dialogue and actions. In this quote “In effect, characters who stand for ideas can assume symbolic status, as in Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown”, where the protagonist symbolizes the alienation that accompanies zealousness. Such characters can be equated directly with particular ideas, and to talk about them is a shorthand way of talking about ideas ” (Roberts 123).

Posted by: Marquisa Turner at February 7, 2013 03:44 PM

Jade Lowe
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122 CA08
7 February 2013

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with "actions". Explain why.

Answer: According to Roberts, You should not confuse ideas with actions. He gives an example from O'Connor's "First Confession": "The major character, Jackie misbehaves at home and tries to slash his sister with a bread knife." He mentions that the sentence describes a major action in the story, but does not express an idea that connects characters and events, and so it blocks our understand.(page 121 first paragraph)

Posted by: Jade Lowe at February 7, 2013 03:52 PM

Marlie Gonzalez
Dr.Hobbs
Eng122 Academic Writting II
7 Febuary 2013

Question:As you seek to find the approiate "place" for ideas in literature, Robert claims that there are some common concepts you must not confuse with the concept of "idea". Identify one of them. BONUS: Identify another one.

Answer: According to roberts one of them is actions and according to him, "It is important to avoid the trap of confusin ideas and actions. Such a trap is contained in the following sentence : 'The major charecter, Jackie misbehavesat home and tries to slash his sister with a bread knife.' It describes an action in the story but it does not express an idea that connects charecter and events, and for this reason it obstructs understanding."

Posted by: Marlie at February 7, 2013 05:43 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA04
8 February 2013

Question: “Most stories,” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?

Answer: To identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work,” Robert uses the two terms “theme” and “major idea” (Robert, 119).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 7, 2013 07:21 PM

Analisa Johnson
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122- CA 08
7 Feb 2013

Question: In reference to the word above, most literary works have many of them. When one of them recurs "over and over again throughout a work" it is called a _________?

Answer: Most stories contain many ideas. When of these ideas seems to turn up over and over again throughout a work, it is called the theme.

Posted by: Analisa Johnson at February 7, 2013 07:30 PM

Octavio Herrera
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II
5 February 2013

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.

Answer: Confusing ideas with actions obstructs the understanding “it is important to avoid the trap of confusing ideas and actions” (Roberts 121). Certain scenarios in a story may describe a major action in a story, “but it may not express an idea that connects characters and events” (Roberts 121).

Posted by: Octavio Herrera at February 7, 2013 09:41 PM

Jose Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA04 Academic Writing II
6th, February 2013

Question:
12. FILL-IN-THE-BLANKS

a.) According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 7, “the result or results of
general abstract thinking” is called a/an ___________________
Hint: “Synonymous words are concept, thought, opinion, and principle.

b.) In reference to the word above, most literary works have many of them.
When one of them recurs “over and over again throughout a work,” it is
called a ____________________.

Answer:
a.) “The word IDEA refers to the result or results of general and abstract thinking.” (Roberts 119)
b.) “When one of the ideas seems to turn up over and over again throughout a work, it is called the THEME/MAJOR IDEA.” (Roberts 119)

Posted by: Jose Garcia at February 7, 2013 09:50 PM

Lauren Irish
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
7 February 2013

Question : 14.IDENTIFICATION: As you seek to find the appropriate “place” for ideas in
literature, Robert claims that there are some common concepts you must not
confuse with the concept of “idea.” Identify one of them. BONUS: Identify
another one.

Answer: To determine an idea you need to consider the meaning of what you read and to develop explanatory and comprehensive assertion. Ideas are different then characters and setting. Many may confuse the concept of ideas with characters and settings.

Posted by: Lauren Irish at February 7, 2013 11:14 PM

Brynn Laverdure
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
February 7, 2013

Question:In this course, we have already identified several figures of
speech. In this chapter, Roberts discusses the importance of paying attention
to “figures of speech.” What is a “figure of speech”?

Answer: A figure of speech is used to often to show a meaning of something by comparing or identifying one thing with another that has a meaning that could be more familiar to a reader. In the article Roberts says "...in Glaspell's Trifles, when one of the characters compares John Wright, the murdered husband, with 'a raw wind that gets to the bone"(Roberts 123).

Posted by: Brynn Laverdure at February 7, 2013 11:54 PM

Jasmine Lowe
Dr.Hobbs
ENG-122-CA08
8 February 2013
Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.
Answer: To” study the character and the words of the first-person speaker” means that since the first-person speakers express ideas and they outline actions and situations you can make conclusions about ideas from the statements they make. (Page 122)

Posted by: Jasmine Lowe at February 8, 2013 12:34 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA02 Academic Writing II
7th of February 2013

Question: “Roberts makes the claim that literature ‘emobodies values along with ideas.’ I’m sure you can think of many values. You have your own and our Institution even has Core Values that we are expected to embrace while here. Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly does he apply it to one of the works we’ve read and studied for this course? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title.”

Answer: Roberts’ refers to both “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant, and “A Jury of Her Peers” by Susan Glaspell, and puts out two values that can be found in each story. These values are Justice and Democracy. Justice is demonstrated by Mathilde attempting to enact justice by repaying the debt of the lost necklace, and the women attempting to solve the murder on their own. Democracy is shown in “The Necklace” by demonstrating a society with a distinct lack of democracy, one that’s permeated with classism, and “A Jury of Her Peers” is has the theme of the struggle for equality between genders.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at February 8, 2013 01:23 AM

Ryan Nowotny
Dr.Hobbs
English-122 ca 05
8 February 2013

Roberts says it is important to use assertions because it gives the reader the chance to consider and develop the sentence. for example Roberts uses the example of a nice day. instead of saying it is a nice day you should say it is a nice day because it is sunny,and warm.

Posted by: Ryan Nowotny at February 8, 2013 08:23 AM

Vintoria Hopps
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
7 February 2013

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “Making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work’s figures of speech.” Explain what this means.
Answer: According to Roberts one which to formulate an idea in literature is to study the work’s figures of speech. In doing this you bound in prose fiction. Things like constancy and metaphorical language help you to theorize these things.

Posted by: Vintoria at February 8, 2013 09:42 AM

Abigail Evans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
8th February 2013

Question:In this chapter, Roberts says “Literature embodies values
along with ideas.” Although value “commonly refers to the price of
something,” in “the realm of ideas and principles,” value also signifies what?

Answer: In the realm of ideas and principles value also signifies, "a standard of what is desired, sought, esteemed, and treasured.For example, democracy refers to our political system, but it is also a complex idea of representative government that we esteem most highly."

Posted by: Abigail Evans at February 8, 2013 10:20 AM

Jazmine Dixon
Dr.Hobbs
English 122 CA04 Edgar V. Roberts’s Chapter 7: “Writing about an Idea or Theme
8 Feb 2013

Question: SHORT ANSWER: In this course, we have already identified several figures of speech. In this chapter, Roberts discusses the importance of paying attention to “figures of speech.” What is a “figure of speech”?

Answer: A figure of speech is an expression that uses language in a nonliteral way, such as a metaphor or synecdoche, or in a structured or unusual way, such as anaphora or chiasmus, or that employs sounds, such as alliteration or assonance, to achieve a rhetorical effect.

Posted by: Jazmine Dixon at February 8, 2013 10:41 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA08
Feb 8, 2013

6) Allusion: Recall the often told parable of the "Good Samaritan" as revealed in the Gospels of the New Testament. How is the narrative to Langston Hughes's "On the Road"?

A: This story is similar to the parable of the "Good Samaritan" in the sense that it involves an unfortunate man , two people who don't help him, and one person who does help him. In "On the Road" this unfortunate man is Sargeant, a black homeless man looking for someplace to stay. Sargeant came to the house of a Reverend Mr. Dorest, who much like the Priest of the parable says, "I'm sorry. No! Go right on down this street four blocks down and turn to your left, walk up seven and you'll see the Relief Shelter." (1). The police who arrest Sargeant for knocking down the door of the church are similar to the Levite in the parable. The stone figure of Jesus that walked with Sargeant is much like the Good Samaritan who helped the man in the parable that was left on the side of the road beaten, robbed, and half dead.

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 8, 2013 12:20 PM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA08
30 September 2013

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as
this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations .” Explain why.

Answer: Roberts says that you should not confuse ideas with situations because while ideas take the form of an opinion or thought, situations actually bring out those ideas or thoughts.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at September 30, 2013 01:24 AM

Taina Valcarcel
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
September 30, 2013

Question:Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the statements made by characters.” Explain what this means.

Answer: Studying the statements made by characters helps give an insight on what a character's way of thinking is and their personality. analyzing what a character says helps identify what type of person they are and how they view the world around them.

Posted by: Taina Valcarcel at September 30, 2013 12:44 PM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA08
30 September 2013

Question: FILL IN THE BLANK
A) According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Ch.7 "the result of general abstract thinking" is called a/an ____________ Hint: synonymous words are concept, thought, opinion, and principle

B) In reference to the word above, most literary works have many of them. When one of them recurs "over and over again throughout a work," it is called a ___________

Answers:
A) idea (p.2, paragraph 1, line 1)
B) theme (p.2, paragraph 4, lines 2-3)

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at September 30, 2013 03:02 PM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
30 September 2013

Question: “Most stories,” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?

Answer: In the reading “Writing about an Idea or a Theme” from Edgar V. Roberts, the author points out, “When one of the ideas seems to turn up over and over again throughout a work, it is called the theme. In practice, the words theme and major idea are the same” (Roberts 119). Therefore the two terms to identify an idea that turns up over and over again throughout a work are theme and major idea.

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at September 30, 2013 04:46 PM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng. 122 Academic Writing CA 08
30 September 2013

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.

Answer:
It is very important to not confuse actions and ideas. Roberts explains to us that some sentences we read can be misleading but are ultimately an action or and idea. In writing, an action is when the character actually does something. Sometimes the author will say that the character is a certain way due to something in their life. This is the author explaining an idea. The character is not actually doing anything, therefore it is not an action (Roberts 121).

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at October 1, 2013 08:19 PM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
1 October 2013

Question #6: "Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering
one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the authorial voice.” Explain what this means."

Answer: According to Roberts, authors attempt to say certain things to put ideas and thoughts in our heads that will lead us down a certain path. Roberts says, "Although authors mainly render action, dialogue, and situation, they sometimes state ideas to guide us and deepen our understanding" (Roberts 122). We see instances of this in both "The Necklace" and "Young Goodman Brown". In "The Necklace", Maupassant leads us to believe that to survive in this world, women only use their beauty and charm. In "Young Goodman Brown", Hawthorne uses authorial voice to talk about the major character. Roberts concludes his section on this topic saying, "Although the idea is complex, its essential aspect is that the causes of evil within human beings themselves, with the implication that we alone are responsible for all our actions, whether good or evil" (Roberts 122).

Posted by: Madison Owens at October 1, 2013 10:48 PM

Luis Maritnez
Dr. Hobbs
Eng122 Academic Writing II
10/2/13

Question- Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work’s figures of speech.” Explain what this means.

A- By searching for multiple main ideas, we can begin to see the bigger picture of the story. By analyzing said ideas we can help bring one of the main themes to light by interpreting the connections between each of these reoccurring ideas. Paying attention to the figures of speech used is important because a figure of speech can set the tone for the characters state of mind.

Posted by: Luis Martinez at October 2, 2013 08:25 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
1 October 2013

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.

Answer: Roberts shows the reader an example of a sentence which expresses the main action of the story it is concerning (Roberts 4). He mentions though, that this statement “does not express an idea that connects characters and events, and for this reason it obstructs understanding”(Roberts 4). Furthermore, one must expand on connections and ideas that exist in a story, or else he might only summarize the story by naming the actions which take place(Roberts 4).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at October 2, 2013 09:41 AM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
2 October 2013

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “Making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain what this means.

Answer: What Roberts means by “studying the work itself as an embodiment of ideas” is that the many parts of a work can embody main ideas. He goes on to explain what “escape literature” is, which makes the readers forget about the problems in the story. This brings in the conflicts, which are the main components of the works. The conflicts help the reader understand what the story is about, and with that, this can bring the reader, once the story is read, to a conclusion on what the story was about and why the author told this story. Conflicts can range from ideas such as love vs. hate, or good vs. evil. This then helps the reader draw a conclusion on what the story is about through the different conflicts between characters. This idea of understanding the conflict to get to the them embody these many ideas, and the intention is to make the reader stop thinking so much and so hard about the theme, and to make them forget and enjoy the story and then think of the big message the author is trying to deliver to the people reading their story.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at October 2, 2013 03:12 PM

Maryerie Rojas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
29 September 2013

15. IDENTIFICATION/EXPLANATION: Roberts warns us that ideas “are not as obvious as characters or setting” and suggests six “different ways in which authors convey ideas.” The study of these methods will help you find the major ideas. a.) Identify and b.) explain one of them.

Answer: Roberts 122-123
1. Study the Authorial Voice
2. Study the Character and the Words of the First-Person Speaker
3. Study the Statements Made by Characters
4. Study the Work’s Figures of Speech
5. Study How Characters Represent Ideas
a. Robert’s explains that the actions of the characters equated to specific ideas and values (123). He uses as an example Mathilde in “The Necklace”. She represents how unrealizable dreams damage how the real world actually works
6. Study the Work Itself as an Embodiment of Ideas


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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas at October 6, 2013 07:41 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
17 February 2014

QUESTION #1:
What does Roberts mean when he says it is better to "always express ideas as assertions" rather than "ordinary conversational statements"? What example does he give for an idea stated as something that has no promise of "an argument" and what examples does he give for operational sentences that do "make an assertion promising an argument"? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title of the texts referenced.

ANSWER:
When Roberts says that it is better to "always express ideas as assertions" rather than "ordinary conversational statements," he means that good operation sentences give us ideas and stimulate our minds, such as thoughts and arguments (Roberts 119). As example, Roberts said, "you might state that an idea in Chekhov's The Bear is 'love,' but it would be difficult to discuss anything more unless you make an assertion promising an argument, such as 'This play demonstrates the idea that love is irrational and irresistible'" (Roberts 119).

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at February 17, 2014 11:38 AM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
17 February 2014

Question:
“Most stories,” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?

Answer:
Theme and values are two terms that turns up over and over again throughout a work (Roberts 120).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at February 17, 2014 11:47 AM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
17 February 2014

Question:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering
one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts
suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for
further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the
Statements made by characters.” Explain what this means

Answer:
What Robert means when he says study the statements made by the characters is that you can tell the theme or get an idea of what it may be by what or how a character says it. Like what he says about the “conventional masculine ideas about the need for men to control women” (Roberts 5-6). He means based on the statements the men made in regards to the killer you can tell that you’re somewhere the men tend to dominate and that they have the idea that everyone has rolls to fulfill.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at February 17, 2014 02:06 PM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
17 February 2014

QUESTION #13:
In this chapter, Roberts says “Literature embodies values along with ideas. ”Although value“commonly refers to the price of something,” in “the realm of ideas and principles,” value also signifies what?

ANSWER:
Value also signifies a standard of what is desired, sought, esteemed, and treasure (Roberts 120).

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at February 18, 2014 10:41 AM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 February 2014

Question 4:
If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.

Answer:
Idea is the “results of general and abstract thinking” (Roberts 119), however actions is what the character does. Just because a character does something does not mean the story involves around what the whole story circles around. An idea can determine a character’s action throughout a story.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at February 18, 2014 02:15 PM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
19 February 2014

Question #7:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.

Answer:
Roberts explains to us that when theorizing about a work's ideas, we need to study the speaker and their character in order to determine what they are really trying to tell us. This is necessary because "their ideas can be right or wrong, good or bad" suggesting there could be an underlying meaning behind it all (Roberts 122). If there is not and a hidden message you just need to evaluate the character to determine what their perspective is on the situation. Roberts also says this is required because "even if the speaker is of dubious character, you may nevertheless study the work's ideas" (Roberts 122).

Posted by: Berlin Waters at February 18, 2014 03:35 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 February 2013

Question #6: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, "making a number of formulations" before "selecting one for further development." One formulation technique is to "study the authorial voice". Explain what this means.

Answer: Roberts explains to us that writers "mainly render action dialogue, and situation, they sometimes state the ideas to guide us and deepen our understanding" (Roberts 122). Roberts give us an example from the short story "The Necklace". In the Necklace, the authorial voice " presents the idea that women have no more than charm and beauty to get on in the world" (Roberts 122). From reading "The Necklace" we find out that the main character, Mathilde, has no charm.

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at February 18, 2014 03:42 PM

Bianca T. Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 FEB. 2014

Question#14:As you seek to find the appropriate "place" for ideas in literature, Robert claims that there are some common concepts you must not confuse with the concept of "idea." Identify one of them. BONUS: Identify another one.

Answer:Robert states that it is important to avoid the trap of confusing ideas and actions. And its important to avoid the trap of confusing ideas and situations. He said you must distinguish and understand the two(Roberts 4).


Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at February 18, 2014 06:42 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
18 February 2014

Roberts makes the claim that literature “embodies values along with ideas.”
I’m sure you can think of many values. You have your own and our
institution even has Core Values that we are expected to embrace while here.
Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly, does he
apply it to one of the works we’ve read and studied for this course? Be sure to
correctly identify the author and title.
Roberts Identifies the values “Democracy” and “Justice.” He applies them to “A Jury of Her Peers” by Susan Gaspell and how the men exemplify democracy while Minnie was more concerned with justice.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at February 19, 2014 09:38 AM


Sergio Velazquez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng122 - ACADEMIC WRITING II CA12
February/18/2014


Question # 15. IDENTIFICATION/EXPLANATION: Roberts warns us that ideas “are not as
obvious as characters or setting” and suggests six “different ways in which
authors convey ideas.” The study of these methods will help you find the
major ideas. a.) Identify and b.) explain one of them.

The six types of identification and explanation are ,study the authorial voice, study the statements made by characters,study the works figure of speech,study how character represent ideas,study the work itself and the embodiment of ideas.

The reader can find the Idea of the story if they look for figurative language. For example we understand that “Miss Brill, compares a sunny day to gold and white wine.”(Edger V. Roberts123) We know the sun is not gold or white wine, but we understand that it is a beautiful day.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at February 19, 2014 10:02 AM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
19 Feb. 2014

Question 16:
: In this course, we have already identified several figures of speech. In this chapter, Roberts discusses the importance of paying attention to “figures of speech.” What is a “figure of speech”?

Answer:
"Figure of Speech" is when something is said in a non literal, metaphorical tone. It can be a contrast of what is trying to be expressed, as well. (Roberts 6)

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at February 19, 2014 10:03 AM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
25 February 2014

Question:
In your own words, explain how editors M. H. Abrams and Geoffrey Galt Harpham define the “epiphany” in the excerpt from A Glossary of Literary Terms. Then, show at least one instance how the “epiphany,” according to Abrams’s and Harpham understands of it, is manifested in Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave.”

Answer:
Epiphany is when you have a sudden manifestation of something, usually something involving God and his presence. In Plato’s Allegory of a cave, there was an instance of an epiphany regarding the story as a whole. It shows how people can’t stand the light, however, when that person is able to face the light and find out what reality really is they have this moment of epiphany. An example of this shows when the prisoner was thrown out of the cave and he saw what was really happening ,”Last of he will be able to see the sun, and mere reflections of him in the water, but he will see him in his own proper place, and not in another” (Plato 3).

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at February 25, 2014 02:40 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 30, 2014
Writing about Literature
Question 1:
What does Roberts mean when he says it is better “always express ideas as assertions” rather than “ordinary conversational statements”? What example does he give for an idea stated as something that has no promise of “an argument” and what example does he give for operational sentences that do “make an assertion promising an argument”?
Answer:
Edgar V. Roberts means that expressing idea as assertions allows us to consider and develop the idea of the statement being expressed. For example, Roberts uses the sentence “It’s a nice day” for an ordinary conversational statement. Rather he creates the sentence into something more vivid, “A nice day requires light breezes, blue sky, a warm sun, relaxation, and happiness” (Roberts, 119). This sentence gives us an assertion as to what we would describe a nice day as.

Posted by: Stephanie Vera at October 1, 2014 01:48 PM

Zachary Gary, Sam White
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
1 October, 2014

Question #10:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study how characters represent ideas.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
This quote/ question is meaning the actions and thoughts of the characters can represent the ideas of the author, if they continue to occur.(Roberts 123)
“In effect, characters who stand for ideas can assume symbolic status, as in Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown,” where the protagonist symbolizes the alienation that inevitably accompanies zealousness.”

Posted by: Zachary Gary, Sam White at October 1, 2014 01:48 PM

Elizabeth Brown
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II
1 October 2014

Question #7:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “Making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.

Answer:
When Robert’s suggests the formulation technique, “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker,” he is actually saying you can observe the character in a story and figure out clues that could later help you understand what kind of character they are. Dramatic presentation allows the reader to understand the first-person speaker’s point when present events occur due to experiences. When a speaker is uncertain, or making a confession about a failure you are able to study the work as a whole and assess its ideas.

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at October 1, 2014 01:49 PM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
1 October, 2014

Question #10:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study how characters represent ideas.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
This quote/ question is meaning to find what is obvious about them and how they act. By looking at their actions and see what they do. A great example would be Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” because it is expressing the protagonist and how it is the alienation. Explaining that it can be equated and to talk about them in shorthand about the ideas. (Roberts 123)
“In effect, characters who stand for ideas can assume symbolic status, as in Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown,” where the protagonist symbolizes the alienation that inevitably accompanies zealousness.”

Posted by: Zachary Gary at October 1, 2014 01:49 PM

Elizabeth Brown, Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
1 October 2014

Question #11:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
Edgar V. Roberts gives an interesting example with paint. Like paint, a person can view a text in different ways. A work can also represent human concepts or emotions. The reader has to go beyond the text and try to understand what the true intention of the author is, page 123: “ the various parts collectively can embody major ideas, as in the third section on Bierce’s “ An occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”, which is based on the idea that under great stress the human mind operates with lightning speed.”

Posted by: Elizabeth brown, Stephanie Vera at October 1, 2014 01:56 PM

Rashard Knowles
John Crane
Dr. B Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing CA07
1 October 1, 2014

Question:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering
one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts
suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for
further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the
statements made by characters.” Explain what this means.

Answer:
Characters emotions and dialogue can directly influence the direction of the theme of the story. Depending on the way certain characters express themselves, the reader can obtain an idea of how the story will turn out. Also, statements characters make can also influence the mood or emotions in the story and that the reader

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at October 1, 2014 01:59 PM

Trejon Baynham, Justine Gonzalez
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 07
1 October 2014

QUESTION:
Which two values does Roberts provide as an example and how, exactly, does he apply it to one of the works we’ve studied in class?

ANSWER:
The two values that Roberts provides as examples in his text are democracy and justice. Roberts describes democracy as a “complex representation of ideas” in reference to our political system (Roberts 120). Justice, according to Roberts, is in regards to “equality before the law” and fair review of conduct (Roberts 120). Roberts applies these values, mainly the value of justice, to the short story Trifles written by Susan Glaspell in efforts of explaining the estranged relationship between Minnie Wright and her husband.

Posted by: Trejon Baynham, Justine Gonzalez at October 1, 2014 01:59 PM

Shyra. B Alyssa. D
Dr. Lee Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA07
1 October 2014

Question #1:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering
one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts
suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for
further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the
authorial voice.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
To study authorial voice is to know the writers voice. Portraying the literary term used to describe an individual’s voice, or the writers voice. It can also be known as being irrelevant to understanding a work of literature.

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at October 1, 2014 02:16 PM

Roslyn Thomas Gianna Anderson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
1 October 2014

Question #7.
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “Making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first - person speaker.” Explain what this means.

Answer:
Looking at the people’s personality of the main character makes the difference. It only works when its first person story. “First-person narrators or speakers frequently express ideas along with their depiction of action and situations.” (122)

Posted by: Roslyn at October 1, 2014 02:19 PM

Mickael Dodard Danielle Kluender
Dr.Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
1 October 2014

Question 9
Theorizing about the ideas literature is one thing but actually discovery one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulation “ before “selecting one for further development. “One formulation technique is to “study the works figures of speech.” Explain what this means.

Answer:
“One formulation technique is to “study the works figures of speech.” A figure of speech is a word or phrase used in a nonliteral sense to add rhetorical force to a spoken or written passage. Roberts means that you should study discover all the themes of a story before interpreting an opinion.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at October 1, 2014 02:19 PM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing CA07
1 October, 2014

Question:
5. If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as
this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you
should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations.” Explain why.

Answer:
You should not confuse ideas with situations simply because situations bring ideas, for example, if Mary and her husband had planned to go out on the lake fishing next week and he died today. That situation would raise the idea that obviously next week Mary and her husband will not be fishing becuase he dies. Therefore on page 121 line 16 - 17 Roberts says "... future plans may be destroyed by uncontrollable circumstances, or that fate strikes..."

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at October 1, 2014 10:30 PM

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 29, 2014

QUESTION #6:
One formulation technique is to “study the authorial voice.” Explain what this means.

ANSWER:
The author or narrator will add in very thought provoking and meaningful statements within their works, and then they will use other occurrences in the story to back it up. These extra sentences of input from the author are called authorial voices. These statements “sometimes state ideas to guide us and deepen our understanding” (Roberts 122). The author presents the idea with the statement and then uses situations between the characters in the story to support or even reject the original idea. These can be interpreted slightly different, but one main idea should come about connecting them.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at October 2, 2014 08:15 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 30, 2014
Writing about Literature
Question 1:
What does Roberts mean when he says it is better “always express ideas as assertions” rather than “ordinary conversational statements”? What example does he give for an idea stated as something that has no promise of “an argument” and what example does he give for operational sentences that do “make an assertion promising an argument”?
Answer:
Edgar V. Roberts means that expressing idea as assertions allows us to consider and develop the idea of the statement being expressed. For example, Roberts uses the sentence “It’s a nice day” for an ordinary conversational statement. Rather he creates the sentence into something more vivid, “A nice day requires light breezes, blue sky, a warm sun, relaxation, and happiness” (Roberts, 119). This sentence gives us an assertion as to what we would describe a nice day as.

Posted by: Stephanie Vera at October 5, 2014 11:40 PM

Trejon A Baynham
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 CA 07
29 September 2014

ANSWER:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work’s figures of speech.” Explain what this means.

QUESTION:
The term figure of speech refers to a work’s usage of a word or phrase in way that goes beyond its literal meaning for rhetorical purposes. Figure of speech is a form of figurative language. To study a work’s figure of speech means to analyze aspects of the author’s writing – such as their usage of simile and metaphor – to surface an often undisclosed interpretation of the text. In his example of Susan Glaspell’s Trifles, Roberts points out that Glaspell compares the husband to ‘a raw wind that gets to the bone,” Roberts continues that with that demonstration of figure of speech “Glaspell conveys the idea of bluntness, indifference, and cruelty create great personal damage” (Roberts 123).

Posted by: Trejon Baynham at October 6, 2014 08:50 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
13 February 2015

Question: Roberts makes the claim that literature “embodies values along with ideas.” I’m sure you can think of many values. You have your own and our institution even has Core Values that we are expected to embrace while here. Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly, does he
apply it to one of the works we’ve read and studied for this course? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title.

Answer: Roberts uses the value, justice, in Susan Glaspell’s Trifles as an example. At first it seems justice for the murder of the farmer would be for his wife to be convicted for his death. As the story progresses the reader’s and the character’s perspective of justice changes. “… justice as an idea also involves a full and fair consideration of the circumstances and motivation of wrongdoing.” (Roberts 120) They learn how the wife was ‘justified’ in freeing herself from her husband. The perception of justice has changed by the end of the story, justice “should be tempered with understanding.” (Roberts 120)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 13, 2015 12:23 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
15 February 2015

“Writing About an Idea or Theme”

Question #15: Identification/Explanation: Roberts warns us that ideas “are not as obvious as characters or setting” and suggests six “different ways in which authors convey ideas.” The study of these methods will help you find the major ideas. A.) Identify and b.) explain one of them.

One of the major ideas are by studying the authorial voice, sometimes the dialogue state ideas to deepen our understanding. “In the second paragraph of Maupassant’s “The Necklace”, for example, the authorial voice presents the idea that women have no than charm and beauty to get in the world.” Maupassant uses this story to convey that Mathilde’s charm cannot prevent disaster. (Roberts page 122)

Posted by: Selena Hammie at February 15, 2015 06:50 PM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
15 February 2015

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain what this means.
Answer: “Study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas” means to help readers forget problems causing them to think more. “Even “escape literature,” which ostensibly enables readers to forget immediate problems, contains conflict between good and evil, love and hate, good spies and bad, earthlings and alien, and so on. Thereby, such works do embody ideas, even though their avowed intention is not to make readers think but rather help them to forget.”(Pg.123)

Posted by: Rachel Addington at February 15, 2015 08:17 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA 12
15 February 15

Writing about Idea or Theme Discussion Question

Question 9: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. One suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development”. One formulation technique is to “study the works figures of speech.” Explain what that means.

Answer: “Figurative language is one of the major components of poetry” (Roberts 6). Figures of speech are an expressive language used as a metaphor, simile, or personification to suggest something. This type of writing is used in narratives and dramas. For example, in the short story “Trifles,” a man is compared to “a raw wind that gets to the bone” (Roberts 6). Writers do this in a way that describes something using imagery.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 15, 2015 11:26 PM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
16 February 2015

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of foundations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work’s figures of speech.” Explain what this means.

Answer: What Roberts is meaning with, “study the work’s figures of speech” is that figurative language is a huge key to poetry and also fiction as well. It engages the reader to think more into what he/she just read and to create a better idea of what the writer wants the reader to visualize what they meant. In Trifles, “when one of the characters compares John Wright, the murdered husband, with ‘a raw wind that gets to the bone’ (speech 103). With this figurative language, Glaspell conveys the idea that bluntness, indifference, and cruelty create great personal damage” (Roberts 123). That being said, the “study of work’s figures of speech” is an excellent technique for a writer to incorporate into their writings due to the fact that it helps the reader get a better idea of what the author wanted them to get out of their reading.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at February 16, 2015 12:34 AM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
16 February 2015

Question 4: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with "actions." Explain why.

Answer: You should not confuse ideas with "actions" because an action may convey one thing but the idea of the work may be reveled in the words. "Although authors mainly render action, dialogue and situation, they sometimes state ideas to guide us and deepen our understanding" (Robert 122) Roberts mentions as we should look at the authorial voice not so much of the actions.

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 16, 2015 05:44 PM

Jorge Braham

Dr. Hobbs

Academic Writing II CA12

13 February 2015

Question:

“Most stories,” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?

Answer:

“when on of the ideas seems to turn up over and over again throughout a work it is called a theme. In practice, there words theme and major idea are the same.”(Roberts 119) This occurs in the story of An Occurrence at Owl Creek. Usually, a story that has this contains many ideas.

Posted by: jorge Braham at February 17, 2015 12:22 AM

Diego Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
16 February 2015

Discussion Question

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering
one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the authorial voice.” Explain what this means.

Answer: The authorial voice is an idea that an author states that will “guide us and deepen our understanding.” (Roberts 5). By studying this idea, one can gain more of an understanding of why the author wrote the story.

Posted by: Diego Garcia at February 17, 2015 01:26 AM

Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA 12
17 February 2015

Question 14:
As you seek to find the appropriate “place” for ideas in literature, Robert claims that there are some common concepts you must not confuse with the concept of “idea”. Identify one of them.

Answer:
One of the common concepts Roberts says you must not confuse with idea are Ideas and situations.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 17, 2015 03:57 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 February 2015

Question 13: In this chapter, Roberts says “Literature embodies values along with ideas.” Although value “commonly refers to the price of something,” in “the realm of ideas and principles,” value also signifies what?
Answer: In the realm of ideas and principles, value is something that is desired, sought, esteemed, and treasured (Roberts 120).

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 17, 2015 08:22 PM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
17 February 2015

Question: Which two values do Roberts provides as an example and how, exactly, how does he apply it to one of the works we have read and studied for the course?

Answer: One of the examples Roberts give is justice, which he defines as equality before the law and fair evaluation. In Trifles, he says the two women considered Minnie’s situation as they examined her kitchen. He compared their speeches to jury-like deliberation because of how they sympathized with Minnie. Their final decision to hide the evidence was the women showing their ideas of justice. The other example Robert gives is democracy referring to our political system. “…but it is also a complex idea of a representative government that we esteem most highly, and so do we esteem concepts like honor, cooperation, generosity, and love.” (Roberts 3) He is saying there is a difference between the political term of democracy and the way we view democracy based on our values.

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at February 17, 2015 09:18 PM

Alison Colon
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA12
18 February 2015

Question 8 : Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the statements made by characters.” Explain what this means.

Answer: The technique of “studying the statements made by characters” is described as interpreting and evaluating the views expressed by the characters (Roberts 123) . In literature the characters may have controversial views and ideas and when making formulations that you intend on developing further you need to study the topics presented and interpret them accordingly . You may not agree with the ideas and views presented and some may be contemptible which is why you must study them more in depth before selecting one to begin writing about.

Posted by: Alison Colon at February 18, 2015 12:58 AM

Rously Paul
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 February 2015


Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations.” Explain why.

Answer: Robert’s tip on confusing ideas and situations is to avoid drifting focus by thinking more about the idea than the situation at hand, Roberts uses Lowell’s Poem “Patterns” in his explanation where he states, “…the narrator is describing what is happening to her as a result of her fiancé’s death. Her plight is not an idea, but a situation that brings out ideas.”(Page 4 Paragraph 2) Roberts goes on to add that to distinguish various situations from the author’s major purpose and ideas.

Posted by: Rously Paul at February 18, 2015 09:06 AM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 February 2015

Writing about an Idea or a Theme

Question #7: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.

Answer: Roberts explains that the first-person speakers “frequently express ideas along with their depiction of actions and situations, and make statements that you can make inferences about ideas” (Roberts 122). The characters choice of words can foreshadow on the remainder of the story. The ideas of the first-person speakers can be “right or wrong, well-considered or thoughtless, good or bad” (Robert 122).

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at February 18, 2015 09:21 AM

Aderias Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
18 February 2015
16. SHORT ANSWER: In this course, we have already identified several figures of speech. In this chapter, Roberts discusses the importance of paying attention to “figures of speech.” What is a “figure of speech”?
A figure of speech is a word or phrase used in a nonliteral sense to add rhetorical force to a spoken or written passage. In this chapter figure of speech is important because it helps create a picture before the mind; others gratify the sense of proportion; others adorn the subject by contrasting it with some other which is like or unlike; and thus in various ways they appeal to the aesthetical sensibilities. Helps enable the author to change his form of expression at will. Contributes to perspicuity, by the power which many of them have of throwing fresh light upon a subject by presenting it in a new and unexpected form.

Posted by: aderias ewing at February 18, 2015 09:47 AM

Amber Dunlap, Alison Colon, Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing CA 12
18 February 2015

Question:
What does it mean to study the character?

Answer:
To study the character means to study there statements and views before actually choosing the character. For example, how they speak and how they react to certain things.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 18, 2015 10:44 AM

Kathleen Sholl and Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
18 February 15

Writing about an Idea or Theme Discussion Question

Question 5: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations.” Explain why.

Answer: Readers should not confuse ideas with “situations” because it could interfere with understanding events on a larger scale. For example, “the major character, Jackie, misbehaves at home and tries to slash his sister with a breadknife. This sentence describes a major action, but it does not express an idea that connects characters and events” (Roberts 4). Readers must be able to distinguish situations from the writer’s ideas. If they do not accomplish that, they will not be able to focus on ideas and therefore it will be more common to confuse situations with ideas. “To find an idea, you need to consider the meaning of what you read” (Roberts 4). Readers must also be aware how the writer conveys ideas. Sometimes, situations can bring out ideas as well. Readers must be on their toes, and dig deep to separate these two concepts.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl and Selena Hammie at February 18, 2015 11:06 AM

Emily Buckley and Diego Garcia
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 February 2015

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.

Answer: The idea of the story could be completely different than the action. This could sidetrack the reader from the idea in the story. “This sentence successfully describes a major action in the story, but it does not express an idea that connects characters and events, and for this reason it obstructs understanding.” (Roberts 121)

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Diego Garcia at February 18, 2015 11:33 AM

Charis Lavoie and Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Question 7: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.
Answer: From a first-person perspective, they express their ideas along with their individual depiction of actions and situations. Depending on the character whose point is being told the thoughts could be right or wrong, good or bad, brilliant or half-baked all depending on the speaker (Roberts 122).

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 19, 2015 04:20 PM

Aderias N Ewing & Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
19 February 2015
Group 3
Question 3: Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly does he apply it to one of the stories we read and studied?
Two values used in Roberts’s example are democracy and justice. Applies to Glaspell’s play “Triflies.” For justice she did kill her husband so she should go to jail; on the other hand the wives see justice that she got away from an abusive husband.

Posted by: aderias ewing & Mallory Delay at February 19, 2015 07:04 PM

Emma Riemer and Rachel Addington
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Idea and Theme

The authorial voice is the way the author writes to deepen the understanding of the meaning of the story. In order for the reader to understand what the idea of the story is.

Posted by: Emma Riemer and rachel addington at February 19, 2015 09:05 PM

Vallinique Martin and Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
18 February 2015

Question: What two terms does Robert identify as an idea that “turns up over and over throughout a work”?
Answer: “When one of the ideas seems to turn up over and over in a work, it is a called a theme.” (Roberts 2) The two terms Robert identifies as an idea are value and assertions.

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at February 19, 2015 10:18 PM

Rously Paul and Jorge Braham
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Question:. What does Roberts mean when he says it is better “always express ideas as
assertions” rather than “ordinary conversational statements”? What example
does he give for an idea stated as something that has no promise of “an
argument” and what examples does he give for operational sentences that do
“make an assertion promising an argument”? Be sure to correctly identify the
author and title of the texts referenced.

Answer:
Roberts believes expressing good operational idea rather than a vacant statement allows thoughts to flow like in his example of a “nice day” adding the assertion of what qualifies a nice day allows for an argument. An idea without a promise of argument is a way of condensing Chekov’s “The Bear” where an idea without promise of argument is saying the story is about love rather than a good operational thought that Roberts provides like “This play demonstrates the idea that love is irrational and irresistible”. Another example being in Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek” using a statement like “Farquhar embodies the idea that perception is produced in human beings more by hope than reality.”

Posted by: Rously Paul and Jorge Braham at February 20, 2015 08:44 AM

Rachel Addington and Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

The theme of “The Storm” is adultery because while Claxita’s husband, Boinôt, and son, Bibi, were out during the storm, she went to go have an affair with Alcee. Claxita finds her affair more pleasing than being with her husband. Eventually, the storm subsides and Boiôt and Bibi come home to her making dinner and she acts as if nothing had happened with her and Alcee. “The generous abundance of her passion, without guile or trickery, was like a white flame which penetrated and found response in depths of his own sensuous nature that had never yet been reached.” (Page 4)

Posted by: Rachel Addington at February 20, 2015 11:07 AM

Kathleen Sholl, Amber Dunlap, Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA 12
20 February 15

The Masque of the Red Death Group Discussion Question

Question: What are the themes of The Masque of the Red Death?

Answer: There are many themes in this short story. These themes include mortality, delusion, fear, and foolishness. Mortality is considered a theme in this story because the characters are attempting to escape death at all costs and are just trying to live in the moment until they are reminded of their fears when death joins them at the party. The next theme, delusion, is a theme because Prince Prospero is making up an alternative universe to make his party over the top and seems to be absorbed in himself because he is snobby. The third theme, fear, is a theme because the focus of the story is horror, which draws the reader in and puts them on the edge of their seats. Poe describes the fear set in as, “the redness and the horror of blood” (Poe 3). The partygoers are also fearful of their own deaths as well as Prince Prospero who spends his time avoiding the plague. Poe describes the companies reaction as, “then, finally, of terror, of horror, and disgust” (Poe 7). The last theme, foolishness, is a theme because the partygoers mock death. Poe describes their foolishness as, “the musicians looked at each other and smiled” (Poe 5). Once death actually comes to the party, they do not necessary care, and just go to a new location. The company’s focus is pleasure and happiness of themselves due to their extravagant, rich, high-class mindset.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl, Amber Dunlap, Charis Lavoie at February 20, 2015 11:43 AM

Diego Garcia and Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Question: What is the Theme for O’Connor’s “A Good Man is hard to Find”?

Answer: Family, Good vs. Evil, Faith, and Nostalgia are some of the themes within this short story, nostalgia being the main theme. The theme of family is shown more in the beginning when they all get in the car and go on a road trip together. The grandmother being good and the misfit being evil show the theme of good vs. evil; they both face off after the family crashes. The theme of Nostalgia is shown at the beginning and end of the story when the grandmother remembers her past. One of O’Connor’s examples is when he says “She said he was a very good-looking man and a gentleman and that he brought her a watermelon every Saturday afternoon with his initials cut in it, E. A. T.” (O’Connor 3). He uses it again when the Misfit remembers being a part of the gospel singer and remembers his parents on page 9 and 10.

Posted by: Diego Garcia and Mallory Delay at February 22, 2015 04:06 PM

Emily Buckley and Alison Colon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
20 February 2015

Question: What is the theme in the story “The Three Strangers” by Thomas Hardy?

Answer: The theme of this story is rooted in the struggle between the rich and the poor. The higher-class party goers (constable, hangman) are guilty of being deceitful (when the constable sends the party out instead of him doing the work.) They are arrogant because they believe they are capable of taking care of the convict without a struggle. They are self-righteous because they condemn the poor sheep thief despite the circumstances by which he was forced to steal. On the other hand, the lower class characters such as the shepherd show humility they do not condemn the convict right away; they believe justice has not been given to the poor sheep thief.

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Alison Colon at February 22, 2015 05:45 PM

Emily Buckley and Emma Riemer and Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23 February 2015

Question: What are some symbols used in “The Masque of the Red Death?”


Answer: The primary symbol of the story would be the ‘Red Death Man’ who represents the Red Death Plague. There are many other symbols in the story such as the following: the clock, the black and red room, the masks, the castle, and the movement of ‘the red death.’ The clock represents the passing of time, and the imminent death of the partygoers. The black and red room represents death. This room could also represent the end of the story or the end of the lives of the wealthy because the story ends in the black and red room. The Masks of the party goers represents how they were hiding themselves from the plague. The castle itself represents protection or separation from the plague. The movement of the ‘red death’ moves through the rooms infecting everyone.

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Emma Riemer and Charis Lavoie at February 23, 2015 11:47 AM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
25 September 2015

Question 2: “Most stories”, says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?
Answer: Roberts uses the terms theme and major idea to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”. Roberts uses the story, “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce as an example. He writes, “an assertion like the following would advance further argument: ‘Farquhar embodies the idea that perception is produced in human beings more by hope than by reality’” (Roberts, 2).

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 25, 2015 11:14 AM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
25 September 2015

Question: IDENTIFICATION/EXPLANATION: Roberts warns us that ideas "are not as obvious as characters or setting" and suggests six "different ways in which authors convey ideas." The study of these methods will help you find the major ideas. a.) Identify and b.) explain one of them.

Answer: The six different ways in which authors convey ideas is to study the authorial voice, the character and the words of the first-person speaker or the statements made by characters. Also to examine the work's figure of speech, how characters represent ideas, and the work itself as an embodiment of ideas. Robert states, "To determine an idea, you need to consider the meaning of what you read and then to develop explanatory and comprehensive assertions." For example, in "Araby" by James Joyce, the narrator was representing ideas by showing the reader how much he was obsessed and in love he was with Mangan's sister. Joyce states, "I had hardly any patience with the serious work of life which, now that it stood between me and my desire, seemed to me child's play, ugly monotonous child's play" (Joyce, 4). The narrator's uncle, who was a drinker, arrived home and said to him that he was a just a boy. After the narrator had gone to the bazaar, he knew once he went that Mangan's sister did not love him back. So, he gave up.

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 25, 2015 03:18 PM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
26 September 2015

Question: 12.FILL-IN-THE-BLANKS
a.) According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 7, “the result or results of general abstract thinking” is called a/an ___________________ Hint: “Synonymous words are concept, thought, opinion, and principle.
b.) In reference to the word above, most literary works have many of them. When one of them recurs “over and over again throughout a work,” it is called a ____________________.

Answer:
a.) According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 7, “the result or results of general abstract thinking” is called a/an idea. Hint: “Synonymous words are concept, thought, opinion, and principle (Roberts 119).
b.) In reference to the word above, most literary works have many of them. When one of them recurs “over and over again throughout a work,” it is called a theme (Roberts 119).

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at September 26, 2015 12:00 PM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
26 September 2015


Question: Roberts makes the claim that literature “embodies values along with ideas.”
I’m sure you can think of many values. You have your own and our institution even has Core Values that we are expected to embrace while here. Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly, does he apply it to one of the works we’ve read and studied for this course? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title.


Answer: The two values presented in “Writing about Ideas or themes” by Roberts are justice and democracy. The author states that every story has a certain moral or ideal guiding the theme or action of the character. One example that Roberts mentions is “Trifles” by Susan Glaspell. A thirty-year-old marriage of fear and unfairness ends by the hand of Mrs. Wright—a woman who has always been known by her neighbors as the cheering and loving wife of Mr. Wright. However, one day she stood up for herself and decided to end the mistreatment by killing her husband. The values of justice and democracy are present when the two woman of the story are speaking to each other about the fond memories they had of Mrs. Wright; “many of their speeches showing their sympathy to Minnie were equivalent to a jury like deliberation,” confirmed Roberts (120).” In spite of the modern concept of the words democracy and justice, in the story, they represent the mere image of love and consideration from the characters towards other characters or cause.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 26, 2015 07:03 PM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
26 September 2015

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work’s figures of speech.” Explain what this means.

Answer: In Roberts’s chapter on “Writings About an Idea or a Theme,” he states that studying the figures of speech in literature helps one construct ideas about the work. The figures of speech found can be used to show irony. Roberts gives us an example found in “Miss Brill” by Mansfield. “A sunny day compared to white and gold wine” shows irony saying the world is very cheerful in contrast to Miss Brill’s miserable event-filled life (Roberts 123). Another purpose of the figures of speech is to describe an idea, such as in “Trifles.” When Mrs. Hale compares the deceased Mr. Wright to “a raw wind that gets to the bone,” it conveys the idea that Mr. Wright caused physical harm to his wife (Roberts 123).

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 26, 2015 07:33 PM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CAO3
September 26, 2015

Question: IDENTIFICATION: As you seek to find the appropriate “place” for ideas in literature, Robert claims that there are some common concepts you must not confuse with the concept of “idea.” Identify one of them. BONUS: Identify another one.

Answer: An idea is the result or results of a general and abstract thinking (Roberts 2). Ideas are vital to understanding and appreciating literature. An example of it is in The Bear, Chekhov directs laughter at two unlikely people and suddenly unpredictably falls in love (Roberts 3). It is this because its bakes on the idea that love takes priority over other resolutions that people might make.

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 26, 2015 09:18 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
25 September 2015

Question: IDENTIFICATION/EXPLANATION: Roberts warns us that ideas “are not as obvious as characters or setting” and suggests six “different ways in which authors convey ideas.” The study of these methods will help you find the major ideas. a.) Identify and b.) Explain one of them.

Answer: Roberts explains that there are six different ways authors can convey ideas, and one of them is to study the statements made by characters. Often characters will express their views on a topic that can be right or wrong, praiseworthy or reprehensible. The character’s view on the topic can reveal an idea(s) that the author conveys in the story. For example, “In Chekhov’s The Bear, both Smirnov and Mrs. Popov express many silly ideas about love and duty as they begin speaking to each other, and it is the sudden force of their love that reveals how wrongheaded their previous ideas have been”(Roberts 122).

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at September 27, 2015 01:04 PM

Catalina Suarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
27 September 2015

Question #5: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations.” Explain why.
Answer: You should not confuse ideas with “situations” because a situation is something that brings out ideas while ideas, “refers to the result or results of general and abstract thinking.” (Roberts, 2). Somewhat like a cause and effect relationship, the situation or a happening can cause someone to gain an idea or meaning after the specific situation

Posted by: Catalina Suarez at September 27, 2015 04:52 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
27 September 2015


“Figurative language is one of the major components of poetry, but it also abounds in prose fiction. In the sonnet, “Bright Star,” for example, Keats symbolizes the idea of constancy with his references to a fixed star (such as the North Star).”
“Another notable figure occurs in Glaspell’s Trifles, when one of the characters compares John Wright, the murdered husband, with “a raw wind that gets to the bone” (speech 103). With this figurative language. Glaspell conveys the idea that bluntness, indifference, and cruelty create great personal damage.”

Question: In this course, we have already identified several figures of speech. In this chapter, Roberts discusses the importance of paying attention to “figures of speech.” What is a “figure of speech”?

Answer: A figure of speech is one of the major components of poetry, but it also abounds in prose fiction (Roberts 123). An example of this would be in the sonnet, “Bright Star,” where Keats symbolizes the idea of constancy with his references to a fixed star (e.g. North Star) (Roberts 123). Another figure appears in Glaspell’s Trifles, when one of the characters compares John Wright, the murdered husband, with “a raw wind that gets to the bone” (Roberts 123). With that kind of figurative language, Glaspell conveys the idea that bluntness, indifference, and cruelty create great personal damage. (Roberts 123)

Posted by: Hana Lee at September 27, 2015 07:14 PM

Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
27 September 2015

Question 7: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.

Answer: For first-person narrators they frequently express ideas along with their depiction of actions on situations. They also make statements from which you can make inferences about. From what first-person says, it is apart of the dramatic presentation and their ideas could be right or wrong, good or bad and so on. But for every speaker you can nevertheless study and evaluate the works ideas.

Posted by: Jaclyn Taylor at September 27, 2015 07:40 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
25 September 2015

Question: Roberts suggest, “Making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.

Answer: “First-person narrators tend to express ideas with their depiction of actions and situations.” They make statements understandable enough to where the reader can infer a set of personal ideas towards the story. The narrator’s dramatic presentation can make your ideas right or wrong with just one action or situation.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 27, 2015 07:52 PM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
27 September 2015

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, "making a number of formulations" before "selecting one for further development." One formulation technique is to "study how characters represent ideas." Explain what this means.

Answer: This means that characters can represent the theme that goes throughout the whole story. Robert says, "Two diverse or opposed characters can embody contrasting ideas" (Roberts 123). So in "The Necklace" the theme is "that unrealizable dreams can damage the real world" (Roberts 123). Which means that Matilda wanted to be rich, but really she couldn't handle it and she lost the necklace and made her life miserable but having to work overtime so that she could give back the necklace to Mrs. Forrestier.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 27, 2015 09:10 PM

Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA03
27 September 2015

Question: FILL-IN-THE-BLANKS
a.) According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 7, “the result or results of general abstract thinking” is called a/an ___________________ Hint: “Synonymous words are concept, thought, opinion, and principle.
b.) In reference to the word above, most literary works have many of them. When one of them recurs “over and over again throughout a work,” it is called a ____________________.

Answer:
a.) theme
b.) motif

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 27, 2015 09:14 PM

ENG 122 CA03
“Writing about Theme or Idea”
Robert’s
28 September 2015


Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “ study the authorial voice .” Explain what this means
Answer: One formula that Robert’s discussed was to “study the authorial voice.” This formula in theory means you are looking to understand what the author is trying to portray to his audience. This gives you the ability to reach out to the readers knowing what the voice of tone is referring to.

Posted by: Tannor Berry at September 27, 2015 09:43 PM

Yaribilisa Colon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
9/27/2015

QUESTION: In this course, we have already identified several figures of
Speech. In this chapter, Roberts discusses the importance of paying attention
To “figures of speech.” What is a “figure of speech”?

ANSWER: Figure of speech is a word or phrase used in a non literal sense to add rhetorical force to a spoken or written passage. It is important to pay attention to figures of speech because not only will it help you understand things in the story, but it will also help you understand the metaphors used.

Posted by: Yaribilisa Colon at September 28, 2015 12:14 AM

Madison Helms
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
28 September 2015

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering
one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts
suggests,“making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for
further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the
statements made by characters.” Explain what this means.

Answer: Roberts says, "First person narratives or speakers frequently express ideas along with their depiction of actions and situations, and they also make statements from which you can make inferences about ideas"(pg.5) He also states that, "characters express their own views, which can be right or wrong, admirable or contemptible(pg.5)

Posted by: Madison Helms at September 28, 2015 09:27 AM

Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09
28 September 2015

Question: a.) According to Edgar V. Roberts, in Chapter 7, “the result or results of general abstract thinking” is called a/an ___________________ Hint: “Synonymous words are concept, thought, opinion, and principle.
b.) In reference to the word above, most literary works have many of them. When one of them recurs “over and over again throughout a work,” it is called a ____________________.


Answer: a.) idea (page 1)
b.) theme (Page 2)

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 28, 2015 09:51 AM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing CA09
27 September 2015

Question:
IDENTIFICATION: As you seek to find the appropriate “place” for ideas in literature, Robert claims that there are some common concepts you must not confuse with the concept of “idea.” Identify one of them. BONUS: Identify another one.
Answer:
One of the common concepts that Roberts explains is that " Its not appropriate to go "Message hunting" as though their work contains nothing but ideas." ( Roberts 120) and what he means by that is that is let the story flow out don’t over sell it.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at September 28, 2015 11:05 AM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.

Answer: Roberts says not to confuse ideas with actions because it "describes a major action in the story, but it does not express an idea" (Roberts 121). He also says, "it obstructs understanding," meaning confusion between the two will confuse the readers or listeners even more.

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at September 28, 2015 12:54 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class excercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with "situations." Explain why.

Answer: According to Roberts, one should not confuse ideas with situations. He states “ In Lowell’s poem “Patterns,” the narrator describes what is happening to her as a result of her fiancé's death. Her plight is not an idea, but a situation that brings out ideas, such as that plans may be destroyed by uncontrollable circumstances or that fate strikes the fortunate as well as the unfortunate, or that human institutions often seem arbitrary, capricious, and cruel” (Roberts 121). By this statement, Roberts is trying to explain the differentiation between a situation and an idea. Ideas can be formulated from a situation, but a situation is separate from an idea. If one can tell the difference between ideas and situations, they will be able to sharpen their thinking to focus on the important matters at hand.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at September 28, 2015 01:28 PM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question: What does Roberts mean when he says it is better “always express ideas as assertions” rather than “ordinary conversational statements”? What example does he give for an idea stated as something that has no promise of “an argument” and what examples does he give for operational sentences that do “make an assertion promising an argument”? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title of the texts referenced.
Answer: Roberts’ statement “always express ideas as assertions” is, in a way, Roberts’ way of saying “back up what you’re saying”. In order to convey your understanding of an idea in literature, you must provide an argument or make an assertion. Roberts’ basic example is the phrase “it’s a nice day”, which can be true but according to Roberts “gives us no ideas and does not stimulate our minds” (Roberts 119). An actual assertion would be along the lines of “to be a nice day there can be no clouds and the temperature must be between 70-75 degrees”, which gives us an idea to start from so we can ponder the idea of the word “nice”. In actual literature, you must make assertions based on your comprehension of the story and any ideas you may have come up with. Chekov’s The Bear is featured as an example. A correct assertion, as given by Roberts, would be “This play demonstrates that love is irrational and irresistible” (Roberts 119). The statement presents Love as an idea from the play and provides an assertion that it is irrational, thus providing a means of digressing on the idea of Love.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 28, 2015 01:30 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question #3
Question: Roberts makes the claim that literature “embodies values along with ideas.” I’m sure you can think of many values. You have your own and our institution even has Core Values that we are expected to embrace while here. Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly, does he apply it to one of the works we’ve read and studied for this course? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title.

Answer: Roberts lists two examples from his text to demonstrate that literature “embodies values along with ideas” (Roberts 120). These two things are democracy and justice. Roberts compares justice to the play “Trifles” by Susan Glaspell (Roberts 120). Justice is one of those things that really depends on the person. Everyone has a different sense of justice. One person might think the death penalty is worthy of the crime while the other might think that no crime was committed at all and that the person was “justified” in their actions. Justice is biased and inconsistent. When someone says, “I want to get justice” be careful because there is a good chance that both of your versions of justice might be very different. Roberts points out the different views of justice from the women and men in “Trifles” (Roberts 120). The men are positive that Minnie is guilty and should go to jail, while the women believe that her actions are understandable and she shouldn’t be prosecuted (Roberts 120).

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at September 28, 2015 01:58 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means
Answer: A first-person narrative is a story from the first-person perspective: the viewpoint of a character writing or speaking directly about itself. In films, videos, or video games, a first-person perspective could also be that the narrative is shot or accessible as if straight coming from a character's in-body point of view, representing exactly what the character sees or understands. The narrators of written works clearly mention to themselves using variations of "I" and "we" characteristically as well as other characters. This lets the reader or spectators to understand the point of view such as opinions, thoughts, and feelings solitary of the narrator, and no other characters. In some stories, first-person speakers might mention to info they have caught from the other characters, in order to attempt to bring a bigger point of view. Other stories can change from one narrator to another, letting the reader or audience to involvement the thoughts and feelings of more than one character or character plural.

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at September 28, 2015 02:40 PM

Peyton Farrier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
28 September 2015

Question: “Most stories,” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?

Answer: Roberts uses the words sentence and assertions to describe the stories. "Good operational sentences about ideas are not the same as ordinary conversational statements such as 'it's a nice day' you can make an assertion about the word nice with light breezes, blue sky, warm sun, and happiness.

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at September 28, 2015 02:56 PM

Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobbs
English Academic Writing CA09
September 28, 2015

Question: What does Roberts mean when he says it is better “always express ideas as assertions” rather than “ordinary conversational statements”? What example does he give for an idea stated as something that has no promise of “an argument” and what examples does he give for operational sentences that do “make an assertion promising an argument”? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title of the texts referenced.

Answer: It is better to use assertions because it give the writer way to argue their idea whereas conversational statements makes it hard to discuss the idea. Roberts said, “…an idea in Chekhov’s The Bear is ‘love’” to show that there is no promise of an argument (Roberts 7). To make an assertion promising an argument, Robert uses The Bear by Chekhov idea, “The play demonstrated the idea that love is irrational and irresistible” (Roberts 7).

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at September 28, 2015 03:02 PM

Zekeriya kayaselcuk

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09

September 28, 2015


Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the statements made by characters.” Explain what this means.

Answer: “In many stories, characters express their own views, which can be right or wrong, admirable or contemptible.” (Roberts pg. 122). According to Edgar V. Roberts, this technique is used to identify the true ideas of the story. Roberts uses “The Bear” by Chekov and “Trifles” by Susan Glaspell as examples. In the short story “The Bear”, Smirnoff and Mrs. Popov constantly argued throughout the story. Each character expressed their views about love. After interpreting and evaluating their statements, their love reveals how both of their views were wrong. In the end, Smirnoff and Popov fall in love with each other. As for ”Trifles”, the men express their ideas of women, although the women mock the men for their findings. The play shows the stupidity of the men because the women find the truth behind the murder.

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk at September 28, 2015 03:11 PM

Peyton Farrier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
28 September 2015

Question :“Most stories,” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?

Answer: Robert states theme and major idea "an idea that turns up over and over again throughout a work" (Robert 119).

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at September 28, 2015 03:58 PM

Group 2 Sidnee Yaeger, Peyton Farrier
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question 2: “Most stories,” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?

Answer: Robert says theme and major idea is “when one of the ideas seems to turn up over and over again throughout a work” (Roberts 119).

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger, Peyton Farrier at September 28, 2015 04:06 PM

Jorge, Brad
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing CA09
28 September 2015

Question:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the authorial voice.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
The authoritative voice stimulates the mind into listening to what the reader ideas. For a conversation is it informal and not assertive. Conversing it true but still doesn’t challenge the mind to the readers message "Although single words can name ideas, we must put theses words into operation in sentences or assertions before they can advance our understanding." (Edgar )

Question:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
"First person narrators or speakers frequently express ideas along with their depiction of actions and situations, and they also make statements from which you can make inferences about ideas." (Roberts 122) This explains that any idea can be right or wrong can be well thought out or thoughtless it depends on the speaker.

Question:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the statements made by characters.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
This means that the characters are allowed to make or express their own views. They can be right or wrong it really up to the reader. Edgar shows the readers the techniques into finding the statements that character say or think. One formula is to find out why it is so important to have ideas and what values they have. Another technique is " Are ideas limited to members, of any groups represented by the character( Age, Race, nationality, personal status)? or are the ideas applicable to general conditions of life?" (Edgars 124)

Posted by: jorge and brad at September 28, 2015 04:17 PM

Lawrence Watt, Necdet Gurkan, Zekeriya Kayaselcuk
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question: What does Roberts mean when he says it is better "always express ideas as assertions" rather than "ordinary conversational statements"? What example does he give for an idea stated as something that has no promise of "an argument" and what examples does he give for operational sentences that do "make an assertion promising an argument"? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title of the texts referenced.

Answer: When Roberts says it is better “always to express ideas as assertions” rather than “ordinary conversational statements” he is saying that by taking a simple idea and putting it into an operational sentence or making an assertion about the idea allows for advancement of the understanding of the idea and allows for the reader to consider and develop the idea. “A nice day requires light breezes, blue sky, a warm sun, relaxation, and happiness.” Because this statement makes an assertion about the word nice it allows us to consider and develop the idea of a nice day” (Roberts 119). Here Roberts shows an example of an assertion of an idea and explains what the assertion does to the idea. The idea is love, and the assertion is the elaboration about the love that is put into statement form. By elaborating or asserting further on the idea of love one can expand more on the idea to better understand it. The quote above that is from Checkov’s “The Bear” love is the idea stated that has no promise of an argument because it is not asserted, there is no elaboration on what love is. The quote above is an example of an operational sentence that makes an assertion promising an argument. By taking the idea of love and elaborating on it, there can now be an argument on it because love has now been described and put into an assertive statement. One could either agree or disagree with this assertion.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at September 28, 2015 04:17 PM

Group 4
Brittany and Daniel
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Questions: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.

If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations.” Explain why.

Answer: Ideas and actions or situations should not be confused because ideas are not always acted upon. By talking about something that is acted upon, "it does not express an idea" (Roberts 121). Another way to separate the three would be that ideas do not come with consequences, only actions and situations do. They should not be confused because none of these things are the same. Ideas are not tangible; they are simply concepts.

Posted by: Brittany and Daniel at September 28, 2015 04:18 PM

Maria Gonzalez, Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question #3: Roberts makes the claim that literature “embodies values along with ideas.” I’m sure you can think of many values. You have your own and our institution even has Core Values that we are expected to embrace while here. Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly, does he apply it to one of the works we’ve read and studied for this course? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title.

Answer: The two values that Roberts provides examples are democracy and justice. He applies them to the play “Trifles” by Susan Glaspell. In the democracy example he states, “Democracy refers to our political system, but it is also a complex idea of representative government that we esteem most highly” (Roberts 120). This can be seen in the play where the democracy value is missing. In contrast, for the justice example, he identifies it within the play of Glaspell. “Justice involves equality before the law and also the fair evaluation of conduct that is deemed unacceptable or illegal” (Roberts 120). He goes on and states that the men want Mrs. Wright convicted for killing the husband; however, the women identify the reason and conclude that the circumstances justify the murder (Roberts 120). In this example, Roberts clearly states how one value can be seen differently from different perspectives.

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at September 28, 2015 04:20 PM

Jorge, Brad
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing CA09
28 September 2015

Question:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the authorial voice.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
The authoritative voice stimulates the mind into listening to what the reader ideas. For a conversation is it informal and not assertive. Conversing it true but still doesn’t challenge the mind to the readers message "Although single words can name ideas, we must put theses words into operation in sentences or assertions before they can advance our understanding." (Edgar )

Question:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
"First person narrators or speakers frequently express ideas along with their depiction of actions and situations, and they also make statements from which you can make inferences about ideas." (Roberts 122) This explains that any idea can be right or wrong can be well thought out or thoughtless it depends on the speaker.

Question:
Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the statements made by characters.” Explain what this means.
Answer:
This means that the characters are allowed to make or express their own views. They can be right or wrong it really up to the reader. Edgar shows the readers the techniques into finding the statements that character say or think. One formula is to find out why it is so important to have ideas and what values they have. Another technique is " Are ideas limited to members, of any groups represented by the character( Age, Race, nationality, personal status)? or are the ideas applicable to general conditions of life?" (Edgars 124)

Posted by: Jorge Braham at September 28, 2015 04:21 PM

Group 8: Hana Lee, Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question #14: As you seek to find the appropriate “place” for ideas in literature, Robert claims that there are some common concepts you must not confuse with the concept of “idea.” Identify one of them. BONUS: Identify another one.

Answer: Ideas are often confused with actions. For example, in O’ Connor’s “First Confession”: “The major character, Jackie, misbehaves at home and tries to slash his sister with a breadknife.” This describes a major action in the story, but does not express an idea that connects both characters and events. Another one, is making distinction between situations and ideas. An example of this is in Lowell’s poem “Patterns,” the narrator described what happened to her as a result of her fiancé’s death. Her plight is not an idea, but a situation that brings out ideas. (Roberts 121)

Posted by: Hana Lee at September 28, 2015 04:22 PM

Conner Knaresboro, Freddie Williams
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II
28 September 2015
Question: In this chapter, Roberts says “Literature embodies values along with ideas.” Although value “commonly refers to the price of something,” in “the realm of ideas and principles,” value also signifies what?
Answer: Values signifies an object or idea that is initially priceless and has no value to it. Democracy and Justice are stated as values and when Roberts says this he means that these ideas value the plot. In Trifles by Susan Glaspell, democracy is a value because the men are making the decisions yet they don't know as much as the women. Also for justice it could be justice for why she killed the man in the men's perspective meaning that she is a murder or justice in the way that she is defending herself and letting herself free from the "cage" that her husband put her in.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at September 28, 2015 04:38 PM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
28 September 2015

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” Three of these formulation techniques are “study the work’s figures of speech.”, “study how characters represent ideas”, and “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain these three techniques
Answer: When trying to find a theme or idea in a work of literature, a reader has no lack of places to search. However, finding one that is actually worth digressing on can be quite difficult, especially if the reader doesn’t actually know what they’re looking for. Edgar Roberts, in his book Writing about Literature, suggests a number of formulation techniques on finding a good idea to base your assertion on.
One of Roberts’ techniques is “Study the work’s figures of speech”. A figure of speech is a method of conveying an idea through careful arrangement of content (such as repeating a certain phrase or constant alliteration, a vivid description, or the lack thereof). If a reader pays close enough attention they can easily identify ideas by following subtle clues from the author. Roberts’ provides a very insightful example from Susan Glaspell’s play Trifles, “When one of the characters compares John Wright….with a raw wind that gets to the bone. With this figurative language, Glaspell conveys the idea that bluntness, indifference and cruely create great personal damage” (Roberts 123). This assertion is reached by examining how Glaspell arranged the description of John Wright, and can be digressed on or argued on.
The second technique is “study how characters represent ideas”. Many works of fiction use symbolism to convey their ideas, characters are one of the main forms of symbolism used throughout literature. For example, Prince Prospero in Poe’s The Masque of Red Death can be seen as a symbol of futility by his attempt to hide from the plague by sealing himself and his close friends in his castle, and trying to assault the embodiment of the plague with a knife. His attempts are ultimately in vain as he and his guests all succumb to the plague “And now was acknowledged the presence of the Red Death. He had come like a thief in the night. And one by one dropped the revellers in the blood-bedewed halls of their revel, and died each in the despairing posture of his fall. And the life of the ebony clock went out with that of the last of the gay. And the flames of the tripods expired. And Darkness and Decay and the Red Death held illimitable dominion over all.” (Poe 10). This assertion is based on the actions of the Prince, his character traits, and his ultimate fate. Roberts’ own example is Mathilde Loisel from The Necklace, and how “(she) represents the idea that unrealizable dreams can damage the real world” (Roberts 123). This assertion is based on Mathilde’s traits, actions, and her ultimate fate.
The third and final technique is to “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas”. Many works link together various ideas into the overall theme of the book. Roberts simplifies this by comparing literature to the art of painting, “for a painting can be taken in with a single view that comprehends all the aspects of color, form, action, and expression, each of which can also be considered separately” (Roberts 123). For example, by piecing together the various ideas in Steinbeck’s The Chrysanthemums one can infer that Elisa’s exchange with the transient handyman, the symbolism in the story’s exposition, and Elisa’s conversation with her husband in the end of the story all point towards the overall theme of gender inequality.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at September 28, 2015 04:52 PM

Shania Bienaime, shyiem
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
28 September 2015
Q#15
Question: IDENTIFICATION/EXPLANATION: Roberts warns us that ideas “are not as obvious as characters or setting” and suggests six “different ways in which authors convey ideas.” The study of these methods will help you find the major ideas. a.) Identify and b.) Explain one of them.
Answer: Study how characters represent ideas. In other words Roberts simply is saying that characters may be symbolizing a bigger picture. For instance In the necklace Mathilde can represent that being someone who you aren’t can make things worse or The Cat In The Hat can symbolizes chaos, fun, and a little order. He idea can be represented as characters being a bigger picture.

Posted by: Shania Bienaime, Shyiem - Akiem at September 30, 2015 01:38 AM

Johnny Nguyen & Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA09
30 September 2015

Question: As you seek to find the appropriate “place” for ideas in literature, Robert claims that there are some common concepts you must not confuse with the concept of “idea.” Identify one of them. BONUS: Identify another one.
Answer: Some of the concepts you shouldn’t confuse with idea are actions and situations.

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 30, 2015 09:43 AM

Yaribilisa Colon, Madison Helms
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122
9/30/2015

QUESTION: In this chapter, Roberts says “Literature embodies values
Along with ideas.” Although value “commonly refers to the price of
Something,” in “the realm of ideas and principles,” value also signifies what?

ANSWER: Value also signifies a standard of what is desired, sought, esteemed, and treasured. One example stated is “democracy refers to our political system, but it is also a complexed idea of representative government that we esteem most highly, and so also do we esteem concepts like honor, cooperation, generosity, and love. (Pg. 2)

Posted by: Yaribilisa Colon at September 30, 2015 09:54 AM

Group 5: Jaclyn Taylor, Matt eebe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
30 September 2015

Question 6,7,8: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “Making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to (6) “Study the authorial voice.” (7) “Study the character and the words of the first-person speaker.” (8) “Study the statements made by characters.” Explain what this means.

Answer: In Roberts Writing about Idea and theme he talks about studying different speakers and voices done by characters throughout the story. Through which the first one that he describes is “Study the authorial voice”. (Question 6) When studying the authorial voice the authors mainly render action, dialogue, and situation, they sometimes to guide us and deepen our understanding of the text. It come from the first, second or third person speaker whoever leads you through the story. The next study he goes on to express is “Study the character and the words of the firs-person speaker.” (Question 7) For first-person narrators they frequently express ideas along with their depiction of actions on situations. They also make statements from which you can make inferences about. From what first-person says, it is a part of the dramatic presentation and their ideas could be right or wrong, good or bad and so on. But for every speaker you can nevertheless study and evaluate the works ideas. Lastly Roberts goes to explain “Study the statements made by character”. (Question 8) In many stories characters express their own views, which can be right or wrong, admirable or contemptible. When you consider such dramatic speeches, you must do considerable interpreting and evaluating yourself.

Posted by: Group 5 at September 30, 2015 10:19 AM

Emma Duncan
Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
30 September 2015

Question: “Most stories”, says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?
Answer: Two terms that Roberts uses to identify an idea that “turns up over and over again throughout a work” are theme and major idea. The two terms are very similar but the big difference between idea and theme is that theme has to be reoccurring and an idea doesn’t. Roberts writes, “For example, you might state that an idea in Chekhov’s The Bear is “love”, but it would be difficult to discuss anything more unless you make an assertion promising an argument, such as ‘This play demonstrates the idea that love is irrational and irresistible’” (Roberts, 119). Another example would be from Susan Glaspell’s “Trifles”. A theme from that would be justice. The two women in Mrs. Wrights house discover that she did kill her husband. Throughout their findings in the house, they reflect on their own lives and agree if they were in Mrs. Wrights shoes they would’ve killed their husband too.

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 30, 2015 11:28 AM

Cannelle Samson and Tannor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
30 September 2015

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.


If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations.” Explain why.

Answer: Roberts in his work “Writing about Literature” states that you should never confuse ideas with action in any written work. He says this because action are not ideas. Actions do not express ideas that connect to character’s and events in a story. Roberts’ gives an example and states, “Such a trap is contained in the following sentence about O’Connor’s ‘First Confession’: ‘The major character, Jackie, misbehaves at home and tries to slash his sister with a breadknife’” (Roberts, 121). Roberts continues by stating that the example from the “First Confession” displays a major action rather than an idea. However, the action may be led by an explanation or idea. In “Writing about Literature” Roberts’ goes on with his example, “…’First Confession’ Illustrates the idea of family life may produce anger and potential violence…” (Roberts, 121). This illustrates that behind every action there is an idea; however, an action is not an idea in itself.


In “Writing about Literature” Roberts also states that as readers we should never confuse ideas with situations. A situation, which a character may be in, may bring out ideas, such as fate or future plans. Roberts’ gives an example of this and states, “…In Lowell’s poem ‘Patterns’, the narrator describes what is happening to her as a result of her fiancé’s death. Her plight is not an idea, but a situation that brings out ideas, such as future plans may be destroyed by uncontrollable circumstances, or that fate strikes the fortunate as well as the unfortunate…” (Roberts, 121). Another example of situations and ideas is found in “The Diamond Necklace” when Mrs. Loisel loses the diamond necklace, and is put in a situation of lack and hard work. The idea behind this tragedy is to admit your mistakes, and/or not to be consumed by material wealth.

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at September 30, 2015 11:53 AM

Luis Bautista
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing
30 September 2015

Question; Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain what this means.

Answer; Roberts uses a comparison to explain the Embodiment of Ideas. For instance, he compares how if we look at the art of painting, a painting can be seen in a single, which incorporates action, form, aspects of colors and expression in the painting. “In the same way,” claims Roberts, “when a work is considered in its totality, the various parts collectively can embody major ideas”(Roberts 123). In other words, a major idea can be analyzed from one point of view, which includes other ideas, which at the same time are integrated to the major idea.

Posted by: Luis A Bautista Gonzalez at October 1, 2015 11:44 AM

Zeida Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
30 September 2015
Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “actions.” Explain why.

Answer: In chapter 7 of “Writing About Literature”, Roberts says to not confuse ideas with “actions.” The reason being, the “ideas” in literature relate to meanings and significance. “Actions,” on other hand, are not the same thing. “Actions” are not reoccurring and do not express the entire concept the author is trying to show the reader. “It obstructs understanding” (Roberts, 121).

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at October 1, 2015 02:33 PM

Group 6: Zeida Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
28 September 2015
Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” The formulation techniques are to “study the work’s figures of speech”, “study how characters represent ideas.”, and “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain what these mean.

Answer: In chapter 7 of “Writing About Literature”, Roberts formulated techniques to find ideas throughout literature. One of the techniques is, “study the work’s figures of speech,” meaning that the author uses figures of speech to get the idea across and add emphasis to the idea he wants to portray. Another technique is, “study how characters represents ideas,” meaning that the characters’ actions can embody the idea the author wants. The last technique is, “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas,” meaning, the entirety of the work can express the ideas the author puts in place for the reader to understand.

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at October 1, 2015 02:34 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
30 September 2015


Question #15: Define each of the following words: “allusion,” parallelism (in literature),” “dualism,” and “irony.”

Answer: Allusion is a figure of speech that makes a reference to a place, person, or something that happened (Roberts 133-134). Parallelism in literature is the repetition of a word or phrase within a sentence/group of sentences. Dualism is the theory that the mental and physical (or mind and body or mind and brain) are, in some ways, radically different kinds of things. Irony is the figure of speech in which words are used in such a way that their intended meaning is different.

Posted by: Hana Lee at October 2, 2015 12:01 AM

Alexis Clayton and Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
25 September 2015

Question: IDENTIFICATION/EXPLANATION: Roberts warns us that ideas “are not as obvious as characters or setting” and suggests six “different ways in which authors convey ideas.” The study of these methods will help you find the major ideas. a.) Identify and b.) explain one of them.

Answer: The six different ways in which authors convey ideas is to study the authorial voice, the character and the words of the first-person speaker, the statements made by characters, the work’s figure of speech, how characters represent ideas, and the work itself as an embodiment of ideas. Robert states, “To determine an idea, you need to consider the meaning of what you read and then to develop explanatory and comprehensive assertons.” For example, in “Araby” by James Joyce, the narrator was representing ideas by showing the reader how much he was obsessed and in love he was with Mangan’s sister. For instance, the text states, “I had hardly any patience with the serious work of life which, now that it stood between me and my desire, seemed to me child’s play, ugly monotonous child’s play” (Joyce, 4). The narrator’s uncle, who was a drinker, arrived home and said to him that he was a just a boy. After the narrator went to the bazaar, he knew once he went that Mangan’s sister did not love him back. So, he gave up.

Posted by: Alexis Clayton at October 2, 2015 08:24 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
12 February 2016

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study the work itself as an embodiment of ideas.” Explain what this means.

Answer: What Roberts’ means by this is you should bring everything from the work together to understand it any further. He stated, “authors express ideas is to interlock them within all parts and aspects of the work” (Roberts 123). Roberts is saying that to help get the ideas across a story; authors will intertwine them to help get the point across.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 10, 2016 07:06 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA 06
11 February 2016

Question: Roberts makes the claim that literature “embodies values along with ideas.” I’m sure you can think of many values. You have your own and our institution even has Core Values that we are expected to embrace while here. Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly, does he apply it to one of the works we’ve read and studied for this course? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title.

Answer: In this chapter, which focuses on theme in literature, Roberts states that "Literature embodies values along with ideas (Roberts 120)." Roberts also gives examples of theme: "democracy" and "justice (120)." Roberts examples how democracy is a symbol of the government and concepts like "honor, cooperation, generosity, and love (120)." He explains that justice is consists of just treatment before the law as well. After he explains these concepts of themes, he uses "Trifles" by Susan Glaspell to show the use of these themes. Roberts explains the how the there is a conflict for Ms. Hale and Mrs. Peters to protect Minnie, who suspected to be guilty of killing her husband, and through this story, the theme of justice is presented. He also shows their decision to sympathize with Minnie and cover up the evidence can be compared to a jury's deliberation and jury's verdict (120). Roberts analyzes the play to illustrate to the audience how the theme of justice, in particular, is interweaved in "Trifles".

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 10, 2016 07:39 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
10 February 2016

“Writing About Idea or Theme”

Q: “Most stories” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we have read. What two terms does Robert’s use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?

A: When an idea turns up “over and over again throughout a work,” it is considered a “theme.” He goes on to say that a stories theme and its major idea are virtually the same exact thing (Roberts 119).

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at February 10, 2016 08:52 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
2 February 2016

Theme and Idea

Question #13: In this chapter, Roberts says “Literature embodies values along with ideas.” Although value “commonly refers to the price of something,” in “the realm of ideas and principles,” value also signifies what?

Answer: A value in a literary sense is “a standard of what is desired, sought, esteemed, and treasured” (Roberts 120). For example, you could say the value of an antique dresser is some lump sum. The term can also be used to say that you value that dresser. You personally could value it differently due to your attachment to the piece.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 11, 2016 11:01 AM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
11 February 2016

Question 1) What does Robert's mean when he says is it better to "always express ideas as assertions" rather than "ordinary conversational statements" and what examples does he give for operational sentences that do "make an assertion promising to an argument"? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title of the text references.

Answer 1) What I think Robert's means when he says "always state ideas as assertions" is that when stating a sentence, there needs to be some kind of opinion behind it, for it to be commented on as opposed to just stating something that is vague. Robert's uses the example of the short story "the bear" and says that an idea in it is love. However, just saying that an idea is love, makes it hard to comment on. He then progresses the example by saying "this play demonstrates the idea that love is irrational and irresistible" and says that this is now easier to comment on because there is an assertion behind the idea.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 11, 2016 12:56 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
10 February 2016

Question: SHORT ANSWER: In this chapter, Roberts says, “Literature embodies values
along with ideas.” Although value “commonly refers to the price of something,” in “the realm of ideas and principles,” value also signifies what?

Answer: According to (Roberts 120), in the realm of ideas and principles, value signifies a standard of what is desired, sought, esteemed and treasured.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 11, 2016 01:26 PM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
10 February 2016

Question: Theorizing about the ideas in literature is one thing but actually discovering one worthy enough for writing a formal paper is quite another. Roberts suggests, “Making a number of formulations” before “selecting one for further development.” One formulation technique is to “study how characters represent ideas.” Explain what this means.

Answer: Studying how characters represent ideas means that the character and their actions are considered with ideas. In the necklace, the idea represents dreams that damage the real world. Another example, from the story of an hour, two diverse characters embody different ideas. “For example, Mathilde, in Maupassant’s “The Necklace,” represents the idea that unrealizable dreams can damage the real world (Roberts 123).”

Posted by: Omar Martinez at February 11, 2016 11:52 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
12 February 2016

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations.” Explain why.

Answer: In Roberts’ writing, he says that an idea is “the result or results of general and abstract thinking” (119). A situation can be defined as an event that brings out ideas. Examples of this are as follows, “plans may be destroyed by uncontrollable circumstances, or that fate strikes the fortunate as well as the unfortunate, or that human institutions often seem arbitrary, capricious, and cruel” (Roberts 121). The goal is to be able to identify a writers situations and be able to distinguish them from the writer's main ideas.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at February 12, 2016 12:22 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
12 February 2016

Question: 15.) IDENTIFICATION/EXPLANATION: Roberts warns us that ideas “are not as
obvious as characters or setting” and suggests six “different ways in which
authors convey ideas.” The study of these methods will help you find the
major ideas. a.) Identify and b.) explain one of them.

Answer: 15.) Analyze the idea as it applies to characters is one of the ways that authors convey the concept of idea. This means that the way the character feels is how they perceive the story. he uses the example, "Minnie Wright embodies that living with cruelty and insensitivity leads to alienation, happiness, despair, and maybe to violence" (Roberts, 125).

Posted by: Justin Robinson at February 12, 2016 02:25 PM

Hussam Babge and Allison Cobb

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 CA06

12 February 2016



Question: For a formal writing assignment, you should not confused ideas with actions, according to Roberts. Explain why.




Answer: Roberts writes that confusing ideas with actions “obstructs understanding” (Roberts 4). A major action in a story does not necessarily equate to an idea in the story. Roberts uses the example of a character in a story attempting to stab someone. The action is the attempted stabbing, the idea is that a troubled home life can generate anger. The action is generally an event within the story, while the idea is the bigger picture or concept. Robert describes confusing these two things as “a trap” (Roberts 4). If you confuse these two, you miss the point of an idea.

Posted by: Allison Cobb at February 12, 2016 03:21 PM

Randawnique Coakley and Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA 06
11 February 2016

Question: Roberts makes the claim that literature “embodies values along with ideas.” I’m sure you can think of many values. You have your own and our institution even has Core Values that we are expected to embrace while here. Which two values does Roberts provide as examples and how, exactly, does he apply it to one of the works we’ve read and studied for this course? Be sure to correctly identify the author and title.

Answer: In this chapter, which focuses on theme in literature. After he explains that theme is essentially a recurring idea, Roberts states that "literature embodies values along with ideas (Roberts 120)." Roberts also gives examples of themes, which is "democracy" and "justice (120)." Roberts examples how democracy is a symbol of the government and concepts like "honor, cooperation, generosity, and love (120)." He also explains that justice “involves equality before the law and also the fair evaluation of conduct that is deemed unacceptable or illegal (120).”After Roberts explains these examples of themes, he uses "Trifles" by Susan Glaspell to show the use of these themes, justice in particular. Roberts explains how there is a struggle for Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters to protect Minnie, who is suspected to be guilty of killing her husband, and through this story, the theme of justice is presented. In this play, Minnie is suggested to have murdered her husband because of his long term emotional abuse. The question is whether it is fair to imprison Minnie, someone who was emotionally distraught when she murdered her husband. So, this issue of how difficult to decide what is just to do is the major idea of the play. Roberts continues to explain how characters in the play, Mrs. Peters and Mrs. Hale’s difficult decision to sympathize with Minnie and to cover up the evidence can be compared to a jury's deliberation and jury's verdict (120). Essentially, Roberts analyzes the play to illustrate to the audience that justice is a recurring idea and how the idea of justice is interweaved in "Trifles.”

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 12, 2016 08:11 PM

Vincia Mitchell and Travis Framer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
12 February 2016

Question: If your task is to analyze a work for ideas, such as in a class exercise such as this, an open-class discussion, or for a formal writing assignment, then you should not, says Roberts, confuse ideas with “situations .” Explain why.

Answer: According to (Roberts 121), there is a distinction between ideas and situations, whereas a situation is not an idea/thought but a context that helps to bring about an idea. For example, an open-class discussion is a situation or setting in which students actively participates in the class. During this participation, the students will reveal their ideas or thoughts that will contribute the topic or reading that they are working on.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 14, 2016 01:41 PM

Clark de Bullet, Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
12 February 2016

Question: “Most stories,” says Roberts, “contain many ideas.” You should be able to identify many in any of the works we’ve read. What two terms does Roberts use to identify an idea that turns “up over and over again throughout a work”?

Answer: Two terms that identify an idea that turns up over and over is a theme and major idea. Most stories have a lot of ideas, theme usually, can tell what the story means. “Although we have noted only one idea in these two works, most stories contain many ideas (Roberts 119).”

Posted by: Omar Martinez at February 15, 2016 01:10 AM

Phillip Moss, Vincia Mitchell, Allison Cobb
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
15 February 2016

Question: discover the themes (repeating patterns) that are values. Which of these is the primary value-theme?

Answer: In the story, “The Chrysanthemums” the protagonist Elisa cares about her flowers as well as her husband cares about the property giving insight that Compassion, Commitment, and Responsible stewardship are themes in this story. Elisa’s conflict in the story is that every male in the story refuses to take her seriously. Elisa spends a great deal of time caring for her chrysanthemums; Her husband sees this as only a useless hobby, and when she ends up trading one of them to a stranger she finds her flower tossed on the side of the road.

Posted by: Phillip Moss at February 15, 2016 03:07 PM

Nastassja Sielchan, Travis Farmer, and Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
16 February 2016

Trifles:

Question: What values are in this story? Which is the primary "value-theme"?

Answer: A few values that are used throughout this story are dishonesty, loyalty, justice, responsibility, compassion, and friendship. However, the value that we decided as the “value-theme” was loyalty, more specifically loyalty to gender. The women in the story were loyal to their friend whereas the men in the story were loyal to the diseased. The women, Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters even sympathize with their friend even though she is accused of murder, “Mrs. Peters, look at this one. Here, this is the one she was working on, and look at the sewing! All the rest of it has been so nice and even” (Glaspell 6). When the two women discovered the dead bird, they hid I from the men remaining loyal to their friend. When the court attorney came down he asked about the knitting and instead of showing him the bird, Mrs. Peters said, “We think she was going to—knot it” referring to the sewing (Glaspell 8). Lastly, the court attorney even says that the women are loyal to their gender, “Ah, loyal to your sex, I see. But you and Mrs. Wright were neighbors. I suppose you were friends, too” (Glaspell 3).

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at February 16, 2016 08:44 AM

Chloe Lelliott Randownique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
February 16 2016

Question) Describe the mains themes and values of Kate Chopin's "the storm".

Answer) The main themes of the storm are sex, women, femininity and marriage. The story line is about two characters that are disloyal in their marriages. We could say that the values in the short story are disloyalty, as both of them are being disloyal to their families and spouses. You could also say that these to characters value sex more than they value the relationships that they have.

However, I think they key theme in this story is self centered or egocentric, simply because the two characters performing adultery are putting themselves before anyone else and for this they are easily judge able characters.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 16, 2016 08:45 PM

Chloe Lelliott Randownique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
February 16 2016

Question) Describe the mains themes and values of Kate Chopin's "the storm".

Answer) The main themes of the storm are sex, women, femininity and marriage. The story line is about two characters that are disloyal in their marriages. We could say that the values in the short story are disloyalty, as both of them are being disloyal to their families and spouses. You could also say that these to characters value sex more than they value the relationships that they have.

However, I think they key theme in this story is self centered or egocentric, simply because the two characters performing adultery are putting themselves before anyone else and for this they are easily judge able characters.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 16, 2016 08:45 PM

Matt Scharr, Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CAO6
17 February 2016

Question: In your story, discover the themes that are values. Which of these is the primary “value-theme?”

Answer: In “The Bear” by Anton Chekov have different values that he portrays throughout the play. Popova has two values that she portrays: loyalty and closemindedness. She states that she will never find another man after her husband has died just a year prior. Her servants that work for her try to help her find someone to be with since she is still young, but she is too closed-minded to listen to them. She likes to have a lot of contrary with her workers because she cannot see what they see in her. Popova says, “My life is over. He’s dead and buried, and so am I” (Chekov 21). She continues this throughout the story. Loyalty is the primary value throughout the play. From her servants helping her find a new love and Popova’s loyalty to her dead husband, stands out from the entire play.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 17, 2016 11:24 AM

I couldnt find the "tone and mood" link so i decided to submit this here

Phillip Moss
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing CA06
22 February 2016


Question: Using the information from both Edgar V. Roberts and the secondary handout (on libguides) on the subject of “Tone and Irony,” briefly discuss the use of tone and/or irony in "An Occurrence on Owl Creek Bridge" by Ambrose Bierce. As with all homework questions, be sure to incorporate quoted passages from the text—properly cited in MLA format—to support your answer/thesis.

Answer: In the short story “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” Roberts attempts to set a morbid but peaceful tone. Peyton Farquhar (the protagonist) is spending the last few minutes of his life reflecting on this bridge before he is hung. Rather than panicking and pleading for his life Farquhar takes in the nature around him which happens to be a rather calm scene. “He noted the prismatic colors in all the dewdrops upon a million blades of grass. The humming of the gnats that danced above the eddies of the stream a fish slid along beneath his eyes and he heard the rush of its body parting the water.”(Roberts 7)

Posted by: Phillip Moss at February 22, 2016 12:38 PM

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