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January 10, 2013

Telling the Tale in Poe's “Tell-Tale Heart”


Image Source: http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs40/i/2009/024/4/8/The_Tell_Tale_Heart_by_Okoolarniq.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by lhobbs at January 10, 2013 06:35 PM

Readers' Comments:

Allyn Tuff
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA14
2/10/2009
First Person Proves Insanity in The Tell Tale Heart
In the short story Tell Tale Heart, by Edger Allen Poe, the first person point of view of the narrator is essential to the story. First person can be explained through Roberts’ text as “If the voice of the work is an ‘I,’ the author is using the first-person point of view-the impersonation of a fictional narrator or speaker who may be named or unnamed” (Roberts 81). In this case, the narrator is left unnamed. The first person view helps prove that the narrator is obviously insane, and this thesis can be proved by Edgar Robert’s attributes of the first person view, “What they themselves have done, said, heard, and thought” (Roberts 81).
When Roberts talks about what the narrator has done, he means that the narrator’s actions show a view of the story. In Tell Tale Heart, the narrator kills an old man because of his eye. This is not just any ordinary eye though; it is an eye that looks like one of a vulture. In this case, the thoughts, and what the narrator has done prove that he is insane. The fact that someone would kill a man(which is the action done), and the reason for that being the old man’s eye looked like a vulture’s(which is the thought), proves that the narrator is deviant enough to be considered insane. Here is a passage from the story to detail this analysis. “I think it was his eye! yes, it was this! He had the eye of a vulture --a pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees -- very gradually --I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye forever”(Poe paragraph two).
According to supra, Roberts also brought up that what an author says also has an essential part to the point of view. In the story, the narrator shows a repetitive speech, in ways that would make one believe insanity is present. For example: “I undid the lantern cautiously --oh, so cautiously --cautiously (for the hinges creaked)” (Poe paragraph three). Another way that the narrator implies that he is insane is with his talk of normality about things that are not very normal. While he is sneaking into the old man’s room he states this “I kept quite still and said nothing. For a whole hour I did not move a muscle, and in the meantime I did not hear him lie down. He was still sitting up in the bed listening; --just as I have done, night after night, hearkening to the death watches in the wall” (Poe paragraph six). This scene was explained as being a normal event, when it really is an event that a majority of other people would not do.
The last attribute from Roberts’ text that is being proven is what the narrator hears. When we put into perspective what the narrator in the story heard, it can be explained as delusional. The narrator claimed to have heard the heart of the deceased old man still beating after he chopped off the limbs and hid them under the floor boards of the old man’s house. Here are the words from the story “Yet the sound increased --and what could I do? It was a low, dull, quick sound --much such a sound as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton” (Poe paragraph 17). Reality proves that hearing a heartbeat from someone else’s body is impossible when they are no longer living. This proves the narrator to be delusional, which is a form of insanity.
According to Robert’s theory, the first person view in this story displays examples of the narrator’s insanity through the actions and thoughts of killing an old man because of his eye looking like a vulture, the words that were said and the way he said them repeatedly, and the delusional heart beat of the old man’s chopped up and deceased body. Robert’s text supports all of these first person attributes.


Works Cited
Roberts, Edger V. Writing About Literature. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentive Hall, 2005.

Giordano, Robert. "The Tell Tale Heart." Edger Allen Poe
27 June 2005. 8 March 2007

Posted by: Allyn Tuff at February 9, 2009 05:22 PM

Sonia Perez
Dr. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing 2 ENG 122 CA16
3 March 2009

“The Tell-Tale Heart”: Insanity

In the short story “The Tell-Tale Heart”, Edgar Allan Poe shows an unknown person kills an old man because of his eye. With such an unusual action, there is one idea that comes to mind; insanity. There are many reasons for this conclusion, namely the speaker wants to kill
the old man for an odd reason, and does it because of the sound of his heart, and hears it again. It seems that the narrator has an over active imagination, and his insane actions are caused by guilt.
The unknown speaker does not like the old man’s eye, which he calls “vulture eye”, yet
the person loves the old man and has done nothing wrong to him. The man’s vulture eye makes
him feel bad every time it looks his way. “I made up my mind to take the life of the old man,
and thus rid myself of the eye forever” (Poe 297). It takes the narrator a while to come to this conclusion to murder since he thinks once he kills the old man, he does not have to deal with the eye. He imagines the eye as a vulture because of the way it looks and it seems it pierces through his soul. No sane person thinks this. The narrator probably does not want the man to see the real him.
The person believes he is not mad because he plans to and is cautious of killing the old
man. For seven days, he goes to the man’s chamber at midnight. He shines the light of the
lantern on the man’s eye, but it is closed. Since the eye is shut, the speaker cannot destroy the man those nights because it is the eye that bothers him. In the eighth night, the old man is awake; the narrator enters to the room and shines the light and his eye is wide open. He just stands there looking at the vulture eye for some time. “I thought the heart might burst. And now a new anxiety seized me- the sound would be heard by a neighbour” (Poe 300). With that, he runs in
and knocks the man over and kills him by setting the bed on top of him. He is relieve that the
heart stops. Then he hides the corpse in the floor. The speaker considers that he has to silence the heart since someone might hear it; he must have imagined hearing the heart because that’s impossible to hear it aloud.
In the early morning, police officers came to investigate since a neighbor reported
hearing a shriek from the house. The narrator lets them in and is speaks to the officers calmly
and guides them through the house showing that nothing is amiss. He leads them to the old
man’s room and invites them to sit, while sitting exactly where the body is. They start to have a
conversation, and after a moment, the man starts to feel unwell. Then, the man hears the beating
of a heart. He speaks more rapidly and loudly and the beating is louder. He acts out and
wonders why the police are not leaving. He realizes that they must know what he did. “I admit the deed! - tear up the planks! - here, here! - it is the beating of his hideous heart” (Poe 302). In this scene it shows again that he imagines the beating heart of a dead man and feels guilty for killing him. It seems the narrator has gone over the edge, since the old man is dead; his heart is
not beating.
The definition of theme according to Edgar V. Roberts, “result or results of general and abstract thinking” (119). Poe’s theme of this short story is insanity caused by guilt. It seems more that the speaker’s imagination shows that he is insane already. He thinks the old man’s eye looks like a vulture. He also hears the old man’s heart before he executes him and hears it again knowing that the old man is dead. All this imagination comes from guilt, since the narrator feels that the old man will not love him. Poe writes this story with that purpose in mind showing it through the actions, and thoughts of one character.

Works Citied
Poe, Edgar Allan. The Works of Edgar Allan Poe. J.H. Ingram. Complete Edition. Oxford University, 1874. 297-302. http://books.google.com/books.
Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2006. 119.

Posted by: Sonia P. at March 2, 2009 06:20 PM

Sonia Perez
Dr. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing 2 Eng 122 CA16
16 April 2009
Works Cited

Fraiberg, Louis, ed. Psychoanalysis & American Literature Criticism. Wayne State University
Press, 1960. 140-3. This is a book on scholars who use the theory psychoanalysis to critique on authors, and other scholars critique them. This helps with understanding the mind of Edgar Allan Poe.

Gregory, Richard L., and O.L. Zangwill, eds. The Oxford Companion to The Mind. USA, Oxford University Press, 1987. 30-1, 470-1. This book has definitions and explanations of the terms, techniques, and other things in psychology. I can have guesses on the diagnosis of the main character who wanted to kill an old man in “The Tell-Tale Heart”.

Groden, Michael, Martin Kreiswirth, and Imre Szeman, eds. The Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Criticism. Second Ed. The Johns Hopkins Press: Baltimore, MD, 2005. 777.This guide is about writers, theories, critique techniques, all things that are in literature. To have more details of the psychoanalysis theory for one paragraph in my five-page research paper.

Haycraft, Howard, and Stanley J. Kunitz, eds. American Authors 1600-1900: A Biographical Dictionary of American Literature. The H.W. Wilson Company, 1938. 623-5. It is a dictionary of short biographies of American Authors from the years of 1600-1900. Edgar Allan Poe’s experiences show through his work, which I am going to prove in my research paper.

Poe, Edgar Allan. “The Tell-Tale Heart”. The Works of Edgar Allan Poe. Complete ed. 1847. Ed. J.H. Ingram. Google Book Search. 6 Aril 2009 . A short story from Edgar Allan Poe, I will be using the psychoanalysis theory to examine this work.

Posted by: Sonia P. at April 15, 2009 11:49 PM

Sonia Perez
Dr. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing 2 Eng 122 CA16
21 April 2009

Causes of Insanity in “The Tell-Tale Heart”

“The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe, is a short story about a narrator who kills an
older man because of his “vulture eye” (Poe 297). At the end, he murders the old man because
of his beating heart. The narrator kills the old man for an illogical reason. In the late 1800s,
Sigmund Freud and other psychologists developed the psychoanalytic theory which can explain
this behavior of the main character and also shed light on Poe’s reasons for writing such a
morbid story.
Sigmund Freud and his followers started to psychoanalyze literary works. They did it by
investigating the author’s background and then looking into the works of the author to see any
connection between them. Well, the main aim for this theory was psychobiographical.
“...patterns of wish and defense revealed by analytic discovery of ‘latent content’” (Johns
Hopkins Guide 777). According to the guide, this practice refuses to subordinate art to neurosis
and organizes the tools of psychoanalysis to explore precise terms of language, metaphor, and
character. The psychoanalytic theory also looks into clearing up the symbolic representation in
literature. The scholars connect the symbols with primitive sensory impressions of key process
of thinking anchored in subdued, unconscious representations of the body, sexual life, family
relations, and death. They become a pool of images common to human development and
responsible for regressive attention during periods of stress, dreaming, or creative activity (Johns Hopkins Guide 777). So during periods of creativity, artists, like Poe might have been afflicted by the impressions of their early lives.
When he was three, Poe’s parents died and he was separated from his two siblings, and
he was taken in by John Allan (American Authors 623). During Allan’s first marriage, Poe
was the darling child of a wealthy family, and Mrs. Allan proved a real mother to him.
Eventually, Poe went to University of Virginia for a semester, but Allan would not allow him to
go back to the university; instead, Poe had to work in a mercantile office. He ran away and
joined the army as a private, in Boston, under a false name for three years. During that time,
Mrs. Allan was dying and asked her husband to find Poe, so he did by buying him off from the
army and got him a position at West Point, but Poe got himself expelled, and during this time,
Allan married again after Mrs. Allan’s death. When she had a son, Allan ended all ties with Poe,
since he was an unworthy son. Freud may have felt Poe probably had developed the Oedipus
complex since he loved Mrs. Allan very much and thought Allan was not a suitable husband.
Then, Poe went to Baltimore to look for a job in journalism in 1835. He met his aunt,
Maria Clemm and her daughter Virginia, and he automatically became attached to his aunt as a
mother figure. He finally got a job in 1835, a staff position on the Southern Literary
Messenger, published in Richmond, then one of the leading magazines. Before going, he married
his cousin Virginia, who was not yet fourteen. Then, he started to travel after he left the
Messenger in 1837 with his aunt and cousin in tow. Virginia started to be fatally ill in six years, while they were in Philadelphia. Since Virginia was ill, Poe deceived himself that the outer form of normal sexual relationship was the actual substance (Literature Criticism 141). When, Virginia died, it was impossible for Poe to keep believing in this image (still unconsciously), and he went into a series of affairs with other women, whom were wealthy literary-minded widows. Freud would say that Poe finally realized that he could not ignore his libido after the death of his wife and that he was subconsciously going after his dream of having affairs with these women to have his own magazine come to a reality. Poe’s life was chaotic but in many ways it was his own doing and is evident in his work.
Scholars make connections with his life and his literary works. “Joseph Woods Krutch, a
Poe scholar, sees two major forms of expression in Poe…” (Literature Criticism 140). One thing
is Poe’s repeating theme with differences of the death of a beautiful woman. The second
connection is the repeating claim upon the powers of pure intellect. Also, Poe did lose his
mother, foster-mother, and wife to death and he valued intellect. Then, Poe’s heroes and
heroines in his works are usually of ancient and decaying families. They are identified only as
noble, great willed and sensitive, and suffering from a mysterious illness more spiritual then
physical (Literary Criticism 140). Poe’s characters have sinned in some lovely and horrible way and they undergo the punishment of death or of suffering the death of a loved one. The characters are morally lost. They hover on the brink of madness or are suddenly over the edge. They suffer the anticipated outcome of their bizarre behavior (Literary Criticism 140). Poe perhaps feels that God has punished him for whatever reason, or Poe believes that he did not
deserve to be loved. Poe was most likely lost after he lost everyone who was dear to him, and
suffered. Poe might also have believed that he was going insane, so he tended to drink since he
thought he was repressing the insanity. But, he was a wholly different person while he was
drunk; this was possibly caused by a mental illness. “Krutch believes that Poe’s writing was solely a product of morbidity” (Literary
Criticism 141). Poe suffered a great trauma after the death of his mother, and this was
intensified by negative experiences as the foster-son of the Allans. As a result, he developed into a neurotic young man who quarreled with most men and idealized most women. He became weak from psychic causes (Literary Criticism 141). This caused mental instability so great that there was danger of insanity. Through investigations of Poe’s work, most scholars presume that he had neurosis, but Poe only gives minor hints of the origin of this emotional disorder. Krutch thinks that Poe’s art was limited since it shows that Poe only wrote about his own experiences, which reveals his morbidity. Even though scholars believe that other people have the same weaknesses and strengths like Poe, to them, Poe’s imbalance of sadness was abnormal (Literary Criticism 143). In addition, Krutch believed that Poe was only a genius in expressing his characters in “perfect symbols”. Poe’s emotional disorder made him lose his grip upon the images which had always haunted him. He lost, too, the power of giving his imagination form, and Poe was left with his neurosis. Krutch insisted that Poe communicated his impulsiveness to his readers by his elaborated fantasies (Literary Criticism 143).
One such elaborated fantasy is Poe’s short story, “The Tell-Tale Heart” about a
character’s abnormal behavior. The narrator wants to kill an old man because of his eye. He
goes into detail explaining what the eye looks like and his response to it. “Whenever it fell upon me my blood ran cold…” (Poe 297). I believe the narrator is anxious and impulsive like Poe.
Anxiety is an emotion that is distressing, and it is unlike fear (Oxford Companion 30). Since the
narrator is anxious about the eye, he formulates a plan to murder the old man. The narrator’s
anxiety is getting worse and he starts to get frustrated so he becomes angry and wants to get rid of the eye. The narrator goes into the old man’s room for eight nights because his eye is closed. The narrator does not kill the old man since it is the “vulture eye” that bothers him. In the eighthnight, the eye is open and the narrator is just standing there looking at it. The man just stares and is getting angry; then, he hears the old man’s heart beating. It gets louder and louder until the narrator realizes that someone might hear it, and he bursts into action and finally smothers the old man. It is impossible to hear that old man’s heart, so perhaps he is hearing his own heart since it is accelerated from his anxiety. Then, the narrator hides the corpse in the middle of the room in the floor, and the police arrive when he finishes replacing the floor boards. He gives them a tour and finishes it in the old man’s room. The narrator brings chairs and sits exactly where the body is and starts having a conversation with the police, but he starts to feel ill and hears the heart beating again. He starts to be anxious and tries different things to get rid of the
police. In this scene, it is evident that the narrator definitely has a mental disorder, and his psychological problems affected him physiologically, according to the Oxford Companion (470). “I admit the deed! – tear up the planks! – hear, hear! – it is the beating of his hideous heart!” (Poe 302). At the end, the narrator could not take any more of the beating of the old man’s heart. The narrator should not be able to hear it since the heart is no longer functioning, this shows that he has remorse for his action.
The narrator is experiencing anxiety throughout the story, which turns into rage along
with the anxiety, and eventually leads to the old man’s death. Like the narrator, Poe had anxiety
for a long time in his life. He lost everyone in his life, and assumed that it was his fault. His
wife Virginia died, and Poe believed that he killed her because he did not take care of her well since he was poor. The narrator in the story wants to kill the old man because of his eye, because he is afraid and anxious the old man will find his true nature. Poe also probably thought he was worthless since his foster father knew he was a failure. The women in his life treated him otherwise, but he probably thought that he could not keep them from dying, which was another failure. The narrator’s relationship with the old man can be a father and son relationship and the narrator fears that the old man will see him as a failure. In contrast, this narrator does not have a relationship with a female and there is no female in the story, perhaps because there were no women in Poe’s life at the time. Another thing is, Poe knew he was about to go insane. Although, the narrator completely believes he is not insane, it could be that when Poe wrote this story, he wanted to think that he was not going insane, since he was drinking and to Poe, that meant he was repressing the insanity at that time.
“The Tell-Tale Heart”, is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe about a man killing an old
man because of his eye. Some scholars who examine this short work using the psychoanalytic
theory will say to first observe the life of the author through it. Then, start to make connections with the work and the author, because it explains the causes of abnormal behavior. It helps if people know some biographical information on that author and then start to make the connections. Poe had an emotional disorder and he wrote to escape his insanity. Poe wrote his poems and short stories about death and insanity because of his life experiences.

Posted by: Sonia P. at April 22, 2009 07:35 PM

Did the narrator at one time work for the old man?

Posted by: Arlene at September 16, 2009 11:50 AM

Allison Knipe
Partners: Chris and Brynn
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08
18 January 2013

Question: Remember the idea of writing in either first, second, or third person from ENG 121? Which “person” is this story told in? How can you tell?

Answer: “I was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before I killed him.” (Poe 3) This story was written in first person. You can tell because the author is the main character and the narrator. He talks in first person, using the word I and expressing his feelings step by step throughout his story. You get the feel that you know the main character and his problem with the old man living with him. This story would not give the same feel if told in any other point of view.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at January 18, 2013 11:17 AM

Octavio Herrera, Jillian Stolzenburg
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA04
18 January 2013

Question: This story is an example of how the author and the narrator can be two different entities. Explain the difference between an author and a narrator in fiction.

Answer: In this story, the narrator and author are opposites, the narrator claiming sanity and the author saying otherwise. The narrator tries to portray calmness “How calmly I can tell you the whole story” (Poe 3). Throughout the entire story the narrator tries to seem calm, while the author make the narrator seem crazy. This shows a dichotomy between the sane author and the insane narrator. The narrator states “If still you think me mad, you will think so no longer when I describe…” (Poe 7). The narrator truly thinks what he did was right, he thinks that he is sane. While the author on the other hand is using words to show otherwise “…but the noise arose over all and continually increased. It grew louder—louder—louder” (Poe 8). Obviously the author is showing that the narrator is insane, because he can hear a noise that is not actually there.

Posted by: Octavio Herrera, Jillian Stolzenburg at January 18, 2013 12:17 PM

Lauren Irish and Ana Demaio
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
18 January 2013

5. Why does the narrator wait eight days to commit his crime? Identify the exact sentences that reveal
the reason.

Answer: For the first seven nights he wanted to kill him but he didn't see the old mans eye because it was closed. But on the 8th night the old mans eye was open. The narrator said "And this I did for seven long nights—every night just at midnight—but I found the eye always closed;" On the eighth night "It was open—wide, wide open—and I grew furious as I gazed upon it."

Posted by: Lauren Irish and Ana DeMaio at January 18, 2013 06:27 PM

Jazmine Dixon Alexia Chambers Anthony Jannegta
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
18 January 2013

Question: As the story opens, what is the relationship like between the old man and the narrator? Identify the exact sentences that reveal that relationship.

Answer: The relationship between the old man and the narrator seem to be okay because the narrator expressed that he loved the old man in this quote,” I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult. For his gold I had no desire. I think it was his eye! Yes, it was this! One of his eyes resembled that of a vulture—a pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—very gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye forever.” (pg.3)

Posted by: Jazmine Dixon at January 18, 2013 06:31 PM

Analisa Johnson and Angie Fortunak
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122- CA 08
19 January 2013

Question: Why does the narrator commit his crime? Identify the exact sentences that revel the reason.

Answer: The narrator committed the crime because he hated the old man's eye. His eye resembled that of a vulture-a pale blue eye with a film over it. The narrator had then " made up his mind to take the life of the old man, to rid himself of the eye forever" (Poe, 3).

Posted by: Analisa Johnson and Angie Fortunak at January 19, 2013 06:14 PM

One of his eyes resembled that of a
vulture—a pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell
upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—very
gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old
man, and thus rid myself of the eye for ever.

Posted by: Marquisa & Habib at January 20, 2013 03:05 PM

Adrie Johnson
Christopher Burke
“A Tell Tale Heart”

Question #6:
What do you think the narrator is really hearing at the end of the story? What makes you think so?
Answer:
In the short story “A Tell- Tale Heart”, the narrator or also “The Murderer” is a man who is a caretaker for an old man with a disturbing looking eye. He is quoted as calling it “Evil eye”. He ends up using the eye as an excuse to murder the old man, saying it was driving him insane. After committing the murder he ends up hiding the evidence under the floor boards. The police end up showing up to the house and investigating a scream that was reported coming from the house (old man’s yelp). After the investigation found no results “the murderer”, in order to solidify his innocence, decides to conversate with the police officers. The chosen place for this conversation was the room where he had hidden the body. As they spoke we believe that the thought of getting caught drove him to surrender and confess his crime. In the short story he uses the “Evil eye” as the excuse of confessing. As the police talked it seems as though the guilt had something to do with the confession. The symptoms of his guilt and stress of being caught were described as “ringing in the ears, headache, hyperactivity and a paleness of the skin.”

Posted by: Chris Burke at January 20, 2013 05:02 PM

Jasmine Lowe, Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-122-CA08
20 January 2013

Question: As the story opens, what is the relationship like between the old man and the narrator? Identify the exact sentences that reveal that relationship.
Answer: In the beginning of the story, the old man and the narrator had a friendly relationship. “I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult. For his gold I had no desire.” (Paragraph 2, page 3). Then the narrator decided he wanted to kill the old man because he couldn't stand the sight of his film covered blue eye. “Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—very gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye forever.” (Paragraph 2, page 3).

Posted by: Jasmine Lowe, Marie Ryan at January 20, 2013 06:16 PM

Briyana & Jordan
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 A Tell Tale Heart
21 January 2013
Question: What do you think the narrator is really hearing at the end of the story? What makes you think so?
We think that the narrator is hearing the man's heart beart. "It was a low, dull, quick
sound—much such a sound as a watch makes when
enveloped in cotton." "“Villains! I shrieked, “dissemble no more! I admit the
deed!—tear up the planks!" (Poe,8) The narrator burried the man under the planks, and he heard the sound coming from the planks. The narrator felt guilty for his actions.

Posted by: Briyana & Jordan at January 21, 2013 12:28 AM

Marlie Gonzalez and Jennifer evans
Dr.Hobbs
English 122 academic writing II
21 january 2013

Question: Conflicts pit one thing/person/idea against another. What is the primary conflict/struggle in this story?Is it external or internal? could it be both?Give evidence from the story to support your answer.

Answer: The primary conflict/ struggle in the story is that he killed an old man. as the narrator stated in the story, "It is impossible to say how first the idea entered my brain, but once conceived,it haunted me day and night."

Posted by: Marlie Gonzalez at January 21, 2013 09:03 AM

Ti’rani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
6 September 2013

Question 15: “I bade the gentlemen welcome [. . . ] I bade them search—search well.”
(a.) What is the context of this passage?
(b.) Explain what the word “bade” means.

Answer: The madman offered the policemen to search the house for any evidence of a loud noise. He did so in a manner that was exaggerated and almost sarcastic. It also acted as a pat on his own back because in his mind, there is no way the policemen could find the now hacked up old man. The word bade is the past tense use of bid, which is to order or offer to another person

Posted by: Ti'rani Rye at September 6, 2013 02:46 PM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
8 September 2013

Question 2: Conflicts pit one thing/person/idea against each other. What is the primary conflict/struggle in this story? Is it external or internal? Could it be both? Give evidence from the story to support your answer.

Answer: The conflict in Poe’s short story is internal, and not external. The unnamed narrator sees the old man with his foggy eye and becomes obsessed with what he calls the Evil Eye. The narrator never actually has confrontation with the old man, and says he likes him. With no fighting or any kind of argument ever seen in the story, it was a surprise to the reader that the narrator killed the old man. Another reason the conflict in the story is internal is because the narrator is struggling to control his thoughts regarding the beating heart he hears in the floorboards. As the sound is getting louder, the narrator is trying to cover up the sound so the officers do not hear it. “I talked more quickly- more vehemently; but the noise steadily increased. I arose and argued about trifles, in a high key and violent gesticulations, but the noise steadily increased.” (Poe 8) The reader has no background on why the narrator has these crazy delusions that lead him to kill the old man. However, it is clear that all the conflict takes place in the narrator’s mind.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 8, 2013 05:22 PM

Michael Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
8 September 2013

Question:“I arose and argued about trifles, in a high key and with violent gesticulations; but the noise steadily increased.”
(a.) What is the context of this passage? (b.) Part of your responsibility as a young scholar (and task
for this course) is to look up words you do not know (expect to see them on the tests). Explain what
the word “gesticulation” means.

Answer:
A)the context is saying that the character went into this event showing his emotions of excitement, but his emotions could handle the situation at hand.
B)"gesticulation" means to give a gesture of being over excited about something, make gestures of excitement

Proof:“I arose and argued about trifles, in a high key and with violent gesticulations; but the noise steadily increased.”

Posted by: Michael Ossolinski at September 8, 2013 06:36 PM

Maryerie Rojas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
8 September 2013

Question 3: As the story opens, what is the relationship like between the old man and the narrator? Identify the exact sentences that reveal that relationship.

Answer: The narrator was fond of the old man. His strong feelings towards the old man were exhibited when he stated, “I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult” (Poe 3). The narrator also stated that he “was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before [he] killed him” (Poe 3). The narrator explained that what led him to kill the old man was that he was annoyed by “his Evil Eye” and not the old man himself (Poe 3).

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas at September 9, 2013 12:07 AM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
8 September 2013

Question #8: "In your own words, explain how the term "deathwatches" is used to create three different meanings or images in the story."

Answer: "Deathwatches" is a term that comes with numerous definitions. In some ways it can mean someone who is watching over one set to be executed, other ways it represents the title of a small bug that likes to burrow in wood, and finally, it is the sound of "ticking" or a "heart beat" as someone drifts off during their time of passing away. You see an example of all three of these instances in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart". Beginning with the executor watching over a soon-to-be killed fellow, Edgar Allan Poe writes, "And every night, about midnight, I turned the latch of his door and opened it [. . .] It took me an hour to place my whole head within the opening so far that I could see him as he lay upon his bed" (Poe 3). This character who claims he is not mad, watches over the man he will soon kill directly every night at midnight. He sits and plots his death, planning out exactly how this execution will take place, just like "deathwatches". After stumbling through the man's door on the eighth night of watching him, the man awoke startling the murderer, "With a loud yell, I threw open the lantern and leaped into the room [. . .] In an instant I dragged him to the floor, and pulled the heavy bed over him. I then smiled gaily, to find the deed so far done [. . .] The old man was dead [. . .] I dismembered the corpse [. . .] I then took up three planks from the flooring of the chamber, and deposited all between the scantlings" (Poe 7). "Deadwatches", as in the bug, burrow into wood for shelter hoping not to be found. We see this image come to life as the murderer buries the dead man's body into the wood planks of his own home, hoping that this idea is too clever for anyone to discover the body. The final meaning, or image, that comes out from "deadwatches" in the story is when the murderer begins to be haunted by the sound of the man's beating heart, or ticking. He shrieks, "[. . .] dissemble no more! I admit the deed!-tear up the planks!-here, here!-it is the beating of his hideous heart!" (Poe 8). All three of these instances relate back to the term "deadwatches" and help develop the short story creating a confidence within the murderer in the beginning of the plot and ending with the final break down due to the "ticking heart".

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 9, 2013 12:13 AM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
9 September 2013
Question: Why does the narrator commit his crime? Identify the exact sentences that reveal his reasons.
Answer:
It is clearly stated in the beginning of the story why the narrator kills the old man. In “The Tell Tale Heart,” one can conclude it is because of how much the narrator hates the “creepy” eye of the old man. The eye is mentioned many times and the narrator openly despises it. The first time the eye is mentioned, the narrator says, “I think it was his eye! Yes, it was this! One of his eyes resembled that of a vulture—a pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—very gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye for ever” (Poe 3). This quote tells us exactly why the narrator does not like the old man. It has nothing to do with how the old man acts or how much money he has. It truly has to do with how much the narrator despises his creepy eye.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 9, 2013 01:21 AM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
9 September 2013
Question: Why does the narrator commit his crime? Identify the exact sentences that reveal his reasons.
Answer:
It is clearly stated in the beginning of the story why the narrator kills the old man. In “The Tell Tale Heart,” one can conclude it is because of how much the narrator hates the “creepy” eye of the old man. The eye is mentioned many times and the narrator openly despises it. The first time the eye is mentioned, the narrator says, “I think it was his eye! Yes, it was this! One of his eyes resembled that of a vulture—a pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—very gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye for ever” (Poe 3). This quote tells us exactly why the narrator does not like the old man. It has nothing to do with how the old man acts or how much money he has. It truly has to do with how much the narrator despises his creepy eye.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 9, 2013 01:21 AM

Luis Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Wiriting II CA08
13 September 2013

Question 7: This story is an example of how the author and the narrator can be two different entities. Explain the difference between an author and a narrator in fiction.

Throughout Edgar Allan Poe’s “A Tell Tale Heart”, we see that the main character is the narrator of the story. We read about the nuisances the main character has with the mans heart and, as said on page 3, his “pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold” his point of view. The narrator and author can be two separate entities as the author is simply the writer of the book while a narrator can be any character said author creates and designates.

Posted by: Luis Martinez at September 9, 2013 08:30 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA08
9 September 2013
Question: “In the enthusiasm of my confidence, I brought chairs into the room, and desired them here to rest from their fatigues, while I myself, in the wild audacity of my perfect triumph, placed my own seat upon the very spot beneath which reposed the corpse of the victim.”
(a.) What is the context of this passage? (b.) Part of your responsibility as a young scholar(and task for this course) is to look up words you do not know(expect to see them on the tests). Explain what the word “audacity” means.
Answer: (a.)At this point in the story, the main character has already killed the man and hid his body. He ended up cutting apart the man’s body and hiding it under the wooden planks making up one of the floors in the house. Three policemen were sent to search the victim’s house because one of the victim’s neighbors told the police he heard a shriek coming from the house. The author says, as the speaker, “I went down to open it with a light heart,-- for what had I now to fear?”, indicating, most likely, that his worst fear has been removed(Poe 7). The murderer is not worried at first, and he actually keeps conversation moving with the men smoothly. The quote above refers to the point in the story when the man brings the policemen chairs to sit on while they all talk. He does not just allow them to sit in a random space; he allows them to sit on chairs placed on the floor under which the victim is shoved(Poe 7). The narrator remains extremely pleasant and casual until he begins to feel guilty, and then he appears to be uncontrollable in his actions. At the end of the story, he even admits that he killed the man(Poe 8).
(b.)According to Webster’s online dictionary, the word “audacity” means “intrepid boldness” or “bold or arrogant disregard for normal restraints”(Merriam-Webster, Incorporated). This definition is very appropriate to the situation because the narrator, who murders a man, is so easy-going at a time when he could have gotten caught for killing. In fact, he puts his chair right on top of where the man was put under the floor, but he does not show that he knows this fact at all until he starts to feel guilty(7-8).
Works Cited:
I. Merriam-Webster, Incorporated. Merriam-Webster. Encyclopedia Britannica Company, 2013. Web. 9 September 2013.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 9, 2013 10:20 AM

Tyiasha Bailey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
9 September 2013

Question: A reliable narrator is one that the reader/audience can depend to be telling the truth (why would you
want to be lied to?). In this story, is Poe’s narrator an example of a reliable or an unreliable narrator?
Provide evidence from the story to prove your point.

Answer: Poe's narrator is an example of a reliable person because although the character in the story was not truthful with the officers, we as the readers knew exactly what had happened. She says, "Villains!" I Shrieked, " dissemble no more! I admit the deed!-- tear up the planks! -- here, here. -- it is the beating of his hideous heart!"(Poe 8). This quote shows that the character couldn't bear being untruthful with the officers so she told them the truth. As the reader, we already knew what was going on. I don't think the narrator was unreliable because eventually she told the truth about everything.

Posted by: Tyiasha Bailey at September 9, 2013 11:01 AM

Tori Thomas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
9 September 2013


Question Number Ten: “You should have seen how wisely I proceeded—with what caution—with what foresight—with what dissimulation I went to work!” (a.) What is the context of this passage? (b.) Part of your responsibility as a young scholar (and task for this course) is to look up words you do not know (expect to see them on the tests). Explain what the word “dissimulation” means.


Answer: This story is based off a man defending his sanity and basically confessing that he killed the old man in the story. The quote “You should have seen how wisely I proceeded, with what caution, with what foresight, with what dissimulation I went to work.” Is stating how he prepared to kill the man or “proceeded”. He did it with caution foresight and dissimulation. Dissimulation is the concealment of thoughts and feelings. So with feelings he was concealing the truth or half-truth before killing the old man.

Posted by: Tori Thomas at September 9, 2013 11:16 AM

Ryan MacCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
9 September 2013


Question: “Never before that night had I felt the extent of my own powers—of my sagacity.” (a.) What is the context of this passage? (b.) Part of your responsibility as a young scholar (and task for this course) is to look up words you do not know (expect to see them on the tests). Explain what the word “sagacity” means.


Answer: The context of this passage is that the narrator is extremely confident in the wisdom they have. He is confident in his plan to kill and has pride in what he is about to do. Sagacity is the ability to make good judgments. Sagacity in this story can be used in many ways, as he is ready to commit a murder in the story, “I could scarcely contain my feelings of triumph” (4). Sagacity seems like a theme in this story as the ability to make good judgments is what the story is all about

Posted by: Ryan MacCarthy at September 9, 2013 11:44 AM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
8 September 2013
“‘Villains!’ I shrieked, ‘dissemble no more!’
Part of your responsibility as a young scholar (and task for this course) is to look up words you do not
know (expect to see them on the tests). Explain what the word ‘dissemble’ means.”

To dissemble is to hide the truth, to keep a secret. When the narrator ceases to dissemble, he gives up the truth, he confesses. If the reader is unclear as to what the word means Poe even restates it immediately after saying, “I admit the deed!”(Poe 8)

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at September 9, 2013 12:26 PM

Sade loiseau
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 121
9 September 2013

Question 1. Remember the idea of writing in either first, second, or third person from ENG 121? Which “person” is this story told in? How can you tell?

Answer: Edagar Allen Poe wrote this story being told in "first" person. In the following passage from the beginning of the story makes it very obvious. "Now this is the point. You fancy me mad. Madmen know nothing. But you should have seen me. You should have seen how wisely I proceeded—with what caution— with what foresight—with what dissimulation I went to work! I was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before I killed him. And every night, about midnight, I turned the latch of his door and opened it—oh, so gently! And then, when I had made an opening sufficient for my head, I put in a dark lantern, all closed, closed, so that no light shone out, and then I thrust in my head (Poe,3)". The author emphasizes on the word "I" either than "we", "she", "her" and so on.

Posted by: Sade Loiseau at September 9, 2013 12:29 PM

Taina Valcarcel
Dr. Hobbs
September, 9, 2013
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08

Q“I talked more quickly—more vehemently; but the noise steadily increased.”
(a.) What is the context of this passage? (b.) Part of your responsibility as a young scholar (and task
for this course) is to look up words you do not know (expect to see them on the tests). Explain what
the word “vehemently” means.

Answer:The context of this passage is that the killer was delusional and heard the beating heart of his victim and believed that the officers were listening to it to. The killer tried to ignore it by talking nonstop, but to no avail, the beating became louder and louder. It came to the point in which the killer could not bear the guilt and believed the officers already knew about the murder and were mocking him. One of the quotes in the book indicated:
“Was it possible they
heard not? Almighty God!—no, no! They heard!—they
suspected!—they knew!—they were making a mockery of
my horror!—this I thought, and this I think. But any thing
was better than this agony! Anything was more tolerable
than this derision! I could bear those hypocritical smiles no
longer!” (Poe, 8)
This quote indicated that the killer was at his boiling point and he believed that the beating could be heard loudly around the room, and the officers were feigning ignorance. Also, the word “vehemently” was used in the quote, which means intensely emotional, or powerful outburst. This reflected the killers emotions rapidly losing control and driving him mad.

Posted by: Taina Valcarcel at September 9, 2013 12:58 PM

Sade Loiseau and Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
9 September 2013

Question 4: Why does the narrator commit his crime? Identify the exact sentences that reveal the reason.
Answer: He committed the crime because of the eye of the old man. He did not have any sort of argument or fight with the old man, however, it was his eye that just drove the narrator mad. In the passage, he states that whenever the eye would lay upon him it was evil. The narrator goes into detail about the eye itself and how it made him feel whenever he saw that foggy, blurry eye. The narrator states that, “Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—very gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye for ever. (Poe 3) This explains that the eye itself made the narrator crazy, and he wanted to do something about it. Instead of doing something about the eye itself, the narrator decides the best way to get rid of his mad feelings is to kill the old man. He hopes that by killing the old man, and never seeing that eye again, will give him some sort of comfort and peace within himself.

Posted by: Sade Loiseau and Rebecca Liller at September 10, 2013 06:05 PM

Emma De Rhodo and Ryan MacCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
10 September 2013

Question #6: What do you think the narrator is really hearing at the end of the story? What makes you think so?

Answer: I believe the narrator is hearing his own heart beating at the end of the story. The reasons I think this is what he is hearing are the fact that he appears to be mad and the fact that the narrator appears to be the only one hearing the sound of a heart beating throughout the story. After the narrator says he is planning on killing a man because the man’s eye frightens him, he mentions that many people may already assume that he is mad. The narrator says, “Now this is the point. You fancy me mad”(Poe 3). Then he continues on to explain what he believes is the difference between himself and a madman in an attempt to convince the reader that he is not mad(Poe 3). However, the fact alone that the narrator hears a heart beating throughout the story makes him seem as if he is crazy. The narrator hears a heartbeat at times in the story in which he expresses that he feels anxious or nervous. For example, at the end of the story, after mentioning that he is nervous and the sound has gotten louder, the narrator worries that “The sound would be heard by a neighbor”(Poe 8). The narrator, especially since he seems to be psychologically unstable, may be hearing what he is feeling.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 10, 2013 07:34 PM

Kiara Michelle Burgos Diaz, Ti'rani Rye, Ryan Voss
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
10 September 2013

Question: Conflicts pit one thing/person/idea against another. What is the primary conflict/struggle in this story? Is it external or internal? Could it be both? Give evidence from the story to support your answer.

Answer: In the story "The Tell-Tale Heart" by Edgar Allan Poe, the primary conflict is the murderer with himself; it is a man vs. man conflict. Being a struggle within himself everything happens inside his mind becoming an internal conflict. When the murder add, "And This I did for seven long nights-every night just at midnight-but I found the eye always close, and so it was impossible to do the work" (Poe 4). These shows the constant struggle in the mind of the murderer whether or not to kill the old man. This battle leads the internal conflict finally been reflected in an external conflict, when on the eighth night the old man was murdered. The delusional behavior mixed with the inside fight go throughout the story, "I foamed-I raved-I swore! I swung the chair upon which I had been sitting, and grated it upon the boards, but the noise Arose over all and Continually Increased. It grew louder, louder, louder! "(Poe 8), until eventually leads him to accept his crime to the cops, "dissemble no more! I admit the deed!”

Posted by: Kiara M Burgos Diaz at September 11, 2013 12:25 AM

-----------------


*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 11, 2013 11:24 PM

Bianca T. Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 Jan. 2014

Question #2: Conflicts pit one thing/person/idea against another. What is the Primary conflict/struggle in this story? Is it external or internal? Could it be both? Give evidence from the story to support your answer.

Answer: In the story, there is two events that show conflict/struggle that the main character goes through. The first conflict/struggle that the main character goes through is that he had a problem with the old man's eye. "Whenever it fell
upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—" (Poe 3). He felt uneasy about the old man's eye when it stared at him, so he mad the decision to kill the man and rid his eye for good."very gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye for ever"(Poe 3). Unlike most killers, he liked the old man and the old man never did him wrong or hurt him in any way. He just didn't like his eye and he felt uncomfortable with it."I loved the
old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult. For his gold I had no desire. I think it was his eye! yes, it was this!"(Poe 3).
The second conflict/struggle that the main character goes through was the killing of the old man and feeling guilty and hearing the old man's beating heart through the floorboards.He succeeded in the of killing the old man and didn't feel uncomfortable with the eye anymore now that the old man is dead and under the floorboards."The old man was dead. I removed the bed and examined the corpse. Yes, he was stone, stone dead. I placed my hand upon the heart and held it there many minutes. There was no pulsation. He was stone dead. His eye would trouble me no more"(Poe 6)."I then took up three planks from the flooring of the chamber, and deposited all between the scantlings. I then replaced the boards so cleverly, so cunningly,that no human eye—not even his—could have detected any thing wrong"(Poe 7).The officers were there and every minute that went by he started getting nervous and pale."No doubt I now grew very pale;—but I talked more fluently, and with a heightened voice." "I gasped for breath—and yet the officers heard it not. I talked more quickly—more vehemently; but the noise steadily increased." "Oh God! what could I do? I foamed—I raved—I swore! I swung the chair upon which I had been sitting, and grated it upon the boards, but the noise arose over all and continually increased. It grew louder—louder—louder! And still the men chatted pleasantly, and smiled. Was it possible they heard not? Almighty God!—no, no! They heard!—they suspected!—they knew!—they were making a mockery of my horror!" "I could bear those hypocritical smiles no longer! I felt that I must scream or die!—and now—again!—hark! louder! louder! louder! louder!"(Poe 8). He then couldn't take it anymore and confessed to the officers.
"“Villains!” I shrieked, “dissemble no more! I admit the deed!—tear up the planks!—here, here!—it is the beating of his hideous heart!”


Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at January 26, 2014 08:07 AM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
26 January 2014

Question:
A reliable narrator is one that the reader/audience can depend to be telling the truth (why would you
want to be lied to?). In this story, is Poe’s narrator an example of a reliable or an unreliable narrator?
Provide evidence from the story to prove your point.
Answer:
On occasion he, also pretends to be an omniscient narrator. He tells us how the old man feels and what the old man is thinking. Here's an example: Presently I heard a slight groan, and I knew it was the groan of mortal terror. I knew the sound well. Many a night it has welled up from my own bosom (Poe 5).

As you can see, the narrator's insight into the man's head is just a reflection of his own experience. Yet, he's probably right. In this moment he humanizes both himself and the man through empathy.

Unreliable narrators are compelling because they represent a basic aspect of being human. We all experience moments of unreliability, where we can't perceive or remember events accurately. We all get confused and do and say things we don't mean or don't mean to do or say. In a story like The Tell-Tale Heart, this unreliability is taken to extremes.

The scare power in this technique is the nagging knowledge that we could become a person like the narrator, or a victim of a person like the narrator, a person whose inner unreliable narrator has totally taken over.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at January 26, 2014 11:17 AM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12

Question #3:
As the story opens, what is the relationship like between the old man and the narrator? Identify the exact sentences that reveal that relationship.
Answer:
The following quote, “I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult. For his gold I had no desire. I think it was his eye! yes, it was this! One of his eyes resembled that of a vulture—a pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—very gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye forever.” (Poe 3) clearly shows that the narrator has a good relationship with the old man and has love for him; however, the appearance of the man’s eye is driving the narrator insane. It gets between these the good feelings that he has for him which has driven him to insanity which is shown when he kills him.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at January 26, 2014 06:32 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 January 2014

QUESTION #4:
Why does the narrator commit his crime? Identify the exact sentences that reveal the reason.

ANSWER:
According to the narrator, he commits his crime against the old man due to his fear of the man's pale blue eye. This fear, and somewhat of an obsession, can be clearly seen through his thoughts, which are as follows, "I think it was his eye! yes, it was this! One of his eyes resembled that of a vulture—a pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—very gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye for ever." Therefore, the narrator commits his actions due to fear and obsession with the old man's pale blue eye.

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at January 26, 2014 07:37 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
26 January 2014
Remember the idea of writing in either first, second, or third person from ENG 121? Which “person” is this story told in? How can you tell?

It is in first person because we have exclusive insight into the protagonist mind and the protagonist is also the narrator. Poe uses sentences like “I kept quite still and said nothing.” (Poe 4) to show this.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at January 26, 2014 08:29 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 January 2014


Question: What do you think the narrator is really hearing at the end of the story? What makes you think so?

Answer: At the end of the short story “The Tell-Tale Heart” the narrator grows mad over a sound he claims to be hearing in his end. He believes this sound to be the heartbeat of the man he had murdered, but instead the sound is supposed to symbolize his conscious. You can tell this is quotes such as ““…such as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton. I knew that sound well too! It was the sound of the old man’s heart.”(Poe 6). Quotes like that and others such as “…but it continued and gained definitiveness-until at length, I found that the noise was not coming from my ears….yet the sound increased and what could I do? It was a low, dull, quick sound, much such a sound a watch makes when enveloped in cotton.”(Poe 8). really symbolized the narrators conscious playing tricks on his mind. Ultimately his conscious causes him to admit to the entire murder.

Posted by: sawyer hand edited at January 26, 2014 08:52 PM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 January 2014

Question 13:
“I then took up three planks from the flooring of the chamber, and deposited all between scantlings” (a) What is the context of this passage? (b) Part of your responsibility as a young scholar (and task for this course) is to look up words you do not know (expect to see them on the tests). Explain what the word “scantling” means.

Answer:
The man narrating the story was explaining how he hid the old man’s body under nether the floor boards. He had to remove the old man’s “head and the arms and the legs” (Poe 7) in order for the body to fit under nether the floor boards. The body was placed between the scantling, which is a wood framing for the house.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at January 26, 2014 10:15 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 January 2014

Question #14: "There entered three men, who introduced themselves, with perfect suavity, as officers of the police."
(a.) What is the context of this passage? (b.) Part of your responsibility as a young scholar is to look up words you do not know. Explain what the word "suavity" means.

Answer: The context of this passage is very graceful during a not so graceful event. When a police officer shows up, they are not graceful, they are there to do their job and to do it right. Therefore, this passage is hypocritical as well.

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at January 27, 2014 01:13 AM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 January 2014

Question #7
This story is an example of how the author and the narrator can be two different entities. Explain the differences between an author and a narrator in fiction.

Answer:
The author of this story is Edgar Allen Poe while the narrator of it is a fictional person. In fiction, the author is whomever writes the story and because it is made up the narrator can be whoever the author wants it to be because the narrator is someone who simply tells the story. In this case it is a make-believe character who has committed the murder of an old man.

Posted by: Berlin Waters at January 27, 2014 01:27 AM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng122 - ACADEMIC WRITING II CA12
“The Tall Tell Heart”

In your own words, explain how the term “deathwatches” is used to create three different meanings or images in the story.
The term “death watch” is used literately when, the narrator talks about waiting on watch for the man to fall asleep so he can kill him, ergo watching for death. Death watch is used as a symbolic, tool for a beating heart sounding like a clicking of a watch “, I say, there came to my ears a low, dull, quick sound, such as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton. I knew that sound well too. It was the beating of the old man’s heart. It increased my fury, as the beating of a drum stimulates the soldier into courage.” the author makes vivid imagery with that seen, the reader can almost see a heart, beat and a watch tick in juxtaposition.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

Jeffrey Wingfield Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 January 2014
“In the enthusiasm of my confidence, I brought chairs into the room, and desired them here to rest from their fatigues, while I myself, in the wild audacity of my perfect triumph, placed my own seat upon the very spot beneath which reposed the corpse of the victim.” (a.) What is the context of this passage? (b.) Part of your responsibility as a young scholar (and task for this course) is to look up words you do not know (expect to see them on the tests). Explain what the word “audacity” means.
The narrator writes this passage in an effort to convince the reader of his sanity. He is demonstrating extreme confidence in his actions. The narrator defines himself as being audacious, or willing to take risks. This is him further attempting to boost his own credibility. He says at the beginning of the story, “How, then, am I mad? Hearken! and observe how healthily—how calmly I can tell you the whole story.” (Poe 1)

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield Traneisha Cunningham at January 27, 2014 10:55 AM

James Jessop and Sawyer
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
Scribe write up from class

Questions 17-18
17. “I talked more quickly—more vehemently; but the noise steadily increased.” (a.) What is the context of this passage? (b.) Explain what the word “vehemently” means.
18. “I arose and argued about trifles, in a high key and with violent gesticulations; but the noise steadily
increased.” (a.) What is the context of this passage? (b.) Explain what the word “gesticulation” means.

Answer:
The context of both the first and second passages are exactly the same, in that he is in a nervous situation. He “grew very pale” (Poe 8) and “paced the floor to and fro” (Poe 8) which shows how he was losing his mind, he was becoming paranoid and could not control himself. The way that his voice grew higher and louder also shows the nerves and paranoia.
Vehemently is characterized by forcefulness of expression or intensity of emotion or conviction (Online Dictionary)
Gesticulation is a deliberate vigorous motion or gesture. (Online Dictionary)

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: James and Sawyer at January 28, 2014 11:25 PM

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